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  • An odd In-Universe/meta version of this trope can be seen in Adventure Time, in regards to Fionna. At first she seems like nothing more then a gender flipped version of Finn, but a later episode suggests that her voice and various personality quirks were also sub-consciously taken from Ice King's girlfriend, Betty.
  • In The Avengers: Earth's Mightiest Heroes!, Black Widow is a costumed S.H.I.E.L.D. agent who apparently defects to HYDRA, but is really a triple agent reporting directly to Nick Fury. Then he disappears, so she can no longer prove this. That's Spider-Woman's story in New Avengers.
    • Nick Fury's Season 1 design is a fusion of his Ultimate and classic designs. He's black like Ultimate Fury, but has a full head of hair with gray temples like the original Fury, and also wears the latter's trademark S.H.I.E.L.D. jumpsuit.
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    • Along those same lines, Mockingbird is given most of Spider-Woman's plot from Secret Invasion, right down to getting kidnapped and replaced by Veranke, the Skrull Queen.
    • Baron Zemo is another one, mixing first Zemo (fought Cap during World War II and leads Masters Of Evil) with his son, the second Zemo (costume and personality, as well as the fact that his face was hideously disfigured due to Captain America's actions).
    • Viper takes Elektra's place as the villain who kicks off the Secret Invasion storyline after it's revealed she's really a Skrull.
    • There is also Hulk, who takes from different versions of himself at different periods of time, mixing his original personality, well-known Savage Hulk and recent Green Scar Hulk.
    • The New Avengers are basically given the origin story of the Young Avengers.
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    • William "Crossfire" Cross is given his cousin Darren Cross's role in Scott Lang's origin story.
    • While the Red Skull is largely the same as his comic book counterpart, his role of being responsible for Bucky's death via the explosion of a rocket plane ( that is until Captain America touched the Cosmic Cube and (unknowingly) altered reality to make it so Bucky survived the blast of the explosion in the 21st century) resembles that of the first Baron Zemo, while the fact that he is portrayed as the mastermind behind Bucky becoming Winter Soldier resemble that of Aleksander Lukin.
  • The Avengers: United They Stand: The team's government liaison is a thin, clean-shaven Obstructive Bureaucrat named Raymond Sikorski. He bears little resemblance to his comic counterpart, a portly, mustachioed man who was generally helpful to the Avengers, and has much more in common with Henry Peter Gyrich, Sikorski's predecessor in the comics. In fact, the animated Sikorski's physical appearance and meddling nature (right down to forcing The Falcon onto the team) come directly from Gyrich.
  • The Batman:
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    • Dr. Hugo Strange is initially introduced as the morally ambiguous director of Arkham Asylum, who views the insanity of Batman's villains (and Batman himself) as a fascinating riddle. While he soon becomes the Mad Scientist of the comics, the early appearances owe more to Dr Jeremiah Arkham. Additionally, his role in the episode "Brave New World" was originally meant for the Scarecrow, though Strange does predates Scarecrow and some of his earliest appearances saw him employ similar hallucinogenic toxins to Crane.
    • In the final season, Firefly becomes this, when he came into contact with an isotope and gained the powers and (partly) the codename of minor Batman baddie Doctor Phosphorus.
    • Alan Burnett said the Flash was Barry Allen, but the character has a personality more in line with Wally West and Bart Allen. Like Wally, he also needed to consume large amounts of food to keep up with his ultra-fast metabolism.
    • The Batman in general had a lot of this, due to the Bat Embargo preventing them from being able to use villains from Batman Begins and The Dark Knight (Batman and Joker being the exceptions). Accordingly, Ethan Bennett/Clayface is similar to Harvey Dent/Two-Face (and a similar appearance to Crispus Allen), Black Mask is similar to Ra's al Ghul, and Hugo Strange's later appearances (particularly Strange New World) use him as a stand-in for Scarecrow. They were also unable to use Robin due to Teen Titans, so Batgirl wound up inheriting a lot of his Kid Sidekick traits (at least until Robin was able to appear in later seasons).
  • Batman: The Brave and the Bold:
    • Similar to Venom is Firestorm. In the original comics, Firestorm was an amalgam of slacker student Ronnie Raymond and physicist Martin Stein, then Raymond and Mikhail Arkadin, then Raymond on his own. After his death, the new Firestorm was teenager Jason Rusch, who would combine with whomever happened to be nearby but would eventually combine with his friend Mick Wong, then Stein, then Firehawk, then his girlfriend Gehenna. The animated version was formed by a combination of gym teacher Ronnie Raymond and his student, a pre-teen Jason Rusch (now a science whizz-kid to provide Stein's atomic knowledge). As of Brightest Day and the New 52, the Rusch/Raymond combo has appeared in the comics as well.
    • In the comics, the Golden Age Cheetah was Priscilla Rich, a wealthy American socialite who had no powers and wore a cheetah costume, while the post-Crisis Cheetah was Barbara Anne Minerva, a British archaeologist who was turned into a superhuman cheetah creature by the plant god Urzkartaga. The TB&TB version of Cheetah is Priscilla Rich, but like her successor, possesses superhuman abilities that were given to her by Urzkartaga.
    • The TB&TB incarnation of Damian Wayne combines elements of three separate children of Bruce Wayne from different continuities - obviously he gets his name from Grant Morrison's Batman, but the story he appears in is more like the Golden Age "Imaginary Stories" with Bruce Wayne Jr. (complete with the Framing Story of Alfred writing fiction). And his mother isn't Talia, like comics Damian, or Kathy Kane, like Bruce Jr., but Catwoman like Helena Wayne of Earth-2, who became a vigilante in order to avenge the death of her mother, and continued on, taking her father's place after his subsequent death.
    • The Weeper in "Joker: The Vile and the Villainous" is based on a Golden Age character who was a foe of Bulletman, but the story itself is based on a team-up between Joker and a character called Willy the Weeper. The composite character has the original Weeper's real name and appearance (and is shown fighting Bulletman in flashback), but like Willy is an Ineffectual Sympathetic Villain who cries genuine tears for his victims.
    • Krull the Eternal is mostly Vandal Savage, but his name and appearance come from Captain Marvel's caveman enemy, King Kull. He also takes visual cues and a voice actor from Darkseid's son Kalibak.
    • The Hunter's name and appearance come from the Faceless Hunters who appeared in Strange Adventures. His role as humanoid frontman for Starro is loosely based on Cobi from R.E.B.E.L.S.
    • Equinox is two Justice League of America villains: Libra (balance-obsessed, cosmic-powered villain) and the Gray Man (embittered and crazy ex-agent of the Lords of Order).
    • OMAC enemy General Kafka is combined with the completely unrelated character Shrapnel, for no reason that's easy to figure out.
    • The Batman of Zur-En-Arrh is an existing character in his own right, but his civilian identity (largely unexplored in the comics, but heavily expanded on in the show) is heavily inspired by Clark Kent. Likewise, Vilsi Vayla is a combination of Vicki Vale (name and appearance) and Lois Lane (personality, voice, and relationship with the two Batmen).
    • In early episodes, Mongul and his sister Mongal often took over roles more associated with Darkseid and his lieutenants, like commanding the Female Furies and Steppenwolf. The show generally stopped doing this after Darkseid was properly introduced about halfway through Season 2.
    • The Reverse Flash is Eobard Thawne, but he has Hunter Zolomon's red and black eyes.
  • Ben 10 (2016) turns Kevin into a composite of the Kevin from the original series and Albedo from Alien Force, fittingly both Evil Counterparts to Ben. Here, Kevin has his own counterpart to Ben's Omnitrix called the Antitrix, which turns him into stronger and darker-looking versions of Ben's alien forms similar to Albedo's Ultimatrix in Omniverse.
  • The Black Lightning shorts on DC Nation imply that Black Vulcan, Black Lightning's Captain Ersatz from Super Friends, was simply an identity that he used in the past.
  • The Dexter's Laboratory episode "Mock 5", an Affectionate Parody of Speed Racer, had Dee Dee playing the roles of both Spritle and Racer X.
  • The DC Animated Universe had a whole lot of these:
    • Batman: The Animated Series:
      • Clayface is this of the original three men to bear the name in the comics. He's an actor (Basil Karlo) named Matt Hagen who gained shapeshifting powers (Matt Hagen) but consequentially became horribly disfigured (Preston Payne).
      • Vertigo is a composite of the Green Arrow foe Count Vertigo and Ebeneezer Darrk. His name, powers, and Eastern European heritage come from Count Vertigo, while his status as a pupil of Ra's al Ghul and a turncoat member of the League of Assassins (or Society of Shadows in the case of the series) comes from Darrk.
      • The second Robin, who appears in the final season, is a composite of the second and third Robins, Jason Todd and Tim Drake, possessing Jason's backstory and general attitude and Tim's name and computer expertise.
      • Rupert Throne has the name and appearance of the comic book version of Rupert Thorne, who was a corrupt politician. His role in the animated series is more similar to Sal Maroni, as he became Gotham's top mob boss by overthrowing Arnold Stromwell (a Captain Ersatz of Carmine Falcone) and also assumes Sal Maroni's role in Harvey Dent's transformation into Two-Face.
    • Batman Beyond once paid homage to the Fantastic Four with the Terrific Trio, which actually consists of two examples: most prominently is team leader Magma, a Rock Monster like the Thing but also associated with fire like the Human Torch and is a scientist like Mister Fantastic (unlike 2-D Man, who had Reed Richards's powers), while Freon has more in similarity with Vapor of the U-Foes (enemies of the Hulk) than with the Invisible Girl/Woman.
    • Superman: The Animated Series:
      • Kyle Rayner is a combination of Kyle and Hal Jordan. He has Kyle's name, personality, youthfulness and profession as an artist, and Hal's brown hair, costumenote , and origin story.
      • Sinestro takes Legion's place as the one who fatally wounded Abin Sur and caused him to crash land on Earth in the first place.
      • The Flash is a combination of the second and third Flashes: Barry Allen (occupation and Base of Operations) and Wally West (name and personality) respectively. Justice League added to this by giving Wally Barry's role as a founding member of the Justice League and his occupation as a forensics scientist.
      • While Brainiac on this series has the motifs, methods, and personality of his comic book counterpart, his history is essentially a mild variation of Eradicator's.
      • Jax-Ur is a weird example. He is Jax-Ur in name only, as he is pretty much General Zod in terms of background, role and modus operandi.note  In terms of visual appearance, animated Jax-Ur was somewhat closer to Superman II General Zod. His personality was also borrowed from Terence Stamp's Zod. Likewise, Jax-Ur's ally, Mala, shared her name with a male villain, but is more in-line with Ursa from Superman II (even being voiced by Sarah Douglas in her second appearance) or Faora Hu-Ul.
      • The show's interpretation of the Parasite is a combination of the Rudy Jones and Maxwell Jensen Parasites. He has Rudy Jones's name and origin of being a janitor who was mutated while trying to rob the company he worked for and Maxwell Jensen's ability to absorb the memories and powers of whoever he touches (In the comics, the Rudy Jones Parasite could only absorb his victims' life energy, although this later got retconned to match the series).
      • In an odd example of a composite location, the planet Argo is a combination of the comics' Argo City (name and being Supergirl's home) and Daxam (Krypton's sister planet whose inhabitants are nearly identical to Kryptonians).
    • Justice League:
      • John Stewart takes over Hal Jordan's role as the Green Lantern who helped found the Justice League and Hawkgirl's true love from Hawkman. Additionally, Static Shock gave John Hal's role in Sinestro's expulsion from the GLC.
      • Flash foe Mirror Master was the Sam Scudder version, but possessed the amped up, supernatural abilities of his successor, Evan McCulloch.
      • Also in Justice League Unlimited Steven Mandragora is a combination of Tobias Whale, Black Lightning's Arch-Enemy and Stefano Mandragora, the man murdered the Huntress' parents. Steven Mandragora has Tobias Whale's look and physical strength, but has Mandragora's name and status as the man who murdered Huntress' parents.
      • One brief gag during the episode "The Greatest Story Never Told" had Booster Gold see what appears to be Superman fall from the sky, only for "Superman" to turn towards Booster, showing that the other half of their body is Batman(itself a nod to the Silver Age villain Composite Superman), then addressed Booster with the voice of Wonder Woman.
      • Another in-universe example is when Superman is under the power of the Black Mercy, he imagines himself living on Krypton and married to a woman who is obviously a composite of Lois Lane and Lana Lang, named Loana.
      • In "Ancient History", it's revealed that the Thangaran Shayara Hol, based on Silver Age Hawkgirl, is a reincarnation of the Egyptian Queen Chay-Ara, like the Golden Age Shiera Saunders Hawkgirl. In this version Chay-Ara was actually Thangaran, as was her husband, who is named Katar Hol like the Silver Age Hawkman, rather than Khufu Kha-Tar. Additionally, Hawkgirl takes Aquaman's role as a founding member of the League.
      • As mentioned with Hawkgirl, when the show did do a proper Hawkman, they merged Katal Hol with Carter Hall, via making Katar a past life of Carter's. Related to this, Shadow Thief is actually Carter's dark side and not a human thief named Carl Sands.
      • The Justice Lords started off as an adaptation of the Crime Syndicate (an evil version of the League from an alternate reality), but morphs into a commentary about characters like The Authority (a group of expies of various League members who are willing to use lethal force).
  • The 2018 version of DC Super Hero Girls:
    • Much like Super Best Friends Forever, Barbara Gordon is the Batgirl used, but her personality is more in-line with Stephaine Brown's.
    • Also like SBFF, Supergirl has the build and personality of Power Girl, only this time, she also sports Pee Gee's shorter hair.
  • Dilbert revived LOUD HOWARD, a character who'd proved quite popular with readers of the strip but who the author thought was too flat to make much use of. To make him more interesting, the show merged him with Nervous Ted and had him shout constantly about trivial worries.
  • The 1990s Discworld animated series replaces the unnamed Mended Drum barman in Wyrd Sisters with Hibiscus Dunelm, the new proprietor in Soul Music. Soul Music also gives Adrian "Big Mad Drongo" Turnipseed all the lines belonging to the other two students at the High Energy Magic Building, Skazz and Tez the Terrible. He's also given Skazz's Blinding Bangs.
  • DuckTales (2017): New character Lena is an Expy of Minima DeSpell from the 80s comics, being Magica DeSpell's niece who befriends Webby. However, her backstory of actually being Magica's shadow who was granted sentience after being separated from her host comes from a one-shot character from an episode of the original 1987 DuckTales cartoon.
  • The Fantastic Four (1967):
    • "The Invasion of the Super-Skrulls" ends with the FF forcing the titular villain to shapeshift into a cow, and then hypnotizing him into believing he really is a cow so that he'll never hurt anyone again. That's not how the Super-Skrull was beaten in Fantastic Four #18 (The issue the episode was adapted from), but is how the group of Skrull invaders in Fantastic Four #2 were disposed of.
    • Alicia Masters never appeared, so when the show did an adaptation of the original three-part Galactus storyline from the comics, her pivotal role was instead given to Sue Storm.
  • In The Fantastic Four (1978), Medusa takes her husband Black Bolt's place as the ruler of The Inhumans.
  • Terri Cloth is one of the five main Garbage Pail Kids in the Garbage Pail Kids Cartoon, but she is actually a combination of two trading card characters: Terri Cloth/Dee Faced (her head being completely devoid of facial features) and Ugly Hans/Jan Hand (her face being on her hand).
  • In the original G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero animated series, the General Flagg that appears in the original "MASS Device" mini-series has the same name and role as the General Flagg from the comics, but his character design resembles that of General Austin, General Flagg's adviser from the comics.
  • G.I. Joe: Renegades:
    • Vinnie Hauser has the first name of most incarnations of Lt. Falcon, but is the brother of Duke like Falcon's animated counterpart.
    • Heavy Duty is an American soldier and Roadbock's cousin like his original incarnation, but his real name is that of his film counterpart's, Hershel Dalton (as opposed to Lamont A. Morris).
  • Iron Man
    • Julia Carpenter has a lot of elements of Pepper Potts thrown in. This is especially obvious in the second season, where her romance with Tony is given much more focus. She also uses mechanical web-shooters like the ones worn by Peter Parker, unlike in the comics, where she possesses the ability to conjure psychokinetic webbing.
    • In the comics, Force kick starts the "Armor Wars" storyline after it's discovered that his armor contains stolen Stark technology. Later in the same story, the Russian hero Titanium Man II dies after a battle with Iron Man. The show combines both roles into Crimson Dynamo, a Russian villain who is killed during a battle with Iron Man, and whose death starts the whole "Armor Wars" plot after Stark technology is discovered within his charred armor.
    • Also, in the original "Armor Wars" storyline, Justin Hammer was responsible for distributing the stolen Iron Man technology to various shady characters. One of Hammer's clients was another Corrupt Corporate Executive named Edwin Cord, who used Stark's designs to build the Firepower armor. In the TV series, Hammer is both the one who sells Tony's designs and the businessman who uses that same technology to create Firepower.
    • Speaking of which, the show's Titanium Man is the original Boris Bullski version, but his armor design is heavily influenced by that of the Gremlin, the second Titanium Man in the comics.
    • The second season also makes the modular Iron Man armor a composite suit, by giving it the ability to transform into different models, including the Hydro Armor and the Silver Centurion, which were separate (and previous) models in the comics.
    • The Mandroids wear the the same armor as the Guardsmen, and even guard the Vault like they did in the comics.
  • Iron Man: Armored Adventures:
    • The Mandarin combine elements of his comic counterpart and his son, Temugin.
    • Blizzard has the real name of Donnie Gill, the better-known Blizzard II in the comics. But his backstory as an embittered ex-Stark scientist who created the cryosuit comes from Gergor Shapanka, the original Blizzard.
    • And Justin Hammer is Titanium Man.
    • Whitney Stane is a composite of Whitney Frost (as Madame Masque) and Ezekiel Stane (as Obadiah Stane's child and a user of the Iron Monger armor).
    • The Black Knight used in the show is the villainous Nathan Garrett version, but sports the costume and clean-shaven appearance of Dane Whitman, his heroic successor.
      • The same combination (Garrett's personality and identity, Whitman's costume and physical appearance) was used for the Black Knight's appearance in the Avengers: United They Stand tie-in comic.
  • In Ivanhoe Burbank Animation, De Bracy does not appear (although he is mentioned), and Front-de-Bouef is the one who is infatuated with Rowena.
  • Ivanhoe: The King's Knight features...
    • Prince John combined with Athelstane, as Rowena's fiancé via an arranged marriage while she loves Ivanhoe and he her.
    • Philip de Malvoisin combined with Waldemar Fitzurse, as Prince John's advisor.
    • Reginald Front-de-Boeuf combined with Maurice de Bracy, as one of Prince John's knights who is in love with Rowena.
  • Johnny Test has Hank Anchorman in every season following the first; he looked much different in the first season before his design was changed to a human version of the one-off robot anchorman from "Sonic Johnny".
  • The Toyman in Justice League Action is Asian like the Hiro Okamura version of Toyman, but is also a villain like the previous iterations of the character. He also has the diminutive stature of the Toyman from Superman: The Animated Series.
  • Legion of Super-Heroes pays tribute to Superman's entire legacy of Phantom Zone criminals in the form of Drax, a young Kryptonian with a big 'Z' on his chest and an inexplicable British accent who was born in the Phantom Zone and has design elements of the non-Kryptonian Zod from Superman: Birthright.
    • The spikes on him are reminiscent of Doomsday. The pale skin may be a shout out to Bizarro as well.
    • Kel-El/Superman X is effectively a composite of Kon-El and the Superman of the 853rd century, with a little bit of Mon-El thrown in as well.
  • Marvel Rising: Secret Warriors: Ghost Spider is Gwen Stacy, but her dyed pink hair is taken from Gwenpool, another character she inspired.
  • Marvel Universe:
    • Avengers, Assemble!
      • The Falcon is similar to James Rhodes, in that he was close friends with Tony and was initially intended to pilot the War Machine armor before deciding on the Falcon suit instead. Additionally, in season 4, he becomes a fusion of different versions of himself as a Plot-Relevant Age-Up saw him trade his classic!Falcon inspired costumes in for one inspired by his MCU and Ultimate counterpart. Furthermore, related to Ultimate, his alternate self in "Planet Doom" wore a costume similar to his Ultimate costume.
      • M.O.D.O.K. has elements of the movie version of Arnim Zola, mainly his role as the Red Skull's chief scientist. MODOK later merges with the Super-Adaptoid, a completely unrelated character in the original comics. This also means he's got a humanoid robot body with his face appearing on its chest, cementing the Zola connection.
      • The Midgard Serpent is given elements of Cul, Odin's brother from Fear Itself, specifically like him, the Serpent is prophesied to kill Thor. (Although strictly speaking, Cul is decomposited from the Midgard Serpent in Norse Mythology.)
      • Hyperion is merged with The Sentry and King Hyperion from Exiles. He has the alien fortress of the former and genocidal/megalomanical tendencies of the latter. In fact, The Squadron Supreme are essentially the Squadron Sinister, a similar team of characters who predated the heroes. In particular, their speedster is called Speed Demon rather than Whizzer or Blur - this is the current identity of the Sinisters' Whizzer. They also have versions of Power Princess and Nuke, which the Sinisters never had. At their worst, the Squadron were Well Intentioned Extremists and Nighthawk left to protest their actions. Additionally, Doctor Spectrum is the Billy Roberts version, but is black like the original Kenji Obatu version.
      • The show's version of Dracula has elements of Baron Blood, such as his connections to Captain America and World War 2.
      • The Alternate Timeline version of The Defenders has a Darker and Edgier version of Hawkeye who calls himself Bullseye (after the Daredevil villain), and an evil version of Black Widow who acts and dresses exactly like Madame Masque. The former also wore the costume he wore in The Ultimates 3. Speaking of Hawkeye, in the comics, his mentor was an archer called Trick Shot. In the show, Trick Shot was the identity Hawkeye used back when he was a criminal.
      • Ant-Man is Scott Lang, but has the personality and science background of Hank Pym. The creators said they specifically designed the character to be a composite of the various Ant-Men from the comics.
      • Radioactive Man is the Russian Igor Stancheck version, but sports the costume and personality of Chen Lu, the original Radioactive Man from China.
      • A Composite Artifact: In the episode "Beneath the Surface" the animated version of the Serpent Crown functions more like the Horn of Proteus. The comicbook Crown is a source of mind-control powers and other abilities including illusions and energy blasts; the animated Crown, like the comicbook Horn, is used to control Giganto.
      • Truman Marsh is an all but In Name Only adaptation of the character, with his personality and relationship with the Avengers taken directly from Henry Peter Gyrich. It's also later revealed that Marsh is actually Ultron in disguise.
      • Baron Mordo is an unambiguous villain and sports his classic costume from the comics, but is also black like his MCU counterpart.
      • In Avengers: Secret Wars, Thunderstrike is Jane Foster instead of Eric Masterson, allowing a riff on Jane's time as Thor without losing the original Thor.
    • Guardians of the Galaxy:
      • The Universal Believers are the Universal Church of Truth, except that instead of the Matriarch, their leader is J'Son of Spartax as the Patriarch. Although it could also be argued that he's in the Magus role (since the Believers were not founded directly by Magus, as the UCT were), with Mantis as the Matriarch. This also suggests the Believers are composited with the Priests of Pama (the Kree sect that believed Mantis was the Celestial Madonna).
      • Phyla-Vell has the name, appearance and powers of her comic book counterpart, but her background as a vengeful Kree Accuser is taken from the character Hala.
    • Hulk and the Agents of S.M.A.S.H.
      • The episode "Inhuman Nature" is basically the original Inhumans storyline from Fantastic Four with A-Bomb in the role of the Human Torch (outsider who falls in love with Crystal, thereby leading his superhero team to Attilan).
      • Mainframe is reimagined as a former gaming A.I. who escalates and starts endangering real people with his games. This is very similar to an obscure villain called the Prime Mover.
    • Ultimate Spider-Man:
      • Harry Osborn becomes (the first) Venom. In most continuities he becomes the second Green Goblin while Venom is a separate character named Eddie Brock. In the final season, he continues this by bonding to the Anti-Venom symbiote, which also happened to Brock after separating from Venom in the comics.
      • Norman Osborn eventually becomes the Iron Patriot like he did in the comics, but the armor he wears is actually modeled after the one sported by James "Rhodey" Rhodes in Iron Man 3, not the one Norman had during Dark Reign. Even as the Green Goblin, he's a fusion of the Goblin of the Ultimate comics (he transforms into a hulking monster instead of wearing a costume) and the classic Goblin (using a glider and pumpkin bombs). Additionally, while his counterpart from Miles Morales's universe is closer to the actual Ultimate Goblin (having similar horns, as well as being pyrokinetic and leaping around as his mode of travel), he has wings similar to the Goblin from Spider-Man 2099
      • The origin of the Venom Symbiote also comes from Carnage's origin in Ultimate Spider-Man. The only major difference is that in the Ultimate comics, Curt Conners was the one who created the Symbiote from Peter's blood, while in the TV show, it was Doctor Octopus.
      • Peter Parker becomes the first incarnation of Carnage due to Cletus Kasady's absence.
      • Scorpio is based off Jake Fury, Nick Fury's brother from the comics, but is named after Max Fury, Nick's evil Life Model Decoy from Secret Avengers.
      • Electro starts off in his normal Earth-616 form (complete with the classic costume), but transforms into his energy-based Ultimate counterpart after an accident.
      • The Power Man used is the original Luke Cage version, but his costume is heavily based off that of Victor Alvarez, the modern Power Man.
      • Hector Ayala, the original White Tiger, is merged with his own father so that he becomes Ava Ayala's dad (he's her older brother in the comics).
      • Amadeus Cho, companion to The Incredible Hercules becomes the Iron Spider, an identity used by Peter Parker around the time of Civil War in the comics.
      • The Scorpion's ethnicity, backstory and motivation are largely taken from Davos/Steel Serpent, Iron Fist's nemesis.
      • The Vulture is the original Adrian Toomes version, but in contrast his comic book counterpart (who has no powers and relies on a winged flight suit), is an actual bird mutate like the Jimmy Natale version of the Vulture.
      • Power Man's parents are named Walter and Amanda Cage in this adaptation, thus making Luke Cage his legal birth name rather than Carl Lucas. They are based of James and Esther Lucas from the comics, but they are given the same back story of Peter Parker's parents, Richard and Mary, from the Ultimate Universe, being SHIELD scientists working on recreating the Super Soldier Serum and supposedly dying in a plane crash.
      • Scarlet Spider is a combination of both Scarlet Spiders, having Kaine's costume and personality, but being given the name Ben Reilly by Aunt May. However, he's also a Decomposite Character, as he isn't the Kaine of this universe, who's a separate clone.
      • In "Return to the Spider-Verse", the role of the Inheritors from the comic book Spider-Verse is taken by Wolf Spider, an evil alternate Peter Parker. There's also a Spider-Gwen who wasn't bitten by a radioactive spider, but duplicates the powers with technology, like a non-steampunk version of May Reilly/Lady Spider of Earth-803 in the comics and additionally, fused with Ultimate!Gwen as this Spider-Gwen hails from the same universe as Miles. Blood Spider is also an alternate version of Peter Parker, as opposed to the comics, where he was a mercenary named Michael Bingham.
      • The show's version of Spider-Woman turns out to be Mary Jane Watson. Who as Carnage Queen also had elements of Adriana Soria/Spider-Queen and Ultimate Gwen Stacy Clone/Carnage II.
      • In the final episode, Crossbones is transformed into the new Lizard.
      • Mysterio is Francine Beck, daughter of Quentin Beck. The character is loosely based on Maguire Beck, a cousin of Quentin's who wanted to avenge his death, but who used the Jack O'Lantern identity to do it, teaming up with her cousin's apprentice Daniel Beckhart as the new Mysterio. The "Francine" name appears to come from Francis Klum, who briefly took the Mysterio name at around the same time and was challenged by Daniel.
      • In the "Spider-Slayers" arc, the Slayers have elements of the Spider-Clones (especially the "Maximum Clonage" and "Ultimate Clone Saga" versions, which had more variants than "duplicate Spider-Man") and Deathweb, a team of spider-themed villains that fought the West Coast Avengers and included a huge guy (Therak) and a white-clad teleporter (Anthro).
  • Marvel's Spider-Man:
    • In the comics, the Jackal has a brother named Raymond, who is a teacher at Midtown High. Here, the Jackal is Raymond. Additionally, he's fused with Arthur Stacy as he's Gwen's uncle.
    • Flash Thompson is a jock like in the comics, but is interested in science (but not very good at it) like his Marvel Cinematic Universe counterpart, and cuts his hair extremely short like his Amazing Spider-Man counterpart. He also displays the Reformed Bully characteristics that he eventually gained in The Amazing Spider-Man and the post-high school issues of the original comics. Additionally, while he did have his Agent Venom time, this Flash takes over Eddie Brock's role as the symbiote's first post-Spidey host.
    • Kraven fused the skills of his 616 self, the reality show stardom of his Ultimate counterpart, and a look his second son Alyosha wore when he fought The Punisher.
    • Gwen Stacy is a fusion of her 616 and Spider-Gwen incarnations.
    • Screwball is Liz Allan instead of a separate person.
    • Harry Osborn, much like in the Ultimate Spider-Man comics, is the Hobgoblin, in this particular case, he's fused with post-Face–Heel Turn Phil Urich as this Harry has spiky black hair, as opposed to the reddish-brown of past versions of Harry, and wields a flame sword.
    • Electro is based on the second one, Francine Frye, but has an Energy Being form similar to the Ultimate incarnation of Max Dillon, her being black might also be from The Amazing Spider Man 2's version of Dillon, and she's also an Engineer like Dillon.
  • The enemy robots in Mega Man: Fully Charged take cues from robots from the orginal series whenever possible. For example, Wood Man appears to be a combination of his classic counterpart, as well as having ninja tricks like Shadow Man and a solider's mentality like Commando Man.
  • In the Moominvalley episode "Snufkin and the Park-Keeper", the kindhearted and well-meaning Hemulen policewoman appears to be based on the kindhearted cousin of the officious (and male) Hemulan jailer in Moomnsummer Madness. The Park-Keeper himself serves a more active role in the investigation, essentially taking the novel jailer's place.
  • A few of the My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic ponies are Composite Characters with other ponies, due to loss of trademark on the G1 ponies that were meant to be used. Surprise became Pinkie Pie, Firefly got turned into Rainbow Dash, Glory became Rarity, Twilight became Twilight Twinkle (though her name was changed to "Twilight Sparkle"), and Posey became Fluttershy.
    • Pinkie Pie is the best example of this. G1 Surprise was a fun-loving prankster who used that quality to confuse her enemies when it was time to get dangerous. However, G3 Pinkie Pie was a party planner. FIM Pinkie has Surprise's madcapness and then some but she's the foremost party planner in Ponyville. A lot of FIM characters are a G1 character's personality with a G3 character's name, but the FIM Pinkie Pie is really a fusion of Pinkie Pie and Surprise instead of just being Surprise in Pinkie Pie's colors. (Compare to Rainbow Dash, whose G3 incarnation was more like Rarity in personality, none of it carrying over to FIM RD aside from her color scheme.)
    • Surprise was originally a Pegasus, and Posey an Earth pony, but the races were switched for their G4 counterparts.
    • In the case of Applejack, Hasbro actually kept her trademark and thus just updated her G1 design to the G4 style, but she did inherent human character Megan's cowgirl aesthetic and Team Mom status. Applejack's older brother is a composite of some of the G1 Big Brother Ponies and gained G3 Applejack's color scheme.
  • In the Arrowverse animated series Freedom Fighters: The Ray, the title character's look and name come from Raymond Terrill, the second Ray in the comics. His sexuality comes from The Multiversity's version of Lanford Terrill, the original Ray. His origin appears to be based loosely on Lucien Gates, the New 52 Ray, with Lanford's journalism background.
  • In the final episode of the first season of Scooby-Doo and Scrappy-Doo "Ransom of Scooby Chief", which mostly focuses on Scrappy and his friends (Velma, Daphne and Fred are only seen at beginning and end, Shaggy and Scooby spend most of the episode kidnapped), the three of them show combined traits of the typical gang:
    • Scrappy of himself and Fred, taking the role of The Leader and initially being the one to initiate the rescue operation.
    • Duke of Velma and Scooby, showing signs of being The Smart Guy and holding Scrappy back when he gets too hotheaded (Which Scooby usually does)
    • Annie of Shaggy and Daphne, being The Chick and relying on Duke and Scrappy to figure things out, and being rather cautious when it comes to the kidnappers.
    • The cast of The New Scooby-Doo and Scrappy-Doo Show featured Daphne as a regular but not Fred or Velma, so Daphne became a composite of all three characters, taking on Fred's role of the leader of the group and Velma's role as the smart one who analyzes the clues, while still occupying her old role as Distressed Damsel.
  • Silver Surfer:
    • Frankie Raye takes Alicia Masters' place as the human woman who convinces the Surfer to turn against Galactus and spare Earth.
    • Drax is changed from a dead human recreated by Kronos to a living brain in an android body built by Mentor. This essentially makes him the show's equivalent of ISAAC, the advanced Artificial Intelligence created by Mentor in the comics.
  • Parodied in the The Simpsons episode "I Am Furious (Yellow)", when Bart claims his comic character "Angry Dad" is not based purely on Homer, but is a composite of his dad, Lisa's dad, and Maggie's dad.
  • The Smurfs
    • Greedy Smurf is a composite of both Baker Smurf and Chef Smurf and the original comic book version of Greedy.
    • Painter Smurf in the cartoon show combined elements of the comic book version and Sculptor Smurf. He still is that way in the live-action movie series.
    • Brainy combines himself with King Smurf from the original comic book story to become the title villain in the cartoon show episode of the same name.
  • In The Spectacular Spider-Man, Montana of the Enforcers and the Shocker (originally Herman Schultz in the comics) are now a single character. His partner in the Enforcers, Fancy Dan, becomes Ricochet (two heroes in the comics continuity, one of whom was Spidey himself). The Ox also gets a power suit, but stays the Ox.
    • Their boss, Lonnie "Tombstone" Lincoln, also uses the alter-ego "Big Man," originally Frederick Foswell in the comics. (Interestingly, Foswell was in the series, and said that he knew if anyone was the Big Man, it wasn't Lincoln; it's unclear if something would have developed with this had the show not been Screwed by the Lawyers.) As a billionaire Villain with Good Publicity he's also far more reminiscent of The Kingpin than thug-for-hire comic Tombstone, or even the original Big Man, who was more of a street gang leader. Word of God says they were originally going to include the Kingpin as "the Big Man of Crime," but had to Write Around Trademarks since they were only allowed to use official Spider-Man characters. Kingpin is technically a Daredevil villain, so Sony didn't have the rights to him.
    • And the Cat, Black Cat's Gentleman Thief father, is combined with Uncle Ben's killer, which in turn makes Black Cat combined with Jessica Carradine.
    • There's also Sable Manfredi. Her role as the loyal daughter of the elderly crime-lord Silvio "Silvermane" Manfredi comes from Alisha Silver in Spider-Man: The Animated Series. Her name and appearance are clearly based on Nazi-hunter and occasional Spidey ally Silver Sable (Silver Sablinova).
    • Liz Allan's brother Mark has a gambling addiction, much like Betty Brant's brother Bennett in the comics.
  • In Spider-Man (1967), Mary Jane Watson is Captain Stacy's niece, presumably to fill the void left by Gwen Stacy, his daughter in the comics.
  • In Spider-Man: The Animated Series:
    • Felicia Hardy and Mary Jane Watson both received characteristics of Gwen Stacy due to Gwen being Demoted to Extra. Felicia retains Gwen's original Lovable Alpha Bitch characterization from her early appearances, while Mary Jane has her more wholesome personality from later comics, as well as receiving Gwen's death, although she is trapped in another dimension instead of dying.
    • Electro mixes in elements of Albert Malik, the second Red Skull, by having Electro's costume and powers and much of Malik's background by being a Russian Agent, having ties to the conspiracy of the deaths of Peter's parents, and impersonating the real Red Skull.
    • Tombstone is turned into an enforcer for Silvermane, a role in the comics that's primarily held by minor Spider-Man villain Man Mountain Marko.
    • Spider-Carnage is created when the Carnage symbiote merges with an alternate universe version of Peter Parker, unlike in the comics, where Spider-Carnage was the result of a merger between the symbiote and Ben Reilly.
    • Much like the live-action Daredevil movie would do years later, the show made the Wilson "The Kingpin" Fisk the one responsible for the murder of Jack Murdock, combining Fisk with Roscoe "The Fixer" Sweeney, the man who killed Jack in the comics.
  • Super Best Friends Forever
    • The Batgirl used is Barbara Gordon but her personality in more in line with Stephanie Brown.
    • Likewise, the classic Kara Zor-El Supergirl is used, but she's fused with Power Girl as she's more muscular like PG and has Karen's more rougher personality.
  • On The Super Hero Squad Show, Scorpio (Nick Fury's brother in the comics) is Nick Fury himself using the identity to infiltrate Dr. Doom's plans.
  • In the original Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles comic book, Splinter was the pet rat of ninja master Hamato Yoshi, who gained anthropomorphic qualities after exposure to the mutagen. In the 1987 animated series, Splinter was Hamato Yoshi himself, who gained rat-like qualities due to the mutagen.
    • The 2003 version averts this, being the only animated adaptation that does so. However, in the first cartoon, the Shredder was teamed up with an exiled, brain-like alien megalomaniac who got around in a robotic body. In this series, the Shredder IS an exiled, brain-like alien megalomaniac operating a robotic body. Although Word of God is that the show runners tried to keep the two dissimilar, Turtles Forever went one step further and gave the 2003 Shredder a body with the same Make My Monster Grow function Krang's android body once displayed. (Shredder even said that Krang's technology and the Utroms worked well together.)
    • The 2012 cartoon reboot makes Splinter and Hamato into the same person once again. He's also the guy who originally bought the turtles before they were exposed to the Ooze, taking the role of Chet, the little boy who bought them in their original origin story from the comics.
    • The 2012 show reintroduces Krang, but as a species of aliens called "The Kraang", who wear human disguises and operate covertly, combining the character with the alien species of the Utroms.
      • As of the 2015/16 season, they have partially gone back on this, showing that the Krang are a Hive Mind faction that have all but taken over the Utrom race.
    • The 2012 incarnation of April O'Neil has some similarities with the fifth turtle Venus de Milo from Ninja Turtles: The Next Mutation, mainly in that both characters are teenagers, have ponytails, and wield the tessen as their weapon. This is most notable because many fans saw Venus as a Replacement Scrappy for April.
    • The 2012 Shredder, like his film counterpart, takes his brother Nagi's part in the Love Triangle between him, Yoshi, and Tang Shen, but his part in killing her and being raised alongside Hamato Yoshi is taken from Yukio Mashimi, the stand-in for Nagi in the 4Kids adaptation.
  • Teen Titans:
    • Robin is an amalgam of the first three characters who went by that name, although he is mainly implied (and later confirmed in the tie-in comics) to be Dick Grayson. He has Dick's origin and future identity as Nightwing, but Tim Drake's fighting style, costume and detective skills. And to a lesser extent, Jason Todd's anger issues.
    • While the Warp in the comics had Villain Teleportation, the Warp in this show was clearly meant to be DC supervillain Chronos, what with his time-travelling powers and whatnot.
    • Kole has her comic book counterpart's powers and personality in addition to taking Lilith's role as Gnarrk's companion.
    • Before Deathstroke's daughter appeared in the animated series continuity proper, Terra's character combined elements of Rose Wilson and Tara Markov, particularly the abusive relationship the comic version of Wilson had with her father, and the long, blonde hair of Wilson's that fell over one eye, creating a visual comparison with Slade.
    • Raven has her comic book counterpart's powers and backstory in addition to taking Donna Troy's role as Starfire's Heterosexual Life-Partner.
  • This was a shrewd method of giving the lead character more roles in early episodes of Thomas and Friends adapted from The Railway Series novels. Whenever the original novels utilized a generic or unadapted engine, Thomas would be used in it's place. For example, he is the engine that tries to pull Henry out of the tunnel in "The Sad Story of Henry", or the rude engine that fetches James' trucks in "Troublesome Trucks", both of which were unnamed background characters in the original books.
    • The Fat Controller also took the role of the Narrow Gauge Controller in early episodes. Later on Mr Percival was created to take the role of the Thin Controller from the original books.
  • In the Nelvana adaptation of the Tintin book, The Red Sea Sharks, Sheik Bab-El-Ehr's part as the rebels' leader is absorbed into Mull Pasha's (Bab-El-Ehr himself had no screen time anyway in the book).
  • During the 1940s and 1950s, MGM's animation studio used two bulldogs named Spike: the famous one seen in Tom and Jerry, and the one Tex Avery made up for his own shorts. Avery's Spike is mostly gone from most modern media involving the characters due to the One Steve Limit, with his role as Droopy's foil taken by Avery's own wolf character. However, for The Tom and Jerry Comedy Show, the Tom and Jerry Spike takes the role of both, acting as an adversary for the cat and mouse and as a character Droopy would interact with (and occasionally be pit against).
  • In The Transformers, Laserbeak takes Buzzsaw's role as the Decepticons' main spy (as use of the latter was often discouraged), which also resulted in his original Interrogator function being absent.
  • Transformers Animated:
    • Megatron is a combination of his original cartoon incarnation and his larger and more vicious live-action movie incarnation, but with a little dash of his Beast Wars namesake added in.
    • Blackarachnia is a combination of her Beast Wars namesake and Elita One from Transformers: Generation 1, with her design featuring elements of all of Blackarachnia's appearances in the Beast era.
    • The Japanese dub actually did this to everyone by making them all the same characters as the ones in the live action movies. Especially Bulkhead, who was actually even renamed "Ironhide".
    • However, that's a very informed trait that doesn't show up in the series itself. In fact, comedic elements were added to that particular character that make "Ironhide" even less like Movie Ironhide than Bulkhead was.
    • Inverted (or something; we're not quite sure what) with Skywarp and Cyclonus. In Transformers: The Movie, Cyclonus may or may not be an upgraded Skywarp (blame error-prone animation for a confusing Transformation Sequence.) The Animated version, however? Skywarp is one of several clones of Starscream, each with one trait of the original taken Up to Eleven. Skywarp represents his cowardice. As for Cyclonus, he's a brief cameo, but All There in the Manual tells us that his "internal chronometer" is way off, he is seeking someone named Galvatron (that's Megatron's upgraded form in G1 and several other series), and he has some circuitry in common with Starscream, particularly his (now disabled) self-preservation instinct. This hints without saying that Cyclonus is from the future and used to be Skywarp.
  • Transformers Prime:
    • Airachnid at first appears to be an Expy of Blackarachnia. However, personality-wise, she appears to be more a combination of Lockdown and Tarantulas, with just a little bit of the Predator thrown in.
    • Arcee looks and acts more like Chromia than her G1 counterpart, who was pink, Team Mom and The Chick rather than being blue, an Action Girl and Lady of War.
    • Shockwave combines the logic-driven mad scientist characterization of his G1 incarnation with the hulking death machine appearance of his Movie counterpart.
    • As with Transformers Animated, Megatron has taken cues from both his G1 self (his voice actor albeit deeper, the buckethead, his lower legs resemble a pistol's handgrip) and film incarnations (sharp angles on his shoulders, two-toed feet, a demonic face with shark-like teeth, and alt-mode).
    • The Prime Scraplets are a composite of two Transformer-eating species from the Marvel Comic: The Scraplets (name, small size, that those almost eaten look like having a disease) and the Mechaniballs (general shape, not as small as actual Scraplets, and a more direct, physical approach to eat rather than the Scraplets' "infection and multiplication" one).
    • While a case of All There in the Manual between Transformers: Fall of Cybertron and Transformers: Exiles, the Nemesis is a reformatted Trypticon.
  • When Nickelodeon re-introduced America to Winx Club in 2011, they crammed the first two seasons into four, one-hour specials. The season two special, "The Shadow Phoenix," merged Lord Darkar with Professor Avalon by making the latter a disguise. In the original full season, the Avalon the Winx met was an imposter working for Darkar. The change caused a Plot Hole in the third season, since the real Avalon had arrived at Alfea by then.
  • In W.I.T.C.H. comics Nerissa's Dragon Shagon and bestial Kor were random man and his dog turned into her servants. In the cartoon this fate is given to Will's boyfriend Matt and his pet dormouse.
  • In X-Men
    • Lady Deathstrike is Wolverine's former lover from Japan, a backstory that was taken from Mariko Yashida, Logan's longtime girlfriend from the comics. Deathstrike's father, Professor Oyama, was himself combined with Abraham Cornelius, the scientist in charge of the adamantium-bonding procedure that was used on Logan at Weapon X.
    • The Phalanx was amalgamated with the Technarchy.
    • With the exception of Days of Future Past, where it's Bishop who takes the role instead, any role that was originally Kitty Pryde's was given to Jubilee. These include the scene from the first episode where Jubilee is kicked out of an arcade after breaking one of the machines (something that happened to Kitty in Uncanny X-Men #180), and the classic "Kitty's Fairy Tale" issue being loosely adapted as "Jubilee's Fairytale Theater" in the final season.
    • Beast mentions that Magneto is the one who crippled Professor Xavier, an act performed by an alien named Lucifer in the original comics.
  • In X-Men: Evolution, Avalanche seems to be a combination of the comic book Avalanche (name, role with the Brotherhood) and Rictor of the New Mutants (appearance, the details of how his powers work, occasional consideration of a Heel–Face Turn). The hotheadedness comes from both of them.
  • In Wolverine and the X-Men:
    • Marrow appears in the Bad Future, where she befriends Rover the Sentinel and takes on the role of Tom Skylark in the comic book Bad Future Here Comes Tomorrow, only without the Technopathy that explained how Tom had made friends with a Sentinel. Instead, she was given it by Polaris.
    • The show's version of Arclight is a male like the Age of Apocalypse characters, but sported the powers of the classic Marvel version who's a woman and wears a Spear Counterpart version of her costume.
    • Master Mold is combined with Danger, the evil sentient A.I. from Joss Whedon's run. Because of this, Master Mold is depicted as a gynoid.
    • Silver Samurai is merged with Noburu Hideki, Mariko's fiance from the original Frank Miller's Wolverine mini-series. This causes a bit of Squick, since Silver Samurai is Mariko's BROTHER in the original comics.
    • Angel's father, Warren Worthington II, was a combination of his incarnation in X-Men: The Last Stand (a misguided man who thinks he's helping mutants when he's really helping himself who realizes the error of his ways, though here, it's too late to really do anything) and Cameron Hodge (being the one who has Angel's wings amputated).
    • Toad is basically the Earth-616 version with the Ultimate look.
    • Mystique, who's a mix of Mystique as we know her, and Silver Fox, Wolverine's former love interest and fellow captive at Weapon X.
  • Young Justice has Artemis, who shares the name and backstory of her counterpart, but also has elements of Arrowette and Mia Dearden thrown in. Notably, the chest emblem on Artemis' costume comes from Mia's Speedy costume.
    • Match is also given elements from various Bizarros (backwards S, insanity due to the difficulty of copying kryptonian DNA) especially S-01 (being a faulty previous attempt to clone Superman that's been secretly stored in a stasis in the bowels of Cadmus), and Superboy-Prime (carving an S-symbol into his own chest, having black eyes, status as the "original" Superboy).
    • The Guardian seems to be the second Guardian, the clone of Jim Harper who was the first, though he's actually a clone of Jim's grand-nephew Roy, but sports an armored costume more similar to that of Jake Jordan, the Manhattan Guardian from Seven Soldiers.
    • The Queen Bee in the show is the Post-Crisis version from Justice League International, but also possesses the mind-control abilities of the original Silver Age Queen Bee.
    • Mark Desmond/Blockbuster gets his role as control-freak Cadmus boss who created Superboy from Director Westfield.
    • Klarion the Witch Boy's status as an insanely powerful and evil Lord of Chaos comes from The Child, a foe of Hawk and Dove and the JSA. Also, in "Misplaced" he takes the role of Bedlam in JLA: World Without Grown-Ups.
    • Red Tornado's siblings Red Torpedo and Red Inferno both believed themselves to be human and became superheroes during the Golden Age. Red Torpedo's human identity was the original Red Torpedo from Quality Comics, and Red Inferno was the All-Star Squadron character Firebrand.
    • The Runaways are based on the made-for-TV members of the Superfriends, but also bear some similarities to Lex Luthor's iteration of Infinity, Inc.
      • Tye Longshadow also takes his surname (and voice actor) from the Justice League expy of Apache Chief.
      • Static replaces Black Vulcan in the show's group of Superfriends analogues. His jacket, however, is a nod to Vulcan's black and yellow costume. (Presumably, it's because Black Lightning, on whom Black Vulcan was based, is already in the show elsewhere.)
    • Mercy is combined with Robo-Lois from Paul Cornell's "Black Ring" story arc in Action Comics.
    • The tie-in comic reveals that the Ultra-Humanite's gorilla body originally belonged to Tolifhar, one of the Gorilla Knights from Gail Simone's Wonder Woman run.
    • The Reach's interest in the meta-gene, and the way their experiments leads not only to new heroes, but to Earth's superhumans realising this is where their powers come from, seems to be borrowed from the Dominators in Invasion!.
    • Lynn Stewart, Black Lightning’s ex-wife, turns out to be the sister of John Stewart, the Green Lantern. This makes her a composite of her comic counterpart and Rose Stewart, John’s deceased little sister from Judd Winick’s Green Lantern run.
  • The Peloto from the Zipi y Zape 2003 animated series was a mixture of the Professional Butt-Kisser Peloto from the comics with Sapientín's Insufferable Genius traits.

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