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Happens pretty often in Spanish speaking countries for a lot of different reasons. It may be due to the original title not having the same meaning in Spanish when translated directly, to copyright reasons, to marketing reasons, and everything in between.

Also, they often get two different titles: one for the Spanish market and one for that of Latin America.

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    Anime and Manga 
  • Dance in the Vampire Bund became Bailando con vampiros ("Dancing With Vampires") in Latin America. The name can be a wordplay from the Spanish name of Dances with Wolves (Bailando con lobos).
  • Captain Tsubasa became Supercampeones in Mexico. Elsewhere, it became Oliver y Benji, because Tsubasa Oozora and Genzou Wakabayashi's names became Oliver Atton and Benji Price.note  This is finally averted in the 2018 series, when it keeps the original name, along with the subtitle "La Leyenda Regresa" (The Legend Returns).
  • Saint Seiya became Los Caballeros del Zodíaco ("The Knights of the Zodiac") in both Spain and Latin America.
  • The Familiar of Zero became La magia de Zero ("The Magic of Zero") in both Latin America and Spain.
  • The Sacred Blacksmith became La espada sagrada ("The Sacred Sword") in both Spain and Latin America.
  • Speed Racer became Meteoro, el rey de las pistas in Latin America. (That came in handy to explain the big "M" in the Mach 5's hood and Speed's helmet)
  • Slayers became Los justicieros in Latin America and Reena y Gaudy in Spain.
  • Blue Submarine No. 6 became simply as Blue Six in Latin America.
  • Kamisama Kiss becomes Soy una diosa ¿y ahora qué? ("I'm a Goddess, and Now What?") in Latin America.
  • To Aru Hikushi E No Tsuioku became La princesa y el piloto (The Princess and The Pilot) in Latin America.
  • More a tweak than an actual change, but Attack on Titan became El ataque de los titanes (The Attack of the Titans) in Mexico and Ataque a los titanes ("Attack Against the Titans" or "Attack to the Titans") in Spain.
  • While not being a very drastic change, The Seven Deadly Sins became Los siete pecados capitales (The Seven Capital Sins) in both Latin America and Spain, which the sins are known as in The Bible.
  • Shin Mazinger became El magnifico Mazinger Z: Edición Impacto (The Magnificient Mazinger Z: Impact Edition) in Latin America, and just Mazinger Z: Edición Impacto in Spain.
  • Yamato Takeru became Maxbot in Latin America.
  • Parappa The Rapper (the anime, not the game) became Parappa el perro rapero (Parappa the Rapper Dog) in Latin America.
  • Nintama Rantarou became Rantaró, el ninja boy (Rantaro, the Ninja Boy) in Spain and Ninja Rantaro in Latin America.
  • Saber Marionette J had more of a tweak, Chicas Marioneta J (Girl Marionettes J). Ironically Saber Marionette R remained the same.
  • Magic Knight Rayearth became Las Guerreras Mágicas, or "The Magical Warriors" (with a female appellation) in Latin America. This was also the characters' formal title whenever their role as "Magic Knights" was referred to in dialogue.
  • Grimoire Of Zero became La bruja y la bestia (The Witch and the Beast) in Spain.
  • In Spain, Osomatsu-kun (1988), Heisei Tensai Bakabon, and Rerere no Tensai Bakabon were packages as one show called Cosas de Locos (Crazy People's Things).
  • Yama no Susume became ¡Atrevete a escalar! (Roughly translated as "I Dare You To Climb!") in Latin America.
  • Summer Wars became Guerra cibernetica (Cyber War, context-wise) in Latin America.
  • Spirited Away became el Viaje de Chihiro (Chihiro's Voyage/Journey) in both Latin America and Spain.
  • Rokka: Braves of the Six Flowers became Rokka: Los héroes de la flor de seis pétalos (Rokka: The Heroes of the Six-Petal Flower) in Latin America.
  • Fight Ippatsu! Juuden-chan!! became Las chicas recargadoras (The Charging Girls) in Latin America. The name could be a pun from the Latin American name of The Powerpuff Girls (Las chicas superpoderosas).
  • Fireworks, Should We See It from the Side or the Bottom? (2017) became Luces en el cielo (Lights in the Sky) in Latin America.
  • Recovery of an MMO Junkie became Gamer en rehabilitación (Gamer on Therapy) in Latin America.
  • Mirai of the Future became Mirai: Mi pequeña hermana (Mirai: My Little Sister) in Latin America.

    Comics 
  • Conan the Barbariannote  became La espada salvaje de Conan el Bárbaro (The Savage Sword of Conan the Barbarian) in Mexico.
  • Unnatural became Contra Natura (Against/Anti Nature) in Mexico.
  • The Incredible Hulk is known as Hulk, el hombre increible (Hulk, the Incredible Man) in Latin America.

    Films - Animation 
  • Felidae became Francis el vagabundo de la noche (Roughly translated as "Francis The Night Walker") in Latin America.
  • Home on the Range is Vacas vaqueras ("Cowboy Cows") in Latin America and Zafarrancho en el rancho ("A mess in the ranch") in Spain.
  • Despicable ME is Mi villano favorito ("My favorite villain") in Latin America and Gru, mi villano favorito in Spain.
  • Epic is El reino secreto ("The secret kingdom") in Latin America and Epic: El Mundo Secreto ("Epic: The Secret World") in Spain.
  • 101 Dalmatians was La noche de las narices frías ("Night of the Cold Noses") in Latin America in the 70's.
  • Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs is Lluvia de hamburguesas ("Hamburger rain") in Latin America and Lluvia de albóndigas ("Meatball rain") in Spain.
  • Meet the Robinsons is known as La familia del futuro ("The family from the future") in Latin America and Descubriendo a los Robinson ("Discovering the Robinsons") in Spain.
  • Inside Out:
    • There's an interesting case in Spain. It was translated as Del revés, which depending on the context it can mean indeed "inside out"... but most of the time it means "upside down". Since titles don't have context of their own, most people assume it means the latter. However, the English title was kept as a The Foreign Subtitle.
    • In Latin America, it became Intensa Mente as a double pun: mente is Spanish for mind, but is also a suffix to denote an adverb. Therefore, Intensa Mente means "Intense Mind", evoking all the emotions in Riley's head, and "Intensamente", or "Intensely", for how strongly she feels them.
  • Zootopia is known as Zootrópolis in Spain. Incidentally, that's the English title for the UK. The change was made in both countries due to copyright issues.
  • Norm of the North became Norm y los Invencibles (Norm and the Invencibles) in Latin America.
  • Batman: The Killing Joke became Batman: La broma mortal (Batman: The Deadly Joke) in Latin America.
  • Kubo and the Two Strings became Kubo y la busqueda samurai (Kubo and the Samurai Quest) in Latin America.
  • Big Hero 6 is "Grandes Héroes" (Big/Great Heroes) in Latin America.
  • Ferdinand became Olé: El viaje de Ferdinand (Olé: Ferdinand's Journey) in Latin America. In Spain, the original title was kept instead.
  • Wreck-It Ralph became Ralph el Demoledor (Ralph The Crusher) in Latin America. The sequel's title was translated literally from English (Ralph Rompe Internet) for some markets, but others (like Mexico) presented the tile "Wi-Fi Ralph" instead.
  • Brother Bear became Tierra de osos" (Land of Bears) in Latin America, and translated literally as Hermano oso" in Spain.
  • Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse became Spider-Man: Un nuevo universo (Spider-Man: A New Universe) in both Latin America and Spain.

    Films - Live Action 
  • In-Universe in All About My Mother. Esteban is irritated when a dubbed version of All About Eve comes on Spanish TV under the title "Eve Unveiled".
  • One of the most well-known examples in Spain is Die Hard.
    • The title is impossible to translate directly into Spanish, so it was called La jungla de cristal ("The Crystal Jungle") instead. The title made sense for the first film, which is set in a skyscrapper, but not so much for the rest of the series, so they had to adapt it as the films came out. Whether this is a case of Woolseyism or "Blind Idiot" Translation is a topic of fierce debate in Spain.
    • It was translated as Duro de matar ("Hard to Kill") in Latin America, a much more faithful adaptation. However, this caused the actual Steven Seagal film Hard to Kill to be retitled as Difícil de Matar, or "Difficult to Kill."
  • Another very well known example is Star Wars, known in both Spain and Latin America as La guerra de las galaxias ("War of the Galaxies"). However, the title was dropped since the prequels started to come out, using the English title instead to refer to the franchise. Although La guerra de las galaxias is still used in some promotional material to refer to A New Hope specifically. This was brilliantly spoofed in an episode of Futurama, when a fictional movie is shown with the title Galaxy War and the Latino Spanish dub translated it as Guerra de Estrellas ("Star Wars").
    • While most individual films have been translated literally, The Force Awakens was shuffled around to switch verb and subject: instead of "La Fuerza Despierta", it was changed to a more evocative "El Despertar de la Fuerza" ("The Awakening of the Force").
  • True Grit is Valor de ley (a double entendre meaning both "Law's Courage" and "Hallmark Value") in Spain, and Temple de acero ("Temper of steel") in Latin America.
  • Rosemary's Baby gets comprehensively spoilered in Spain by the title La semilla del diablo ("The devil's seed").
  • They Shoot Horses, Don't They? is Danzad, danzad, malditos ("Dance, dance, damn you!") in Spain and Baile de ilusiones ("Dance of illusions") in Latin America.
  • Codename Geronimo is Cazando a Bin Laden ("Hunting Bin Laden") in Latin America.
  • Airplane!:
    • Renamed ¿Y dónde está el piloto? ("So where is the pilot?") in Latin America. This crept unto other Leslie Nielsen films, like The Naked Gun being called ¿Y dónde está el policia? ("So where is the policeman?") and Repossessed being called ¿Y dónde está el exorcista? ("So where is the exorcist?").
    • In Spain it's Aterriza como puedas ("Land as you can" - or "if you can"). As in Latin America, it was continued in later Leslie Nielsen films, or films with the same kind of humor: The Naked Gun is Agárralo como puedas ("Catch it as you can"), Spy Hard is Espía como puedas ("Spy as you can"), Maffia! is Mafia, estafa como puedas ("Maffia, scam as you can"), Family Plan is Acampa como puedas ("Make camp as you can"), Safety Patrol is Asegúrate como puedas ("Get safe as you can"), 2001: A Space Travesty is 2001: Despega como puedas ("2001: Take off as you can").
  • The "So where is the (blank)?" title formula, once made famous by the movies mentioned above, was also applied willy-nilly on many other comedy films. To provide some examples:
    • White Chicks was titled "Y Donde Estan Las Rubias?" ("So where are the blondes?") in Latin America.
  • Some Like It Hot is Con faldas y a lo loco ("With skirts and like crazy") in Spain.
  • My Girl is "Mi primer beso" ("My first kiss") in Latin America.
  • The Latin American dub of Scrooged is called "The Ghosts Attack the Boss" or "The Ghosts Counter-attack" (which turns the title into an Actor Allusion because of Bill Murray's role in Ghostbusters (1984)).
  • Pain and Gain is Sangre, sudor y gloria ("Blood, Sweat and Glory") in Latin America.note 
  • Planes, Trains and Automobiles got a great title in the Spanish and Latin American markets: Mejor Solo Que Mal Acompañado ("Better Alone Than In Bad Company").
  • Bad Grandpa is El abuelo sinvergüenza ("The Shameless Grandpa") in Latin America.
  • The Swedish movie Fucking Åmål was translated to a title meaning Discovering Love in Argentina and Chile.
  • Total Recall (1990) is El vengador del futuro ("The Future's Avenger") in Latin America and Desafío total ("Total Challenge") in Spain. The semantic structure of the former title is ambiguous as to whether it means "an avenger from the future" or "someone who avenges the future".
  • Home Alone is Mi pobre angelito ("My poor cherub" or "My poor little angel") in Latin America.
  • Ocean's Eleven is La gran estafa ("The big scam") in Latin America. The same goes with their sequels, Ocean's Twelve and Ocean's Thirteen in Latin América, named respectively La nueva gran estafa ("The new big scam") and Ahora son 13 ("They are now 13").
  • Similarly, The Italian Job became "La Estafa Maestra", or "The Master Scam".
  • Taken is Búsqueda implacable ("Implacable Search") in Latin America and Venganza ("Revenge") in Spain.
    • Whether this is a distant allusion to Frantic, which was retitled "Búsqueda Frenética" ("Frantic Search"), is up in the air.
  • Speaking of up in the air, Up in the Air was retitled "Amor En El Aire" or "Love In the Air".
  • Ice Princess is Soñando, soñando... triunfé patinando ("Dreaming, Dreaming... I succeeded skating") in Spain and Sueños sobre hielo ("Dreams on ice") in Latin America.
  • Saving Mr. Banks is El sueño de Walt Disney ("Walt Disney's Dream") in Latin America and Al encuentro de Mr. Banks ("Looking for Mr. Banks" or, more literally, "[Going] To meet Mr. Banks").
  • Oz: The Great and Powerful is Oz: Un mundo de fantasía ("Oz: A fantasy world") in Spain.
  • Seltzer and Friedberg movies:
    • Meet the Spartans is Casi 300 ("Almost 300") in Spain and Una loca película de Esparta ("A crazy movie about Sparta") in Latin America.
    • Epic Movie is Una loca película épica ("A crazy Epic Movie") in Latin America.
    • Date Movie is No es otra película de amor ("This is not another Love Movie") in Latin America.
    • Vampires Suck is Una loca película de vampiros ("A crazy movie about vampires") in Latin America and Híncame el diente ("Sink your teeth in me", or less literally, "Bite Me") in Spain.
  • The Fast and the Furious is A todo gas (more or less: "At full speed") in Spain.
  • In Spain, Godzilla vs. Megalon is Gorgo y Superman se citan en Tokio ("Gorgo and Superman meet in Tokyo"). To be fair to the somewhat misleading title, the movie does have scenes in which characters meet each other.
  • Bloodsport is Contacto sangriento ("Bloody Contact") in both Latin America and Spain.
  • Kickboxer was originally called Contacto sangriento ("Bloody Contact") in some Latin American countries, thus Bloodsport ended up as Contacto sangriento 2 and Bloodsport's sequel is Contacto sangriento 3. In Mexico, this played the other way around, with Bloodsport being Contacto Sangriento and Kickboxer being retitled Contacto Sangriento 2.
  • Child's Play became Chucky: El muñeco diabólico("Chucky: The diabolical doll") in Latin America and Muñeco diabólico ("Diabolical doll") in Spain.
  • Sexy Beast is Bestia salvaje ("Wild Beast") in Latin America.
  • A Million Ways to Die in the West is Pueblo chico, pistola grande ("Small Town, Big Gun") in Latin America and Un millón de maneras de morder el polvo ("A Million Ways To Bite The Dust") in Spain.
  • House on Haunted Hill (1999) is Residencia del mal ("Evil Residence") in Latin America, which caused a lot of jokes as the name sounded like it was about something else. When the actual Resident Evil movie came out, they had to use another title, El huésped maldito ("The Cursed Guest") instead.
  • Clerks is Detrás del mostrador ("Behind the Counter") in Latin America.
  • The Parent Trap is Tú a Londres y yo a California ("You Go to London and I Go to California") in Spain and "Juego de Gemelas" Latin America. The latter is also a pun, in that "Juego" can mean either a game or a set (as in, a collection) and both "Game of Twins" and "Set of Twins" are both viable, humorous titles.
  • Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind is ¡Olvídate de mí! ("Forget Me!") in Spain.
  • Doctor Strangelove is ¿Teléfono rojo? Volamos hacia Moscú ("Red Phone? We're flying to Moscow") in Spain and Doctor Insólito ("Dr. Extraordinary") in Latin America.
  • See No Evil, Hear No Evil is Ciegos, sordos y locos ("Blind, Deaf and Insane") in Latin America and "No me chilles, que no te veo" ("Don't yell at me, I can't see you") in Spain.
  • Horrible Bosses is Quiero matar a mi jefe ("I Want to Kill My Boss") in Latin America.
  • The Craft is Jóvenes brujas ("Young Witches") in Latin America.
  • Fury is Corazones de hierro ("Steel Hearts") in Latin America.
  • Rat Race was called El mundo está loco, loco in Spanish. This is a Shout-Out to the fact that Rat Race is actually a remake of It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World, as that film had a literal translation into Spanish: El mundo está Loco, Loco, Loco.
  • American Sniper is just Francotirador ("Sniper") in Latin America.
  • The Boondock Saints is Los Elegidos ("The Chosen") in Spain, El Quinto Infierno ("The Fifth Hell") in Argentina, and Los Santos Del Infierno ("The Saints of Hell") elsewhere.
  • Real Steel is Gigantes de Acero ("Steel Giants") in Latin America amd Acero puro ("Pure Steel") in Spain, much closer to the original meaning.
  • Pacific Rim is Titanes del Pacífico ("Pacific titans") in Latin America.
  • 47 Ronin is La Leyenda del Samurái (47 Ronin) in Spain ("The Legend of the Samurai (47 Ronin)" - singular Samurai, which makes even less sense).
  • The Searchers is Centauros del Desierto ("Centaurs of the Desert") in Spain.
  • Jaws is Tiburón ("Shark") in Spain and Latin America.
  • Lake Placid is Mandíbulas ("Jaws") in Spain.
  • The Ghost and the Darkness is Garras ("Claws" or "Paws") in Latin America.
  • Inkheart was marketed in Latin American cinemas as Inkheart: El Libro Mágico ("Inkheart: The Magic Book"), despite the movie having no magic books anywhere. When aired in cable, the movie is now translated more literally to Corazón de Tinta.
  • The Martian is called "Misión Rescate" ("Rescue Mission") in Latin America. Many people who were waiting for the movie to release were blindsided when told it had been out for weeks already because of this. In Spain it's Marte (The Martian) (giving the title as "Mars").
  • Left Behind (2014) became Apocalipsis (Apocalypse) in Latin America.
  • Girl, Interrupted is Inocencia interrumpida ("Innocence interrupted") which some audiences misinterpreted as a sexual innuendo.
  • The Revenant became El renacido (The Reborn One)note 
  • The Punisher (1989) became Venganza es mi nombre (Revenge is My Name) in Latin America, possibly because at the time the comic was basically unknown there. Later films and adaptations uses El castigador (literal translation), the original English name or both.
  • Vantage Point became Justo en la mira ("Right in sight") in Latin America.
  • Straight Outta Compton became Letras explicitas (Explicit Lyrics) in Mexico and Chile, a very controversial change for many viewers.
  • Tropic Thunder became Una guerra de pelicula (A Very Movie-like War) in Latin America and Una guerra muy perra (A Very Bitchy War) in Spain. Even the movies-within-the-movies had different names as well:
    • Satan's Alley became Amor Satanico (Satanic Love) in Latin America.
  • The Latin American Spanish title for Mad Max: Fury Road is "Mad Mad: Furia En El Camino". "Fury Road" would actually translate as "Camino De Furia" (it's even said as such when Nux says the Title Drop), the Latin American title instead is "Fury On The Road (or more laconically, "Road Rage")".
  • Raising Arizona became Arizona Baby in Spain. In Latin America the title is translated literally to Educando a Arizona.
  • Wild at Heart became Corazon Salvaje (Wild Heart) in Spain. In Latin America it was also translated literally as Salvaje de Corazon.
  • I Love You Phillip Morris became Una pareja dispareja (An Uneven Couple/Pair) in Latin America.
  • The film Death Becomes Her became La muerte le sienta bien (Death Feels Good [To Her] or, more accurately, Death Fits Her Well), and in Spain it's La muerte os sienta tan bien (Death Really Feels Good [To Us]).
  • Independence Day: Resurgence became Dia de la independencia: Contraataque (Independence Day: Counterattack) in Latin America.
  • The Butler became El mayordomo de la Casa Blanca (The White House's Butler) in Latin America.
  • Harley Davidson and the Marlboro Man became Dos duros sobre ruedas (Two Tough Guys on Wheels) in Latin America. It also uses the altenative name of La justicia tiene su precio (Justice Has A Price) there as well.
  • Hang 'Em High: the literal translation of the title would be "Cuélguenlos Alto" (or "Colgadlos Alto", depending on the dialect)". Spanish versions of the film have one of two titles: "La Marca De La Horca" ("The mark of the noose"), because of the mark Jed's botched hanging left behind; and "Cometieron Dos Errores" ("They made two mistakes"), after a speech the Big Bad does mentioning their Bond Villain Stupidity, which was even referenced on the original tagline:
    "All right, now that makes three mistakes we've made. The money, we hung an innocent man, and we didn't finish the job. We can't undo the first two... but we can still finish the job."
  • There are so many comedy movies that get a "Crazy [Something]" or [Something] Crazy" title in Spanish (when a better title could be used) that the count is lost and the mind boggles. To give some examples:
    • RV got the title "Locas Vacaciones Sobre Ruedas (Crazy Vacation On Wheels)" in Latin America.
    • Police Academy got the title "Loca Academia De Policia (Crazy Police Academy)", also occasionally reduced to "Locademia De Policia (Police Crazy-demy)".
    • Space Balls gets this treatment to an absurd degree. Although the titular villains are called astrobolas, which translates to astroballs, in Latin America the title is "S.O.S. Hay un Loco Suelto en el Espacio," which translates to S.O.S. There's a Crazy Person/Madman loose in Space, or "Los Esfericos" (The Spherics,) while in Spain it's known as La loca historia de las galaxias which translates to The Crazy History of the Galaxies, likely a combination play on ''Guerra de las Galaxias'' and Mel Brooks's own La Loca Historia del Mundo.
  • A good chunk of Seltzer and Friedberg movies got this treatment:
    • Meet the Spartans is Una loca película de Esparta ("A crazy movie about Sparta") in Latin America.
    • Epic Movie is Una loca película épica ("A crazy Epic Movie") in Latin America.
    • Vampires Suck is Una loca película de vampiros ("A crazy movie about vampires") in Latin America.
  • The Love Bug films are normally renamed in Latin America as Cupido motorizado (Motor Cupid).
  • Drunken Master got the really epic name of El mono borracho en el ojo del tigre (The Drunken Monkey in the Eye of the Tiger) in Spain. In Latin America, the title was translated literally as El maestro borracho.
  • Beetlejuice became Bitelchus in Spain, who is more or less the phonetic spelling of the name in Spanish. In Latin America it was translated as Beetlejuice: El super fantasma. (Beetlejuice: The Super Ghost)
  • East Side Sushi became Sushi a la mexicana (Mexican-style Sushi) in Latin America.
  • Nine Lives (2016) became Mi papá es un gato (My dad is a cat) in Latin America and Siete vidas, este gato es un peligro (Seven lives, this cat is dangerous). Note that in Spanish-speaking countries, cats are said to have seven lives.
  • Train to Busan became Estacion Zombie (Zombie Station) in Latin America.
  • Shin Godzilla became Godzilla Resurge (Roughly translated as "Godzilla Rises Again") in Latin America, albeit the original name is used as well.
  • The Garbage Pail Kids Movie became Basuritas (Roughly translated as "Little Garbages" or idiomatically speaking "little (pieces of) crap/shit" in Latin America ) and La Pandilla Basura (The Garbage Gang) in Spain.
  • Law Abiding Citizen had in Spain the literal translation "An exemplary citizen", while it was "The Avenger" in Mexico and "Days of Ire" in Argentina.
  • The Tamil film Kabali became La venganza de Kabali (The Revenge of Kabali) in Latin America.
  • Wild became Alma salvaje (Wild Soul) in Spain.
  • St. Elmo's Fire got the odd name of El primer año del resto de nuestras vidas (The First Year of the Rest of Our Lives) in Latin America, and St. Elmo, punto de encuentro (St. Elmo, Meeting Point) in Spain.
  • Italian Vendetta dal futuro ("future revenge") was released in Spain as either Destroyer or Brazo de acero — "steel arm". In Colombia it was Manos de piedra — "stone hands" after the original working title.
  • Perfect Assassins became Criminal Instinct.
  • In Mexico, Wicked Little Things became Shadows in the Forest.
  • Cold Sweat had two different Spanish titles of this sort:
    • In Spain, it became The Companions of the Devil.
    • In Uruguay, it became Visitors of the Night.
  • Dark Harvest became The Devil's Scarecrow in Mexico.
  • Final Exam became Panic at College in Argentina and Blood Test in Colombia.
  • The Pit became Teddy with the Devil Inside in Mexico.
  • A Bucket of Blood became The False Sculptor.
  • Grave of the Vampire became The Terror Baby.
  • Fire with Fire became Crossfire.
  • The Black 6 became The Revenge of the Black Warriors.
  • Supersonic Man became The Supersonic in Peru.
  • Children Shouldntplay With Dead Things became The Night of the Dead.
  • Doctor Blood's Coffin became The Embrace of the Dead.
  • The Exterminators of the Year 3000 became The Exterminator of the Road.
  • 2020 Texas Gladiators became 2020: The Texas Rangers.
  • Teenagers from Outer Space became Space Rebels.
  • Trancers:
    • Spain: The Guardian of the Future
    • Mexico: Zombie Hunter
  • Shaft became The Red Nights of Harlem.
  • The Void became Spells of the Beyond.
  • Shaun of the Dead was inexplicably released in Spain as "Zombies Party" (in English). To make it worse, the subtitle "A romantic comedy... with zombies" was changed to the very lame "A night... of death". Even though most of the film takes place during the day.
  • Dr. Cyclops became The Ogre of the Jungle in Mexico.
  • The Vampire Bat:
    • Argentina: The Vampire's Return
    • Mexico: The Vampire Stalks
  • The Four Skulls of Jonathan Drake became The Wandering Skulls.
  • The Black Room became Horror in the Black Room.
  • Innocent Blood became Fresh Blood (An Insatiable Girl).
  • Braindead became Your Mother Has Eaten My Dog.
  • Zombie Strippers! became Attack of the Zombies in Argentina.
  • Black Christmas (1974) became The Macabre Residence.
  • Poltergeist became Juegos diabolicos (Devilish Games) in Latin America.
  • Deliverance became Amarga pesadilla (Sour Nightmare) in Latin America.
  • The Cottage became A Dark Secret.
  • Stone Cold:
    • Argentina: Cold-Blooded
    • Spain: Cold Like Steel
  • I Come in Peace became The Deadly Destroyer.
  • Time After Time became Escape to the Future.
  • Get Out is an interesting case. In Spain the working title is "Déjame salir" (Let me out), while in Latin America it goes by the title "¡Huye!", which despite how different it looks it actually translates "Get Out!" or even as "Escape!"
  • The Dirty Harry series The Dead Pool became Sala De Espera Al Inferno ("Hell's Waiting Room") in Latin America.
  • Trading Places became in Latin America De Mendigo A Millonario (From Beggar to Millionaire).
  • Red Sonja became "El Guerrero Rojo" (The Red (Male) Warrior), which technically would make Arnold Schwarzenegger's character the titular warrior (even if he never wears red and only appears halfway in... the kid and his bodyguard both wear red, but they are much more argumentative as main characters). The Spain translation of the film called it "Sonja, La Guerrera" (Sonja the (Female) Warrior), which is more accurate.
  • The Rundown got a third title on Latin America (when certain markets already had it as "Welcome To The Jungle"), "El Tesoro del Amazonas" (The Treasure of the Amazon).
  • Freddy Got Fingered became Fuera de Casa ("Out of the House") in Latin America and Freddy el colgao (Freddy the Wacko) in Spain.
  • Dead Heat got the title Estamos muertos... o que? (Are we dead or what?) in the European Spanish market.
  • Beverly Hills Ninja became Un Ninja en Beverly Hills (A Ninja in Beverly Hills), an almost literal translation. However, in Spain, it has the misleading (and somewhat narmy) title of La Salchicha Peleona (The Fighting Sausage).
  • The Sound of Music became La Novicia Rebelde (The Rebellious Novice) in Latin America, and Sonrisas y Lágrimas (Smiles and Tears) in Spain.
  • Up the Creek became Río de Locura (River of Crazyness) in Latin America, and the somewhat bizarre Los Albóndigas en Remojo (The Washed-up Meatballs) in Spain.
  • Outside Providence became Lejos de Providence (Far from Providence) in Latin America, however, in Spain, it received what's considered one of the craziest titles for a translation: No Puedo Perderte por Algo tan Tonto Como el Sexo (I Can't Lose You for Something as Dumb as Sex).
  • The Meg became Megalodón in both Latin America and Spain, mostly because "Meg" is normally understood there as a diminutive for "Megan" in English (like Meg Ryan, for a most visible example) and also because "Megalodon" gets the point faster in Spanish about what the movie is about.
  • Showdown in Little Tokyo became Masacre en el barrio japones (Massacre in Japan Town), in Latin America, being "barrio japones" the Latin American equivalent for a China Town, except with Japanese people, while the Chinese equivalent is named "barrio chino" there.
  • The Incredible Hulk is know as "Hulk, el hombre increible" (Hulk, the Incredible Man) in Latin America, while in Spain it's called "El increible Hulk," which is the direct translation.
  • Winchester became La maldicion de la casa Winchester (The Curse of the Winchester Residence) in Latin America and Winchester: La casa que construyeron los espíritus (Winchester: The House Built By Spirits) in Spain.
  • Being John Malkovich is ¿Quien Es John Malkovich? ("Who Is John Malkovich?"). The alternate title has a bit of a double meaning, since the premise of the film involves multiple characters taking over the body of John Malkovich.
  • The Black Hole was named at least in Spain El Abismo Negro ("The Black Abyss")note .
  • Rim of the World became Campamento en el fin del mundo (A Camp on the End of the World) in Latin America.

    Literature 
Unlike what happens with other media, both Latin America and Spain share the same names regarding this because almost all book translations are done in Spain (and sometimes, Colombia) and brought to Latin America without any changes due of a mix of cultural reasons and also cost reasons, as non-Spanish-speaking companies prefer to translate their books in both countries. Non-Spaniard and non-Colombian book translations are very rare in the Spanish-speaking world.

  • The Most Dangerous Game became The Wicked Zaroff.
  • The Andromeda Strain became La amenaza de Andromeda (The Threat From Andromeda)
  • Animal Farm became Rebelión en la granja (Rebellion on the farm).
  • Brave New World became Un mundo feliz (A Happy World).
  • Ender's Game saga:
  • The Catcher in the Rye is quite a controversial example of this, since it involves the original author regarding how the Spanish title should be named: The first Spanish translation of the book was named El cazador oculto ("The Hidden Hunter"), who was used in both Latin America and Spain (the book was translated in Argentina in the first edition) and later it was retranslated, this time in Spain, as El guardián entre el centeno ("The Guardian Between The Rye"), which is a close translation of the English title. However, the Spaniard name was despised by many members of the Spanish-speaking members, and some non-Spanish speaking ones, for being too literal, due to a communication problem between J.D. Salinger and the Spaniard translators,note  Salinger banned the Argentinian translation and its title and now all the Spanish translation (Latin American and otherwhise) are named with the Spaniard title, with everything that involves with it.
  • Brian Lumley 's Necroscope saga:
    • Necroscope II: Wamphyri became Necroscopio II ¡Vampiros! (Vampires!)
    • Necroscope III: The Source became Necroscopio III El origen del mal (The Source of Evil)
    • Necroscope IV: Deadspeak became Necroscopio IV: El que habla con los muertos (The one who speaks with the dead)
    • Necroscope V: Deadspawn became Necroscopio V: Engendro de la muerte (Spawn of the Death)
  • The Jim Morrison's biography No One Here Gets Out Alive is one of the very rare cases when there's two translations for both Latin America and Spain. The Latin American translation of the book, who was translated in Mexico, is translated literally, when the Spaniard version was translated as De aqui nadie sale vivo, who stands for the same thing, but in European Spanish.
  • Harry Potter and the Cursed Child is Harry Potter y el legado maldito - Harry Potter and the cursed legacy. While it tries to hide that it is an Antagonist Title, it's still very vague.
    • Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince is Harry Potter y el Misterio del Principe ("The Mystery of the Prince")
    • Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows is Harry Potter y las Reliquias de la Muerte ("The Relics of Death")

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    Live Action Television 
  • In Spain, Choujuu Sentai Liveman became known as Bioman as a consequence of dubbing over the French dub (where the series was known as as Bioman III: Liveman in reference to Choudenshi Bioman being the first Super Sentai series that had been brought over to France).
  • Star Trek was called Viaje a las estrellas ("Voyage to the Stars").
    • Although this is a case of a correct translation of the title, as Trek also means "viaje".
  • Kickin' It is called "Los guerreros wasabi" ("The Wasabi Warriors") In Latin America.
  • Pawn Stars:
    • El precio de la historia ("History's price") in Latin America
    • La casa de empeños ("The pawn store") in Spain
  • Get Smart became ''El superagente 86" (Superagent 86) both in Latin America and Spain.
  • Gun Smoke became La ley del revolver ("The Law of the Revolver") in Latin America.
  • Diff'rent Strokes became Blanco y Negro ("Black and White") in Latin America.
  • The X-Files became Los expedientes secretos X ("The Secret X Files") in Latin America. In Spain the title was translated literally without the Secret bit.
  • Full House became ''Padres forzosos" ("Forced Fathers") in Spain (due to a British sitcom of the same name which title was translated directly before) and "Tres por tres" ("Three by three") in Latin America.
    • In Ecuador, the title was changed to "Un hogar casi perfecto" ("An almost perfect home") at the time Ecuavisa held the broadcasting rights during the 90s. The TV channel went to the extreme to censor the official Latin American title. However, years later, Teleamazonas now holds the broadcasting rights to the show and they opted to use the original "Tres por tres" name as in the rest of Latin America.
    • The sequel series, Fuller House, got into account the Gender Flip nature of the series for its Spaniard title: "Madres Forzosas" ("Forced mothers"). In Latin America it keeps the original English name but using the official title of the first series as a subtitle, due of Netflix's policy of keeping the original name of any series or movie in their original language as much as they can.
  • Both Cold Case and the A&E reality show Cold Case Files had a interesting bit regarding this, at least in Latin America: In the TV series, it was renamed as Caso cerrado (Case Closed) and the reality show was named Casos no resueltos (Unsolved Cases). In both cases none of the Spanish titles matches with the original meaning of the English title because there's no legal equivalent of "cold case" in Spanish in Latin American countries, due of the fact all the Spanish-speaking countries of the region use a different legal framework, compared with The Common Law used in English-speaking countries.
  • Stranger Things became Casos extraños (Strange Cases) in Latin America, but only for non-Netflix use. (See above for details)
  • The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air is an interesting case. In Spain it's called El Principe de Bel Air (The Prince of Bel Air), but in Latin America it's called El Principe del Rap (The Prince of Rap).
  • The Fall Guy became "Profesión: Peligro" ("Profession: Danger") in Latin America. Ironically, the title was also used in Brazil for MacGyver (1985) of all things.
  • The Incredible Hulk is called Hulk, el hombre increible (Hulk, the Incredible Man) in Latin America.

    Video Games 
Just like the Literature folder, both Latin America and Spain share the same names, with very few exceptions.

  • South Park: The Fractured but Whole became South Park: Retaguardia en Peligro (Literally as "South Park: Rear in Danger" but it's also an elaborate idiomatic phrase roughly translated as (My) Ass is in Danger).

    Western Animation 
  • SilverHawks became Halcones galácticos (Galactic Hawks) in Latin America.
  • Iznogoudnote  became El Califa (The Caliph) in Latin America, even though Iznogoud is a Grand Vizier and his whole motivation is becoming a caliph. Even Latin American fans calls him as such, despite this.
  • Family Guy is Padre de familia ("Family Dad").
  • American Dad! is Un agente de familia (A family agent) in Latin America and Padre made in USA ("Father made in USA") in Spain
  • Regular Show is Un show más ("One More Show"; literally. However it can also mean "Just another show" which makes more sense. ["Eh it's just another show", "Eh it's just a regular show"]) in Latin America and Historias corrientes ("Everyday Stories") in Spain.
  • Recess is La banda del patio ("The Playground Gang") in Spain.
  • TaleSpin became Los aventureros del aire ("The Air Adventurers") in Latin America and Spain.
  • The Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles franchise had a quite complicated story regarding this in Mexico and Latin America: Originally it was named in the original 1986 version on-series as Ninja tortugas adolescentes mutantes (a very literal translation of the English title), but network-wise, it was named simply as Las tortugas ninja ("The Ninja Turtles", which incidentally, was the name used in the other Spanish speaking countries). The Mexican dub didn't fix this until many seasons later, when the voice actors started to use the name given by the networks, rather than the literal one used during many seasons. Curiously, many Latin American fans prefer the network name over the literal translation, without the Teenage Mutant part. Ironically, the English version also used the simplified Ninja Turtles name too, albeit for legal reasons.
  • Care Bears became Los ositos cariñositos in Latin America and Los osos amorosos ("The Loving Bears") in Spain.
  • Muppet Babies retained its untranslated title in Latin America. In Spain they received the name of Pequeñecos, a portmanteau of Pequeños ("Little", in plural) and Muñecos ("Dolls"), while also based on the spanish title of the Muppets "Los Teleñecos" (roughly "the TV dolls").
  • Randy Cunningham: 9th Grade Ninja became Randy Cunningham: Ninja total (Randy Cunningham: Total Ninja) in both Latin America and Spain.
  • Rocket Robin Hood became Meteoro Robin Hood (Meteor Robin Hood) in Latin America.
  • We Bare Bears is known in Latin American countries as Escandalosos, a Pun-Based Title playing on "osos" (meaning "bears") and "escandaloso" (meaning "outrageous" or "scandalous").
  • Craig of the Creek became El mundo de Craig (Craig's World) in Latin America.
  • Disenchantment became (Des)encanto (literal translation, albeit with brackets in the prefix "Dis-" and (Des)encantados (Lit. "(Dis)enchanted People") in Spain. For the record, this is one of the few times Netflix translated the name of one of the original productions in Latin America, rather than leave it in English.
  • The Powerpuff Girls:
    • The series is called "Las Supernenas" (The Super Little Girls) in Spain.
    • In Latin America, the What A Cartoon shorts were dubbed in Colombia and called "Las Chicas Coquetas" (which the best translation would be "The Flirty Girls"). When the full series was dubbed in Mexico they retained the name to not break from the original shorts, but after some complaints and simply that the title didn't made sense, it was changed to "Las Chicas Superpoderosas" (The Superpowerful Girls).
  • Total Drama has three of them in Latin America.
    • "Luz, Drama, Accion" (season 2) is the Spanish name for "Total Drama Action".
    • "The Ridonculous Race" is known as "Drama Total: Carrera Alucinante" (Drama Total: Amazing Race). Not only is it the direct translation to the the show/season it is based on, but 'amazing' could be a synonym to 'ridonculous'.
    • Total DramaRama is known as "Drama Total: La Guarderia", meaning "Total Drama: The Nursery".

    Other 
  • Mister Clean became Maestro Limpio (Master Clean) in Mexico.
  • Even public holidays aren's safe: U.S. Memorial Day is normally translated in Spanish, at least in Mexico, as Dia de los Caidos. (Day of the Fallen Ones or Day of the Fallen in Combat, in-context)
  • Dodgeball to Balon quemado (Burned Ball) in Latin America and Spain.
  • Countries and even the names of cities had different names or spellings between Spanish-speaking countries:
    • Saudi Arabia is spelled as Arabia Saudita in Mexico and Arabia Saudi anywhere else.
    • The capital of Somalia, Mogadishu is spelled as it in Latin America, but in Spain, it's spelled as Mogadiscio.
    • In a similar way, Bangladesh is spelled the same way in Latin America. In Spain, it's spelled as Bangladés (without the h).
    • Mexico City itself is named by Mexicans themselves as La Ciudad de Mexico, (literally, The Mexico City or The City of Mexico), but anywhere else in the Spanish-speaking countries, it's just Ciudad de Mexico, without the "La" article.
    • Key West, Florida is named Cayo Hueso ("Bone Cay") in Spanish. This is because Florida used to be part of Spain until 1821 and the name is still used by the Spanish speakers from both the island and the rest of the Spanish speaking countries, but not for the English-speaking ones nor for the rest of the world.
  • The Peanuts comic strip is called Rabanitos (Little Radishes) in Latin America.
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