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  • Ultimate Marvel has its own page.
  • Image Comics' Altered Image #2 "Everybody Smoosh Now!" was a single-continuity pastiche of Amalgam Comics starring Dragaxx (The Savage Dragon/The Maxx), ShadowSpawn(Shadow Hawk/Spawn), and Witchestic (Mr Majestic/Witchblade). Trying to correct reality in the face of smooshed teams like CyberC.A.T.S., they managed to resmoosh themselves as DragonSpawn, ShadowBlade, and Maxxestic, before eventually sorting things out.
  • The Amalgam Universe was naturally made up entirely of these, with nearly every character being a combination of a DC Comics character and a Marvel Comics character. Some characters combined traits from more than two — Speed Demon, for instance, is the amalgamation of Marvel's Ghost Rider with DC's The Flash and the Demon Etrigan
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    • Speaking of the Big Two, they tend to flesh out any major story arcs that involve time travel or alternate universes to introduce character composites from their respective continuities.
  • DC's Ame-Comi Girls:
    • Duela Dent's father is Jack "the Joker" Dent, a combination of Harvey Dent and the Joker in the form of a relatively mundane gangster. This is probably to justify the fact that she's better known as the Joker's Daughter despite never actually being that in any other continuity.
    • Because there are no male superheroes in the setting, several heroines receive elements of their Spear Counterparts — for instance, Power Girl is Jor-El's daughter, Kara Zor-El's cousin and best pals with Jimmy Olsen, who alerts her with his signal watch at the first sign of trouble. Furthermore, Natasha Irons is Steel and the resident Gadgeteer Genius of the hero set, and Jesse Chambers (here The Flash rather than Jesse Quick) now has a characterization reminiscent of Bart Allen. Jade (in addition to now being Chinese) also has parts of Hal Jordan's origin.
  • In Marvel Comics Heroic Fantasy Elseworlds Avataars: Covenant of the Shield:
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    • Some of the heroes also fought against the Z'Axis in the Worldwar, and the flashbacks suggest they are composites of Golden Age and modern characters:
      • Blood Raven: Falcon/Red Raven
      • Warmaker: Thor/Destroyer
      • Nosferata: Black Widow (Natasha Romanova)/Black Widow (Claire Voyant)
    • At the end of the story Witchfire (the Scarlet Witch) raises a dying Idol (Wonder Man) as a bald energy spirit called Phantazm, a composite of the Vision and Wonder Man during the period he only existed in energy form.
  • A famous Composite Characters / Decomposite Character example: The Vision was originally the Golden Age Human Torch rebuilt and given the brain patterns of Wonder Man by Ultron. Eventually, John Byrne decided to Retcon the story by claiming that the original Human Torch had instead been buried alive before being freed and revived by the West Coast Avengers. Kurt Busiek finally reconciled this in Avengers Forever, where he established that both stories were true; Immortus had used a Timey-Wimey Ball to create two separate versions of the Human Torch's corpse, one of which had been rebuilt as the Vision, and the other of which was revived as the real deal.
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  • Most incarnations of Two-Face in Batman stories from all media use the "obsessed with duality and primarily evil" personality of Paul Sloane, the second Two-Face from the Golden Age, but with Harvey Dent's background and name. The issue becomes a mite confused when both versions operate within the same continuity, as they do now (though Sloane now calls himself the Charlatan).
  • In the 1940s, Jack Kirby created "Brooklyn" of the Boy Commandos, a tough Brooklynite kid in a derby hat. In the 1970s he created Superman and New Gods supporting character Dan "Terrible" Turpin, a tough Brooklynite police officer in a derby hat. In Post-Crisis comics Turpin is an adult Brooklyn (in his original New Gods appearances, Turpin seems to have been a police officer since before World War II; another officer talks about "the old days, when you took the tommy guns away from the gangs!", which suggests the 1920s.)
  • Post-Crisis DC also suggested that Tommy Tomorrow, the Silver Age "near-future of wonders" character, would have been Kamandi, the Last Boy on Earth if the Great Disaster had happened, but in the (ha!) single future of the Post-Crisis timeline, it didn't. It remains to be seen if the various Tommys and Kamandis of the 52 Multiverse are considered alternate versions of each other.
  • In DC Comics Bombshells:
  • In Bullet Points, a For Want of a Nail moment causes several Marvel characters to become different heroes than their mainstream counterparts:
  • In Daredevil Noir, Elektra and Bullseye are combined as Eliza, the Bull's Eye Killer.
    • Meanwhile, in X-Men Noir, Anna-Marie Rankin is a composite of Rogue and the Mimic, Calvin Rankin.
    • And in Iron Man Noir, Baron Zemo is a mish-mash of, well, Baron Zemo and Howard Stark.
  • Likewise, some of the What If? issues explore For Want of a Nail scenarios where certain Marvel took on different identities.
    • Volume 1:
      • In issue #10, Jane Foster is the one who finds Mjolnir in a Norwegian cave, not Donald Blake, which results in her becoming The Mighty Thor. Note that this was published decades before Jane became Thor in the mainstream continuity.
      • In issue #12, Rick Jones saves Bruce Banner from the Gamma Bomb explosion, and thus becomes The Incredible Hulk after being exposed to the radiation.
    • Volume 2:
      • In issue #29, the ripple effect caused by Captain America having been frozen in 1942 instead of at the end of World War 2 leads to an Avengers line-up consisting of traditional members Cap, Namor and Thor, but also Frank Castle as Iron Man, Sam Wilson as Giant-Man and Logan as the Wendigo (which is a double example, as he fills the same role the Hulk did in the initial Silver Age Avengers stories).
      • In issue #44, Frank Castle becomes the host of the Venom symbiote instead of Eddie Brock.
      • Issue #51, What If The Punisher Became Captain America?, is pretty self-explanatory.
      • In issue #62, a former Canadian soldier named Guy Desjardins is the one who is kidnapped and given an adamantium skeleton and claws by Weapon X instead of Logan.
      • In #79, Jean Grey is knocked unconscious during the X-Men's escape from Steven Lang's satellite, meaning that Storm takes her place as the mutant who pilots the space shuttle and encounters the Phoenix Force.
      • Issue #113 presents a continuity where Tony Stark became the Sorcerer Supreme instead of Stephen Strange.
  • In Dark Reign, Norman Osborn's new alter-ego the Iron Patriot is to be a blend of elements from two of the biggest names in the superhero community: Powered Armor a'la Iron Man and is Captain Patriotic like Captain America. The name later gets passed to a squadron of robots, before eventually ending up with Rhodey like in Iron Man 3.
  • Deadpool Max: Deadpool's crazy wife Inez turns out to be Outlaw, Domino, and Copycat.
  • DC's New 52 Earth 2
    • The Atom is a composite of the Golden Age Atom (the name Al Pratt and the atomic powers), his son Damage (elements of his costume), his godson Atom Smasher (the power to grow in size), and the unrelated Captain Atom (employed by the military).
    • And the fact Earth-2 Alan Scott is gay is taken from his son Obsidian, since writer James Robinson felt bad that de-aging Alan was removing a gay character from existence.
    • Red Tornado is a Fem Bot, combining elements of the Golden Age Red Tornado, Abigail Hunkel (or more likely her granddaughter Cyclone) and the male robot version. And it later turns out that Red Tornado is female because she houses the resurrected mind of Lois Lane.
    • Lee Travis, the original Crimson Avenger, is now an African American woman like Jill Carlyle, the second Crimson Avenger.
    • Red Arrow takes his costume and Codename from Roy Harper, the original Red Arrow, but has the civilian identity of Connor Hawke, the second Green Arrow from the pre-Flashpoint continuity.
    • Tempest from Earth-2 in Future's End: Teen Titans looks exactly like Lagoon Boy, but takes his name from the first Aqualad's second identity.
    • Fury's codename and status as Wonder Woman's daughter come from the Infinity, Inc. member Hippolya "Lyta" Trevor, but her real name is eventually revealed to be Donna, which is taken from the original Wonder Girl.
    • As a young girl, Huntress was originally the Robin of Earth-2.
    • Brutaal turns out to be a composite of Superman in the various Elseworlds where he's a servant of Darkseid, and Bizarro.
  • Heroes Reborn:
    • This version of Hellcat has the codename and civilian identity of her mainstream Marvel Universe counterpart, but sports the abilities and werecat appearance of Tigra, one of her fellow Avengersnote .
    • The Swordsman ultimately becomes the Heroes Reborn universe's version of Deadpool.
    • Combining this with Decomposite Character, Hank Pym takes Ultron's role as the creator of The Vision.
    • While ultimately averted, the issue before the change from Liefeld to Walt Simsonson for Avengers hinted that Hawkeye was a different person than Clint Barton, as a flashback in the issue sees Hawkeye and a man called Reaper trying to infiltrate HYDRA, only to be caught and Reaper getting part of his right arm shot off and Hawkeye telling him something important, but the simulation is interrupted by Hellcat, the implication that "Reaper" was the HR version of the Grim Reaper and hence, Hawkeye was Simon Williams, as opposed to Clint Barton (or at the very least, given a Wonder Man does appear in it, that Hawkeye and Grim Reaper are Related in the Adaptation). However, because of the change, Hawkeye was shown to be Clint Barton, as always.
    • Mantis is the object of Kang's desires as well as his primary source of motivation, essentially making her this reality's version of Princess Ravonna. This is also reflective of the Mantis seen The Crossing before Avengers Forever retconned that Crossing!Mantis was a Space Phantom.
    • The HR Doc Samson started off as the HR version of the Abomination until he altered his own condition to be more like the actual Doc Samson's.
  • Some DC Comics Elseworlds do this; for instance in Speeding Bullets Kal-El's rocketship is found by the Waynes and he becomes Batman, while Lex Luthor is in a chemical accident and becomes The Joker. In Darkest Knight, Bruce Wayne becomes Green Lantern, and Sinestro absorbs Joe Chill's mind and becomes a Joker stand-in who empowers Selina Kyle and Harvey Dent as Star Sapphire and Binary Star (Evil Star with Two Face elements) respectively.
  • In Supergirl/Batgirl story Elseworld's Finest: Supergirl & Batgirl:
    • The Joker has traits from Bane, Metallo and the Kryptonite Man (he pumps a kryptonite-based drug into his blood to increase his muscle mass).
    • Captain Marvel is a bald African-American with rivets around his lightning bolt insignia. The implication seems to be that in this universe, a young John Henry Irons was given the magic word.
    • This universe's version of Kon-El was cloned from Kara rather than Kal and is therefore a spunky blonde girl even though their origins, powers, personalities and fashion sense are pretty much the same.
  • In Fables several similar characters from different fairy tales are often revealed to be one person. Bigby Wolf was Big Bad Wolf in both Three Little Pigs and Little Red Riding Hood. With an exception of Jack Sprat, if there was a character named Jack in any fairy tale, it was really Jack Horner, and if there was a unnamed witch, it was Frau Totenkinder.
  • When Devil's Due Publishing renewed the G.I. Joe comics during the 2000's, years after the original Marvel run was canceled, they merged Overkill, the leader of Cobra's Battle Android Troopers, with Robert Skelton, the formerly nameless S.A.W. Viper who killed several Joes during the early 90's.
  • Superwoman is usually depicted as Wonder Woman's evil Mirror Universe counterpart. This element is kept in Grant Morrison's JLA: Earth-2, but with the twist that in her secret identity, she's a journalist named Lois Lane.
  • League of Extraordinary Gentlemen:
  • In Threeboot Legion of Super-Heroes:
    • Micro Lad/Colossal Boy is a combination of, you guessed it, Micro Lad (a villain from the original continuity who could shrink) and Colossal Boy (a hero from the original continuity who could grow). The twist is that this Micro Lad comes from Big City, where everyone is a giant, and his power is technically to shrink to normal human size. Virtually everyone but himself refers to him as Colossal Boy because the Micro Lad name is just too awkward and confusing to normal sized people.
    • Similarly, Plant Lad of the Wanderers shares a heroic identity with a one-shot character from The Silver Age of Comic Books, but is otherwise a morally ambiguous version of Chlorophyll Kid from the Legion of Substitute Heroes.
    • The Legion/Star Trek (IDW) crossover had a composite race; our introduction to the mashup Mirror Universe includes a race of logicians with green skin, pointy ears and blond bowl-cuts. A later issue features a version of the Fatal Five in which Emerald Empress is an Orion, the Persuader is a Gorn, Tharok is Ruk from "What Are Little Girls Made Of?", Validus is a mugato from "A Private Little War", and Mano is a Benzite from Next Gen. Also the reveal that the Big Bad is an alternate version of both Flint the Immortal and Vandal Savage.
  • The Man of Steel #5 introduces the Post-Crisis versions of Bizarro and Lucy Lane. Lucy's role in the story is identical to that of the one-shot character Melissa in the original Superboy Bizarro story from The Silver Age of Comic Books.
  • Marvel Mangaverse:
  • On the animated version of Mortadelo y Filemón, they had the Agente Bestiájez fulfilling the roles of many one-off characters in the comics, probably so they could reuse his design and voice actor.
  • The Multiversity:
    • Spore from Earth-41 seems to be a cross between Spawn and Swamp Thing.
    • Superdemon is what happens when you take the concept of Superman and add Etrigan into it.
    • Society of Super-Heroes: Conquerors of the Counter-World #1:
      • The Green Lantern of Earth-20 is Abin Sur with a costume heavily based on pre-New 52 Alan Scott's.
      • The Immortal Man of Earth-20 was once called Anthro, and his origin and powers are altered to be much more similar to those of Vandal Savage, who is now his alternate self from a Mirror Universe.
    • The Super-Sons in The Just #1 are Chris Kent and Damian Wayne, rather than Clark Kent Jr. and Bruce Wayne Jr. as it was Pre-Crisis.
    • In Thunderworld #1, Black Sivana of Earth-5 is a combination of two of Captain Marvel's deadliest foes: Dr. Sivana and Black Adam.
    • The Multiversity Guidebook #1:
    • In Mastermen #1, Blitzen, the female Flash of Earth-10, is briefly shown on one page to have blonde hair implying she’s an analogue of Barry Allen, but her costume seems to be based more on Jay Garrick.
  • In Seven Soldiers: The Shining Knight, the final battle of the Celtic ur-Camelot includes a brief mention of "Gawain, the Silent Knight, attended by his wondrous hawks". In DC's "classic" King Arthur setting, the Silent Knight is an OC named Brian Kent, who had a falcon named Slasher.
  • In Smallville Season 11, Barbara Gordon is Nightwing, complete with escrima sticks. Her costume is similar to Dick's in the comics, only with yellow "wings" (like Dick had originally) instead of blue or red, and occasionally purple highlights in the black sections, both suggesting the Batgirl costume. She also takes some personality elements from Stephanie Brown.
  • Superboy (1994): A few of the alternate earth Superboy analogues Kon-El teams up with to fight Black Zero are mash-ups of Kon and other DC characters:
    • The first earth Kon goes to is home to a Batman trained Kon-El who is combined with Tim Drake in costume, history and personality.
    • The second earth he visits is home to a girl with Kon's history, powers, fashion sense and personality mashed with Supergirl. Since there is no Superman on her earth she was cloned from Kara.
    • Kamandi has Kon-El's powers but is otherwise based on Kamandi.
    • There's another Superboy analogue whose been combined with Aqualad.
  • In Supergirl: Cosmic Adventures in the 8th Grade Linda Lee's Evil Twin Belinda "Superior Girl" Zee has a few obvious Bizarro elements, but is thematically closer to "Dark Supergirl".
  • The New 52 Superman character H'el appears to take aspects of the Eradicator (obsessed with rebuilding Krypton), Bizarro (chalky skin, reversed S-symbol), Superboy-Prime (S-shield scar), and possibly the Golden Age character Halk-Kar (name, connected to the House of El but not exactly a member of it).
  • There was a storyline in Superman/Batman in which they visited an alternate reality where the world's heroes were the Justice Titans, based in Gothamopolis and led by Hal Grayson, Night Lantern. (Amusingly, The Flash looks unchanged, until you learn his real name is Wally Allen). Their archenemies, the Brotherhood of Injustice, are composites of Batman and Superman's Rogues Gallery, led by Lex Joker. It turns out to be one of Dr Destiny's dreamworlds.
  • Dark Nights: Metal introduces the post-Flashpoint version of Lady Blackhawk, who is quickly revealed to be Kendra Saunders, A.K.A. Hawkgirl.
  • In All-Star Superman, the Unknown Superman of 4500 AD is a cross between Superman and the Unknown Soldier.
  • In the original Supreme, Kid Supreme was more or less Supreme's sidekick. In Alan Moore's run, Kid Supreme was the superhero identity of a young Ethan Crane before he grew older and became Supreme.
  • In DC Comics' First Wave line of Two-Fisted Tales, featuring Doc Savage, The Spirit, etc. The Batman wields twin revolvers, in sharp contrast to his usual characterisation, and seems to be there because DC no longer had the rights to The Shadow.
  • In Street Fighter III, it was said that Yun and Yang were raised by an unnamed grandfather who taught them how to fight. In UDON's Street Fighter series, they were instead raised and trained by Gen, a character from the original Street Fighter and Street Fighter Alpha.

  • In the DC Comics New 52 Superman titles, the Cyborg Superman is a composite of the original Cyborg Superman and Zor-El.
  • The DC: Earth One line get on on this.
    • In Batman: Earth One, Bruce Wayne's mother, Martha, is a member of the Arkham family, effectively combining Batman himself with Dr. Jeremiah Arkham.
    • In Superman: Earth One, General Zod is combined with Zor-El as he's Jor-El borther and hence Superman's uncle.
  • In the DC Comics Elseworld The Kingdom, Plastic Man has a son called Ernie who shares his powers and goes by the superhero identity Offspring. In Joe Kelly's JLA, regular-continuity Plas is given a son called Luke, who likewise shares his powers. In Countdown to Mystery, Luke takes the identity of Offspring.
  • In Archie Comics' Sonic the Hedgehog, the comic book version of Breezie the Hedgehog, a minor character from Adventures of Sonic the Hedgehog was merged with Ret Gone characters Mammoth Mogul (A Man Of Wealth And Taste who owns a casino and hires Eggman's old robots) and Scourge the Hedgehog (an evil, green-toned hedgehog with a grudge against Sonic).
  • A Composite/Decomposite/Literal Split Personality version in the New 52 version of New Gods, with the Infinity Man. Originally the Infinity Man was just the Fusion Dance form of the Forever People. In Post-Crisis continuity he was given a backstory as Darkseid's brother, Drax. In the New 52, he's the part of Izaya the Inheritor who would rather be the Good Shepherd than a Well-Intentioned Extremist, explaining why New 52 Highfather is such a jerk. (And in New 52 continuity, Izaya is Darkseid's brother-in-law.)
  • Emperor Zheng Zu from the Master of Kung Fu tie-in to Secret Wars (2015) is a combination of The Mandarin and Fu Manchu, Shang-Chi's usual father from the comics.
  • In Batman '66:
    • The '66 continuity version of Dr Quinn/the Harlequin is obviously based on Harleen Quinzel/Harley Quinn, but her villain name and cat's-eye glasses suggest the Golden Age Green Lantern villain Molly Mayne/the Harlequin.
    • The comic reveals that the real name of False Face (a Silver Age comics villain, though much better known through his appearances on the TV show) is Basil Karlo, Clayface I in the mainstream comics, and gives him a power-up to achieve Clayface's full shape-shifting ability as opposed to just face changing.
  • In Superman & Batman: Generations, Stephanie Trevor, the blonde daughter of the Golden Age Wonder Woman, who takes the name Wonder Girl in the sixties and joins a team of kid sidekicks, is an amalgam of Earth-1 Donna Troy, who has dark hair and isn't related to Diana but is called Wonder Girl and joins a team of kid sidekicks in the sixties, and Earth-2 Hippolyta Trevor, who is the blonde daughter of the Golden Age Wonder Woman, but calls herself Fury and joins a team of second-gen heroes who aren't sidekicks in the eighties.
  • Pre-New 52, Courtney Whitmore started off her crime-fighting career after finding the costume and belt of Sylvester Pemberton, the deceased Star-Spangled Kid. Later, she changed her name to Stargirl after Jack Knight, her teammate Starman, retired from the superhero game and left her his trademark Cosmic Staff. Courtney's New 52 origin combined both of her predecessors into a single character, with Sylvester Pemberton now reimagined as a deceased superhero called Starmannote , whose costume and Cosmic Staff were taken up by Courtney after his death.
  • In Darkseid War, the New 52 version of the Black Racer has Barry Allen as a human host. In addition to being a literal composite, he also has elements of the pre-Flashpoint "Black Flash", a Psychopomp in a black Flash costume.
  • Spider-Gwen:
  • In the New 52 Flash, Zoom is Eobard Thawne from the 25th century who came back in time to destroy Barry Allen's legacy. However, his power is creating the illusion of superspeed by slowing down time, just like Hunter Zolomon, the Zoom who fought the Wally West Flash.
  • In the original Transformers cartoon, Jetfire could not be used due to legal reasons involving Macross, resulting in the creation of an Expy named Skyfire. Most of the modern comics combine Jetfire and Skyfire into a single character, usually with a robot form based on Skyfire and a vehicle mode based on Jetfire. For added points, he often wears a battle mask inspired by the headsculpt of the original G1 Jetfire toy.
  • Lincoln March/Talon/Thomas Wayne Jr in Night of the Owls and Batman Eternal is a composite of two Thomas Wayne Jrs in previous continuities: the pre-Crisis Earth-One version who suffered severe injuries in a car accident and grew up in Willowood Asylum and the Antimatter Earth version who takes on an owl-based identity - although another variant of this version also shows up on the New 52 version of Earth-3.
  • The New 52 version of Black Canary has Pre-Flashpoint Dinah Lance's sonic scream, but her maiden name is Drake and Lance is her married name, like the Golden Age Black Canary (the pre-Flashpoint version's mother). Confusing things further, the Drakes were a florist/martial artist and a private detective, decompositing Larry Lance and Dinah Drake-Lance from the Canary elements.
  • Big Bang Comics:
    • The Knight Watchman's enemy Mr Mask is a composite of three Batman villains: having had his face mixed with an experimental rubber while planting a bomb at a novelty factory, he can change his appearance like Clayface; his Shapeshifter Default Form resembles the Joker; and at one point in his origin, half his face reverts to the Joker-form, creating an effect similar to Two-Face.
    • The Knight Watchman's archenemy, the Pink Flamingo, is a composite of the Joker and the Penguin
    • The Badge is primarily based on the Guardian, but has a number of elements cribbed from Captain America.
    • Mike Merlin, the Round Table of America's mascot, is based on Snapper Carr, but in stories set in the Bronze Age Mike becomes the Zatanna stand-in: Miss Merlin.
  • Lee Price, the initial protagonist of the 2016 Venom series, is an intentional composite of the previous holders of the identity. He's a disabled Army veteran like Flash Thompson, is a vicious, amoral killer like Mac Gargan, and has a Venom form that looks similar to Eddie Brock's.
  • In Shazam!: The New Beginning, Sivana is the composite of his original character with Billy Batson's greedy uncle Ebenezer Batson.
  • The New 52 version of Wonder Woman foe Cheetah is Barbara Anne Minerva (the third Cheetah Pre-Flashpoint), but uses Priscilla Rich and Debbie Domaine, the names of the previous two Cheetahs, as aliases.
  • The Wonder Woman (Rebirth) version of Doctor Cyber/Adrianna Anderson manages to combine two previously human characters into one AI, the previous Dr. Cyber Cylvia Cyber and Veronica Cale's only friend Dr. Leslie Anderson.
  • In Wonder Woman and the Star Riders the sole villain Purrsia combines Circe's (usually) purple hair and magic use with Cheetah's cat theme and driving motivation of stealing the hero's mystical items.
  • The Legend of Wonder Woman (2016)
    • Donna Troy, who has often used "Troia" as a code name, gets merged with Diana's liflong Amazon friend Euboea to make a character named Troia.
    • The "Titan" turns out to be a combination of three villains traditionally associated with Green Lantern; the it borrows from the Legion's backstory as a robotic host for the twisted souls of a dying civilization that feared death and sought immortality, the Manhunters ties to the Guardians, group status and name, and the Anti-Monitor's appearance.
  • The original version of Jenny Sparks from The Authority was a Caucasian adult and the spirit of the 20th century. Her successor, Jenny Quantum, was a young Asian child and the spirit of the 21st century. The Wild Storm combines both characters into the rebooted Jenny Mei Sparks, who is now an adult Asian woman and the latest spirit of technology.
  • The New 52 version of Azrael is Jean-Paul Valley, but the armoured costume that triggers "The System" is called the Suit of Sorrows, which pre-Flashpoint was the armour worn by the Michael Lane Azrael.
  • In the original Charlton Comics version of Captain Atom's origin, he reports to a General Eining. In Charlton Bullseye Eining is replaced as the Captain's superior by the corrupt General Wolfe. The Post-Crisis version combines them into General Wade Eiling, whose name is close to Eining's and has a similar role in the Captain's origin story, but is a villain like Wolfe.
  • In 1990s New Titans, Donna Troy was going by the name Troia and wore Star-Spangled Spandex, as did her evil Kid from the Future Lord Chaos, who came back to the present and fought the Titans in the Total Chaos storyline. In Titans (Rebirth) Troia is the name of an evil future version of Donna who wears Star-Spangled Spandex and came back to the present to fight the Titans.
  • In the Lord Havok and the Extremists tie-in to Infinite Crisis, the Extremists were, as ever, Alternate Company Equivalents of major Marvel villains. However, because the "heroes" of this version of Earth-8 were all terrible (the basic idea seeming to be "What if The Ultimates, but too much?") and the "villains" were actually more sympathetic, several of them have backstories where they originally had elements of Marvel heroes, until the Meta-Militia ruined everything. So Dr Diehard (Magneto) ran a mutant school a la Professor X; Tracer (Sabretooth) is given Wolverine's backstory as conflicted killer and amnesiac living weapon; and Dreamslayer (Dormammu) possesses (and is controlled by) a nun who became a powerful magic user who looked like a female Dr Strange.
  • In Marvel 1602, Peter Parquah, in addition to being this continuity's version of Spider-Man, also fulfills being the 1602 continuity's equivalent of Rick Jones by having David Banner become the Hulk after getting caught in the energies of the Anomaly while trying to protect Peter and Peter subsequently convincing Banner to use his Hulk form for good.
  • In Gotham City Garage, Catwoman is the outlaw identity of Lex Luthor's assistant Mercy Graves, who is playing both sides against each other for her own mysterious ends.
  • Cosmic Ghost Rider is what would happen if you took The Punisher, bond him with a Spirit of Vengeance, let him Go Mad from the Isolation, and finally imbue him with the Power Cosmic.
  • In "Warpworld", from Infinity Wars the population of the universe has been halved by fusing people together, leading to characters like Iron Hammer (Iron Man/Thor), the Soldier Supreme (Captain America/Stephen Strange) and Ghost Panther (Ghost Rider/Black Panther).
  • In the "Justice-League-as-Steampunk-scientists" Elseworld JLA: Age of Wonder, the Flash is Barry Allen but wears a costume closer to Jay Garrick's. And Starman is Ted Knight, but has black hair and wears regular clothes with a gold star-in-a-circle pin and green tinted goggles, looking more like an Edwardian version of Ted's son Jack.
  • Muppet Sherlock Holmes had two examples of a character in the adaptation being a combination of two characters fom the source material.
    • Duncan Ross from The Red-Headed League is eventually revealed to be an alias of Sherlock Holmes' nemesis Professor Moriarty. While Duncan Ross was also an alias in the original story, his true identity was a separate character from Professor Moriarty.
    • Irene Adler uses the alias Miss Hudson to keep tabs on Sherlock, Watson and Inspector Lestrade. Miss Hudson is loosely based on Holmes' landlady Mrs. Hudson.
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