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Cool Old Guys in real life.


  • John Quincy Adams was nicknamed "Old Man Eloquent" and served as a member of the House of Representatives and an antislavery advocate until his death at the age of 81. He actually died inside the Capitol Building after suffering a cerebral hemorrhage.
  • For a non-human example, the Russian Tupolev Tu-95 Bear bomber. These propeller-driven planes were manufactured by the Soviets in the 1950s, and despite the advent of seemingly superior jet fighters and bombers, they're still enough of a threat to be escorted by fighters when the Bears stray into foreign airspace, and as of 2015, they finally got a chance to show off how powerful they still were against ISIS in the middle east.
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  • Konrad Adenauer. He had been retired for years, hunted by the Nazis, many times imprisoned, financially broke, and 73 years old when he got elected Chancellor of (West) Germany, supported by all large parties except Communists. Stood for 14 years, throughout the worst of the Cold War, rebuilt the state administration of Germany by himself, practically from scratch, initiated the reparations agreement between Germany and Israel, helped secure the release of the last German POWs from the USSR, and above all gained the entrance of Germany in the nuclear club during the 1950s. It takes some diplomatic hype to ask the cooperation of former enemies in this matter barely 10 years after the War.
  • Kheyr ed-Din, a.k.a. "Barbarossa" (not to be confused with the Holy Roman Emperor Frederick I), was a Barbary pirate who was still fighting sea-battles in his eighties - and kicking righteous ass, too.
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  • Genghis Khan was still commanding his armies at age 72. Considering the average human lifespan at the time, that's pretty impressive.
  • King Bhumibol Adulyadej, Rama IX of Thailand. Until his death he simultaneously was the world's oldest, richest, and longest-reigning monarch, led his country to democracy in the 1990s, and was really the one stable constant in Thailand's notoriously shaky political system (the man has seen sixteen governments go by without a single change to his own office). He also was the only monarch in the world to hold a patent (on a water aerator and some rainmaking devices) and an accomplished saxophonist.
  • Fred Astaire took up skateboarding in his seventies and was awarded a life membership in the National Skateboard Society. At the age of 78, he broke his wrist while practicing in his driveway. His comment: "Gene Kelly warned me not to be a damned fool, but I'd seen the things those kids got up to on television doing all sorts of tricks. What a routine I could have worked up for a film sequence if they had existed a few years ago."
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  • Tony Benn. An ever-present figure in British politics from his start in 1950 until his death in 2014. Even after retiring from Parliament in 2001, had a talk with Ali G once. Mourned throughout the political spectrum.
  • Tom Bergeron, host of The Hollywood Squares, Dancing with the Stars and America's Funniest Home Videos. He's known for being very laid back and "un-Hollywood" off camera.
  • David Attenborough is cool enough to go down a hundred feet in a submarine or climb a 100-foot tree while pushing 90, all while maintaining a dapper composure that few men half his age could muster.
  • William Shatner and Leonard Nimoy. Kirk and Spock. Also best friends in real life (albeit starting long after their most famous roles—chiefly because Shatner had been a tremendous dick professionally in the series, but Nimoy helped him come to terms with that and make peace with the rest of the Star Trek cast). And despite being well into their eighties, both are still very active in the Star Trek fandom and the media as a whole (that is, before Nimoy died in 2015).
  • Former Emperor Heisei of Japan (birth name Akihito, but rarely referred to as such in the country) pretty much built his image on being the “gentle, lovable grandpa”, improving the PR of the imperial family to the point of almost universal adoration domestically after his rather controversial father. He visited earthquake sites and made a point to speak with the people at eye level, his favorite food was said to be a simple curry rice, and changed the image of the emperor from a formal, untouchable figure to a person of the people.
  • Winston Churchill: Because He Never Surrenders.
  • Dick Clark. Until his stroke, he still looked so untouched by age that he epitomized his "World's Oldest Living Teenager" nickname.
  • Jacques Cousteau, the great aquatic explorer who seemed like the Ancient Mariner himself in his documentaries.
  • Walter Cronkite, "The Most Trusted Man in America". Uncle Walter not only brought us "the way it is" night after night but was a long-time race car driver and expert sailor.
  • Clint Eastwood is the personification of this trope. At 80-ish years old, he's still awesome, is a Memetic Badass, still makes some of the best movies in Hollywood (now more often as the director rather than an actor, with a distinctive visual style and a good reputation for finishing ahead of schedule and always within budget), and still has a great attitude. As a licensed pilot, he apparently still sometimes flies his own helicopter to the studio to avoid traffic. He's a veteran of the Korean War and is a former lifeguard. He's also a Friend to All Living Things and has long been involved with animal rescue efforts in California, and he and his wife take care of several rescued animals that they've adopted on their ranch. He's also got a talent for music, and in particular is an aficionado of jazz (and his son Kyle is a renowned jazz musician in his own right), as well as Country Music. He's also been known to practice meditation every morning since the 1970s. And he can still kick your ass easily.
  • Roger Ebert (RIP). Although he died at 70 in 2013, not all that old by today's standards, he battled cancer for the last decade of his life, and lost his voice to it... but still published movie reviews almost to the end. The fact that his reviews contained equal parts Deadpan Snarker and Sophisticated as Hell, and even coined a few tropes along the way certainly helped.
  • Donald Fagen and Walter Becker. Fagen still is, though Becker passed in 2017.
  • The Reverend Lionel Fanthorpe. Anglican priest, member of Mensa, former writer of Extruded Book Products (which made him a figure of minor legend in the UK SF scene), dan-grade martial artist and weightlifter, biker, investigator of anomalous phenomena. All carried out with an enormous zest for life and a great sense of humor. Your only problem, if you're lucky enough to meet him, will be getting him to stop talking...
  • Tim Gunn. To the point where Congress recently declared him a national treasure.
  • Benjamin Franklin was this by the time of the Revolutionary War.
  • Morgan Freeman. Because, you know, he's God.
  • James Harrison, the "man with the golden arm." His unique blood donations have saved approximately 2 million babies' lives, and at 74 he's still donating a pint of blood as often as he can.
  • Jerry Goldsmith.
  • Mark Hamill is an avid comic book fan since childhood and has voiced everybody's favourite clown psychopath for twenty-odd years now.
  • Werner Herzog. Among other achievements, his most recent documentary required him to climb around in a cave with his camera crew, someone once drove by and shot him with a BB gun and he just laughed it off.
  • Sammo Hung. A legendary action superstar (and friends with Jackie Chan and Yuen Biao) in Hong Kong action cinema. What's even more impressive is that this former Peking Opera player turned actor doesn't seem to get any thinner, but could still go toe-to-toe with the likes of much younger action stars such as Donnie Yen and Wu Jing.
  • Samuel L. Jackson.
  • Lloyd Kaufman, who's been making truly independent films for about forty years, and, at 65, he definitely hasn't softened.
  • A 63-year-old man named Fred Kemp protected himself and his wife from a robber by getting him in a rear-naked choke.
  • Sir Christopher Lee: Just read the article; actor, commando, secret agent,note  heavy-metal singer. That's right—heavy metal singer. At age 87. And it's epic metal about Charlemagne - to whom Lee could actually trace direct lineage, at that. And then, at age 90, he participated in another heavy metal album, this one focusing on CHRISTMAS SONGS. You truly have not lived until you hear Dracula/Count Dooku/Saruman singing "Little Drummer Boy" to the sound of heavy metal. On top of that, he released ANOTHER heavy metal album on his 91st birthday in 2013. He passed away in 2015 but remains an inspiration to many.
    • Being Saruman the White AND Dracula.
    • Did his own stunts in the Star Wars prequels, used a stunt double only when he was supposed to run.
  • Stan Lee, as the image on this page indicates. Lee, who created most of the Marvel Universe, hands down, not only continued to be involved in creating comic books until his death in 2018 at 95, but it became traditional for him to make cameo appearances in movies and TV shows based upon his works. In 20 years, there were only a couple of films and shows in which he failed to appear. He also continued to be a much in demand elder statesman at comic book conventions. If anything, his legendary youthful optimism seemed to have increased over the years.
  • Kurt Loder for MTV News. Granted he was only 42 when he began to work for MTV, but that was still twice as old as even the second oldest on-screen MTV personality. Despite this, he's actually MTV's longest-serving personality because of his trustworthiness and popularity with the young adult crowd.
  • Most of the stalwart staff of MAD magazine is pretty well up there but still turning out some top-notch parody. This includes Sergio Aragonés (born 1937), Dick DeBartolo (born 1945), and Al Jaffee (born 1921). In particular, Jaffee was acknowledged by the Guinness Book of World Records as the longest continuously working cartoonist in 2016, having worked in the field since 1942.
  • Nelson Mandela, until his health finally failed in the last months of his life.
  • William Marshal. He had multiple chances to seize a throne for himself but his honor and loyalty were stronger than the temptation of power. He also suffered from terminal levels of badassery. His most dramatic moment was the battle of Lincoln, as he put down the rebellion against young Henry III (William was Regent). He led the charge against the rebels and fought in the streets until he captured the enemy commanders, with three dents in his quarter-inch-thick steel helm from the fighting. Not bad considering he was 73 at the time. Immediately after that he rode to Dover and stopped the invading French forces there and negotiated a peace.
  • Michael McDonald. (02/12/1952 - present); 5-time Grammy Award-winning singer and songwriter who has worked with Steely Dan and The Doobie Brothers.
  • Shigeru Miyamoto. It's hard to find a picture of him where he's not grinning his ass off with that youthful sparkle of creativity in his eye, and he's in his sixties.
  • Paul Newman. Aside from being a beloved actor, philanthropist, World War II Pacific veteran, and all-around great guy, he was still racing cars in his seventies.
  • Don Pardo. Kept rockin' the opening announcements for Saturday Night Live until he died in 2014 at NINETY-FIVE.
  • Ron Graham- mathematician and former circus performer who managed to work out a number so big that if you tried to mentally envision it in its entirety your head would collapse into a black hole. Also still doing trampoline somersaults and juggling pins in his eighties.
  • The late John Peel fit this trope when he got older. He never settled into a routine of playing his old favorites on another radio station; even up until the very end, he kept his Radio 1 gig of playing new, upcoming acts and making sure that if a demo tape/CD was good enough, it'd be played on his program, regardless of whether the artist was signed or unsigned.
  • Prince Philip, Queen Elizabeth's husband. Still grills at the age of 90, flew over 5,000 pilot hours by the time he turned 70.
  • Former US president Ronald Reagan. After being shot, he was wheeled into the hospital...and was still calmly cracking jokes.
  • Former US president Theodore Roosevelt. Not only was he a Memetic Badass during his life, but he was also once shot before giving a campaign speech (a copy of his speech and his eyeglass case in his breast pocket likely saved him). Once the assailant was arrested, Roosevelt gave his speech, which lasted 90 minutes, before accepting medical attention.
  • Both Jimmy Carter and George H. W. Bush have cultivated this image in their post-presidency. Carter became an award-winning peace activist who started disease-eradication programs that saved countless lives and builds homes for the poor during his free time. Until shortly before his death in 2018, Bush Sr. appeared at public events with colorful ties and socks while also taking up the hobby of skydiving despite his old age. Ironically, both left office with dismal approval ratings yet are now highly revered by people of all political backgrounds.
  • His Excellency, General and President George Washington was a Memetic Badass within his own lifetime and has continued to be ever since. He survived near-death experiences on the battlefield and rallied the troops to keep fighting for independence. Later, the inability of the first Congress to pay the troops' long-overdue salaries in the aftermath of the war created a situation where angry troops wanted to overthrow Congress and many wanted to convince Washington to lead this coup and become a military dictator, which would have crushed American freedom in its infancy. George Washington refused and successfully convinced his troops to relent. By doing so, Washington saved the early American republic (for the second time, considering the fact that his military leadership had preserved it during the Revolution), and became the Cincinnatus. Years later, he became the first President and set another important precedent by stepping down after two terms (becoming the Cincinnatus a second time), a precedent followed by all following Presidents except FDR. The early Americans were well aware of Washington's status as "the American Cincinnatus", and one of the first veterans' associations in the United States was named the Society of the Cincinnati in recognition of this fact. This is also where the name of Cincinnati, Ohio comes from. Even Washington's archnemesis, King George III of the United Kingdom, readily admitted that by giving up power, Washington would deserve the title of greatest man then-currently alive. That's right, Washington was so badass that his own archnemesis couldn't deny it.
  • Mr. Warmth, Don Rickles. He died at age 90 and up until his passing, he could still kick all those younger standup comedians and insult comics around the curb.
  • The late Fred Rogers, Friend to All Children and beloved by generations of television viewers.
    • Rogers might well be an uber-example; make fun of him on a site like, say, 4chan - generally regarded as the cesspool of the Internet - and the only reason you will not be banned on the spot is that they will thoroughly trash you first. On 4chan. Can't get much cooler than that...
  • The late Scatman John. Not only did he have to overcome his severe speech impediment (during the height of his success, journalists commented that interviews were difficult due to his constant stuttering), he achieved global success with his numerous dance singles. Did we mention that he was releasing dance songs at the age of 54? While not by any means ancient, at the time dance mixes were something almost exclusively created by the younger generation. Worth noting is said speech impediment invariably contributed to his success.
  • Socrates became something of a youth idol in his time, despite being over forty when he began his "gadfly of Athens" phase, to the point that the main charge that led to his execution was "corrupting the youthnote ." (Athenian law was more... flexible.)
  • Charlie Watts deserves special mention for making a decades-long marriage, clean living and jazz drumming look cool for 50-plus years.
  • Keeping to music, David Bowie was this since he marked his 50th birthday with an all-star concert at Madison Square Garden in 1997, but then he released The Next Day in 2013, which was his first album in nearly 10 years and international success with critics and music buyers. He followed it up with his swan song album Blackstar in 2016, released two days before his death and recorded with the full knowledge of his impending death with the track and video to the song "Lazarus" being his final farewell to his fans.
  • Jim Steranko. Instantly recognizable at any comic book convention in his double-breasted suits, tinted aviator glasses, and wave of silver hair, Steranko continues a lifetime of being a Cool Guy, having been an escape artist, early rock-n-roll musician, ground-breaking comics artist, and collaborator of Spielberg, Lucas, and Coppola. In a recent interview, he revealed that he only sleeps two hours a day and only eats one meal of raw fruits and vegetables. Interviewer Jonathan Ross asked him, "You know how mad that makes you sound?" He replied, "Yeah, I don't give a damn." Ross concludes his article by expounding, "I believe it when he tells me he still runs miles every day, pumps iron, and fornicates blissfully like a man a third his age." He also lived every comic fans' dream of clapping Bob Kane in the face for screwing over Bill Finger and Jerry Robinson.
  • Sir Patrick Stewart, along with his good friend Sir Ian McKellen. Although they were both Shakespearean actors with long careers, they really only got to know each other well in the 2000s (when they first played together, in the X-Men films)—and promptly found that they actually got along together rather well, much to the delight of their (mostly much-younger) fans. They've embraced technology and interesting roles, as well as keeping up their friendship and keeping the world posted on it via the Internet.
  • Tamerlane/Temur Lang/Timur Lenk, the fourteenth-century conqueror. Absolutely brutal, but notable for surviving being a great, empire-building conqueror, outliving two and a half (the third son suffered crippling brain damage) of his four sons. When he was about seventy, his favorite grandson stalled out invading India, so he rode out and gave the kid a hand, sacked Delhi, and went back to Qandahar. He died at seventy-four in the process of gearing up to invade China. And he probably would have won, too.
  • Nobuo Uematsu. Singlehandedly wrote and composed ALL the Final Fantasy songs from FFI to FFX. Is also in a metal band called the Black Mages.
  • Norio Wakamoto definitely counts amongst the Seiyuu circles.
  • Many dub voice actors for anime are both old and beloved among their fans, including Wendee Lee (54), Jamieson Price (53), Michael Mcconnohie (63), and Steve Blum (54), who spearheaded the "#BringBackToonami" movement.
    • The same goes for many veteran voice actors for cartoons, including Frank Welker (71 as of June 2017), Rob Paulsen (61), Jim Cummings (64) and Phil Lamarr, who just turned 50 this year. Not only are they well-known and loved by fans and have built respectable careers out of doing what they love, but serve as mentors to their younger colleagues, as well.
  • Tom Waits is over 60 years old, yet has lost none of his grizzled, husky-voiced charm.
  • The one, the only Sir Terry Wogan. For ages, the only reason many tuned into the Eurovision Song Contest, and his radio audience transcended age boundaries (which is why there's a "TYG/Terry's Young Geezers" counterpart to the "TOG/Terry's Old Geezers" fanbase). He too broke new artists on his Radio 2 program, from Katie Melua to the late Eva Cassidy to Jamie Cullum.
  • Tsutomu Yamaguchi, a Japanese businessman who lived to be 93, having survived the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings in 1945.
  • Kirk Douglas is old enough to have a son who also qualifies for this list, and Kirk is, at the time of this writing, the oldest surviving (and highest-ranked) star on the AFI's Top 100 Classic Stars, celebrated his 102nd birthday in 2018, and by all accounts is still walking around on his own energy just fine.
  • All the astronauts from the US space program, as interviewed in the documentary In the Shadow of the Moon.
    • Buzz Aldrin in particular. One day, while walking with his daughter, he was confronted by a crazy conspiracy theorist who kept loudly and rudely claiming that the Moon landing had been faked, and called Aldrin "a coward, and a liar, and a thief." Aldrin promptly responded by punching the conspiracy theorist in the face... at the age of 72.
    • Later, to commemorate the 40th anniversary of the first lunar landing, Buzz teamed up with Snoop Dogg, Quincy Jones, Talib Kweli, and Soulja Boy to create the rap single and video, "Rocket Experience." Proceeds from video and song sales went to benefit Buzz's non-profit foundation, Share Space.
    • Once introduced himself at a speaking event as Buzz Lightyear, and also appeared As Himself on The Simpsons in a role where he mercilessly mocked himself.
      NASA Scientist: ...and Buzz Aldrin, the second man on the moon!
      Aldrin: Second comes right after first!
      [long pause as everyone save Aldrin looks around awkwardly]
      • He also had a cameo on an episode of The Big Bang Theory, where he again mocked himself playfully. It showed him in a You Tube video, handing out candy to trick-or-treaters and telling every last one of them that "I've walked on the moon!"
  • Ch. Loteki Supernatural Being, better known as Kirby, won Westminster when he was 8. That's old for a dog. This was the same year he won the canine Triple Crown. However, his pure canine awesome didn't stop. When he was 14 he came out of retirement to win (for the fourth time) Papillon Club of America's National Speciality Show. This made him both the oldest dog to win this title and the dog with the most wins of said title. He died two years later at 16.
  • Sir Elton Hercules John.
  • Although he isn't exactly "old" quite yet, as of his 50th birthday, Jon Bon Jovi is on his way to becoming this trope. At 50, he's still very athletic (apparently, he still has abs), recently started up the JBJ Soul Foundation to help provide quality food and housing to poor people in his home state of New Jersey, and unlike some rockers, he's still married to his first wife, who happens to be his high school sweetheart. Oh, and he and his band (who are also on their way to becoming Cool Old Guys) can still put on awesome concerts, and generally, tickets for their tours sell out extremely quickly.
  • Baseball's Yogi Berra is definitely this trope. During the 1940s, '50s, and '60s, he was one of the greatest players in the game. He later became a coach, serving as a mentor to the new generation of players. Even well into his eighties, he still attended the Yankees' Spring Training to dispense wisdom to the current players. He was known for being extremely friendly and gregarious, and lots of people in baseball thought of him as a Cool Uncle. Oh, and the many amusing malapropisms he's uttered over the years, known appropriately as Yogi-isms, always result in a Funny Moment. In short, Berra was a classy, funny veteran of the game and it can quite safely be stated that he was universally loved by fans and players alike. And he kept it up until he died in September 2015 at 90.
  • Arthur Wellesley, the Duke of Wellington was still active in both politics and the military up until his death.
  • Lemmy from Motörhead. Pretty much kept playing kick-ass metal music up until his death at the age of 70 - his final concert was just two weeks before his death and he had hoped to stave off terminal illness long enough to play a final series of farewell concerts in the UK, sadly it was not to be.
  • William S. Burroughs died in 1997 at the age of 83... but not before becoming an alternative-subculture icon during the early 1990s.
  • The Cardinals' Stan "The Man" Musial is very similar to the Yogi Berra example above (until the last months of his life, attended all the events he could, still gave autographs and replies to fan mail; also universally beloved) with one extra detail: at age 90, he was the center of a fan-led grassroots campaign in St. Louis to get him the Congressional Medal of Freedom (the highest honor a U.S. civilian can receive). He received it in January 2011. He's possibly one of the finest Real Life examples of a Sacred Cow. By the time of Musial's death in January 2013, he'd given so many autographs away that it is pretty much monetarily worthless. Think about that.
  • Most males from the Dutch series Golden Oldies are this. They are in a choir that actually sings modern day rock music, despite being over 70— some even being in their late 80s.
    • Ditto for the aptly-named Young@Heart choir, who has an average age of 80 and were famously documented in a film named after them.
  • The Man, the Myth, the Legend, Chuck Norris. Pushing 80 and still going strong.
  • Brian Dewhurst's name is familiar to Cirque du Soleil fans — he originated key roles in two tours (Nouvelle Experience and Fascination), has appeared in several of their film and television productions, and is currently playing the Non-Ironic Clown and crowd favorite Brian Le Petit in Mystere. That he's been working in circuses, cabaret, etc. since his teens is not surprising. That he was born in 1932...that's another story!
  • George Burns built a whole second entertainment career with this trope after the death of his wife, Gracie Allen, and kept it up until his death at 100.
  • Ernest Borgnine lived to be 95 and was in full-on Borgnine mode right up to the end.
  • Joe Biden combines several traits of your favorite goofy uncle with a sharp wit, occasional verbal gaffes and considerable experience. No wonder one of the petitions on whitehouse.gov is to give him his own reality show.
  • Max von Sydow has been acting in films since 1947. He played Father Merrin in The Exorcist, among many other roles. He also provided the voice of Esbern in The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim.
  • Pope Francis is a very affable person who refuses to live in the papal apartments in the Vatican (which is one of the last modern examples that still look the part of the Decadent Court), throws out the script quite often when he makes speeches, enjoys interacting with children, and has gone out of his way to help the poor, including feeding the homeless while dressed as an ordinary priest. He's made some waves among people who are generally not big fans of the Catholic Church for being very supportive of environmental protection, very eager to try out new tech and even says that he was perfectly fine with homosexuals. He's also become the first Pope both to say that animals go to heaven and to proclaim his willingness to baptize visiting aliens if they requested it.
  • Jerry Miculek is a world-class shooter with over ninety titles to his name. He teaches shooting and hosts a series of videos demonstrating various firearms. You can tell that he's having as much fun as he can when he's showing off high-caliber weapons.
  • Lou Reed had ascended to this status by the time he died in 2013.
  • Colin Baker. He became The Sixth Doctor on Doctor Who in his forties in 1984... got slammed, fucked by the BBC, given shit scripts, treated like absolute shit, and to top it off, was outright sacked. This didn't stop him, however, from joining the cast of Big Finish Doctor Who in 1999 to play the Sixth Doctor AGAIN. But this time people who knew how to write good stores and characters were hired, the stories themselves greatly better, Colin got to play the Doctor how he wanted instead of how the BBC forced him. He even got to write his own scripts. And today, at age 71, he's STILL doing it!!! And regularly visiting conventions and meeting crazed fans.
  • The late Shigeru Mizuki, manga pioneer who lived to age 93. He lost his dominant arm/hand in World War Two, so he learned to draw with his other hand. Then he went on popularizing Youkai manga, that even profoundly influenced Osamu Tezuka.
  • Makoto "Macoto" Takahashi was born in 1934, is also a pioneer in the early manga world, and despite being in his 80's is still more or less active. He drew this lovely poster for the 2015 Sakura Jidai Festival in Tokyo, without the help of a computer... at age 81/82.
  • Eugene Levy has been typecast as a Cool Old Guy. Turned 68 in 2014 and is currently starring in a critically praised sitcom called Schitt's Creek on the CBC with his son Dan and his fellow SCTV alumnus/best friend (and Cool Old Gal) Catherine O'Hara.
  • Danny Trejo is 74 years old, looks about twenty years younger and there's not a bar on the planet where you can find someone dumb enough to pick a fight with him.
  • The late Harold Ramis. Appeared as Egon Spengler in the Ghostbusters flicks at the ages of 40 and 45, appeared as Adam (yes, that Adam) in 2009's Year One at the age of 65, and in 2007, while filming Knocked Up with Seth Rogen, Rogen confirmed he and Ramis shared a joint- and Ramis was 63 at the time. Prior to his untimely passing in 2014, Ramis was working on the third Ghostbusters movie with fellow Cool Old Guy Dan Aykroyd, and only stopped making movies in 2009 because he fell seriously ill in 2010 and never quite recovered enough to get back to work. RIP, Egon.
  • Longtime Today anchors Gene Shalit (b.1926) and Willard Scott (b.1934) fit this. The former continued to rip into movies from 1969 until his retirement, still retaining his Jerk with a Heart of Gold status to this day, and the latter is still on the show as of February 2015 (he retired in December), doing the Smuckers 100th birthdays segment, and remains as lovable and carefree as ever.
    • Willard was also a good enough sport to appear as a commentator for VH1's 2005 I Love The Holidays special - at the age of 71. He was the oldest of all the people interviewed for the special.
  • Alex Kozinski, a Judge (later Chief Judge) of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, is famous for his almost dangerously casual style and frequent and humorous pop-culture references (enabled in large part by the fact that the Ninth Circuit includes California, with all the entertainment industry's glorious litigiousness—in Judge Kozinski's own words, the Ninth is basically the "Court of Appeals of the Hollywood Circuit"). He first gained national prominence in 2002 with Mattel v. MCA Records, involving the makers of Barbie suing Aqua's record company for trademark infringement over "Barbie Girl", resulting in Kozinski (in an opinion issued the day after his 52nd birthday) that opened "If this were a sci-fi melodrama, it might be called Speech-Zilla meets Trademark Kong" and ended with the famous line "The parties are advised to chill." Since then, Kozinski hasn't let up... until in 2017 he resigned after numerous allegations of sexual misconduct and abusive behavior, which, needless to say, is very not cool.
  • Sam Waterston. Before his decade-and-a-half-long tenure on Law & Order and being on The Newsroom, this versatile Shakespearean actor was seen in movies like the original film version of The Great Gatsby and The Killing Fields, the latter of which earned him an Academy Award nomination.
  • The late Jerry Orbach. Even though his character, Lenny Briscoe, was a Deadpan Snarker, he, on the other hand, was a warm, friendly family man and gentleman who was so respected that real-life police officers would give him a ride to wherever he needed to go. Even more so, given his popularity in many of his roles like Briscoe and Lumiere gave him a certain appeal that audiences still love.
  • Bernie Sanders is this. It's not often that you get a presidential candidate whose campaign slogan is "Feel the Bern".
  • Blues artist Howlin' Wolf. He was already in his forties during his prime.
  • A number of The Muppets personnel, notably Jerry Nelson and Dave Goelz. The former recorded an album at 75, and while suffering from emphysema - the disease which would eventually take his life in August 2012 - to boot. The latter is pushing 70 as of 2015 and still works as Gonzo.
  • Some old guys have enough sense of humor to take up cosplay and look awesome while at it:
  • Bill Murray because of his Wandering the Earth stories, which can be seen here from this website here.
  • The late Fyvush Finkel. Usually considered the most popular (or at least the funniest) character whatever he's involved in, he was in the business for over 85 years.
  • Dr. Henry Heimlich, inventor of the maneuver named after him; 96 years old, and Still Got It. He sadly died at the end of the year.
  • That awkward moment when an 82-year-old retired Navy pilot and aerospace engineer goes on America's Got Talent and rocks out to Drowning Pool's "Bodies". Did I say "awkward"? I mean "awesome".
  • Tommy Chong of Cheech and Chong fame, who became the oldest semifinalist on Dancing with the Stars on the strength of dances like this.
  • R. Lee Ermey (RIP). Having been a drill sarge in real life and in movies you'd believe it!
  • Former Formula One driver Niki Lauda definitely counts. Not only was his rivalry with fellow racer James Hunt borderline legendary, but the man's attitude, personality, and determination makes him a legend in the community. The 2013 film Rush not only showcases why people love Lauda, but also his sheer tenacity that even after a deadly crash in Germany, he could still race.
  • John Carpenter definitely counts. Not only did he make some amazing movies that are still influencing current popular culture, but he also wrote the music for most of them himself. At the age of 67, he released his first non-soundtrack album, and at 68, he released a second one and went on tour.
  • Toronto city councillor (and for a while, acting mayor while the late Rob Ford was in rehab) Norm Kelly has reached memetic status in the circles of the internet. Politics aside, he's a fantastically hilarious and pop-cultured man at the age of 75, who weighed in on a feud between Drake and Meek Mill, found the infamous raccoon memorial to be hilarious, and tweeted that the city was "looking into how to extract the salt from [his] haters and apply it to the roads this winter." Love him or hate him for his politics, you can't deny that Kelly is hilarious.
  • Jeremy Corbyn, leader of the British Labour party. At the 2017 election, when he was 68 years old, opinion polls showed Labour had a 40-point lead over the Conservatives among under 25s, while the positions were reversed with over 60s. A lot of young people said they had been personally inspired by him and several pro-Corbyn memes went viral in social media. All this led to Turnout from under 25s being much higher than in previous elections.
  • Peter Capaldi is most definitely this, having been a fan of Doctor Who since the very beginning, and incredibly gentlemanly and gracious towards other Doctor Who fans. He also plays the guitar, which he has gotten to show off while playing the Twelfth Doctor.
  • Craig Ferguson was a bandmate of Capaldi back in their younger days and is still very popular, whether discussing history, doing standup, or playing Gobber or Roddy MacStew.
  • Michael Rosen. A beloved children's author, and an Internet sensation due to his use in YouTube Poop. He's supposedly pretty cool with it too.
  • Stephen King is this now.
  • Famous German conservative Ernst Jünger held LSD parties when he was a senior citizen and he also wrote a book about recreational drug use. Before that, he wrote science fiction novels and at the time, he was one of the oldest living science fiction writers in Germany. (At times when the German conservative establishment openly despised science fiction.)
  • Harry Leslie Smith, a World War II veteran and political activist well into his 90s, only started writing books about issues close to him in 2009 following the Great Recession, and was highly active on Twitter from 2010 until literally days before his death in 2018.
  • Christopher Plummer. He's been acting for 65 years now, is charming, witty, a massive Trekkie, and a phenomenal actor. He is the oldest person to have been nominated for an acting Oscar, as well as the oldest person to win an acting Oscar. His last nomination was for All the Money in the World, for which he completed filming in mere days after Kevin Spacey's (who was originally cast in the role) removal once the latter's darker past came to light. Those few days of filming would bag Plummer an Oscar nom. Plummer also watches Game of Thrones, voiced Arngeir in Skyrim, and in general is showing no signs of stopping.
  • When Danny DeVito started playing Frank Reynolds on It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia, the internet has turned him into a Memetic Badass and has given him lots of praise for years. This is especially evident in the Vinesauce community.
  • Many of the people connected with the horror genre are this in real life, having a great deal of respect and admiration for the business, their costars and crew and the fans alike. Among these men include John Carpenter, Kane Hodder, the late Wes Craven, Tobin Bell and, of course, Robert Englund.
  • Would you believe Creator/W.S. Gilbert? At the age of 74, he dived in to save a woman he was giving a swimming lesson to. Sadly, he died from a heart attack from trying to save the woman. But the woman survived!
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