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Analyses and Reviews

  • This Cracked article states that Duke Igthorn from Adventures of the Gummi Bears wiped the Gummis out single handedly and reduced their number to the main six. It's firmly established that the rest of the Gummis fled overseas long before the series began, the protagonists hid underground to the point where they're considered myth, and Igthorn didn't discover them until the first episode. The same article makes some erroneous claims about My Little Pony as well, as mentioned on its subpage.
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  • Besides blowing things way out of proportion in regards to Disney's efforts to revamp Mickey via Epic Mickey, this New Yorker article calls Porky Pig a Disney character.
  • What is The Goth Rebel Dream Girl? is an analysis video that discusses cool goth/punk/alternative love interests in fiction. Amongst the several errors are: calling Marceline from Adventure Time "Rosaline", implying that Gogo from Big Hero 6 is Hiro's love interest instead of a Cool Big Sis, referring to Lucy from The Loud House as an example (she's eight and is Lincoln's sister), pronouncing the name of Mai from Avatar: The Last Airbender as "My"note , and calling Raven from Teen Titans an example despite the fact she's no one's love interest. The video also starts by mentioning that a Twitter user brought light to the "East Asian Girls With Streaks In Their Hair" cliche, but that image was a repost of an image circulating on Tumblr for years prior.
  • This article on shows that aired on PBS Kids from the 90's to the early 2000s has a few mistakes of this type, to the point where some might think it was written as a Stealth Parody of childhood memory-baiting Top [x] lists:
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    • The Big Comfy Couch is claimed to be distributed by PBS. It was actually made in Canada by Radical Sheep Productions and distributed to public television stations (including not just PBS, but those not affiliated with them) by Benny Smart and American Public Television.
    • When The Noddy Shop is brought up, the image is from the Noddy's Toyland Adventures segments of the show, but the description quotes the theme song to Make Way For Noddy, which is from 2005. As noted in the entry for The Noddy Shop in the Live Action TV section, this is a fairly common mistake due to how barely any evidence of the show existed after it ended its' run until The New '10s.
    • Beakman's World is one of the shows listed. It did not air on PBS; it was broadcast on TLC before a Channel Hop to CBS.
    • Thomas the Tank Engine is listed as airing as a stand-alone when it actually aired during this era as part of Shining Time Station.
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    • The Lamb Chop's Play-Along slot calls the ending song "The Song That Never Ends". In the show, it is sung as "The Song That Doesn't End".
    • "A Word From Us Kids" is claimed to be a short that aired in between shows. It actually aired in between episodes of Arthur. PBS never generally aired shorts in between shows that were longer than 30 seconds to a minute at most, though this usually happened on some local stations. For example, WNYE aired The Noddy Shop songs in between shows, and WLIW aired Sheira and Loli's Dittydoodle Works songs between shows.
  • The poster for Common Sense Media's review of the Cartoon Network website, for some reason, features SpongeBob SquarePants note  on it.
  • A brief segment near the end of Happy Happy Joy Joy (a mostly-accurate 2020 documentary about The Ren & Stimpy Show) discusses the show's impact on subsequent cartoons, with an image collage of various other shows as examples (visible in the film's trailer). The collage includes images of shows that were hardly, if at all, influenced by Ren & Stimpy, as well as obvious fan art of SpongeBob SquarePants and The Fairly OddParents (the latter example being particularly egregious, as it depicts one of the show's characters bleeding to death).

Networks and Streaming Services

  • New York cable provider Cablevision is a strange case of this when it comes to their programming guides for kids' channels:
    • Sometimes, the images for shows will be mixed up. For instance, several episodes of We Bare Bears use a promotional image for Teen Titans Go!, and two reruns of Sofia the First on the Disney Junior channel ("Gizmo Gwen" and "Cool Hand Fluke") showed an image of Little Einsteins, possibly because said show aired before the re-run in question. On a similar note, an airing of the Little Einsteins episode "He Speaks Music!" showed an image of Imagination Movers, which the channel doesn't air anymore.
    • In 2018, a weird programming guide error occurred with Cartoon Network programming. If Cablevision did not get info for either an episode of a certain show or info of a certain part of the day, a placeholder schedule based off an archived one will be used rather than the normal one that shows a description of the show in general. This notably happens whenever Boomerang programming like New Looney Tunes and Care Bears: Unlock the Magic get a chance to air during the daytime hours. And sometimes this happens to individual episodes, like how "Bro-Pocalypse" re-runs were listed as "Ones And Zeroes" until January of 2019, when the mistake was fixed. It also extends to other networks, but it's rarer on those. A notable instance was when Boomerang listing the 35th episode of Garfield and Friends as episode 78 the second time the remastered version of said episode aired on the channel.note 

    • On PBS and HGTV, Optimum will occasionally list new episodes as "Repeat" instead of "New" in their premiere slots. One example of this was the Pinkalicious & Peterrific special A Pinkaperfect Birthday being listed as a repeat in its' first airing on WNET.
    • The Starz Encore Kids and Family repeats of episodes 1-5 of Garfield and Friends lists the contents of 101-105 (from season 6, a season the channel has not aired yet), possibly because the network labels them with their production numbers, which puts the season number before the actual number. The same listings also believe that the quickies are actual episode segments (for instance, Show 48 has the U.S. Acres quickie, "Roosters Fly", listed as the U.S. Acres segment instead of "Read Alert".) OnTVTonight also does the same thing.
      • On the same topic, when Boomerang premiered the remastered version of "Ship Shape; Barn Of Fear II; Break A Leg", Cablevision listed it as "Binky Goes Bad!; Barn Of Fear; Mini Mall Matters", possibly because both have "Barn Of Fear" in the title.
      • OnTVTonight listed the August 25, 2019 rerun of The Loud House episode "The Crying Dame" as a new episode, despite said episode first airing on November 24, 2017.
  • When Cartoon Network in the UK started using the 2015 "coming up next" bumpers, they got the Ben 10 and Ben 10: Omniverse bumpers mixed up, despite the two shows looking very different.
  • When Cartoon Network returned the old Looney Tunes shorts to their schedule in September 2016, the up next bumper for the show had a clip from The Looney Tunes Show despite the fact that it wasn't even airing on the network at the time.
  • Netflix is pretty bad about this, especially when it comes to animated films and programs (see also the Anime example).
    • For example:
      "The Teen Titans are a motley crew of five teenagers, each one gifted with a superpower to put to good use. Robin the Boy Wonder is the default leader of the troupe, which roams the planet to protect it from those who aim to harm it and its citizens. But on their days off, they still have to deal with the typical problems that plague teenagers, such as making good grades and forming friendships at school!"
      • Really funny/sad, since there was never a single episode that showed the characters outside of their secret identities or at school. The last episode does show Terra restarting her life by going to school and making friends, but this was her first appearance in years.
      • Robin is just a well trained human. So much for "each one gifted with a superpower".
      • Even the phrase "a superpower" is questionable, since Beast Boy is the only one with a single power: Shapeshifting. Starfire is an alien with myriad abilities, Raven is a magical half-demon, and Cyborg is... a cyborg with technology.
    • Here is their description for Star Wars: The Clone Wars:
      "Set after the events in Episode II: Attack of the Clones, these animated entries in the Star Wars sagas follow the adventures of the Jedi knights, including Anakin Skywalker — who draws ever closer to the dark side — and his master, Obi-Wan Kenobi. As the Jedis and Princess Padmé fight to preserve the Republic and defeat the Separatists, they face off with deadly foes such as Count Dooku and General Grievous."
      • First off, Jedi is both plural and singular. There is no such word as "Jedis".
      • Secondly, "Princess Padmé"? Padmé was a Queen in Episode I, but by the time of the Clone Wars she isn't even royalty anymore. She's a Senator. She's frequently referred to as a Senator on the show.
      • Thirdly, Obi-Wan isn't Anakin's Jedi Master anymore. Although Anakin was still Obi-Wan's Padawan in Episode II.
    • Their description of Street Sharks listed Henry Winkler and Adam West in the cast, based on an entirely fake episode guide that was created by an editor on the TVTome wiki as an experiment to see how ridiculous the description of a show nobody really remembered could become before anyone called him on it. They were far from the only people caught out by the spoof, but you'd think they'd notice the episode titles in their source didn't match the ones they actually had.
  • Italian cartoon-focused channel K2 has issues with its commercial bumpers. In theory they would match the cartoon that airs after the break, airing a short clip of it... but actually they stopped making new ones a long ago, meaning that the bumpers nowadays show either Oggy and the Cockroaches or The Daltons, almost never matching up with whatever it's actually aired.note 
  • Italian TV channel Boing haves some issues with Beast Boy's name. Their episode descriptions for both Teen Titans and Teen Titans Go! keep switching around between calling him "Beast Boy" or "BB": the latter is supposedly his name in the Italian dub, albeit they're not sure if the correct spelling should be "BB" or "Bibi"note . Also, the descriptions for some early episodes of Teen Titans call him "Fauno Boy" and the one for Go!'s "The Croissant" calls him "Beastie Boy".
    • The same channel also keeps referring to Mad Mod as "Mat Mat".
  • According to the American cable company Midco's channel listing of the Avatar: The Last Airbender episode "Lake Laogai", Jet is voiced by Jason Marsden. He does sound like him, but is actually voiced by Crawford Wilson.
  • Now closed Greek channel Alter's descriptions of animated shows were mostly hit or miss, but some had a few glaring errors:
    • Their description of Arthur called the titular character a mouse when he's an aardvark (which is, however, an easy mistake due to Arthur not looking much like one), says he "lives in a fairytale town with his family" (Elwood City is a run-of-the-mill American town), and uses the female word for "teacher" (ignoring that Mr. Ratburn is, well, a male character) and says "she" is "strict as always, often messes with [Arthur] and gives him many punishments that make him begrudge", despite several episodes making it clear that he's just a Stern Teacher and not a sadistic one.
    • Their description of The Berenstain Bears called Honey Bear a boy instead of a girl, though that might be because babies are often subject to Viewer Gender Confusion.
    • Their description of Care Bears (1980s) only mentioned Professor Coldheart as a villain, despite the channel presumably airing the Nelvana episodes as well.
  • A promo for Telad's kids shows on the Israeli Channel 2 used footage from DuckTales (1987) for Quack Pack, despite the obvious differences in character & art design between the two shows.
  • An early version of Freeform's "25 Days of Christmas Song" bumper used for the 2019 holiday season showed a picture of Sam the Snowman to go with the lyric: "Frosty, Grinch, Buzz and Woody, and The Santa Clause", seemingly calling Sam Frosty the Snowman despite Frosty and Sam being two completely separate characters. The bumper was used again for the 2020 holiday season, and this time it switched the shot of Sam out for one of the actual Frosty.
  • Zap2It often lists several Extra Long Episodes of Quarter Hour Short programming (usually on Cartoon Network) as 15-minute segments when they actually aren't.
  • Paramount+ has a bad case of listing the wrong dates for the premieres of episodes:
    • The service lists Dora the Explorer and Oswald as having premiered in April 2003. They actually premiered in 2000 and 2001.
    • The service claims that Allegra's Window premiered in February 1999, when the series premiered in 1994.
    • Gullah Gullah Island and Blue's Clues are both listed with a January 1999 premiere date. They actually premiered in 1994 and 1996, respectively.
    • CatDog is listed with an October 1998 premiere date. While the year is correct, the show actually premiered in April.
    • The final season of Little Bear is listed with a January 2007 premiere date. The last season actually ended in 2001.
    • Ads for the service sometimes show images of Blue's Clues & You! despite Paramount Plus not having the rights to stream the show.

Retailers:

Studios

  • Besides the specific examples below. It can be said that a lot of the non-major Hanna-Barbera shows are prone to this when being reported on in a rush. While everyone knows there is a lot of Follow the Leader in many of their shows some reports practically flanderize the comparisons. As a rule of thumb, there's things to compare in all of them, but not enough to interchange them.
    • That's not the only error in Lenberg's book. In the Wacky Races entry, he lists the General as a character. There was no General as a recurring character (as he was on the spinoff, albeit heard and not seen), just Private Meekley and Sgt. Blast. Also: Help! It's the Hair Bear Bunch! reputedly went into syndication after its CBS run under the title "The Yo-Yo Bears" (its working title). The show remained off the air until 1984 when USA Network ran it in repeats.
  • In 1953, Chuck Jones, Friz Freleng and Robert McKimson were invited to be wined and dined by their studio bosses, the Warner Bros. themselves. The Warners proved hilariously clueless about the output of their own studio, with Harry Warner admitting that he didn't even know where the animation studio was, and that "all I know is that we make Mickey Mouse." (Mickey, you might be aware, has always been the property of one Walt Disney.) Chuck Jones wryly assured his bosses that so long as they were making cartoons, Mickey would remain at the height of his popularity. Jack Warner sternly replied, "It would be in the best interest of your careers that you do just that." Years later, the Warner Bros animation studio closed down. Chuck Jones had left a year earlier, and when Friz Freleng called to give him the news, he said "Bad news, Chuck. Looks like Jack finally figured out we don't make Mickey Mouse." note 

Series

  • LocateTV's description for 3-2-1 Penguins! read as follows: "Follow the adventures of Jason and Michelle, a pair of young penguin twins". One has to wonder if they even bothered to watch the show, or even look at promotional art, as anyone familiar with the show can tell you that Jason and Michelle are a pair of human twins. The eponymous penguins are the four penguins (Zidgel, Midgel, Fidgel, and Kevin) who Jason and Michelle go on adventures with, and not Jason and Michelle themselves.
  • The 7D was conceived as a Disney Junior show before being retooled into the Disney XD show for general audiences that it is now. Despite this, many news reports and other such things still tend to refer to it as a Disney Junior show aimed at preschoolers.
  • It's very common for Nick Jr.'s listings for Abby Hatcher to mix up episode titles with those from Team Umizoomi and Blaze and the Monster Machines.
  • Take a look at this box art for a re-release of Volume 1 of Adventures of Sonic the Hedgehog. The Robotnik design is the one from Sonic the Hedgehog (SatAM) instead of Adventures, and the logo is also from SatAM.
  • The IMDB page for The Adventures of Teddy Ruxpin claims that Ashleigh Ball voiced the young Grubby in "Octopede Sailors", when it's obvious that it's still Will Ryan voicing him during said flashback. In addition, said actress would have been 3 or 4 when the series was recorded, making it impossible for her to have provided the voice.
  • A summer holidays advert ran on Cartoon Network UK in 2012 referred to Adventure Time character Lumpy Space Princess as "Lumpy Space". Presumably this was confusion over the title of the episode "Trouble in Lumpy Space", which the network airs frequently. Less understandable was a promo shortly afterward for new episodes of Redakai, which called one of the main characters "Bloomer".
    • Seemingly caught later that same year when the ad was used for repeats on sibling network CN Too, with Boomer correctly said this time.
  • The summary of the The Adventures of Jimmy Neutron: Boy Genius episode "Broadcast Blues" lists the principal's name as Principal Pinkly. His name is actually Principal Willoughby.
  • Many TV descriptions for The Amazing World of Gumball refer to Gumball and Darwin as friends, but Darwin is really Gumball's adopted brother. They live in the same house for a reason. Granted, they largely are friends as well, so it's not so much inaccurate as it is imprecise.
    • At one point Cartoon Network ran ads referring to The Amazing World of Gumball as a "brand new show", despite it being several years old at the time.
    • The Mysterious Mr. Enter stated that the episode "The Choices" is from Season 6. It's from Season 5, Season 6 hadn't even begun yet when he made that review.
  • American Dad!:
    • Time Warner Cable descriptions of American Dad! episodes sometimes incorrectly call Francine "Lois".
    • On the Sky TV guide, one episode of the series is called "Meter Maid" instead of the actual pun title "Meter Made".
    • The episode "Stan Knows Best" has an incorrect detail on many cable/satellite descriptions. While it correctly describes Stan cutting Hayley's green hair, he doesn't use a shaver with a silencer. Perhaps Fox sent an incorrect description when the show initially aired, and it was never corrected.
  • Angelina Ballerina has this issue: several sources assume the titular character's last name really is "Ballerina", when in reality her real name is "Angelina Mouseling".
  • Much of the print material based on Animaniacs (such as the comic books) used the show's name when directly referring to Yakko, Wakko, and Dot, who were always called the Warners and never the Animaniacs in the show. Even some Kids' WB! spots (such as the preview special Welcome Home, Animaniacs!) and movies and other shows made by WB themselves made this mistake, like Teen Titans Go! To the Movies.
    • It was on Jeopardy!, too. The answer was "On the Warner Bros. lot tour you can see the water tower that this cartoon trio calls home." The contestant responded "Who are The Warner Brothers and Warner Sister?" His response was judged incorrect. They gave it back to him after the commercial, with Alex Trebek professing that he hadn't known that; he learns something new every day.
    • The description TV listings use for Hub airings of episode 26 wrote the words "find a bathroom" as "fins bathroon", and used the term "fire-eating dragon" instead of "fire-breathing dragon".
    • Many websites think that the Pinky and the Brain short "A Meticulous Analysis of History" was shown as one of their segments on Animaniacs rather than the spin-off series.
    • According to "The Monty Python Encyclopedia" Pinky and the Brain is about "a grumpy mouse and his odd circle of bizarre friends", when in reality it's actually about an Evil Genius mouse and his Cloud Cuckoo Lander lackey scheming to take over the world. They also list the episode that Eric Idle guest-starred in as being from 1995 — it actually aired in 1998.
    • The show itself offers an in-universe example with the segment "The Please Please Please Get A Life Foundation", where fans point out false facts found in the show itself. This segment was actually based on the fan-made Cultural Reference Guide for the show.
    • In the first episode of the reboot, one of the things from the past 20 years that was shown to have been missed by the Warners was the Tamagotchi and virtual pet craze. This isn't true-at the time the craze was occuring in 1997, new episodes of Animaniacs were still airing.
  • The desperation-born sweat from reporters trying to figure out just what the hell Aqua Teen Hunger Force is about was enough to smudge the pages. Most of them came up with variations on "show about anthropomorphic food detective superheroes" (a premise which had been abandoned after about three episodes, as lampshaded in many later episodes).
    • Even TV Guide's description of the show is, "Food items fight crime", and it doesn't make sense.
  • Arthur:
    • Arthur Its Only Rock And Roll has an in-universe example where throughout the special, the Backstreet Boys are constantly referred to by the characters as a rock and roll band, when the actual genre of music they perform is pop.
    • The description for "The Secret Life of Dogs and Babies" on the official PBS Kids website is quite strange: "Arthur and D.W. watch impossibly immature TV shows." The episode is an Animal Talk story about Pal and Baby Kate trying to get a decorative cake topper to a wedding, and it seems like whoever wrote this summary based it on the Cold Open of Kate and Pal watching a Rugrats parody.
  • Some sources claim that As Told by Ginger ended its run in 2009, nine years after its premiere. IMDb even lists the series as "2000-present", probably because to date, the last eight episodes have not aired in the US. Production ended in 2003 and some, but not all of the final season aired in 2003-04. The series finale was released straight to DVD in November 2004, effectively ending the series then. For several months (possibly even years), the show's Wikipedia article claimed that the remaining episodes finished airing in November 2009, but this did not happen. Schedule archives confirm that Nickelodeon stopped airing reruns of the series in December 2008, with sister channel Nicktoons following suit one week later. It was finally corrected to state that the show ended in 2006, which isn't technically wrong; one of the remaining episodes aired for the first time in the US during that year, but the others remained unaired until NickSplat aired them in 2016.
  • Avatar: The Last Airbender:
    • Once, Conan O'Brien made a reference to how "Avadar" Aang and his bison Appa (pronounced like Apple with an a on the end) had to break out of an iceberg to save the world. Then he compared it to Sarah Palin breaking out of Alaska.
    • It's rare that you have a reviewer who is tasked exclusively with watching a show fail completely. IGN's Avatar: The Last Airbender reviewer Tory Ireland Mell actually did fail that badly. Her legendarily bad, unprofessionally written, spoiler filled, completely ignorant review of the season 3 episodes was so bad that comments on the reviews lack of skill forced her to watch several episodes before the finale, the review of which still had all of the same issues, only more glaringly magnified, as it covered the two-hour finale. In highlighting the Critical Research Failure, we find that this reviewer:
      • Didn't watch the first episodes, otherwise she'd know Katara was the only Waterbender in the entire Southern Water Tribe.
      • Completely missed the episode covering Bloodbending.
      • Has no idea that the show develops other characters regularly.
      • Has never seen Zuko vulnerable before (so... she has never seen seasons 1, 2, or 3)
    • Another reviewer claimed: "He's supposedly the only one skilled in manipulating all of nature's basic elements. But he isn't. A rival shares his powers."
    • Newspaper articles on the movie adaptation, based on the popular "anime". Jesse McCartney says it was "explosively huge in Asia." It is also not a good sign when the director of the film adaptation refers to Avatar as an "anime"... The movie stars the "evil" Prince Zucko, no less. The news anchor in that same video describes the show's plot as involving "the epic battle between the Fire and Air Nations.", despite everyone in the Air "nation" (except for Aang) being dead. On the anime part, it has been released in parts of Asia but isn't nearly as popular there.
    • Commercials for a toy featuring Aang and Appa repeatedly mispronounced the latter's name. In the show, his name is pronounced "Ah-pa", but in the commercial, it's pronounced, as mentioned above, like "Apple" with an a on the end.
    • The original version of Commander Zhao's collectible e-card on Nick.com claimed that Zhao was the one responsible for Zuko's burn scar, rather than his father Fire Lord Ozai. This was later corrected, but the card still says that "Zhao was too wily for the young Zuko then, but will he come to regret sparing the Prince's life?" In reality, Zuko won the Agni Kai (Firebender duel) and spared Zhao.
    • Iroh's character bio on Nick.com shows the actor who plays him in "The Ember Island Players".
    • When Zuko's daughter, Fire Lord Izumi, finally got to appear in The Legend of Korra, Nick's official Twitter account used a photoshopped image someone on the internet made to illustrate what she looked like when she was younger to promote the episode instead of the actual still of her they'd released previously.
  • A DVD bonus feature for The Avengers: Earth's Mightiest Heroes! says the terrorist organization HYDRA was founded shortly after World War II, instead of during the war. This feels especially jarring since the fact Captain America's first episode showed Allied soldiers fighting HYDRA agents but not Nazis became one of the show's biggest controversies, and one of the episodes on the DVD features the Avengers trying to prevent the terrorists' leader from creating an alternate universe in which they won WWII. This very same episode plays in the corner for the duration of the bonus feature.
  • Many summaries for the Baby Looney Tunes episode "Did Not! Did Too!" claim that the episode is about Lola challenging Bugs to a winner-take-all competition to see who gets to be the leader of the group. The actual episode contains no such competition, and is just about Bugs and Lola not wanting to talk to each other after a fight, thus leading their friends to work together to resolve the issue.
    • On a similar subject, in this Cartoonito UK promo for Tiny Toon Adventures, the first half of the footage is from Baby Looney Tunes, despite the fact that the two shows are completely different from each other. In addition, it's not uncommon for eBay listings for merchandise from the two shows to have their names confused.
    • For some reason, the Virgin Media listings for Baby Looney Tunes claim that Mike Pollock was a cast member. He wasn't - apart from June Foray, the casting was entirely done in Vancouver.
  • The Hub's Web site for Batman: The Animated Series, lists the story of Dick Grayson for Robin, except that the Robin displayed on the site's picture is actually Tim Drake, who has a different origin, and who became Robin after Dick left to become Nightwing.
  • Let's take a trip back to the early-to-mid 1990s, when Moral Guardians were up in arms about Beavis And Butthead. Not only did South Carolina Senator Ernest Hollings infamously refer to them as "Buffcoat and Beaver" (later referenced on the show), the three-part documentary about the series ("Taint of Greatness") revealed some parents thought there was an episode where the boys set a cat on fire. One can only assume one mother caught a glimpse of the episode where they paint Mr. Anderson's cat and set his hedges on fire, completely misinterpreted what happened, and told her friends about it.
    • Speaking of Beavis And Butthead, some reviewers thought Daria was their friend. They were not friends in any sense of the word.
  • In an interview with the Brazilian voice actor Charles Emmanuel about his role as Ben Tennyson in Ben 10, the reporter referred its animation as a Japanese series. The network also wrote the actor's name as "Emmanuel Charles".
  • For some reason, IMDb thinks that the main voice actors in The Brothers Flub were Nick Bakay and Richard Steven Horowitz (aka Norbert and Daggett in The Angry Beavers). Neither man was involved with the show at all. These errors also show up in Jeff Lenburg's Encyclopedia of Animated Cartoons.
  • In January 2021, many news outlets reported that PBS Kids had finally cancelled Caillou after 20 years. This is false; what really happened is that they took it out of reruns. The series had ended over a decade prior to this, and PBS can't actually cancel the show either way; the show is a Canadian import.
  • This blog post calls Disney Junior's Can You Teach My Alligator Manners? "Can You Teach My Crocodile Manners?", when the species' name is said at least thrice in the theme song.
  • For years, there was speculation of two unaired episodes of ChalkZone titled "Darkness Rain/Failure Zone/The Scent of Stupidity/Snap-a-Snap" and "The Art of Sucker Punch/Family Reunion", mainly because of the show's Wikipedia article stating this. These episodes do not exist; executive producer Fred Seibert confirmed that 40 episodes were made (not 42). Further, the complete series was recently released on DVD and did not contain these two supposed "episodes". In the case of other Nickelodeon shows that have had episodes unaired in the US such as CatDog and As Told by Ginger, complete series releases always contain such episodes.
    • On iTunes and on the complete series DVD, "Chip Of Fools" is referred to as "Snap's Nightmare", thus spoiling the ending of the episode (note that this only goes for the iTunes description and DVD menu; the episode itself wasn't renamed).
  • The synopsis of the Clarence episode "Big Trouble in Little Aberdale" provided to listing services identifies the new kid the title character meets as a boy when she is a girl.
  • The IMDB summary of The Cleveland Show states the titular character is still a deli owner; he was on Family Guynote , but on this show he works as an installer for a cable company.
    • Some summaries (based on early descriptions and concept art released by the creators before the pilot was even made) state that the Brown family's neighbors/friends include three different families: a redneck family, a clan of talking bears, and a Trapped in the Past British family. Only the first two appear on the show; the last was scrapped and replaced by Holt.
  • Some American viewers viewing the original short of Creature Comforts mistook it for an existing or forthcoming Wallace & Gromit short where said characters visit the zoo. Justified due to the fact that the character designs were similar - in fact, Nick Park worked on both!
  • A Nigerian content guide provider once promoted The Crumpets on Twitter with the picture of a Swiss all-female band bearing that name instead of the cartoon.
  • The Germans Love David Hasselhoff page on This Very Wiki once claimed that Danger Mouse was an American show that was popular amongst the British, when the show was actually created in Britain by Cosgrove Hall.
    • One news article reviewing the 2015 reboot claimed Professor Squawkencluck was a parakeet. She's actually a young hen.
  • The Danger Rangers episode "Chem Gems" uses two in-universe examples in the music video segment for "Don't Touch That!". The song's lyrics treat Socrates drinking hemlock as being accidental ("When Socrates drank hemlock, what did he learn? Don't touch that!") He was actually given it to drink because of the death penalty he got for corrupting the youth and making false gods. Immediately following this is a claim that Romeo's death in Romeo and Juliet was also accidental when it was actually him comitting suicide. And to make matters worse, their interpertation of the scene where Romeo takes poison took place at the balcony, when in the actual play, it took place inside a tomb.
  • The official PBS Kids description for the Daniel Tiger's Neighborhood episode "Daniel Doesn't Want To Go Potty" reads "Daniel and Mom Tiger are meeting Katerina for lunch, and Daniel learns that it's important to try to go potty before leaving the house". What it describes is completely different than the actual episode, where they meet her at the grocery store to buy ingredients for a veggie pizza.
  • Translation of a Swedish TV-guide's blurb about Danny Phantom: "In the past Danny was a shy child who was hardly noticed. But suddenly one afternoon, when Danny unfortunately burned down his parents' lab, he became a super hero." Besides the name and Danny getting superpowers from something related to his parent's lab, none of this is accurate - he wasn't particularly shy, he got more awkward after getting ghost powers thanks to constant Power Incontinence, and the lab didn't burn down (there wasn't even any fire at all!).
  • Dastardly and Muttley in Their Flying Machines was referred to as Stop That Pigeon (its theme and original working name) so frequently that Yogi's Treasure Hunt lampshades it. In the episode "Yogi's Heroes", Dick and Muttley capture Snooper and Blabber and torture them by making them watch old Dastardly & Muttley cartoons.
    Snooper: Oh, no, Blab. Not Stop That Pigeon cartoons! Our brain matter will turn into toothypaste!'''
  • When Di-Gata Defenders was first aired in Italy, many TV guides presented the series as "Based on the omonymous videogame". While a Di-Gata Defenders game exists, it was released after the cartoon.
  • The show description given to Dofus: The Treasures of Kerubim by Italian TV channel K2 implies that the show is just a straight adaptation of the original game ("The six dragon eggs known as Dofus are vanished. A team of adventurers is searching for them"). Not only, the thumbnail image that they use as a logo for the show in the upper right corner is the artwork of the default male Osamodas character from the game, rather than one of the show's characters.
  • Dragon Tales:
    • The CBC's official website gave the name of the episode "Cowboy Max" as "Cowboy Hat".
    • Amazon calls Emmy "Margarita".
    • Some websites call the show Dragon Tails. It was even spelled this way on Ron Rodecker's obituary.
  • The Fairly OddParents:
    • One of the storybooks, Lemonade With a Twist (a novelization of the episode "Nectar of the Odds"), refers to recurring character Doug Dimmadome as Doug Dimmsdale. Granted, the two names are similar, but since the actual episode has a part where he and Timmy keep saying "Doug Dimmadome, the owner of the Dimmsdale Dimmadome", it's a somewhat glaring oversight.
    • Some descriptions of the show simply state the plot of the show to be that "Timmy's parents grant wishes". Actually, his fairy godparents grant the wishes, his real parents are normal humans who hardly care about him.
      • An Italian TV guide once stated that Cosmo and Wanda are Timmy's imaginary friends, something that is never said or hinted in the actual show.
    • Xfinity's summary of the episode "Hard Copy" states that Timmy brings Darth Vader to life, actually it's the show's expy, "Dark Laser". Looks like the summary writer fell asleep watching the episode.
    • One Nickelodeon Magazine article referred to recurring villain the Nega-Chin as the "Anti-Chin".
  • Small potatoes given some of the other examples here, but Family Guy is sometimes called "The Family Guy". Even the Emmys got this wrong, though possibly intentionally. Lampshaded in "Boopa-dee, Bappa-dee":
    Man: Now, where you listed employment, some of you wrote "Family Guy," and others wrote "The Family Guy." Which one is it?
    Peter: (sighs) It's "Family Guy".
    • Within Family Guy, Peter thinks Scrubs is a character's name. Also Black Scrubs.
    • Agent Booth called it this on an episode of Bones, which was a little odd since it was the episode that featured a well-publicized Intercontinuity Crossover appearance by Stewie.
      • Even odder — Stewie was a manifestation of Booth's subconscious, indicating that Booth must be at least a moderate viewer of the show for it to be on his mind. Yet he still gets the title wrong!
    • Time Warner Cable descriptions of Family Guy sometimes gives the vague description, "Nihilistic animated antics of the grousing Griffins."
      • Specific episode descriptions from other providers don't get much better, such as Comcast's insistence that Quagmire hates the title character of "Jerome is the New Black" (it's Brian who Quagmire hates), or Dish Network assuming "Lois Kills Stewie" is about Stewie auditioning for American Idol (this was a thirty-second-long Cutaway Gag).
      • Verizon's description for "Brian Goes Back To College" claimed it was about Brian getting a job at The New Yorker. That was only the Lead In, and the episode focused on Brian going back to college.
    • According to audio commentary, this almost happened with a joke about JAG. Apparently the writers had never watched the show and assumed Jag was the name of a character.
    • This ''Los Angeles Times'' article actually refers to Peter Griffin as "Peter Griffith".
    • The original DVD releases of the show's first three seasons were infamous for often featuring episodes descriptions that weren't even close to being accurate to what actually happened in the episode. "Fifteen Minutes of Shame" for example tells about a subplot of Meg taking a job as maid for the Von Trapp family, which doesn't happen at all within the episode.
    • This article highlighting the Meta Humor of "The Simpsons Guy" writes at one point, "The Peter vs. Homer fight references the once-beloved fight between Peter and a guy in a chicken suit." There were actually multiple fights with an actual giant chicken, although the first fight appeared as flashback triggered by Peter seeing a guy in a chicken costume in "Da Boom".
  • For some reason, people tend to confuse Dumb Donald from Fat Albert and the Cosby Kids for Mush Mouth, a mistake that was once made in a Saturday Night Live sketch as well a scene in The Boondock Saints.
  • Talking of Flushed Away, one of the above idiotors claimed it to be "inferior" to Ratatouille because "the fur detail isn't realistic". Never mind that the house style of Aardman Animations is claymation, so Flushed Away was done in simulated claymation; so of course the fur detail wasn't realistic — it wasn't meant to be.
  • Futurama:
    • Some people think the show is a spin-off of The Simpsons.
    • On Google, one user left a one-star review in 2020, interpreting a supposedly recently-aired episode where Richard Nixon becomes a cyborg as an anti-Trump Author Tract (specifically pointing at a bumper sticker saying “Impeach This”). The episode in question was “A Head in the Polls”, which aired a full two decades before the 2020 election and had nothing to do with Trump. The "Impeach This" joke was a reference to Watergate.
  • In the TV Trash review of Grandma Got Run Over by a Reindeer, Rowdy C stated that Phil Roman "created every ''Garfield'' TV show". However,The Garfield Show (which was already airing on Cartoon Network before the review was posted), was not made by Roman. He apologized for this when he reviewed said show with The Comic Strip Critic.
    • Speaking of Garfield, the Canadian Zap2It listings omit the word "The" from the title of the U.S. Acres segment "The Impractical Joker", and calls "Fortune Kooky" "Fortune Cookie". note 
    • Mark Evanier himself made this mistake twice. He claimed that "Temp Trouble" was about Aloysius Pig joining the cast note  and said that the whole U.S. Acres cast learned Double-Talking in "Double Trouble Talk."note 
    • Amazon lists "The Discount of Monte Cristo" as "The Discount of Monty Cristo" and "Kiddie Korner" as "Kiddie Corner". It's well worth noting that the latter mistake is made a lot on pages about Garfield and Friends, and those pages also sometimes spell "Kiddie" as "Kiddy".
    • The Big Cartoon Database is really bad about which characters appeared in U.S. Acres. They think that The Weasel, Orson's brothers Mort, Wort, Gort, Wade's cousin Fred Duck and Edward R. Furrow appear in every episode of U.S. Acres. They also think that Aloysius Pig appeared in "Thing In The Box"note , and that Imogene Coca played a character on U.S. Acres. note  The only episode whose cast list they got right was "Temp Trouble".
    • IMDb's summary of Kiddie Korner states that the cast was doing Shakespeare at the beginning of the episode. They were actually doing Doctor Zhivago, which is by Boris Pasternak, not Shakespeare. Orson even says both the story's name and author when Aloysius appears to ask what they're doing.
    • One ESL worksheet for the episode "Short Story" called Power Pig "Howard Pig".
    • And of course there's Netflix, they use a generic Garfield cast pic for the title of "Garfield and Friends" which features Garfield, Odie, Nermal, AND Arlene, who is not on the show, aside from a a few cameos, plus toward the end of the series, Garfield had a totally different girlfriend named Penelope.
    • One such incident involving this trope was described on The Garfield and Friends Supapage. One user said that the DVDs would only contain 180 episodes rather than the full 360. note  After mentioning this, Peter says that TV Tome wasn't reliable, as they were rather notable for once having a listing for a Digimon-themed episode of House of Mouse. note 
    • Boomerang's listings for the remaster were rife with these mistakes:
      • Their description of the Screaming with Binky segment "Clown Convention" claims that it is about Binky the Clown attending a clown convention. In the actual quickie, Garfield goes to a phone booth and tries to call someone, only to get Binky the Clown on the other line telling Garfield that he's currently at a clown convention, shattering the glass. On TV airings, it lists said quickie in place of "Dessert In The Desert" in the episode listing.
      • "Five-Minute Warning" is called "Five Minutes Warning".
      • A season 7 episode ("The Horror Hostess; Newsworthy Wade") is placed in between two season 2 episodes: "Mystic Manor; Flop Goes The Weasel; The Legend of Long Jon" and "Lemon Aid; Hog Noon; Video Airlines".
    • On Hulu, the show's episodes are out of order (with some being placed in the wrong seasons) and the titles and plot summaries describe the quickies, not the actual episodes. Additionally, the captions have a few errors, such as Lanolin being referred to as "lamb-lamb" in one episode.
    • The show itself has an in-universe example: in "Wanted: Wade", Wade says that the law label he pulled from the bottom of Orson's couch was from a pillow instead. This confusion also caused several summaries of the episode to make the same statement.
  • The back of the Gargoyles Season 2 Volume 2 DVD set is rife with errors. It describes the gargoyles' awakening in the modern world, mentioning the names of Goliath, Hudson, Broadway, and Lexington, leaving out Brooklyn and Bronx, who were in the same situation. It describes Demona's evil plan from the series finale as though it were the plot of the entire show. And most egregiously, it says that the gargoyles' protectorate is Gotham City.
  • Netflix describes G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero as such: "Fighting for freedom, G.I. Joe and his fellow patriots storm their way through this animated series inspired by popular 1960s action figures." Similar to the toyline and comic books of the series' era, the actual Joe makes no appearance in the series.
  • Gravity Falls:
    • This description from a Polish TV Guide website mistakenly states that the twins' great-uncle is named Sam instead of Stan.
    • In this video from Mabel's Brazilian voice actress, at one point she states that Mabel lives in Gravity Falls, while actually she was just spending her summer there and lives in Piedmont, where she returns to with her brother in the Series Finale. And the video was made after the finale aired.
  • One description for the Hey Arnold! episode "Quantity Time" says that the episode is about Miriam spending time with her father. The episode is actually about Miriam's daughter Helga spending time with her father; Miriam's father never showed up in the series.
  • Take a look at Amazon.com's editorial review for the House of Mouse Christmas DVD, provided by Tami Horiuchi. It contains this statement: "Mickey tries to brighten Donald's glum mood by screening one of his favorite Christmas stories, Mickey's Christmas Carol. When Donald sees himself as Scrooge (literally)..." Anyone who has actually seen Mickey's Christmas Carol can immediately tell what's wrong with that sentence (it's Scrooge McDuck who's playing Scrooge, not Donald!).
  • Hurricanes: Garkos Gorgons goalkeeper Genghis Khan is wrongfully described at this website as a midfielder.
  • On Amazon.com's listing of Invader Zim episodes, three titles are mislabelled:
    • "GIR Goes Crazy and Stuff" became "GIR's Gone Crazy and Stuff".
    • "The Sad, Sad Tale of Chickenfoot" became "The Sad, Sad Story of Chickenfoot".
    • "Battle of the Planets" became "Battle of the Planets of Doom".
    • AT&T U-verse calls Dib "Dub" in the episode description for "Mysterious Mysteries".
  • Another Kids' WB! thing: In a promo for "Crazy Takes" ("bloopers"), a scene from Jackie Chan Adventures showed Ratso wearing a Hsi Wu mask, but an announcer said, "Ratso, that's not your spot! That's the demon sorceror His Wu's spot!"
    • All of which might've been averted by using hanyu pinyin instead of Wade-Giles (though "Xi Wu" is no easier to pronounce visually, "Xi" is less likely to be mistaken for "his").
  • Cracked states that The Jetsons takes place in a post-apocalyptic wasteland because George Jetson jokes that grass is "ancient history". While the movie does show people living above a thick layer of pollution, most episodes of the series (for example, "The Flying Suit" and "Invisibly Yours, George") show the ground below: green grass, blue water, and lots of other plant life. More than likely they misappropriated one line from The Jetsons Meet the Flintstones.
  • The Disney XD Web site for Jimmy Two-Shoes refers to Lucius as the mayor of Miseryville. This is an understandable mistake, however, as Misery Inc. runs the town anyway.
  • This reviewer of Kick Buttowski: Suburban Daredevil constantly calls the titular character's mother Denise instead of Honey, even in his review of the episode where her name is revealed.
  • Kim Possible:
    • An episode summary for "Oh No! Yono!" refers to Hana as Ron's "step sister". She's actually his adopted sister.
    • The box for A Sitch in Time describes a plan by "Shego and her evil henchmen". Though she's Kim's Evil Counterpart and nemesis and conquers the world in the Bad Future, making the villains work for her, Shego is the sidekick of Kim's Arch-Enemy, Dr. Drakken. Also, Drakken is even dismissive towards her in a way he usually isn't in the series.
      • Some sources misspell the title as A Stitch in Time, apparently unfamiliar with Kim's Catchphrase.
  • An in show example in King of the Hill. Where Bobby is interested in reading a fantasy action book in "Full Metal Dust Jacket", Hank takes it away from him because he believes it is an effeminate book due to the fact that the main character on the cover is a woman and the line he read out of context was about dandelions and someone crafting her breast plate.
    • It also didn't help that Bobby has picked out effeminate things in the past. Also the random quotes he would take out of the book seriously did not help his case.
      Bobby: And in the book that is called 'Justice of the Unicorns'."
    • An excerpt from an academic journal quickly became infamous on social media for claiming that Hank Hill's occupation in King of the Hill is "unspecified" (Hank's obsession with his job as a propane salesman is his most defining character trait and brought up practically Once an Episode) and that "the setting suggests a blue collar suburb" when the show is explicitly set in a fictitious Texan town.
  • The Big Cartoon Database listed "Stimey" [sic] as one of the characters in Hanna-Barbera's series of The Little Rascals.
  • Looney Tunes:
    • Mick Martin and Marsha Porter's Video Movie Guide gives incorrect information regarding the direct-to-video special Bugs Bunny's Lunar Tunes. It says that it includes The Hasty Hare, Hare-Way to the Stars, and Mad as a Mars Hare in addition to clips from Duck Dodgers and the 24th and a Half Century, but the special actually doesn't contain Mad as a Mars Hare, and while it is correct that the special only has clips from Duck Dodgers, it also only has clips from the other cartoons mentioned (in fact the special also has clips from many other cartoons). The book also lists the date as 1977 but the special is actually from 1992, and incorrectly refers to Chuck Jones as the sole director (while he did direct most of the cartoons featured as clips, he didn't direct the linking footage, which was directed by Nancy Beiman). The description actually applies to the rarely-seen Bugs Bunny in Space, which is odd since that special has never been released on video or rebroadcast.
    • Another Looney Tunes mistake in the book comes in the entry on Daffy Duck: The Nuttiness Continues, which states that in Duck Amuck, Daffy "gets his just desserts from an animated witch", which does not happen at all in the short. The short finds Daffy getting his just desserts from the unseen animator, who turns out to be Bugs Bunny, and there are no witches in the short. It's possible the authors were thinking of "A Haunting We Will Go" with Witch Hazel, which reuses animation and gags from Duck Amuck, though that cartoon is not included in the video.
    • And the books entry on the Chuck Jones volume of The Golden Age of Looney Tunes mentions that the video includes Porky & Daffy (which was directed by Bob Clampett, not Chuck Jones), when it actually means My Favorite Duck.
    • HBO Max's description for the 1969 short "Rabbit Stew and Rabbits, Too!" incorrectly calls it a Bugs Bunny short, most likely guessing that based on the title. The short's star is Rapid Rabbit, a Composite Character of Bugs Bunny and the Road Runner, who only appeared in that short as the studio closed down before it could become a series.
    • This article documenting the character changes done in Looney Tunes Cartoons gets its facts right (even some obscure ones like Elmer Fudd’s reddish nose from A Wild Hare and Bugs’s yellow gloves from Elmer’s Pet Rabbit) for the most part, but there are two errors:
      • The article claims that Bugs Bunny debuted in A Super Hare (his actual debut was A Wild Hare). Perhaps they confused it with 1943’s Super Rabbit?
      • The article also claims that Sylvester’s changes are brand new; while the yellow eyes are new, his redesign isn’t; it’s based on the design Robert McKimson used for him in his earlier shorts.
  • The Loud House:
    • Some TV listings of the episode "Come Sale Away" call it "Come Sail Away".
    • More than one article and Youtube video has referred to Luna as lesbian. The series actually depicts her as bisexual, as she has shown interest in boys as well as girls.
    • Cablevision's listings for the show claim that Fred Willard, voice of Pop-Pop, is a main actor in the show when he only appears in a few of the episodes. This even happened with the descriptions of Poorly Disguised Pilots for The Casagrandes, as well as an early listing for the show in question, both of which don't even focus on the Louds.
    • Quizzes and other articles on the Italian Nickelodeon website, when referring to Lucy, often use this gif, which actually decipts Lola dressed up as Lucy as seen in the episode "Cover Girls" (the difference should be obvious since she doesn't have Lucy's pale grey skin)
    • An article on an Italian magazine misinterpreted the show's title and stated that "Loud" is the first name of the male sibling (who is actually called Lincoln) instead of the family's last name. Note that the Italian title of the show is "A casa dei Loud"Translation , which makes clear that "Loud" is not an individual, but the article insists to call it "A casa di Loud"Translation .
  • One article reporting on the death of Kevin Meaney claimed that Mad Jack the Pirate ran from 1988 to 1999. The show actually premiered in 1998. It didn't help that the sentence before it mentioned his role in Garfield and Friends, which began in 1988.
  • The Marvelous Misadventures of Flapjack: Sky, a British satellite TV provider, claimed that Flapjack was 'raised in a bubble'. This probably had root in an understandable typo: he was raised by a whale named Bubbie. Someone probably just misread "raised by Bubbie" as "bubble" and went from there. Then again, Flapjack did sometimes reside in Bubbie's mouth... so Accidentally Correct Writing?
  • The Mr. Men Show:
    • The description for episode "Physical" states that Little Miss Sunshine and Mr. Tickle do aerobics class together. The former is actually Little Miss Chatterbox.
    • Also, the poster for its iMDB page is completely fan-made, complete with crappily-drawn Original Characters.
    • The official Mr. Men Little Miss channel has its fair share of blunders, such as confusing episode numbers, messing up episode titles, and in one egregious case, their upload of "Cooking" has a description of a sketch that doesn't even exist.
    • The Mr. Men Wiki entry for the episode "Pets" once claimed that there was an extra segment about Mr. Funny's dog showing tricks to Miss Magic. According to the article, this segment was shown on the initial premiere, but was removed on all reruns after January 21, 2010. This is a complete hoax; not only was there no evidence to back this statement up, but how could a sketch be removed for absolutely no reason? Naturally, as the Mr. Men Wiki is a huge target for vandalism, this false piece of information stayed on the article for a year and a half before finally being removed in May 2018.
  • Noddy series:
    • The former website LocateTV used this image for airings of Make Way For Noddy. It's not an image of the show in question, but one of The Noddy Shop. Some PBS member stations did the same thing when airing promos for the show, running an up next promo for The Noddy Shop that was five or six years old on their airings of Make Way For Noddy despite it mostly showing the puppet characters and only showing Noddy for two seconds.
    • That wasn't the first time PBS Kids would show a promo for the wrong version of one of their shows as an up next promo. Here's the promo some affiliates used for the reboot of Bob the Builder, which actually uses footage from the previous iteration, Ready, Steady, Build!.
      • Speaking of Ready, Steady, Build!, some cable listings for Universal Kids airings of this season of the show listed it as reruns of the reboot, complete with an image of it if said provider used them for their shows.
    • History would repeat itself again when cable provider Cablevision would show the wrong image of Clifford the Big Red Dog for airings of the 2019 Animated Adaptation.
    • RTP 2's description of the 2009 series of Noddy, Noddy In Toyland, is actually the description of The Noddy Shop and uses an image from Noddy's Toyland Adventures. This is somewhat justified, as Noddy In Toyland was the name that the former series went under in Europe.
    • Cablevision airings of Noddy, Toyland Detective use a picture that shows the series' French name "Oui-Oui, enquetes au pays de jouets" when no networks on that provider air that particular dub.
    • The CD CBeebies: The Album uses the theme song to The Noddy Shop rather than the theme song to the series that the channel aired at the time, Noddy's Toyland Adventures. This is because most of the tracks on that CD had already come from an earlier album by the same distributor, All Together Now: Children's Favourite TV Themes, which was released when The Noddy Shop still aired on British TV.
    • This website article published in 2017 says that Noddy airs on PBS. While this is true of the DVD being promoted, which is from an incarnation that did air on PBS, the plush doll is from Noddy, Toyland Detective, which airs on Universal Kids.
  • While Patrick McHale still felt honored, he expressed confusion on Twitter on how Over the Garden Wall was on a list made by Indie Wire for new, independent horror films to watch on Halloween. Disregarding it being only a couple years old (while the rest of the entries were released in 2016), it was produced for a major, mainstream TV channel that is part of one of the biggest media companies on the planet, barely qualifies as being an example of Defanged Horrors, and is a miniseries rather than a film.
  • In The Complete Guide to Prime Time & Cable Shows entry for Ozzy & Drix it lists "Professor Nightmare" as one of the show's Villains Of The Week. Professor Nightmare is actually what he calls himself in the superhero-themed dream where Hector battles him; in the credits for "The Dream Factory," he's referred to simply as "the Dark Horror."
  • In June 2020, multiple news sources claimed that PAW Patrol was getting canceled in wake of the death of George Floyd because Chase, the show's canine protagonist, is a police dog. This is actually a misunderstanding of a controversy involving the show's social media platforms where they went dark in honor of the aforementioned incident and people called them out on it. The worst thing that happened to the show because of the incident was the removal of two Ultimate Rescue episodes where the dogs get Chase's abilities.
    • The same articles also claim that "All Dogs Go To Heaven Except For Those Class Traitors In The PAW Patrol" was a phrase invented in response to said social media post. It wasn't, as it was originally a reply to a Twitter post from February 2020 where a teenage girl claimed her little brother was banned from watching the show because the main character was a police dog.
  • In the past, whenever Sirius Satellite Radio's kids' music station played a song from PB&J Otter, it would misspell the show's title as "P B & Jotter".
  • Peanuts:
    • In one of Jeff Lenberg's animation books, he begins talking about the Peanuts movie Snoopy, Come Home, and says the plot of the film is Snoopy being depressed from there being too many "No Dogs Allowed" signs, and Snoopy decides to commit suicide.
    • The original VHS cover of It's Christmastime Again, Charlie Brown stated that Charlie Brown was trying to buy a present for the little red-haired girl, when in the actual special, it was in fact for a completely different character named Peggy Jean. This was most likely caused by the fact that the special depicted Peggy Jean as a redhead rather than a brunette as she was in the strip.
  • Phineas and Ferb:
    • This Allmovie.com summary of the episode "Lawn Gnome Beach Party of Terror!" calls the stepbrother main characters "twins." Not to mention, the majority of that author's other summaries for the show just glisten with this trope, including misspelling Doofenshmirtz's name, calling the boys' band a Boy Band, and claiming that anyone who sings "Happy Birthday" to Doof will become hypnotized. The hypnotism bit was probably the writer's misinterpretation of "Raging Bully", where it actually is Doofenshmirtz's birthday and he invents a hypnosis-inator.
    • "Doofenschmirtz" is an incredibly common misspelling, so much so that it actually appears in the official Disney encyclopedia.
    • Disney XD in the United Kingdom seemingly can't decide whether Phineas and Ferb are brothers or best friends.
    • This lyrics page for the Phineas and Ferb song Squirrels in my Pants (S.I.M.P) incorrectly states the Black Eyed Peas did the song, when it was actually 2 Guys n the Parque who did it.
    • Many descriptions of the series, including an old one from Netflix Instant ("Phineas and Ferb stay one step ahead in hiding their crazy inventions from their mom, and making sure their bratty sister has the worst summer ever!"), describe the boys as deliberately annoying Candace or purposely hiding what they do from their mom, rather than annoying Candace largely by accident and having their inventions disappear due to odd coincidences before their mom can see them.
    • Netflix refers to Roger Doofenshmirtz as being elected "governor" in their "Hail Doofania!" summary, whereas he is actually elected mayor in that episode.
    • Some descriptions of the episodes "Tri-Stone Area", "Doof Dynasty", "Steampunx", and "Excaliferb" claim the episodes involve time travel when they're just cases of Something Completely Different.
  • On the character section of Pingu's English, the abominable snowman Bajoo is referred to as "Monster".
  • In this video promoting the The Powerpuff Girls (2016) toys, Professor Utonium is called "Professor Plutonium".
    • The Storymaker Playsets have the Derbytantes among the villains, even though they made a Heel–Face Turn in their very first appearance.
  • In an animation encyclopedia's entry on The Raccoons, Cyril Sneer the pink aardvark is called a "pink wolf." (A sidenote oddly then mentions that he "looks like an aardvark.")
  • Thanks to a VHS having her name as "Moonglo", many Rainbow Brite fans write Moonglow's name that way.
  • IMDb's Rated "A" for Awesome credits mistakenly call Mr. Twitchy "Twitchy Abby" because of a typo in the credits of one episode where the comma between Twitchy and Abby (both voiced by Tabitha St. Germain) is missing.
  • On a few TV listings for Recess, Miss Finster is described as being the gang's fourth-grade teacher. She's actually only the monitor for recess and lunch (and later becomes their fifth-grade teacher), while Miss Grotke's their fourth-grade teacher. Considering that the latter doesn't appear often in promotional material, this mistake had to be made sooner or later.
    • A few summaries for the series say that T.J. is "the brains" of the group. In the show, he's really only this when it comes to his schemes. Otherwise...not exactly.
    • Walmart's online listing for Recess: School's Out lists it as Recess: The Movie: School's Out
    • A few listings for the show have claimed that it was created by Klasky-Csupo. While the show's creators, Paul Germain and Joe Ansolabehere, are former K-C employees, K-C did not create Recess.
    • Some websites say that the show originated from Disney Channel. Recess premiered on ABC.
    • Sky's TV listing for "Bonky Fever" stated that Gus didn't want to give up his favorite childhood toy. In the episode itself, it's Mikey, not Gus.
  • Netflix strikes again! The description for the Regular Show episode "Jinx" says: "In what could be well be the most powerful public service annoucement about the dangers of jinxing, Mordecai gets jinxed. And it does not go well." It's actually Rigby who gets jinxed. (By Mordecai, no less.)
    • Canadian cable TV provider Telus's description for the show when Cartoon Network Canada added it to their On Demand service claims that Pops is Mordecai and Rigby's boss and has lived there his whole life. Benson is their boss.
  • The official Adult Swim description for the Rick and Morty episode "The Ricks Must Be Crazy" says that Rick forgets to check his oil and needs to fix his car. Rick's oil is never mentioned in the episode; it's his microverse battery that is having trouble. It also said Morty was twelve, when he's actually fourteen. While it's only two years off, the DVD Commentary for "Raising Gazorpazorp" has a segment where it talks about how S&P believed it and had issues with the episode as a result.
    • Quite a few cable guides at one point described the show's premise as "A father suddenly appears at his adult daughter’s doorstep, 20 years after disappearing". That's... a single detail regarding the first episode, and while technically true, doesn't really explain anything about what the show is about and makes it sound like a Lifetime Original Movie if anything. Interestingly the iTunes listing features the same description but at least adds a sentence explaining that Rick is a sociopathic Mad Scientist, which does a better job at describing the series.
  • Jerry Beck goes on record as saying he made a mistake about how the 1966 Road Runner cartoon "Chaser On The Rocks" ended. In the book he co-wrote on the roster of Warner Bros. cartoons, he stated that it ended with the coyote shot out of a cannon and heads towards the horizon, colliding with the sun. When numerous people pointed out that this was wrong, he re-watched the cartoon (which he hated) again. Mr. Beck recants his original ending on his Cartoon Research blog.
  • A TV guide summarises the Rocko's Modern Life episode "Bye Bye Birdie" as "Heffer sits on Filburt's budgie"... Even though it's a Myna Bird.
  • This poster featuring inspiring quotes from cartoon characters misattributes the line "A baby's gotta do what a baby's gotta do" to Chuckie Finster from Rugrats. They got the show right, but it was Tommy Pickles, not Chuckie Finster, who said that linenote .
    • If you Google search Rugrats as a whole, you'll notice that Google's description of the show misquotes Angelica's catchphrase as "You stupid babies!" instead of "You dumb babies!" (Which is especially glaring as Angelica practically says her catchphrase Once per Episode.)
    • An early version of the entry for This Very Wiki's trivia section for the show claimed that "Vacation" was never released to DVD, but was then changed to reflect that this really wasn't the case, as the episode has had 3 separate DVD releases.
  • IMDB claims that Sagwa, the Chinese Siamese Cat ended in 2004. It actually ended in 2002.
  • She-Ra and the Princesses of Power:
    • The Other Wiki briefly had the show listed as "She-Ra and the Princess of Power" instead of She-Ra and the Princesses of Power.
    • This article released a day before the show premiered said that Noelle Stevenson worked on Steven Universe. She has never worked on that series or even at Cartoon Network, with all her previous animation credits being at Disney Television Animation.
    • One of the show's tie-in books misspells Glimmer's name as "Glitter" on one page.
    • A December 7, 2019 article at Screenrant referred to Hordak as "Hordak Junior" and Horde Prime as "Hordak Prime".
  • The makers of this UK promo for Sonic Boom seem to be under the impression that Boom is Sonic's last name.
  • The South Park Studios synopsis for "City Sushi" claims that "The boys want to help Butters find out what's really happening to him", but the main four boys don't do anything in this episode; this episode focused solely on Butters. This is especially damning because South Park Studios is the official website for the show and its creators. Whoops.
  • German TV programmes advertise Star Wars: The Clone Wars episode "Duel of the Droids" as Count Dooku having a duel with Asajj Ventress and giving her the mission to kill Anakin Skywalker. In reality this is a complete summary of a 3-minute episode from Star Wars: Clone Wars. Such summaries exist for episodes 1 and 4 to 8. One wonders how they could do a false summary, two correct ones and they a bunch of false ones again.
  • Steven Universe:
    • The official Italian Cartoon Network website and Facebook page often refer to Garnet as "Rodolite", which was apparently going to be her name in the Italian dub... which actually still calls her Garnet.
    • This article, while otherwise good, claims that Steven shattered Bismuth. In the actual episode, he refused to shatter her or anyone else, though he did end up impaling her with a sword... which didn't actually harm her gem at all. The article does draw a distinction between shattering and poofing later on.
    • Some listings for Steven Universe episodes on IceTV in Australia call Rose Quartz "Rosie Quartz". A listing for the episodes "Sadie's Song" and "Too Far" described the series thus: "When Steven inherits his mother's position as a gemstone-based being, he acquires a set of powers he must now learn how to control. Steven is the half-human, half-gem son of Rosie Quartz, the leader of the Crystal Gems, and now he must learn to live in both worlds."
    • Cartoon Network's official Twitter referred to the other Gems shapeshifting into Steven in the episode "Steven Tag" as "Fusions", when Steven himself has fused with many of the Gems and they looked completely different.
  • Some Web sites claim the Stunt Dawgs were stunt "dogs". They're actually humans with a pet dog named "Human".
  • One commercial for the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (2012) toy line has Slash working with the Foot Clan. Slash would never work with the Foot Clan, even when he was a villain. (He was brainwashed to work for Shredder in one episode, but it was very short-lived, and only after Slash had otherwise undergone a Heel–Face Turn.)
  • PBS' description for the Thomas the Tank Engine episode, "Too Many Fire Engines" states that, "Belle thinks he's not needed after inspectors question the need for two fire engines and Flynn beats him to two fires in a row." In the actual episode, it's Flynn who thinks he isn't needed, as Belle beats him to two fires in a row. Also in the description, Belle is referred to as the opposite gender.
  • The VUDU description for the Teen Titans Go! episode "Serious Business" has the description for "Man Person" instead of the actual description for the episode in question.
    • When Cartoon Network brought back re-runs of the original Teen Titans to the schedule, some TV providers mistakenly classified episodes of the original series as Teen Titans Go! episodes. Two episodes that had this happen were "Nevermore" and "Final Exam". It also sometimes happened the other way around: a re-run of "The Academy" was labeled as a Teen Titans episode despite said listing being for the one short itself and not a 30-minute show. This mislabeling also happened a few times during the President's Day 2020 marathon. For instance, TitanTV (which has no relation to the show) labeled "My Name Is Jose" as being an episode of the original Teen Titans.
    • UK TV listings accidentally misspell the title of the episode "Nean" as "Neon".
    • Some cable providers in North America list "Throne of Bones" and "BBCYFSHIPBDAY!" as two-parters, while other cable providers cannot seem to not remember the correct episode title for Tower Power, with them listing it as either "Power Tower" or "Tower of Power". UK listings tend to run into the former problem a lot, with one example being the episode "Lication".
    • Some TV providers list the OK K.O.! Let's Be Heroes episode "Crossover Nexus", which features the Teen Titans among other Cartoon Network Characters, as a Teen Titans Go! episode.
    • Another common mistake, which has also appeared several times on This Very Wiki, is that some believe that "TTG vs. PPG" is an episode of The Powerpuff Girls (2016), but it's actually a Teen Titans Go! episode. Not helping matters is the fact that it's rarely shown, leading some to think that it's an episode of the former.
    • The episode "Hey You, Don't Forget About Me In Your Memory" is sometimes called "Hey You, Don't Neglect Me In Your Memory" by TV providers, not knowing the fact that it was named after the theme song from The Breakfast Club. In addition, an hour-long block on the UK feed of Cartoon Network called the same episode "Hey You, Don't You Forget About Me In Your Memory".
    • "Justice League's Next Top Talent Idol Star" and its' sequel often tend to be mixed up by TV guides. When the sequel was about to air the alternate ending edition, online TV guide TitanTV said that the original episode was airing instead.
    • Some fans call the Crossover with Young Justice "Serious Business" instead of "Let's Get Serious". "Serious Business" is the bathroom episode of the show.
    • IMDB once claimed that the episode Ricky Jay guest-starred in was "In And Out". His guest role actually happened in "The Date".
    • Google uses the description of "The Spice Game" for their listing of "The Dignity Of Teeth".
    • In a similar vein to the "Sweet Victory" example above, many sites claim that "The Night Begins To Shine" was originally written for Teen Titans Go. The song is from a stock music library and actually pre-dates the episode it was first featured in by a decade.
    • This parents' guide for Teen Titans Go! To the Movies calls Beast Boy a gnome.
    • The Netflix description for "Caged Tiger; Nose Mouth" was once the one for "Laundry Day; Dude Relax!".
  • The Sky TV guide's summary for El Tigre: The Adventures of Manny Rivera claims that El Tigre is Manny's secret identity. Anyone who actually watched the show would know that it's not a secret.
  • You'd think that having distinct personalities and costumes would make the Toon Patrol weasels exempt from this, but apparently to some people, if it's a weasel and it's Disney, they're "the weasels from Roger Rabbit".
  • When Cartoon Network and Netflix distributed Total Drama, Pahkitew Island was listed as Season 6, despite it being the second half of Season 5. Likewise, The Ridonculous Race was labeled Season 7, despite it being a spin-off of Total Drama.
    • For Total DramaRama, some network providers, such as Spectrum, say that Carter Hayden (Noah) and Peter Oldring (Cody) are involved with the spin-off, even though they were replaced with Cory Doran and Wyatt White, respectively. Also, some episodes used the generic description for The Ridonculous Race.
  • In 2011, ComicsAlliance did an infographic that allegedly featured all the Autobots from The Transformers listing their alternate modes (original post gone, but a mirror of the pic can be found here). The thing features a bunch of errors and weirdness: multiple altmodes are misidentified (Sunstreaker is listed as being a 1994 Lamborghini Countach even though the show is from 1984 for example) and multiple characters have the wrong pictures for their robot modes, alternate modes, or both (The picture for Bumblebee is actually his upgraded form Goldbug, while Goldbug is a fanart of Bumblebee as a newer model of Volkswagen Beetle; Ratchet and Blurr's altmodes are the ones from their Transformers Animated namesakes; Grapple and Rollbar are shown with their designs from more modern toys instead of their original G1 designs; Optimus Prime's altmode is the one from the live-action movies; Huffer, Windcharger and Beachcomber's robot modes are fanart redesigns; Wheelie's altmode is a fanart of "Wheelimus Prime"; Chromedome is lineart of a custom toy based on Energon Downshift and, most baffling, Rodimus Prime is actually a red recolor of stock art for Armada Optimus Prime)
  • A Hungarian TV guide description for the show Transformers: Prime appears to be asserting that the titular Transformers are weapons used by the Autobots and Decepticons, when of course they themselves are the Transformers.
    • A commercial that aired during the summer on The Hub themselves (now Discovery Family) had a teenager make a rousing speech about not giving up on their summer break. At one point, he says "Did the Transformers give up when they fought the Decepticons?" Considering that Decepticons are Transformers themselves, that's the equivalent of saying "Did the humans give up when the Nazis invaded Europe?".
  • Comcast's website describes Transformers: Robots in Disguise (2015) as "An animated series in which armies of intergalactic robots battle." Most of the show's battles are between a team of four or five Autobots and one Decepticon, with the maximum amount of Decepticons engaged in combat being five. note 
  • The TV Guide description for qubo's VeggieTales is "Bob and Larry receive letters from kids". That badly describes the first five minutes of some of the episodes; other episodes lack this element entirely, and it's not the focus of the series.
  • The Canadian TV provider Bell ExpressVu used to describe The Venture Bros. as, "Two teens live as though it is the 1960s even though they are 21st century teens!" The only good thing about this description is that the awkwardness of the sentence structure distracts you from the head-scratching description.
    • That's probably because "If Arthur Schopenhauer had written Jonny Quest" wouldn't make sense to most of the viewing public.
  • According to the blurb on the 2004 DVD release of Visionaries, the series takes place on a post-apocalyptic Earth. It actually takes place on the planet Prysmos, though it does involve an apocalypse in the form of a total technological breakdown at the beginning of the first episode.
  • Wacky Races:
    • The Polish video game magazine Secret Service, issue April 1998. In one article, the author claimed that Wacky Races is a crossover show where "Hanna-Barbera characters such as Yogi, Huckleberry and The Addams Family" do racing. Either the author didn't see even one episode of the show, or (more likely) he has seen it, but mistook Blubber Bear for Yogi Bear and the Gruesome Twosome for the Addamses. Or maybe he just got it confused with Fender Bender 500.
    • Speaking of Wacky Races, Jerry Beck, a renowned animation historian, claims in his book The Hanna-Barbera Treasury that The Perils of Penelope Pitstop "featured the Ant Hill Mob as her chief rival", when they were in fact her protectors on the show. Jeff Lenberg's Encyclopedia of Animated Cartoons first said it was about a global race between Penelope and the Hooded Claw before being amended in a later edition.
  • There's an alternative ending to the first Wile E. Coyote and the Road Runner cartoon that the Latin American press is raving about, claiming that the ending was funded by a Japanese millionaire who was tired of the Coyote always being the Butt-Monkey. The frame rate is obviously a drop from the real footage, the animation is basically a cut-and-paste of the Road Runner and Coyote's poses rearranged and assembled, and there's the gratuitous use of O Fortuna. But the kicker has to be the Coyote holding up a sign with the name of the new ending's creator on it for absolutely no reason. How the news media have not picked up on these is inexplicable.
  • Nick Jr., in its advertising for Wonder Pets!, once referred to Linny as a hamster. Linny is a guinea pig and this error has itself been Lamp Shaded on the program itself. This sort of mistake isn't uncommon for eBay listings of merchandise of this character either — a couple listings even refer to her as a hedgehog.
  • This Very Wiki once claimed that Mr. Highpants from Yakkity Yak was an Expy of Peppermint Larry from The Marvelous Misadventures of Flapjack, despite the fact that Yakkity Yak was released five years before Flapjack.
  • The book based on the Fancy Nancy episode "Nancy Takes The Case" credits the episode to Laurie Israel when the episode was actually written by Matt Hoverman.
  • The Chilean TV magazine TV grama had a section that mentioned the children's programming highlights of the week in order to advertise a cable company. The description for each featured show were very inaccurate. They stated that Cow and Chicken lived in a stable and sometimes they summarized the premise as "Cow loves his younger brother Chicken, but doesn't understand why he tries to stifle her"; They confused Goosebumps with Are You Afraid of the Dark?; they described Legends of the Hidden Temple as an actual adventure series rather than a game show, and so on. Also, at the end of the shorter descriptions it always said "check the new episodes of this animated series", regardless if the statement fits at all.


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