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Sure, that may not have been the actual name, but for the purposes of this article, MCA's two videodisc divisions, MCA DiscoVision and MCA Videodisc, and MCA's videocassette division, MCA Videocassette, Inc., shall be collectively known as MCA Video Distributing Corporation.

Before the unified division called MCA Home Video, MCA Distributing Corporation, known as a distributor of MCA's music product, had separate videocassette and videodisc divisions. The videodisc division, MCA DiscoVision, came first, in 1978, and was the first company to release laser videodiscs to the consumer market. Laser videodisc had its roots in the '50s when David Paul Gregg, an employee of Gauss Electrophysics, conceived a revolutionary idea for video storage, called "optical video disc". Nearly a decade later, the company's development work was brought to the attention of MCA president Lew Wasserman by his assistant, Don Wynn. MCA purchased Gauss Electrophysics the next year. Like Magnetic Video, MCA saw some potential in the home video revolution; however, MCA's focus at the time was on videodisc product. Kent Broadbent was assigned to the project, which came to be known as Disco-Vision, and MCA Laboratories was spun off for the purpose of developing this revolutionary new system from their headquarters in Torrance, California. MCA Laboratories also purchased a defunct furniture factory in Carson, California, and converted it to a full-scale mastering and replication facility which would become the largest manufacturer of laser videodiscs in the United States. The first public demonstration of the Disco-Vision format took place at Universal Studios in Universal City, California, on December 12, 1972, with a seven-minute screening of clips from Universal's motion pictures.

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Philips representatives, who attended this demonstration, were impressed and, due to the development of their own incompatible videodisc system and the continuing development of RCA's own competing vinyl-based videodisc system, the Capacitance Electronic Disc, began talks with MCA about a merger (of sorts) of their systems, which took place in September 1974. Some time later, the tasks of the two companies involved were assigned: MCA would remain in charge of the videodiscs themselves, and Philips would take charge of the playback systems for said videodiscs. Between 1976 and 1977, several test pressings took place, with three purposes:

  1. To demonstrate the fact that Disco-Vision was capable of producing actual discs and the product was ready to begin consumer replication;
  2. To provide actual products for MCA executives to show off the technology; and
  3. To provide products to test and calibrate players.
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In an example of Early Installment Weirdness, these prototype discs were single-sided and ran for only 25 minutes, and were also thinner and more flexible (though any player can read those discs, even if they have a hard time clamping and holding them correctly). The thinness of the discs caused a lot of problems, and MCA spent the next 18 months developing a dual-sided disc, which helped eliminate the tracking problems inherent on these test pressings. Later in 1977, Pioneer entered into a joint venture called Universal Pioneer to handle the potential industrial applications of Disco-Vision. In 1978, the year of its official launch, Disco-Vision dropped the hyphen and simply became DiscoVision. Also, Disney, Paramount, and Warner Bros., among other entities, signed distribution deals with MCA.

However, DiscoVision was quickly riddled with a lot of problems on many fronts, and MCA and Philips scrambled to try to solve them; however, this ultimately failed, and DiscoVision went bust by the end of 1981 and today is considered an Old Shame by MCA and its successors, though a Cult Classic among collectors. Pioneer then began marketing the system as LaserVision, or as simply the LaserDisc. (Philips maintained European rights to the LaserVision name and marketed it themselves through the 80s.)

Meanwhile, in the spring of 1980, MCA entered the videocassette business under the name MCA Videocassette, Inc. and released a launch slate of just over two dozen titles, many of which were part of the DiscoVision Silver Catalog at one point or another. Magnetic Video and Bell & Howell Video Systems were contracted to duplicate MCA's VHS and Betamax product; however, by 1981, S/T Videocassette Duplicating Corporation bought out Magnetic's distribution contract for MCA. Many more titles soon followed.

In 1982, MCA decided to take a second stab at the videodisc business and launched a more successful division called MCA Videodisc. This label was used for both LaserVision and CED releases. In 1983, MCA Videodisc and MCA Videocassette merged to become MCA Home Video, though videocassette product continued to use the old logo in some form until later that year. The division is now known as Universal Pictures Home Entertainment.

In January 2020, UPHE and Warner Home Video announced a 10-year joint venture that will effectively combine their physical home media divisions, set to launch in 2021 pending regulatory approval.

List of titles:

Releases under the MCA Videocassette name (1980-1983)

    open/close all folders 
    June 1980 (1st Wave) 
  • 55000: Animal Crackers (1930)
    Originally a Paramount Pictures release.
    An MCA-TV presentation.
    Rated G.
    Duplicated at Magnetic Video Corporation and S/T Videocassette Distributing Corporation.
    Presented in black and white; however, the MCA warning and logo are in color.

  • 55001: Psycho (1960)
    Originally a Paramount Pictures release.
    Rated PG.
    Duplicated at Magnetic Video Corporation and S/T Videocassette Distributing Corporation.
    Presented entirely in black and white; on later printings however, only the MCA warning and logo are in color.
    Initial pressings retained the Paramount logo, while later printings replaced it with the 1971 Universal logo.
    Syndicated to television as part of the Universal 53 package in 1970.

  • 55002: Jesus Christ Superstar (1973)
    Rated G.
    Duplicated at Bell & Howell/Paramount Pictures Video Services.

  • 55003: Dracula (1931 version) (1931)
    Rated G.
    Duplicated at Magnetic Video Corporation and S/T Videocassette Distributing Corporation.
    Presented in black and white; however, the MCA warning and logo are in color.
    Syndicated to television as part of the 77 Horror Greats package in 1971.

  • 55004: Frankenstein (1931)
    Rated G.
    Duplicated at Magnetic Video Corporation and S/T Videocassette Distributing Corporation.
    Presented in black and white; however, the MCA warning and logo are in color.
    Syndicated to television as part of the 77 Horror Greats package in 1971.

  • 55005: My Little Chickadee (1940)
    Duplicated at Magnetic Video Corporation and S/T Videocassette Distributing Corporation.
    Syndicated to television as part of the Comedy Festival II package in 1972.

  • 55006: State Of The Union (1948)
    Originally a Liberty Films release.
    An MCA-TV presentation.
    Jackie the Lion's roar is muted on this release.
    Syndicated to television as part of a package of 225 pre-1948 Paramount films in 1964.

  • 55007: Scarface: The Shame of the Nation (1932)
    Originally a United Artists Corporation release.
    Rated PG.

  • 66000: Animal House (1978)
    Rated R.
    Duplicated at Bell & Howell/Paramount Pictures Video Services.
    Syndicated to television as part of the Hit List package in 1981.

  • 66001: Jaws (1975)
    Rated PG.
    Duplicated at Bell & Howell/Paramount Pictures Video Services.
    Syndicated to television as part of the Hit List package in 1981.

  • 66002: Jaws 2 (1978)
    Rated PG.
    Duplicated at Bell & Howell/Paramount Pictures Video Services.
    Syndicated to television as part of the Universal's Most Wanted List package in 1983.

  • 66003: Smokey and the Bandit (1977)
    Rated PG.
    Duplicated at Bell & Howell/Paramount Pictures Video Services.
    Original Bell & Howell pressings ended with a black screen test pattern with a 1000 Hz tone.

  • 66004: Dracula (1979 version) (1979)
    Rated R.
    Duplicated at Bell & Howell/Paramount Pictures Video Services.
    Original Bell & Howell pressings ended with a white screen test pattern with a 1125 Hz tone.
    Syndicated to television as part of the Hit List package in 1981.

  • 66005: The Jerk (1979)
    Rated R.
    Syndicated to television as part of the Universal's Most Wanted List package in 1983.

  • 66006: The Electric Horseman (1979)
    Originally a Columbia Pictures release.
    Rated PG.
    Duplicated at Bell & Howell/Paramount Pictures Video Services.
    Original Bell & Howell pressings did not have a test pattern.
    Syndicated to television as part of the Universal's Most Wanted List package in 1983.

  • 66007: Nineteen Fourty One (1979)
    Produced in association with Columbia Pictures.
    Theatrical version.
    Rated PG.
    Duplicated at Magnetic Video Corporation and S/T Videocassette Distributing Corporation.
    Syndicated to television as part of Columbia's Volume Four for the '80s package in 1984.

  • 66008: The Seduction Of Joe Tynan (1979)
    Rated R.
    Duplicated at Bell & Howell/Paramount Pictures Video Services.
    Original Bell & Howell pressings ended with a black screen test pattern with a 1000 Hz tone.
    Syndicated to television as part of the Hit List package in 1981.

  • 66009: The Sting (1973)
    Rated PG.
    Syndicated to television as part of the Champagne Movies 34 package in 1979.

  • 66010: American Graffiti (1973)
    Rated PG.
    Duplicated at Bell & Howell/Paramount Pictures Video Services.
    Original Bell & Howell pressings ended with a white screen test pattern with a 1000 Hz tone.
    Syndicated to television as part of the Champagne Movies 34 package in 1979.

  • 66011: Battlestar Galactica (1978)
    International theatrical version.
    Rated PG.
    Duplicated at Bell & Howell/Paramount Pictures Video Services.
    Original Bell & Howell pressings ended with a black screen test pattern with a 1000 Hz tone.

  • 66012: Slap Shot (1977)
    Rated R.
    Duplicated at Bell & Howell/Paramount Pictures Video Services.
    Original Bell & Howell pressings ended with a black screen test pattern with a 1000 Hz tone.
    Syndicated to television as part of the Hit List package in 1981.

  • 66013: Same Time Next Year (1978)
    Rated PG.
    Duplicated at Bell & Howell/Paramount Pictures Video Services.
    Original Bell & Howell pressings ended with a white screen test pattern with a 1000 Hz tone.
    One of several early MCA tapes confirmed to have been offered by Fotomat Video.
    Syndicated to television as part of the Hit List package in 1981.

  • 66014: Which Way Is Up (1977)
    Rated R.
    Duplicated at Bell & Howell/Paramount Pictures Video Services.

  • 88000: The Deer Hunter (1978)
    Produced in association with EMI Films.
    Rated R.
    Duplicated at Bell & Howell/Paramount Pictures Video Services.
    Presented across two tapes, with the first tape containing the first 115.5 minutes of the feature and the second tape containing the final 67.5 minutes of the feature.
    Cropped to a 1.85:1 aspect ratio from an original Scope print and then squeezed to fit a 4:3 TV screen.
    Original Bell & Howell pressings ended with a black screen test pattern with a 1000 Hz tone.
    Syndicated to television as part of the Universal's Most Wanted List package in 1983.

    August 1980 (2nd Wave) 
Around this time, the black boxes received a subtle change. The text "PRINTED IN USA" no longer appeared beside the MCA logo on the back, and for the first time ever, the company's address appeared below.

  • 55009: Loretta (1980)
    MCA's first music release on videocassette.

  • 55010: The Birds (1963)
    Syndicated to television as part of the Universal 123 package in 1967.

  • 55011: Frenzy (1972)
    Syndicated to television as part of the Universal Star-Spangled 33 package in 1976.

  • 55012: Duck Soup (1933)
    Originally a Paramount Pictures release.
    An MCA-TV presentation.

  • 66015: Coal Miner's Daughter (1980)
    Duplicated at Magnetic Video Corporation and S/T Videocassette Distributing Corporation.
    Syndicated to television as part of the Hit List package in 1981.

    December 1980 (3rd Wave) 
Tapes released during this period were the first to ditch the black boxes in favor of more colorful artwork.

  • 55008: Massage: The Touch of Love (1980)
    A direct-to-video adults-only title.

  • 66016: Cheech and Chong's Next Movie (1980)
    Syndicated to television as part of the Universal Pictures Exploitable 13 package in 1985.

  • 66017: It Came from Outer Space (1953)
    Duplicated at Magnetic Video Corporation and S/T Videocassette Distributing Corporation.
    Presented in 3D and packaged with four pairs of red and cyan 3D glasses.

  • 66018: Creature from the Black Lagoon (1954)
    Duplicated at Magnetic Video Corporation and S/T Videocassette Distributing Corporation.
    Presented in 3D and packaged with four pairs of red and cyan 3D glasses.

  • 66021: Prom Night (1980)
    An Avco Embassy release.
    Syndicated to television as part of Embassy's Entertainer of the Year package in 1981.

  • 77000: The Blues Brothers (1980)
    Duplicated at Bell & Howell/Paramount Pictures Video Services.
    Original release presented across two tapes.
    Syndicated to television as part of the Universal's Most Wanted List package in 1983.

    January 1981 (4th Wave) 
These tapes premiered at the 1981 Winter Consumer Electronics Show.

  • 66019: Xanadu (1980)

  • 66020: Smokey And The Bandit II (1980)
    Duplicated at Bell & Howell/Paramount Pictures Video Services.
    Syndicated to television as part of the Universal's Most Wanted List package in 1983.

    April 1981 (5th Wave) 
  • 55013: Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band (1978)
    Duplicated at Bell & Howell/Paramount Pictures Video Services.
    Original Bell & Howell pressings ended with a black screen test pattern with a 1000 Hz tone.
    Syndicated to television as part of the Universal's Most Wanted List package in 1983.

  • 55014: Bedtime For Bonzo (1951)
    Released to capitalize on then-President Ronald Reagan, who starred in the film, surviving an assassination attempt the month before.

  • 55015: The Killers (1964)
    Duplicated at Bell & Howell/Paramount Pictures Video Services.
    Original Bell & Howell pressings ended with a black screen test pattern with an 860 Hz tone.
    Released to capitalize on then-President Ronald Reagan, who starred in the film, surviving an assassination attempt the month before.

  • 66022: Flash Gordon (1980)
    Duplicated at Bell & Howell/Paramount Pictures Video Services.
    Original Bell & Howell pressings ended with a white screen test pattern with a 1125 Hz tone.

  • 66023: The Island (1980)
    Syndicated to television as part of the Universal's Most Wanted List package in 1983.

  • 66024: Somewhere in Time (1980)

    June 1981 
  • 66025: Masada (1981)
    Duplicated at Bell & Howell/Paramount Pictures Video Services.
    Original Bell & Howell pressings ended with a white screen test pattern with an 860 Hz tone.

    July 1981 
  • 55016: Play Misty for Me (1971)
    Syndicated to television as part of the Universal Star-Spangled 33 package in 1976.

  • 55017: Change of Habit (1969)

  • 55018: All Quiet on the Western Front (1930)
    Duplicated at S/T Videocassette Duplicating Corporation.
    20th anniversary re-release version.
    Universal International logo appears on this release.

  • 55019: Buck Rogers in the 25th Century (1979)
    The original pilot film.

  • 55020: Galaxina (1980)
    A Crown International Pictures release.

  • 55021: Shogun Assassin (1980)
    A New World Pictures release.
    A re-edit of Lone Wolf and Cub: Baby Cart at the River Styx with 12 minutes of Lone Wolf and Cub: Sword of Vengeance.

  • 55022: Schizoid (1980)
    A Cannon Films release.
    Duplicated at Bell & Howell/Paramount Pictures Video Services.
    Original Bell & Howell pressings ended with a white screen test pattern with a 1000 Hz tone.

  • 55023: The Happy Hooker Goes Hollywood (1980)
    A Cannon Films release.
    Duplicated at Bell & Howell/Paramount Pictures Video Services.

  • 55024: The Yum-Yum Girls (1978)
    A Cannon Films release.

  • 66026: Melvin And Howard (1980)
    Duplicated at Bell & Howell/Paramount Pictures Video Services.
    Original Bell & Howell pressings ended with a white screen test pattern with a 1000 Hz tone.
    Syndicated to television as part of the Universal's Most Wanted List package in 1983.

  • 66027: The Incredible Shrinking Woman (1981)
    Duplicated at Bell & Howell/Paramount Pictures Video Services.
    Syndicated to television as part of the Universal's Most Wanted List package in 1983.

    August 1981 
  • 55029: Silent Running (1972)
    Duplicated at S/T Videocassette Duplicating Corporation.
    Syndicated to television as part of the Universal 49 package in 1974.

  • 55030: Midway (1976)
    Duplicated at Bell & Howell/Paramount Pictures Video Services.
    Original Bell & Howell pressings ended with a white screen test pattern with an 860 Hz tone.

  • 55031: Airport (1970)
    Duplicated at Bell & Howell/Paramount Pictures Video Services.
    Original Bell & Howell pressings ended with a white screen test pattern with an 860 Hz tone.
    Syndicated to television as part of the Universal 49 package in 1974.

  • 55033: Shenandoah (1965)

  • 55034: Earthquake (1974)

  • 71000: Nighthawks (1981)
    Duplicated at Bell & Howell/Paramount Pictures Video Services.
    Syndicated to television as part of the Universal's Most Wanted List package in 1983.

    September 1981 
  • 45001: Neil Sedaka in Concert (1976)

  • 55032: To Kill a Mockingbird (1962)
    Duplicated at Bell & Howell/Paramount Pictures Video Services.
    Original Bell & Howell pressings ended with a white screen test pattern with an 860 Hz tone.

  • 55036: Charade (1963)

  • 55037: The Andromeda Strain (1971)
    Duplicated at Bell & Howell/Paramount Pictures Video Services.
    Original Bell & Howell pressings ended with a white screen test pattern with an 860 Hz tone.
    Syndicated to television as part of the Universal 49 package in 1974.

  • 66035: Mission Galactica: The Cylon Attack (1979)

  • 77002: Bustin Loose (1981)

    October 1981 
  • 77001: Endless Love (1981)
    Duplicated at Bell & Howell/Paramount Pictures Video Services.
    Original Bell & Howell pressings ended with a white screen test pattern with an 860 Hz tone.

    November 1981 
  • 55038: Going My Way (1944)

  • 55039: Holiday Inn (1942)

  • 55040: The Wiz (1978)
    Duplicated at Bell & Howell/Paramount Pictures Video Services.
    Original Bell & Howell pressings ended with a white screen test pattern with an 860 Hz tone.

  • 55041: Mac Arthur (1977)
    Duplicated at Bell & Howell/Paramount Pictures Video Services.
    Syndicated to television as part of the Champagne Movies 34 package in 1979.

  • 55042: Rooster Cogburn And The Lady (1975)
    Syndicated to television as part of the Universal Star-Spangled 33 package in 1976.

    December 1981 
  • 45000: An Evening with Ray Charles (1981)

  • 55043: How to Watch Pro Football (1981)

  • 66034: The Incredible Hulk (1977)
    The original pilot film.

  • 77003: The Four Seasons (1981)
    Duplicated at Bell & Howell/Paramount Pictures Video Services.
    Original Bell & Howell pressings ended with a white screen test pattern with an 860 Hz tone and a faster click than normal.
    Syndicated to television as part of the Universal's Most Wanted List package in 1983.

  • 77004: An American Werewolf in London (1981)
    All subsequent video releases were handled by Vestron Video, Video Treasures, and LIVE Entertainment until 2001 when Universal re-acquired the rights.

    January 1982 
  • 55046: The Amazing Spider-Man (1968)
    Duplicated at Bell & Howell/Paramount Pictures Video Services.
    Includes the episodes "The Origin of Spider-Man", "King Pinned", "Swing City", "Criminals in the Clouds", and "Menace from the Bottom of the World".
    Original Bell & Howell pressings ended with a white screen test pattern with a 1175 Hz tone.

  • 55047: Spider-Woman (1979)

  • 55050: Olivia Newton John: Physical (1982)

  • 66038: High Plains Drifter (1973)

  • 71001: Continental Divide (1981)
    Syndicated to television as part of the Universal's Most Wanted List package in 1983.

  • 71003: Raggedy Man (1981)

    March 1982 
  • 71004: Silence of the North (1981)

  • 77005: Halloween II (1981)

    May 1982 
  • 55064: The Seven-Per-Cent Solution

  • 55067: The Marvelous Land of Oz (1981)
    Duplicated at Bell & Howell/Paramount Pictures Video Services.
    Produced by Television Theatre Company.

  • 55068: The Gangster Wars

  • 55069: Heartbeeps (1981)

  • 66042: Coogans Bluff (1968)

  • 66050: Joe Kidd (1972)

  • 66054: Family Plot (1976)

  • 71006: Death Valley (1982)

  • 71008: Private Lessons (1981)
    Duplicated at Bell & Howell/Paramount Pictures Video Services.

  • 77006: Ghost Story (1981)
    Duplicated at Bell & Howell/Paramount Pictures Video Services.

    June 1982 
  • 55049: The World of Martial Arts (1982)

  • 55054: The Great Waldo Pepper

  • 66041: Conquest of the Earth (1980)

  • 66045: House Calls (1978)
    The Beatles' Something is replaced with generic music.

  • 66051: All Night Long (1982)
    Duplicated at Bell & Howell/Paramount Pictures Video Services.

  • 66055: The Last Married Couple in America (1980)
    Duplicated at Bell & Howell/Paramount Pictures Video Services.

  • 71007: The Border (1982)
    Duplicated at S/T Videocassette Duplicating Corporation.

    August 1982 
  • 55025: Hot T-Shirts (1980)
    A Cannon Films release.

  • 55027: Incoming Freshmen (1979)
    A Cannon Films release.
    Released under the "Collector's Choice" label.

  • 55056: The Hindenburg (1975)
    Duplicated at Bell & Howell/Paramount Pictures Video Services.

  • 55074: Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein

  • 55079: A Little Sex

  • 77008: Cat People (1982)

  • 77010: Conan the Barbarian (1982)

    September 1982 
  • 55026: Cherry Hill High (1977)
    A Cannon Films release.
    Released under the "Collector's Choice" label.

  • 55070: Slaughterhouse-Five (1972)
    Released under the "Collector's Choice" label.

  • 55080: Woody Woodpecker and His Friends

  • 71010: The Sword and the Sorcerer (1982)
    Theatrically released by Group 1 International Distribution Organization, Ltd.

  • 77011: Dead Men Don't Wear Plaid (1982)

    October 1982 
  • 55051: The Funhouse (1981)

  • 55063: The Greek Tycoon (1978)

  • 55081: Sometimes a Great Notion

  • 55088: The Best of Marvel Comics

  • 55089: Jazzercise (1982)

  • 55090: Aerobic Dancing (1982)

  • 77009: The Thing (1982)
    Duplicated at S/T Videocassette Duplicating Corporation.

    December 1982 
  • 71009: Missing (1982)
    Duplicated at S/T Videocassette Duplicating Corporation.

  • 77014: The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas (1982)

    January 1983 
  • 55087: Hold That Ghost (1941)
    Released under the "Collector's Choice" label.

  • 55096: Duel (1971)

  • 77015: Fast Times at Ridgemont High (1982)

     1983 (Unsorted) 
  • 45015: Torn Curtain (1966)

  • 45016: Winning (1969)

  • 55059: The Beguiled (1971)

  • 55071: The Secret War of Harry Frigg (1968)

  • 55073: Crosby, Stills & Nash: Daylight Again (1983)

  • 55082: Little Miss Marker (1980)

  • 55091: Puss in Boots (1982)
    Produced by Television Theatre Company.

  • 55092: Alice in Wonderland (1982)
    Produced by Television Theatre Company.

  • 55095: The Raven (1935)/The Black Cat (1941)
    Double feature.

  • 55110: Let the Balloon Go (1976)

  • 55111: Homework (1982)

  • 55124: Olivia in Concert (1982)

  • 66052: Moonlighting (1982)

  • 60056: The Bingo Long Travelling All-Stars & Motor-Kings (1976)

  • 71011: Halloween III: Season of the Witch (1982)

  • 71012: The Pirates of Penzeance (1983)

  • 71013: Videodrome (1983)

  • 71015: The Sting II (1983)

Releases under the MCA Home Video name (1983-1990)

    open/close all folders 
     1983 
  • 71016: Monty Python's The Meaning of Life (1983)
    Produced by Handmade Films.
    Includes the featurette The Crimson Permanent Assurance before the film.

  • 80001: Doctor Detroit (1983)

  • 80008: Psycho II (1983)

  • 80013: Smokey and the Bandit Part 3 (1983)
    Includes a trailer for Conan the Barbarian after the film.

  • 80022: My Tutor (1983)
    A Crown Internation Pictures release.

  • 80035: The Conqueror (1956)
    Originally an RKO Radio Pictures release.

  • 80037: Nightmares (1983)
    Includes a trailer for The Thing after the film.

  • 80044: Jaws 3 (1983)
    Originally released in theaters as Jaws 3-D.
    Includes a trailer for Jaws before the film.

     1984 
  • 80012: Going Berserk (1983)

  • 80045: Metalstorm: The Destruction of Jared-Syn (1983)
    Includes a trailer for Conan the Barbarian before the film.

  • 80047: Scarface (1983)
    Presented across two tapes.

  • 80048: La Traviata (1982)

  • 80049: Merry Christmas, Mr. Lawrence (1983)

  • 80056: Rumble Fish (1983)

  • 80071: Repo Man (1984)
    Includes a trailer for The Meaning of Life before the film.

  • 80072: Tank (1984)

  • 80075: Firestarter (1984)

  • 80076: Sixteen Candles (1984)

  • 80078: The Last Starfighter (1984)

  • 80079: Conan the Destroyer (1984)

  • 80081: Rear Window (1954)

  • 80082: Vertigo (1958)

  • 80085: Streets of Fire (1984)

  • 80088: ''Mr. T's Be Somebody... or Be Somebody's Fool (1984)

  • 80128: The Man Who Knew Too Much (1956)

     1985 
  • 80124: Cloak & Dagger (1984)

  • 80161: Dune (1984)

  • 80191: Wise Blood (1979)
    From New Line Cinema.
    New Line Cinema logo is absent.

The rights to their library are currently divided as follows:

Alternative Title(s): MCA Discovision, MCA Videocassette Inc

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