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Elmer Earl "Butch" Hartman IV (born January 10, 1965) is an American animator, writer and actor, best known for the many, many shows he's created for Nickelodeon from 1998 to 2018.

Like many great animators from The Renaissance Age of Animation, Hartman is a graduate of California Institute of The Arts. He managed to snag his first animation job between his first and second years an inbetweener on An American Tail.

After graduation, he was hired as a storyboard artist on My Little Pony... then fired six weeks later. He spent a few years at Ruby-Spears before moving on to Hanna-Barbera, a studio he was a huge fan of. Starting as a model designer, Hartman quickly rose through the ranks to being a director on four of Cartoon Network's first five original shows, eventually becoming one of the key staff writers on Johnny Bravo alongside a young Seth MacFarlane (Dr. Elmer Hartman on Family Guy was named after him). He also worked on multiple shorts for the What A Cartoon! Show, one of which, Phish and Chip, was one of the only shorts not spun off into it's own show to receive a sequel short (Hartman also voiced Chip).

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Hartman moved on to Nickelodeon as soon as his contract with HB expired to work on a slightly similar show, Oh Yeah! Cartoons. There, he created several shorts that would eventually become The Fairly Oddparents, one of the station's longest running shows (the Oh Yeah! shorts were retroactively named "Season Zero"). In fact, something else Hartman and MacFarlane have in common: their animated shows are the only ones to ever get Uncanceled twice. Hartman has since produced three more shows for the station, Danny Phantom, Tuff Puppy and Bunsen Is a Beast, making him second to Klasky-Csupo as Nick's most prolific creator. In 2018, he parted ways with the company after twenty years of employment, assuring fans that he was still hard at work on new shows, including Elf Detective for his YouTube channel. He would also make a return to Cartoon Network for the action comedy Dynamice!.

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Hartman's cartoons are instantly recognizable: visually, his character designs tend to be angular and have thick outlines. Most notable is that his are the few characters in TV animation to have colored eyes rather than black circles. Writing wise, expect the characters to be so self-aware that you might be asking them if they're holding up the fourth wall, as well as a healthy does of pop culture references, both modern and not so modern.

Unlike many of his contemporaries, Hartman is admittedly one of the few who isn't at all interested in creating cartoons for adults, and has often expressed his disappointment in other animators for implying that there's anything wrong with cartoons that are exclusively for children. He even has a pet project Noog Network, an app which hosted exclusively "kid safe" shows. Regardless of one's agreement with him, it's clear that the career path he's chosen suits him.

Hartman has also had a fairly steady career as an actor, both in voices and live-action. In addition to some one-shot characters on his friend Seth's show, he was a regular on Days of Our Lives in the late '80s, and starred in the short-lived Generations as Sean Masters, as well as a smattering of small roles in late 80s/early 90s comedy films and shows. He was also part of the video reference cast for Disney's Pocahontas.

Hartman has also been a regular web presence in the second half of The New '10s, with semi-regular videos on YouTube giving career advice, doing live drawing sessions and interviewing fellow talents he's worked with.

Since 2005, Butch and his wife Julieann have been running a Christian non-profit organization called Hartman House, which funds housing for the most poverty-stricken parts of the United States and provides homeless families with dinners during Thanksgiving. Butch has attended many of these events, doing personal drawings and autographs for charity.

And last but not least, he's the Trope Namer for Hartman Hips (although this is a slight misnomer: it's actually Steven Silver who designed many of the characters who are classified as such).

No relation to Phil Hartman, by the way.


Tropes related to Butch Hartman:

  • Adam Westing: Not Butch himself, but he and Seth MacFarlane were the Trope Codifiers in bringing Adam West and his titular trope to animation, first is the Johnny Bravo episode "Johnny Bravo Meets Adam West" and later on their individual shows as Mayor West and Catman, respectively.
  • Better Than a Bare Bulb: The humor in his cartoons is extremely self-aware, with characters frequently acknowledging the absurdity of the situation they're in.
  • Creator Cameo: He often lends his voice to minor characters on the shows he created.
  • Deadpan Snarker: He comes across as one in some of his videos.
  • End of an Age: His departure from Nickelodeon after working there for over 20 years marks the end of his overall style and influence on the channel, effectively killing off Fairly OddParents and Bunsen is a Beast in the process as well as ending any chances of the long-discussed Danny Phantom revival.
  • Lets See You Do Better: Being a borderline workaholic (see Renaissance Man below), Butch has often been at odds with fans who don't find him very sympathetic to anything less than his level of dedication to their art and not very accepting of their criticisms of him.
  • Lull Destruction: A lot of his works are very loud and hectic.
  • Mythology Gag: In his speed-drawing video ADULT CARTOONS as KIDS' CARTOONS, one of the requests was for Bojack Horseman as a My Little Pony character. He chuckles halfway through when he mentions that he worked on the original cartoon, though he draws it in the Friendship Is Magic style.
  • Odd Friendship: With Seth MacFarlane, as the two are close friends in real life, yet have drastically different views in terms of religion, politics, and animation.
  • One of Us: Very often, just navigating his Twitter account tells you he is a fan of so many things that he enjoys drawing said things in his style; from video games, comic books, to anime.
  • Older Than They Look: It's easy to forget that he is in his 50s.
  • Real Men Love Jesus: As stated before, Butch is a practicing Christian and many of his motivational tweets have vague Christian undertones. This actually got him in a bit of trouble when his crowdfunded app, Oaxis Entertainment, was accused of using dishonest tactics to get fans to fund Christian propaganda for him (Butch's pitch for it, once it had been funded, just happened to be in a church and he later assured funders that this had not been the case).
  • Renaissance Man: Outside of animation; Butch is also a painter, cartoonist, vlogger, podcast host, web personality, live action actor, stand-up comedian, occasional composer, script editor, comic book author, philanthropist, creator of the kid friendly app "The Noog Network", and is currently planning to develop a family streaming network called Oaxis Entertainment. It's enough to make people like Fred Seibert wonder if the man even sleeps at night.
  • Sliding Scale of Idealism vs. Cynicism: Mostly on the idealistic end of the scale, with a generous helping of Black Comedy.
  • Something Completely Different: His upcoming cartoon that he is doing for his own network, Elf Detective, is a much more serious, anime-inspired cartoon.
  • Take That!:
    Butch: Ember is fighting Bubbles, Bubbles is fighting Ember, and what I hear about the new Powerpuff Girls is that the show fights off comedy.
  • That Came Out Wrong: His crowdfunded app, Oaxis Entertainment, was the subject of a minor scandal when fans and non-fans alike latched onto some tactless comments he made giving a speech about it. In addition to the typical Moral Guardian jargon of too much violence in the media resulting in real-world violence, depression and suicide, and how such things "didn't exist" when he was younger, some unfortunate wording and body language made it sound like he was blamed Tara Strong for Mary Kay Bergman's suicide in 2000.

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