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Well, since cars exist in Real Life, it only makes sense that reality features many examples of Cool Cars.


  • It should be noted that the predecessor to a tank was the Rolls-Royce Armored car. Only 120 of them were built in 1914 and 1915. The British didn't retire them until 1944, and they were only retired because tyres were no longer available. It should also be noted that during WWI, the UK built only about 150 tanks and Germany built about 20.
  • Jaguar's E-Type. To the point that Jeremy Clarkson called it the beating heart and soul of England.
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    • Its replacement, the XJS, replaced the already great shape with an even better one, while adding creature comforts. It is also the cheapest way to own a V12 GT car, with the cheapest running ones going for less than $2000.
    • The XJR-15 proves that beauty doesn't need to be traded for performance.
    • Also, the XJ220 is fast, reliable, and still comfortable like a Jag' should be on the inside (such as leather seats, air conditioning and a sound system)
  • Most Formula One cars easily fall into this trope.
    • Special mention to the McLaren MP4/4 driven by Ayrton Senna and Alain Prost for the 1988 Formula 1 season. The car was one of the last of the cars of its era.
    • Arguments about which F1 car looks best are guaranteed to never end. Others frequently mentioned are the Lotus models 49, 72, and 79, the 1961 "sharknose" Ferrari, the Williams FW07, the Mercedes-Benz W196, the Brabham BT52, and — for lovers of the bizarre — the six-wheeled Tyrrell P34.
  • Almost any performance Italian car easily falls into this trope, though it's not surprising to see them also fall into The Alleged Car territory.
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    • As Enzo Ferrari himself allegedly said, before all Ferraris, Lamborghinis or Lancias THE Italian Car Itself can only be an Alfa Romeo. (Enzo Ferrari had begun his racing career at Alfa Romeo.)
    • Speaking of Ferraris, most of them were cool because they had to be cool. The Dino 246GT was freezing cool.
    • Ferraris are only cool when they're not on fire.
    • Ferrari's anniversary cars also count, first being the F40 with its twin-turbo V8 that gives it top-notch track performance for its time. Second is the Ferrari F50 that goes the Formula One route with a V12 engine and one of the first cars to start using computerized displays. Even better, its whole roof section can be taken off to turn it from Coupe to Roadster. The F50's only downfall was the idea of hard-mounting the engine to the chassis itself rather than use mountings which act as buffers to soften the torque reaction and vibrations of the engine to the rest of the car.
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    • The Enzo improves upon the shortcomings of the F50 with a 6 speed paddle shift transmission, more computerized displays and controls and was one of the fastest cars on their test tracks outside of their actual Formula One cars. The car only had a production run of 399 with the 400th one reserved for The Pope. In general, you don't name a car after a company founder's first name for no reason as we've yet to have a Pagani Horacio, a Ford Henry, the Lamborghini Ferruccio or the McLaren Bruce.
    • On the subject of Alfa Romeos, there's the 33 Stradale. One of the sexiest looking cars ever built, especially for its time, whose looks can rival that of the Dino 246GT above, it was the first production car to use butterfly doors (not to be confused with scissor doors, a feature first innovated by another Alfa Romeo car, the Carabo [whose design is also based on the 33's chassis], and would later be made famous by Lamborghini), which were used by later cars such as the McLaren F1, Saleen S7, Enzo Ferrari, and the Mercedes-Benz SLR McLaren. It reached a top speed of 260 km/h (160 mph), which was unheard of at the time, and was rated by the German Auto, Motor und Sport magazine as the fastest commercially available car in 1968. As a Bilingual Bonus, "Stradale" is Italian for "road-legal" and/or "road-going". A heartbreaking shame that only 18 of them were ever made.
    • No discussion of Italian automotive successes is complete without Lancia. Top Gear dedicated an episode to their history of cool cars, see below.
  • Ford GT, the Spiritual Successor to the legendary GT-40, the greatest car that Ford has ever made.
    • Slides close to The Alleged Car territory, if Jeremy Clarkson is to be believed. His GT spent more time in the shop, almost always due to electrical faults, than on the road, but he once said that when it was working, it was quite good.
  • The Ford GT-90 concept car. Too bad it was never produced.
    • To go into detail, this car used two engines fused together, that's two separate sections with two turbos each, this raised horsepower to 720 at max and gave it 220+ mph to compete with the F1 at the time, this made the exhaust so incredibly hot, it needed space shuttle like ceramic tiles to keep the body from being damaged... Then you learn this was all speculative and the car was never really tested but the speculative engine design is probably what inspired the W16, quad-turbo engine of the Veyrons later on.
  • The Mazda MX-5 Miata. Sure, it's not the most powerful thing around,note  and in America at least, it's the butt of many jokes. It has, despite the derision from fans of bigger, more powerful cars, been hailed as the return to form for sports convertibles by critics and owners alike thanks to its sharp handling, light weight, even balance, and rear wheel drive, especially at its price point.
    • Joke all you want about "a hairdresser's car" or "underpowered four-banger", but 25 years later, Mazda has produced near to a million of them across four generations - meaning a used one can be had on the cheap, making them a great way to get into club racing or the car scene in general. The 25th Anniversary edition Miata, a production run of 100 cars, sold out in ten minutes.
    • There are people who swap V8s into these cars. Road and Track loved the results. A YouTube channel called Tom's Turbo Garage did the swap himself, and made a video series proving that you, too, can make your own Cool Car.
    • The fourth generation MX-5 ND is quite possibly the best Miata yet. After the heavy NC model that disappointed many Miata purists, Mazda revisited Miata's roots with the ND model. Despite meeting modern safety standards and having all the luxuries you'd expect from a modern luxury car, ND's curb weight is 1058 kilograms making it the second lightest Miata model. The car received critical acclaim upon its release in 2015 and won countless Car Of The Year awards worldwide, most notably World Car of the Year at the 2016 World Car Awards. In a time when most manufacturers are going for bigger and heavier sports cars to meet modern safety standards and increase their raw power, Mazda has managed to make one of the lightest sports cars around without using any expensive or rare materials at a relatively low price point, reminding us that a sports car doesn't have to be big, heavy and powerful to be fun.
  • "Halo" cars are built around this trope: car companies showcase their technical prowess by building a really unusual, low production vehicle. In turn, this makes their regular vehicles look better. Supercars are the most popular (Ford GT-40, Dodge Viper, Honda NSX, Tesla Roadster, etc.), but sometimes, high tech cars like the Chevy Volt or the original Honda Insight can fit this category.
  • Speaking of the Dodge Viper, it's an open-top roadster in the vein of the Shelby Cobra with a huge, 8-liter V10 engine (notable when V12s are also rare supercar stuff and most performance engines are V8 configurations), manual transmission, and no electronic traction control or anti-lock braking system whatsoever to help the driver keep this bucking beast under control. It's a Cool Car in its own right, and if that didn't already convince you, it has its own TV show named after it, complete with transformation into weaponized crime-fighting mode!
  • Multiple Mazda Wankel-engined cars fall into this category, although arguably the engine itself falls into The Alleged Engine territory.
    • All three generations of the Mazda RX-7, Mazda's Wankel rotary-engined sports car produced from 1978 to 2002, count. While the rotary engine does suffer from some reliability issues, especially the third-generation FD-series, the engine produces an extremely high amount of horsepower for its size (the last models produced 280 hp from the 1.3 liter rotary engine), and the RX-7 is currently the best-selling rotary-powered car in the world (with 811,634 produced by the end of production in 2002). The RX-7 won Motor Trend's Import Car of The Year Award twice in 1986 and 1993, and they're often cited as one of the best sports cars of their era. Not to mention the RX-7 is very popular within the tuner scene.
    • The RX-7's successor, the 2003-2011 Mazda RX-8, also counts. While the RX-8 still suffered from the same reliability issues previous Mazda rotary-engined cars had and it did have less power than the third-generation FD RX-7 it succeeded (to be fair, the RX-8 was powered by a naturally-aspirated rotary engine while the FD RX-7 had a twin-turbo rotary engine), the RX-8 is still certainly a Cool Car. The RX-8 ditched the 2-door coupe layout of its predecessor and it instead went with a 4-door quad coupe design. Critics and owners alike noted the RX-8's smooth handling, even balance, light weight, and respectable power outputs especially for its low price. As with the RX-7, the RX-8 has won multiple awards (a staggering 37 as of October 2006) and it remains prolific on the tuner scene.
  • Jay Leno owns an awesome collection of these. He also owns a lot of cool motorcycles too. In fact....Jay has a rather Cool Garage in general. Jay Leno's Garage shows this to the extreme. In case of doubt, fire up Gran Turismo 4 and look at his Tank Car.
  • As a car collector in LA, Yoshiki Hayashi once outbid Jay Leno on a Cool Car during an auction. The result was a small-scale feud between the two, that actually managed to hit racist Unfortunate Implications that became Hilarious in Hindsight and an Insult Backfire. As in, Leno dedicated a segment of one of his shows to mocking Yoshiki's "bedroom eyes" and Asian appearance in general. This, however, became Hilarious in Hindsight with a bit of Fridge Logic applied: how much more likely is a rock musician to get laid than a late night show host?
  • Liberace was fond of these, and often had them decorated in his signature gaudy style (including, yes, a rhinestone-covered car).
  • The Tornado Intercept Vehicle, built by IMAX filmmaker Sean Casey so that he could drive into a tornado, film it, and survive while doing so.
    • Reed Timmer's SRV Dominator. To the average outsider (and to Sean Casey, apparently) it comes off as a cheap knock-off of the TIV. But your average engineer can spot the differences. Timmer studied the TIV to determine the main areas in need of improvement and concluded that the TIV's main disadvantage was mobility - it is extremely heavy and travels in a huge convoy. Reed built a lighter, more maneuverable vehicle and travels in a much smaller convoy, resulting in his higher rate of success in intercepting tornados. His planned improvements (air cannons for parachute probes, side scanning radar) follow down this design path to the point where he has nearly condensed an entire storm-chasing convoy into one vehicle.
    • These cars even got featured in Mythbusters in a proof-of-concept test to show that these vehicles will stay put against winds up to an EF-5 tornado and even past that. While the TIV's ground spikes warped and the Dominator slid around, neither of them were severely damaged nor did they flip over or get flung around by the 747 that produced the test winds.
  • Stephen Fry drives around in a London black cab (don't ask how he doesn't get people hailing him all the time). Perhaps realizing just how cool the idea of Stephen Fry as a cabbie is he even took one on his recent American travelogue.
    • There's something about British actors- Rupert Grint daily driver is an ice cream truck.
  • Top Gear has the Cool Wall, where new cars 'coolness' is rated by Clarkson and Hammond. One of the rules is that any car actually owned by the presenters must be uncool. Hence the Fiat Panda 1.4 being halfway across the studio at the 'Uncool' end - James May has one.
    • Don't forget, Aston Martins have a special fridge reserved just for them located beyond the Sub-Zero end of the cool wall.
    • They also featured at least two whole episodes where they attempted to destroy a red Toyota Hilux pickup truck, but in the end the car kept going every time they restarted the engine. Eventually, they decided with an unanimous decision that the car needed more than a cool wall for its legacy, so they set it on a plinth where it's still on display today.
      • Clarkson and Hammond revealed in Season 14 that they think the car company that has made the most great/cool cars is... Lancia. Considering they made the Stratos, Delta Integrale, Monte Carlo, Gamma, Fulvia, etc. and went rallying with most of them, you can see where they're coming from.
      • But, as the episode shows, every very cool feature Lancia cars had - turbo-supercharged engines, extreme rallying performance, and that sleek, sleek look - were neatly balanced out by some seriously WTF design features. I mean, fixing a braking problem by removing the brake servos entirely? Check for the Montecarlo. Passenger having the pedals and the driver having the wheel? Check-check, Stratos HF. Awesome cars, utterly strange design department.
  • Alex Roy's Team Polizei BMW M5. Very possibly the most reliable car on the planet - it went non-stop from NYC to LA in 31 hours with no problems whatsoever.
  • Not only is President Obama's official car really tough, but his Secret Service escort vehicle is even more badass with popout gatling gun turret! Just check this baby out!
  • This custom car was built around a Rolls-Royce Merlin engine. That's right, it's a car powered by the same engine as a Spitfire. Here it is on Classic Top Gear.
  • As was this '55 Chevy, with the ol' Merlin running 3 thousand Horsepower! Here's a video of it.
  • Just to complete the Rule of Three - other performance car projects focus on modding the injection or swapping engines. Charlie built himself a Rover with a Merlin tank engine. Windscreens are for other people.
  • The crown for aircraft-powered cars probably goes to Quad-Al, a dragster with FOUR Allison V-12 engines, totaling 12,000 horsepower. Unfortunately, the car was never completely finished, and never raced. Instead, it was sold off to a guy named Tex, who was promptly shot to death before he could finish it himself.
  • That crown has probably been taken by Bloodhound SSC, a British attempt to break the land speed record. It has, in addition to a V8 Supercharged Jaguar engine (which is only there to power the hydraulics), a Eurojet EJ200 jet engine, which, for reference, is used on none other than the Eurofighter Typhoon. It is also fitted with a rocket. When completed, it is meant to go faster than 1,000 miles an hour, for reference, Mach One is a (relatively) mere 761 mph. That's right, it's a car fitted with an engine from a fighter jet, and a rocket, that's capable of breaking the sound barrier.
    • Bloodhound nothing, the North American Eagle is an actual F-104 Starfighter's chassis, with the wings removed, and bigger wheels added. Unlike the impractical Bloodhound, whose massive turbofan engine practically double's the craft's size, the Eagle runs on a General Electric J79 turbojet, fitted within the car itself. At the momment, its maximum recorded speed is 400 mph, while the Bloodhound's next milestone is half that.
    • The third contender for the world's fastest car, the Australian Bullet, built explicitly to abuse the way land speed records are measured, is much smaller, and rocket-propelled relative to the jet engines of the larger Bloodhound and Eagle.
  • A particular model of Porsche uses an air-cooled engine which, by pure fluke, is the exact right size and shape, with exactly the right mountings, that it can be used as a replacement engine in the original Volkswagen Beetle if the rear shock were strengthened slightly, resulting in a Beetle that can out-accelerate many sports cars.
    • The Porsche family (Dr. Ferdinand Porsche and his son Dr. Ferry Porsche) founded both companies and are responsible for Beetle and the 911. In addition, they both use air-cooled flat engines and have shared technology for years, and will soon merge. It would be surprising only if the VW couldn't fit a Porsche engine.
    • This particular stunt is used succssfully by the protagonist robber in one of the Parker novels by Richard Stark (i.e. Donald Westlake).
    • The Porsche is the 2.0-litre engined 911 (1964-1969) and the engine can provide in stock form from 110-130 hp in milder versions to 180-190 hp in the European non-catalyzed 911S. And a 7000 rpm redline. Good luck.
  • Speaking of Ferdinand Porsche's brainchildren, the humble VW Beetle aka Type 1, Herbie's Real Life counterpart, might have been the sub-zero on the scale of coolness. Most upgradable, tunable and modifiable car in human history, it went from a 1938 puny, below 1-liter engine which was still specifically designed to run for all day at 100 km/h, not freeze because it was air-cooled and not overheat while pushing a four-man small Jeep in the North African Campaign at 80 km/h... to modern drag-racing monsters running 1000 hp from 2.3 liters and rally-racing Beetles which out-accelerate Vipers. And most mechanical parts like gearbox or brakes are so overbuilt and over-engineered they do not need further upgrades to support engine power. And it stayed in series production for 65 years.
  • The Mazda Furai? Imagine the future, a Le Mans car, a Hot Wheels original car, and anime had a fourway.
    • Unfortunately, it caught fire in 2009.
  • The Porsche 924/944/951/968 line; a design joint venture between Volkswagen, Audi and Porsche resulted in 20 years of evolution of a car which the subframes, engines, and drivetrain are all swappable. A history of having been raced at Le Mans and in IMSA GT, Trans-Am, and rally, having 3 racing series of its own along with racing and beating the fabled 911's in Porsche Cup series, and as of 2011, raced alongside modern GT 3 cars in the Nurburg 24hr. Absolutely loved by Jeremy Clarkson, has the largest production automotive 4cyl in the world (the S2 came with the 3.0L DOHC inline 4) and yet a perfect to near perfect (depending on model) 50/50 weight balance because of a front engine-rear transmission drivetrain. Somehow, this car hasn't caught on with the tuner and drifting crowd, which makes this owner and racer relieved. Oh and the car that saved Porsche from going bankrupt, probably the only reason why new versions of the 911 still race today.
  • How did the page get this far into the works of Dr. Porsche without actually acknowledging the 911?
  • The Ford Nucleon Awesome, but Impractical turned Up to Eleven, and dosed with a lovely green glow.
  • The Citroen DS was a car so revolutionary that Citroen was worried that its future models wouldn't live up to its coolness (they were right). It had, in 1955, power steering, front-wheel drive, crumple zones, collapsable steering columns, disc brakes, and a hydropneumatic, self-leveling suspension that gave it an unbelievably smooth ride (and wound up saving Charles de Gaulle's life from an assassination attempt in 1962 — the car had suffered two flat tires from bullets but was still able to escape at high speed thanks to this unique suspension system) — all features that would take decades to show up on other cars. The 1968 model introduced aerodynamic directional headlamps that swiveled around with the steering wheel, another feature that took decades to show up elsewhere. note  Plus, its aerodynamic outer body design was so slinky and smooth that it would inspire Perverse Sexual Lust out of almost anyone (it is, after all, a French car). It would later be ranked as the third most influential car of the 20th century (behind only the Ford Model T and the Mini), and it is still, in some aspects, a car way ahead of its time.
  • The Classic Saab 900 was the Nordic counterpart of the Swiss Army Knife. Might have looked Boring, but Practical in the age of flashy Ferraris and turbocharged Lancias, but its quirky design, turbocharged engines, well-thought suspension, superior ergonomics, very efficient HVAC and long life even in the Scandinavian climate provided an everyday supercar for whomever was brave enough to live with it. Not incidentally it become James Bond's personal car in The '80s.
  • The Lunar Rover/Moon Buggy. Makes one kinda miss NASA's old Scavenger World aesthetic.
  • Most classic American Muscle cars can easily be called this.
    • Examples include the Ford Mustang, Chevy Camaro, Dodge Challenger, Pontiac Firebird, Plymouth Barracuda, Pontiac GTO (the car that is considered by many to have started the trend in the 60's),etc.. Pretty much every manufacturer back then took their standard cars, gave them a bright orange coat of paint, and stuffed a massive V8 under the hood. You'd be surprised the amount of cool it results in.
    • Many of these cars (Pontiac GTO, Chevrolet Bel Air, etc) were so cool, songs were written about them. Some examples include "Little GTO", "409", "Shut Down", and "SS 396."
    • As for the Camaro, most enthusiasts agree that the 1969 models are the best so far.
  • Two words: Bugatti Veyron. Three words: Mansory Bugatti Veyron. Four words: Bugatti Veyron Bleu Centenaire. Four words and a number: Bugatti Veyron 16.4 Super Sport.
    • One more number: 1,050 horsepower. (Bugatti lists the engine power as 1,001 bhp, presumably because that number is easier to remember.)
      • Not quite so. The request had been to generate "over 1000 bhp" regardless of the measurement system used. 1001 PS (metric hp) means 987 bhp, while 1001 bhp means 1015 PS. To be true to their word, the manufacturers made each engine to generate between 1020 and 1050 bhp, so it's still "over 1000".
      • And just to make things clear, the Super Sport is among the top 5 fastest Production cars in the world. It was apparently purposely designed to reclaim its title as fastest production car in the world from the Big-Fast-Shelby-American-Car-Thingynote  which was the title holder of the time at 256 mph. The Bugatti team were expecting it to go at least 258 mph, but as the onboard-speedometer showed (which read in Kilometers) it ran at 414 km/h (which was the target speed) and kept climbing. 2 Runs later and after getting an Average speed it could went at 431.81 km/h which -translated into miles- is roughly 267 mph beating the old record by a mile (or to be precise, 11).. And to think it still has all the luxuries of a normal Veyron makes it even more amazing.
      • The coolest number associated with the Veyron is 120. That's how many feet it needs to accelerate from zero to 60 mph.
    • The 16.4 Grand Sport, that's the worlds fastest convertible sports car, most other cars of its type don't have a soft/hard, removable roof to preserve their high speed and aerodynamics.
    • Bugatti doesn't seem to be the easiest motoring company to satisfy, as shown in their rumored project called the SuperVeyron; it's 250 kilograms lighter and has scaled up the firepower from 1200 to 1600 horsepower and can go from 0-60 in 1.8 seconds and they're planning to take it all the way up to a top speed of 280 miles per hour. You'd think that at some point even Bugatti will have to call it quits but clearly that point hasn't been reached yet, but no, this rumored custom indeed took form in their new car, the Chiron.
    • The 0-300 km/h acceleration of a Veyron is so quick that while Veyron is parked, below-quoted McLaren F1 can fly by at 200 km/h, Veyron driver starts, launches, follows suit, overtakes the F1 and hits 300 km/h before the F1 does.
    • Speaking about Bugatti, why not include those wacky limousines of late 1920s? The Royales are one of the largest cars in the world, even larger and heavier than a new Rolls Royce Phantom. Only six out of 25 were made, though, due to The Great Depression when European royal families won't buy luxury cars.
  • The McLaren F1. It may not hold the title of fastest production car anymore, but who cares? It's still one of the prettiest, and coolest cars ever to exist (plus the driver seat is in the middle, with a passenger seat on either side, that's one more person you can carry in it when compared to other sports/super cars)
    • Actually, it still holds the title of fastest naturally aspirated car, as the Bugatti Veyron, Konigsegg CCR and SCC Ultimate Aero TT exploit forced induction (turbochargers and superchargers) to reach their top speeds.
    • How cool is the F1? The engine bay is lined with gold. This is not some vanity feature, though. The F1's carbon fibre body panels and monocoque required significant heat insulation. No common material was really up to snuff, so Gordon Murray used gold for its superior heat reflection capabilities. In other words, the bling literally keeps it cool.
    • The company also had the law changed just so the car could have its center driver seat. This car is filled with moments of awesome. What makes it even more awesome is the F1 uses the old seating layout.
    • It can now double-subvert What a Piece of Junk as well; According to Rowan Atkinson, whom he crashed his own F1 and repaired it twice before sold it, the McLaren F1 has much more advantage than many modern supercars, despite its age and weird tendency to crash.
    Atkinson: Look at a modern supercar of comparable performance and it will be vast, heavy and offer little or no space for your luggage. By comparison the F1 is tiny, yet it will seat three, store enough for you all to go on holiday and still finds space for a proper, normally aspirated 6.1-litre V12 engine. And it weighs the same as a shopping car. Nothing has ever been designed before or since with such imagination and clarity of thought.
    • The F1's tendency to crash probably stems from the fact there's no driving assistance offered to the driver, at most you get a brake deployed spoiler but the car has no traction control, launch control, stability control, ABS, no powered steering and a fully manual gearbox and clutch. Coupled with the car's ridiculous power being driven to the rear wheels, this makes the car a case of Difficult, but Awesome where if you can master driving it, other cars like the Veyron become laughably easy to drive in comparison
  • The McLaren P1, a hybrid hyper car and the F1's Spiritual Successor. You get an impressive 176 bhp from the electric motors themselves and that's before you turn on the twin-turbo V8 engine in the back. It's ridiculously light and when racing or otherwise pushing the car to the limit, the electric motors work in tandem to produce a whopping 903 bhp. The motors also work to produce power when the engine might be behind such as during the gear changes, when the engine is outside of the power band or when the turbos are still spooling up. In short, it's a car that produces almost as much horsepower as a Veyron but is much lighter with half the engine size and works as a hybrid car on its electric motors.
    • And then there's its German competitor, the Porsche 918 Spyder. It might be heavier but it has more luxuries on the inside along with better battery range and it has all-wheel drive with its V8 engine alongside the four motors. Like the P1, you can change the car from operating solely on electric motors, hybrid driving mode with both the motors and engine, sport mode that lets you use the V8 itself or change it to race mode where the electric motors kick in at points where the engine is the weakest. Plus, if the "Spyder" part didn't give it away, it has two distinct roof panels that you can remove.
    • The Italian answer is the Ferrari LaFerrari and like any respectable Italian hyper car it uses a V12 engine. Unlike the previous two examples, it can't go into a hybrid driving mode with just the motors or just the engine, making the motors more like that of a KERS on a Formula One car. Like the Huayra, it also has adjusting aerodynamics at the front and back to really stabilize it during turns.
    • All three of these cars sound like an Ultimate Showdown of Ultimate Destiny waiting to happen which it almost did on Top Gear were it not for A: Executive Meddling with the three concerned automotive companies changing the rules on when they could finally test them and B: a certain Jeremy punching a producer in the face. You can still have that showdown yourself in Project CARS 2 as all three of the above cars are available in the same Road A class.
  • Further, the mother of all hippie buses.
  • Racing cars in general, such as Formula One and Le Mans cars.
    • Let's be more specific... How about the Dome S102, Peugeot 905 'Supercopter' (never raced sadly), Audi R8C (only raced once, sadly).
    • The 1971 Porsche 917 LH, in Martini colours. To quote from the Autosport.com message board; "I asked a teenage Lewis Hamilton fan when this car was from. He said, 'dunno, nineties?'"
    • Special mention to the McLaren MP4/4 driven by Ayrton Senna and Alain Prost for the 1988 Formula 1 season. The car was one of the last of the "turbo monsters" with a 1.5 litre 1200 hp twin-turbo Honda V6 engine. In the hands of Senna and Prost it became the most dominant Formula 1 car ever made winning 15 out of 16 races it competed in (10 of which were 1-2 finishes) as well as 15 pole positions and 10 fastest laps.
    • The 1990 Mazda 787B, listed because it's the only japanese car to have won Le Mans, as well as without a piston engine, which produced its limited max power at 9000 RPM (in an endurance racer!), the true maximum power being 930 hp at '10500 RPM(!). The noisiest Le Mans racer ever? But the best is that by the end of the Le Mans win, Mazda engineers (after telling the driver to ignore the limiter in some parts) dismounted the engine and found that it could still do another 24 race. The Wankel engine was banned afterwards. To this day, that 787B, still wearing its racing-number, 55, is kept maintained and occasionally brought out at various motorsport ceremonies as a flagship of Japanese automotive sporting prowess.
      • It gets better yet. Despite having a reputation for being fuel-thirsty, that same year at Le Mans, Mazda managed to also use less fuel than any other team competing in the race! (at Le Mans, all teams are given equal amounts of fuel and if they use it all up before getting to the finish line? They don't get anymore fuel).
    • It may not have won Le Mans, but the Japanese produced an even cooler Le Mans racer. The Toyota TS020, also known as the GT-One. Originally entered in the class for road based cars,note  Toyota used every loophole they could find in the rules to get it into the race, such as claiming that the fuel tank counted as luggage space, and only ever actually building 2 road going models, neither of which were actually sold to the public and were instead kept in museums.
      • In 1998, its first year, the TS020 was one of the two fastest cars, along with the Mercedes-Benz CLK LM, but gearbox issues and accidents kept them from finishing any higher than ninth. Both Mercedes' retired early on with engine issues, and Porsche took a 1-2 with their 911 GT1-98's, ahead of Nissan in third (with their R390, Nissan being good sports the road car was designed first, but it was still primarily a racing car), and the fourth placed McLaren F1, an incredible result for an actual road car, even if it was one which had triumphed outright at Le Mans in 1995.
      • In 1999, the TS020 was now entered as a Prototype racing car, as regulations had changed regarding the definition of a road based "GT" car, requiring a large number of units to be produced for homologation, however the TS020 required very little modification, as it was basically already a prototype. Mercedes-Benz returned with their vastly updated and vastly more beautiful CLR, along with Nissan, Panoz, Ferrari and BMW. Newcomers to Le Mans were Audi, and we all no how that would turn out for them in the years to come. Former F1 driver and renowned TV commentator Martin Brundle put the #1 TS020 on pole, while the #2 Toyota of Boutsen, McNish, and Kelleners qualified second. Behind them were the #17 BMW V12 LMR, the #6 Mercedes-Benz CLR, the #12 Panoz, the #15 BMW, and the #5 Mercedes. Toyota #3 qualified eighth. In the race the Toyota's and Mercedes' led early on, but Mercedes lost one of their cars after this spectacular incident, where fortunately nobody was hurt, and withdrew their other car in fear of a repeat incident with more severe consequences. The #1 Toyota retired during the night due to an accident triggered by a tyre blow out, and the #2 was also taken out by a similar accident, this one so severe that it led to the driver, Thierry Boutsen, announcing his retirement from motor racing. The #3 Toyota, with an all Japanese crew charged hard for the lead, breaking the lap record in the process, but yet another puncture impeded its progress and handed victory to BMW, their car, piloted by Yannick Dalmasnote , Pierluigi Martini, and "Smokin'" Jo Winkelhock, with the #3 Toyota in second, and, as an ominous sign, the Joest run Audi R8Rs in third and fourth. The next year only Audi and Panoz returned, with Audi taking the first of their 12 victories, and Tom Kristensen's second of nine.
      • Toyota has returned in 2012 with the TS030. While it did not win the 24 Hours, it did give the Audi R18 a run for its money. In 2014, the successor, the TS040, won pole position at the 2014 edition of the race, and won first place in the final standings of the World Endurance Championship, defeating the R18 in the process!
    • In any list of cool race cars, there are always 2 cars that are bound to compete for the top slots. The Ferrari 250 GTO and its Arch-Enemy, the Ford GT40. The former is so iconic and nowadays, so rare that when it appeared on Top Gear, it could not be driven simply because the BBC could not afford to pay the insurance for it.
      • The GT40 was the rival to the P330, the 250 GTO fought it out with the Shelby Daytona, while the 250 GTO and GT40 did meet in 64, the GT40 was no competitive till 65 which is when the P330 came out.
    • Don't forget that Lancia had produced Le Mans racing cars too. The Stratos was one of them, being driven by Lella Lombardi in late 1970s Le Mans races. Also, the LC1 and LC2 racing cars which were put into 1980s Le Mans races. These are much faster than the rally cars Lancia had.
    • Those Wacky Nazis also had some cool racing cars too, especially Stupid Jetpack Hitler streamlined racers. Back to 1930s when aerodynamics were primitive, there were some modified Grand Prix racing cars that sported spaceship-style design that wouldn't be seen for next decades. These cars were used to beat the speed records under Nazi propaganda purposes. However, with design philosophies of extreme streamlining by enclosing the wheels completely, this had a crippling flaw in a total lack of downforce, which makes it impossible to control in any way that isn't going real straight. .]] There's one case where Bernd Rosemeyer piloted a streamliner, attempting to break the speed records, and got himself killed.
  • The older electric cars could be heart-stoppingly ugly, but some of the newer ones are certainly cool looking at least - the Aptera 2 Series, which looks like it was made for George Jetson, and the Tesla Roadster, an electric sports car that managed to impress Jeremy Clarkson (a man who is usually rather disdainful of electric cars).
    • For those too lazy to dig up links:
    • And while we're on the subject of electric cars, just about anything John Wayland races, such as the White Zombie.
    • The SLS AMG Electric Drive, each wheel has a motor that individually responds to how the car is cornering, push-rod suspension and it out-accelerates both the normal SLS AMG and its Black Series counterpart. Yes, an electric super car actually accelerates faster than than the petrol models it's based on. It still has the Awesome, but Impractical drawback of its limited range with its batteries, especially when using full power and requires up to twenty hours to completely recharge.
    • One particular Tesla Roadster has become extremely cool, being the first car ever launched into space.
  • Many official cars used by heads of state fit into this category. The limousine currently used by the President of the United States (often called "Cadillac One" or "The Beast") is a monster, fitted with 5-inch thick armor plating that could take anything short of a direct hit by an anti-tank round, yet can accelerate and move faster than most commercially-available vehicles. Has difficulty with driveways, though.
  • The Caterham Super Seven. descendant of the old Lotus Seven. Yes, it looks like a cross between a go-kart and a 1930s racer, and yes, its 250 hp 2-liter engine may appear to be a joke by virtue of it being from a Ford Mondeo. Now that you're done laughing, take into account the fact that it is so friggin' light (506 kg, or 1,116 pounds) that it has a power-to-weight ratio greater than the Bugatti Veyron. Let's reinterate: its power-to-weight ratio is better than the Bugatti Veyron, the fastest production car in existence (it actually got around the ''Top Gear'' test track a second quicker than the Veyron did). It's also a fraction of the cost and is a hell of a lot more fun to drive.
  • Nobuhiro "Monster" Tajima's Pikes' Peak Suzuki Escudo. Holder of the record time up the mountain. Cool Old Guy + Cool Car = Win. It also helps the fact that this car is a complete Game-Breaker in Gran Turismo 2.
  • The agricultural-looking humble Land Rover Defender. It literally started its life as an agricultural implement which could also burn banana oil in 1948, far from the glamorous military career of the American Jeep. Extreme construction simplicity combined with aluminium-alloy bodywork immune to corrosion made it able to outlive modern Jeeps, SUVs and other 4x4 animals by decades, and has remained unchanged in that time (excluding a few engine upgrades). It has become the hallmark of African safaris, the all-enduring donkey able to carry what breaks the camel's back and a bit more. And the British military still clings to it above all the Humvees in the world.
    • The Land Rover Perentie LRPV, part of the 'Perentie' 6x6 series of Land Rovers developed by and for the Australian army and SASR, it's essentially a Defender put on steroids to cope with the Australian conditions. Features include 2 machine gun mounts (one on a cupola, the other on the passenger's seat), 6x6 drive, a fuel capacity of 365 litres (giving it a range of about 1600 km between drinks), an integrated cab and body structure with stowing facilities for equipment and rations as well as a low profile over the crew area, and a mounting rack so it can carry its own motorcycle for scouting purposes. As demonstrated here.
      • It should be noted, however, that both the LRPV and standard 4x4 110s used by the Australian Army do away with the notoriously unreliable stock engine and install an Isuzu Diesel.
  • The American counterpart of the Ferrari... errr... the Studebaker Avanti was a car so cool that it outlived by decades the company who designed it, simply because it was too cool to drop. Although designed by the early 1960s, it was far beyond what the traditional American car was supposed to be: aerodynamic fiberglass body, modern disc brakes, modern suspension, powerful V8 engines, a design straight from Buck Rogers strips. Just after the Studebaker closure of 1964, all it took were a few enthusiastic people and leftover parts to keep production running up to The '80s, when another company took over, got bankrupt itself, let another one to take over... even when the last owner got imprisoned for fraud the brand still didn't give up. As of 2007, they were still in production. If there is more demand, a few more will be made.
    • Ian Fleming got one of the original Avantis. Knowing his taste, it was quite a statement.
    • A better example of the American counterpart to the Ferrari is the Pontiac Fiero, being a mid-engine sports car. Especially the Fiero Mera, which looks nearly identical to the Ferrari 308. Unfortunately, Ferrari sued Pontiac and they had to stop producing them. Both the Mera and the Formula models are really cool cars.
  • For 1953, some ten years before the Avanti, Studebaker produced a low-slung coupe (attributed to Avanti designer Raymond Loewy) that made everything else from Detroit look heavy, dowdy, and wearing too much chrome. As the company was in increasing financial straits it continued to use the basic design, putting it through several facelifts, the final one being the rakish Hawk GT that sold into 1964. An independent company took the cars, dropped powerful Cadillac engines in, and created the Studillac. Ian Fleming had Felix Leiter owning one.
  • Corvette ZL-1 (all of 2 made), and 1964 Corvette Grand Sport (5 built).
  • The Renault Espace F1 concept car, featured in Gran Turismo 2, is a racing minivan. It is actually a Super Prototype.
  • Almost everything Lamborghini has ever made can qualify as a Cool Car. Some of the most famous names of cars from this company are the Miura, Countach, Jalpa, Diablo, Murciélago and as of late, the Aventador. Special Mention goes to the Reventon, just looking at it is explanation enough.
    • The 1995 version of the Lamborghini Diablo SE30, it has most of the accesories removed in exchange for more horsepower and a high enough top speed to rival NASCAR, only 150 were ever made and Jamiroqaui frontman Jay Kay owned one of them, he wanted it shipped overseas so it could appear in the video for Cosmic Girl, too bad for him the car's handler couldn't resist taking the Diablo on a joyride and smashing it up beyond repair.
      • The Diablo SV (short for Super Veloce) was so fast and so good-looking (especially in yellow with big, black "SV" logo decals on the sides) that it became an icon for a video game series (see the Video Games folder on the main page).
    • On the subject of Lambo's, the Countach would count since it was the first Lamborghini to use their famous upward scissor doors. (Fact: They were used because normal doors just would not work with the design.)
      • Plus: It's designed with an angular stealth fighter design which the Reventon and Aventador take after. If the Countach is the F-117 Nighthawk then the later Reventon and Aventador would be the SR-71 Blackbird.
      • Countach itself is an Italian expression typically upon sight of a beautiful woman and simply translates as "Wow!" or "Good Lord!".
    • The Miura was still a fast car despite how long time passed since '67. It's that badass of a grandpa.
    • The Murciélago, named after the bull that survived 28 sword strokes.
    • The Murciélago's heir, the Aventador, is considered to be the best supercar of this generation, if not one of the best cars of all time. It looks amazing and it rolls like a rocket. No wonder even Jeremy Clarkson liked it.
      • The Veneno, was a divisive for the Lambo fandom, but face it: only 3 of them were made, all costing well above 3 million dollars (you heard it, THREE MILLION DOLLARS!!!), and it is currently the fastest production Lamborghini, outclassing the Aventador by just 5 km/h and losing to the Murciélago RGT (essentially a race-tuned Murciélago, yeah, it's that cool) by 2 km/h.
    • Last, but not least, the Lamborghini Egoista Concept. Built to celebrate Lamborghini's 50th anniversary, and looking like a combination of a stealth fighter, a Hot Wheels toy, the Mach 5, and a Colonial Viper; its features include a single seat, a fighter canopy, a detachable cockpit, and a friggin' targeting reticle (not that said reticle can actually be used to fire anything, of course). Its name means "selfish" in Italian. As with the Veneno, there's a sharp divide between Lambo fans who think it's the most awesome thing since sliced bread and those who think it's so over-the-top it crosses over into the realm of being lame.
  • The 2010 Onyx Ranger Rover, only 300 were ever made and GI Motors gave one of them as a free gift to none other than Lindsay Lohan.
  • The Overfinch Holland & Holland Range Rover. A collaboration between Land Rover tuner Overfinch and custom gun make Holland & Holland. In addition to all the usual luxury refinements, the car has the best optional extra ever fitted to any car in the whole of human history - a self replenishing drinks cabinet filled with Vokda, Whisky and Champagne that Overfinch will top up free off charge for the first year you own the car.
  • The Buick Regal Grand National and its siblings. Not only because it could out-accelerate the magnificent Ferrari 288GTO to 60 mph, but because it was a wolf in sheep's skin, so ugly and dated that few people would believe what sort of punch could it pack back then.
    • The Grand National eXperimental (GNX) was an especially limited run model that could outrun any contemporary car on the quarter-mile save for the Lamborghini Countach - simply using a turbocharged V6 when any performance car was expected to have a V8 or bigger! This naturally included the Chevrolet Corvette, so General Motors saw to it that the Regal never got the Grand National treatment again.
  • The Buick-powered Turbo Trans Am that paced the 1989 Indy 500. Often claimed to be the best Firebird that Buick built - engine and transmission were nearly identical to the units that were found in the GNX, and engine mods that work with a Grand National/GNX often bolt right up to the TTA without issue. Coupled to the aerodynamic F-body platform, it can not only go fast, but has the suspension to handle turns as well, even today. The three cars needed for pacecar duty out of the 1550-car run were randomly picked and only needed strobe lights and a rear-facing camera added to them in order to qualify for pacecar duty. Remains the only Pontiac Trans Am that came with a V6 engine; all others were V8s.
    • Worth noting is that the V6 in question is Buick's "Fireball" V6 design - basically their 215 V8 with two cylinders lopped off - constantly iterated and improved into what would become the GM 3800 V6, a pushrod/OHV engine that made Ward's 10 Best Engines of the 20th Century for its sheer reliability, smoothness, fuel economy, and performance, especially when turbocharged and/or supercharged (see GNX above). Small wonder why it's one of the Long-Runners of mass-produced engines and a constant candidate for engine swaps for smaller vehicles where a V8 would be impractical, especially with many examples known to exceed 300,000 miles and still keep going!
  • Duesenbergs. They were some of the biggest, fastest, and most luxurious American cars ever made and were highly regarded by even the car makers in Europe. The most famous were the Model Js.
    • The supercharged "SJ" introduced in 1932 could do 0-60 in 8.5 seconds, hit 104 mph in second gear, and top out at between 135-140. If that somehow does not impress you, keep in mind that a Duesenberg Model J typically weighed around 5,000 pounds and had the drag coefficient of a barn door—and that in 1932, most production cars couldn't do 60 mph, period. As the saying went, the only car that could pass a Duesenberg was another Duesenberg—and only with the lead driver's consent!
  • Any car that has the title of a famous racer or driver such as the Lamborghini Gallardo 550-2 Valvetino Balboni or the Mercedes-Benz SLR McLaren Stirling Moss.
  • The Mercedes-Benz Biome deserves special mention. Not because of looks or specifications (because it hasn't even been made yet), but because of how it's being made—by being lab-grown.
  • The Lamborghini Gallardo LP560-4 Polizia, You read that right, a sports car, in Italy, used as a police interceptor. Once even was the fastest police car in the world. Italians do it better indeed.
    • But now, Dubai has an entire fleet of Cool Cars for the local police department. Hold on tight: Lamborghini Aventador, Ferrari FF, Bentley Continental, Chevrolet Camaro, Mercedes-Benz SLS AMG, Aston Martin One-77, Ford Mustang GT, BMW M6. Yeah, they're comparable to the Seacrest/Redview County Police Department at this point.
  • The Pontiac Banshee concept car. It was designed by John DeLorean to be a two-seat sports car that rivaled even the Corvette in coolness in the early-mid sixties. Too bad it was shot down before production, mainly because anything able to outperform the Corvette (as the Banshee quite assuredly would be) was guaranteed to be met with a ''swift'' veto by the heads of General Motors at the time.
    • This fate nearly befell the Pontiac Fiero, another DeLorean design notable for its mid-engine configuration and light body panels. The only reason General Motors gave it the greenlight was to pitch it as an economy car with the underpowered 4-cylinder "Iron Duke" engine, as they were also reintroducing the Corvette for the 1984 model year and would not allow anything to potentially cannibalize the Corvette's coolness. It wasn't until 1985 that GM decided to give it the V6 engine in the Fiero GT configuration that it deserved from the get-go, and right as the 1988 model year gave it an under-the-hood overhaul with improved suspension and other features, the Fiero was discontinued, ending the production of the only American mass-produced RMR layout sports car.
      • The Fiero has a very devoted following today, with many owners opting to spruce it up further by swapping the engine with the later L67 3800 Supercharged V6 for even better power-to-weight ratios in line with the sports car that DeLorean wanted it to be from the beginning.
  • The Caparo T1 (originally Caparo was known as FreeStream). Basically a formula-one car designed from the ground up to be street-legal (fitted with turn-signals, headlamps, tail-lights, a rear-wing to press the tyres to the ground, and a passenger's seat). From a standstill, it takes 2.5 seconds to attain 60 mph speed. Zero to a hundred mph takes 5 seconds. Max speed, 205 mph. They actually chose to omit a roof because to fit it with a roof would require air-conditioning, which would cost enough horse-power to actually render that 205 mph speed unreachable. Problem is, when you travel at sensible traffic speeds, you have so little downforce, the tyres have next to no traction whatsoever. Remarking that "it's possibly the most amazing, maybe the fastest, and almost certainly the scariest car ever made", Top Gear host Jeremy Clarkson said this about picking the short straw when the time came to choose who would take one for a test-drive, in one of only a handful (countable on the fingers of one hand) of times that Clarkson has dropped his trademark sarcasm-heavy, blasé façade he wears in most of his reviews.
    Clarkson: It hasn't had a particularly easy birth. At a press launch, a Dutch journalist was in it when some aspects of the front suspension came adrift and it speared off into the undergrowth. Then, at the Goodwood Festival of Speed the throttle jammed wide open. And that happened again when Fifth Gear were testing it. And then, at 150 mile an hour, it caught fire massively, burning the driver, Jason Plato, quite badly on the hand, the neck, and the face...And now it's my turn.
  • The Pope-mobile. Only the best for the head of the Catholic Church!
  • The Daewoo Lacetti. Average-looking, but now popular again, despite criticism at the time. Its Spiritual Successor, the Chevrolet Cruze hasn't quite got this response, though.
  • The Holden Hurricane. So cool that when they found it again in 2006, it was returned to Holden who promptly undertook a massive restoration process (right down to duplicating the original paint) that took 3 years to complete, and was only just revealed recently in October 2011.
  • You wouldn't expect a rather mundane car company like American Motors Corporation (aka AMC, now bought out by Chrysler and later turned into the Eagle company) to show up here, but take a good look at the AMX/3. Sadly, this car never reached the market due to exorbitant costs, bumper regulations during the 1970s, and a crippling labor union strike that pulled the rug under this could-have-been head-turner on wheels. However, while the AMX/3 never went into production, they did produce a bunch of other cool cars, like the outlandish red white and blue muscle car, the American Rebel Machine. They also made the AMC Spirit AMX - the first American car to compete in the 24 hours of Nurburgring - and it won both first and second place in its class of 100+ cars - also one of the few racing cars to receive a documentary. The Javelin AMX, a car designed to compete with the giants like the Ford Mustang Boss, curb-stomped most of the other racers in the SCCA races.
  • The Chevrolet Confederate BA Deluxe Sport Coupe was built in true 1950s style, with a large body, chrome all over, whitewall tires, and ridiculous curved bits here and there. The only problem? It was made in 1932, and it generally handled like a '30s car, with the most glaring problem being its low engine power.
  • The SSC Ultimate Aero comes to mind; it beat the original Bugatti Veyron as world's fastest car and was American, which is impressive depending on your opinion of American cars (which some people hold in very low regard).
    • The Ultimate Aero has been discontinued in favor of an even cooler car, the Tuatara. It has been nicknamed by its fans the Batmobile of Heaven, and has been created to challenge the Bugatti Veyron Super Sport.
  • Three words: Hennessey Venom GT. One review of it says: "The Venom GT scrambles Koenigseggs for breakfast, eats Bugatti Veyrons for lunch and flosses with Pagani Huayras." Even Steven Tyler owns one of them!
    • Tyler doesn't just own one of them, he owns the very first Spyder variant of it. He went to Hennessey, asked for an open-top version (which then didn't exist yet), and they ended up making one for him. Awesome.
    • Zig-zagged since it is a Pimped-Out Car technically; in essence a Lotus Exige with a Chevrolet V8 engine. Some may argue that it is not a series production car, but a complete tuned car since Hennessey is basically a tuner specializing in high-powered exotics and sport utility vehicles.
    • In fact, it would have beaten the Veyron for the Guinness world record for Fastest Production Car in the world, but it didn't have enough models produced to qualify for the achievement, and thus is the only reason the dumb-ol' Veyron still holds the world record.
  • The Phantom Corsair. A one off concept car made in 1938. Only the designer's death prevented a full production run. Just look at it.
    • Beside the design, the Corsair got around the clanging associated with 1930s solid-axle cars and dirt-roads by having every single outer panel lined with a layer of cork on the inside. Driving felt like riding a high speed train on rails.
  • "Boomerjinks" does car-cosplay (or "carsplay").
  • Two words: Hot rods. Take any 1920-1950s era car, slap them with high performance kits, and you've got yourself a car that can compete with modern-era sports cars, even if they won't be able to match their performance. It is not a good idea to call these kind of cars Rice Burners, unless the owner was really thinking that way. This custom 1926 Ford Model T is a great example of a Hot Rod. Yes, even the humble Model T, which actually was an Alleged Car back in the day, can, with the right modifications, be turned into a high-brow, breathtakingly cool speedster.
  • The Ariel Atom. The original had a simple 2 litre Honda Engine, but was able to outpace and outmaneuver several hypercars due to having almost no weight. A couple of years later, Ariel released a version with a 500 bhp V8 engine, which is currently the second-fastest road-going car Top Gear has ever tested.
  • On the subject of track day cars, the BAC Mono. It's the closest you'll get to a Formula One car that's road legal. It has one seat, a Ford inline-4 engine tuned up by Cosworth, an F1 style sequential gearbox and a rather magnificent and unique body shape for the best aerodynamics. It's so stable and all of the components, including the driver, are all lined up at the middle for the best weight distribution and balance. The cockpit is even lined with hydrophobic upholstery for when you might be racing in the rain (or wet yourself from the insane acceleration and its ability to corner at speeds that other cars would overshoot at)
  • Ladies and gentlemen, behold... The Pagani Huayra. Designed to be the perfect hypercar, it is astonishing in all point-of-views. Each of the car's components are manufactured from all around the world! And it holds the current record in the Top Gear test track! Heck, it's named after a wind god in South America! Twin-turbo V12, four individual deploying spoilers that actuate at different speeds and help you lean into turns as well, each wheel is manually crafted from a block of aluminium along with its name badge, you even get a conventional gearshift along with the sequential paddles and many interior components have many small details to give it that Steam Punk vibe.
  • The Superbus is going to be a public bus in the Netherlands that looks like a futuristic limo with gull-wing doors. And its top speed is going to be 250 km/h.
  • The fastest land vehicle in the world, the ThrustSSC is most definitely this. It's got two jet engines for crying out loud.
  • The Nissan Skyline GT-R R32. When it came out in 1989 it could be just as fast as Porsches and Ferraris of the same era. Also it was equipped with an electronic torque splitting system called the "ATTESA-ETS" which would send power on demand to the front to help stabilise the car. Many people (including reviewers) said it was a "20th century car with 21st century technology".
    • The Group-A racecar was even more impressive. In its debut year it won every single race in the Japanese Touring Car Champinship (JGTC), and won the championship 5 times in a row. In Australia, it earned its infamous nickname "Godzilla" due to its monstrous 650 hp engine, where especially in the 1000 km race of Mt Panorama in Bathurst, when it dominated the competition. Even in the following year, when it had boost restriction, weight penalty, and even crashed, it still managed to win. This eventually made the officials to ban any kind of turbocharged engines. This car was the very reason V8 Supercars is how it is now.
    • Any mention of the letters "GT-R" would not be complete without mentioning the R32's successors: the R33 and R34 variants have been very prolific in the tuner scenes, especially the latter as the rest of the entries above will testify. Then there's their Spiritual Successor, the supercar-beater known as the R35; while it ditches the "Skyline" name and the old RB26DETT engine that its predecessors had, it still stands testament to the tried-and-tested formula.
  • The Koenigsegg One:1. It was designed to have a 1:1 horsepower-to-kilogram curb weight ratio, and it has succeeded.
    • Heck, it has a Ford-based V8 engine almost always used in every Koenigsegg machine, cranked Up to Eleven.
  • In 1938, tractor builder Minneapolis-Moline decided that a cool car shouldn't even need to be a car.
  • Any car with gull-wing doors.
    • Then one of the best examples would be the Mercedes-Benz SLS AMG that not only has gull-wing doors but they're even rigged with explosive charges just-in-case the car wound up turned upside down. As per Black Series tradition, the SLS AMG Black Series improves upon the initial SLS, adding a fixed wing and making it a bit less tail-happy.
    • The above Pagani Huayra uses gull-wing doors compared to its Zonda-series counterparts.
  • Any car with a mid-engine RWD (RMR) layout, due to weight distribution and generally just looking plain cool - if the driver can handle the lift-off oversteer and snap oversteer that tends to happen in inexperienced hands.
    • Examples include the Pontiac Fiero, Toyota MR2, Lancia Stratos, McLaren F1, and way too many Ferrari and Lamborghini models to count. Some Porsche models also opt for mid-engine (in front of the rear axle) instead of rear-engine (behind the rear axle) layouts. All of them are Cool Cars, even the more affordable, lower-powered ones.
  • The KTM X-Bow is an ultra lightweight super car that uses a 300 horsepower Audi engine and can generate 2 g's of lateral acceleration. Truly amazing car made by a truly amazing bike manufacturer.
  • Yamaha OX99-11. Only three Super Prototypes were built by a Japanese bike maker, but it is a Formula One / Group C racecar-like supercar, combined the Formula One technologies (Yamaha-supplied 3.5-litre 400 hp V12, middle-seat) with Yamaha's motorcycle expertise (tandem seating arrangement).
  • In the 1980s, Honda developed the NSX, Japan's first ever true sports car. Since Japanese regulations at the time prevent domestic-marketed cars from having more than 280 hp, Honda focused on everything else. The car has advanced aerodynamics and styling (inspired by an F-16 fighter jet) as well as a 3.0 L V6 NA engine with Honda's famous VTEC variable valve timing technology, and the car's all-aluminium body (the first in the world ever at that time) grants it a 200 kg weight saving compared to an equivalent steel body. The NSX and the aformentioned Skyline GT-R R32 are one of the very few JDM cars that can match Porsches or Ferraris of their era. Production for the car ceased in 2005, but the NSX returned recently- the first ever car of the second generation was just sold for 1.2 million dollars.
  • Third-generation Ford Falcon. Famous for racing, and for one being the base for a V8 Interceptor conversion. Although the one in the film is impossible to get now, so similar versions from other years are used.
  • First and second generation Holden Monaro. Also the smaller Torana, designed to out-turn the larger Fords it was racing against; particularly the A9X version as raced at Bathurst by Peter Brock.
  • Your Chrysler Valiant not very cool? Why not try The Charger instead! Apart from the difficulty in finding one, of course...
  • The Toyota Hilux 2.4 D and Mercedes W123/W116/W126 in diesel versions can be hit with most types of punishment one can give to a car... and still keep going. There are reports of Mercedes 200Ds that managed to turn half a million miles, which is more than most cars will go throught their entire life, and never broke down while doing that!
  • The Blackbird, a collaboration between visual effects company The Mill and JemFX. A custom-made vehicle made for use in car commercials produced by the former, The Blackbird has the ability to change wheelbase to the exact length of the car being advertised. As well as being able to simulate that car's exact acceleration and shift ratios.
  • The Jeep Wrangler. It’s a convertible and an SUV rolled into one. It's the perfect vehicle for someone who loves adventure and going off-road. And since it's held onto a lot of the design features from the Jeeps of old, it's got a cool rugged and retro look all its own.
  • The Aston Martin Valkyrie, with a V12 making 1130 horsepower without forced induction, in a car weighing just 2270 pounds. There's also an AMR Pro version which is even faster.
    • Its main rival, the Mercedes-AMG One (fka Project One), is no slouch either. Heavily based on the Formula One title-winning W07 Hybrid, and tested by none other than their ace pilot Lewis Hamilton, it features that car's small, yet insanely powerful turbocharged hybrid V6 modified for road use. Its four electric motors eliminate turbo lag and improve the car's efficiency, so it can use the engine's full power at all times.
  • The Mercedes-Benz Silver Arrow Silver Lightning looks less than a conventional car and look more straight from a Ridge Racer title.
  • The Delahaye 175/178 Roadster? Not bad. Put on a custom body by coachbuilder Saoutchik? Frequently called the best-looking car of all time.
  • How do you make a Toyota Prius cool? Well, by turning it into this. Yes, there's a Toyota Prius race car, and it's just as cool as it sounds.
  • In 1994, Volvo had a brilliant idea to turn an estate car into a race car in BTCC. The result is this and while the Estate was mostly unsuccessful on the track (it did qualified third at one race and have a best finish of 5th, which it achieved twice), the Volvo 850 Estate became a cult legend in the racing community thanks to Volvo's bravery and commitment to run the estates.

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