Follow TV Tropes

Following

Completely Different Title / Russian

Go To

The trope is ubiquitous in Russia, with show names being altered to accommodate an Incredibly Lame Pun or make the title more "understandable" by the general populace. Translation Matchmaking also runs rampant. Some of the more baffling (or surprisingly spot-on) examples are listed below.


Anime and Manga
  • The second and the third season of the Sailor Moon anime were renamed Sailormoon is With Us Again and Sailormoon the Super-Warrior, which are technically more or less correct explanation of the letters R ("Return") and S ("Super") in the original titles.
    • The original season also had The Foreign Subtitle "Moon in a sailor suit" tacked on in an attempt to explain what "Sailor Moon" refers to (since the name itself is left untranslated, i.e. in English). Its surreality led to a number of jokes in the local press.
  • Advertisement:
  • Hellsing's TV Series was called Hellsing: The War Against Undead
  • Tokyo Godfathers became Once in Tokyo.

Film (Animated)

Film (Live-Action)

  • The Hangover was renamed Mal'chishnik v Vegase (A Stag Party in Vegas); the sequel is known as Malchishnik: Iz Vegasa v Bangkok (Stag Party: From Vegas to Bangkok). Similarly, Get Him to the Greek was retitled as Pobeg iz Vegasa (Escape from Vegas), quite possibly as a Translation Matchmaking ploy. Also, Bridesmaids became A Hen Party in Vegas.
  • For some reason, The Hurt Locker was retitled Povelitel' buri (Master Of The Storm), producing a very strange Word Salad Title which even the film's distributors in Russia couldn't explain.
  • The Last Airbender was released as Povelitel' stikhiy (Master Of The Elements).
  • Advertisement:
  • The Full Monty is known as Muzhskoy striptiz (Men's Striptease), which pushes the title into Exactly What It Says on the Tin territory. An alternative, and much more creative and punny, translation is Polnyi golyak, which can be understood as both Fully Naked and Completely Broke.
  • Due Date is known as Vprityk (something like Barely On Time). It could also be translated as Just Close Enough, a reference to how close spacially the two male characters have to be for most of the movie.
  • The Town is Gorod vorov (City Of Thieves).
  • Taken was retitled as Zalozhnitsa (Female Hostage), although the girl is kidnapped, not taken hostage...
  • Snatch. became Bol'shoy kush (Big Score), although Dmitry Puchkov (better known as Goblin) made his own translation, preferring to call the movie Spizdili, which is a vulgar way of saying [They] Stole, while also retaining the Double Entendre of "snatch".
  • Advertisement:
  • Lock, Stock & Two Smoking Barrels was translated as Karty, den'gi, dva stvola (Cards, Money, Two [Gun]barrels).
  • Tropic Thunder became Soldaty Neudachi (Soldiers of Misfortune), probably as an effort to better explain the military theme of the movie to people going in blind.
  • Captain America: The First Avenger became just First Avenger, and all the following Captain America movies are released as "First Avenger: Subtitle.". Presumably they were afraid no Russian will go to see "american propaganda".
    • In the same vein, Captain America: The Winter Soldier was switched to more subtle "The First Avenger: Another War", or, more accurately, "A different kind of war", highlighting the Grey-and-Gray Morality of modern conflicts that is a major theme of the film.
    • Captain America: Civil War was renamed to The First Avenger: Confrontation. Some believe that this title describes the events of the film more accurately than original.
  • "Blind Idiot" Translation moment: Death Proof became Dokazatel'stvo Smerti (the Proof of Death, not quite what the original means; triply odd since the Title Drop in the movie itself is translated properly).
  • Sometimes, compactness of the title becomes an issue. Repo Men if translated properly, would take up a LOT of space, so the translators went with a similarly-sounding-in-English Potroshiteli (Ripper Men, if you want to feel poetic, or The Disembowellers if you don't). This is a common problem with short-named movies.
  • In a particularly idiotic case of "Blind Idiot" Translation, Pitch Black is known as "The Black Hole" in Russia, although there are no black holes in the movie.
    • Or a case of Fridge Brilliance, as the word "hole" can also mean "dump" (as in "what a dump") or a place in the middle of nowhere, which is exactly where they end up.
  • The Dark Knight Rises is called The Dark Knight: Revival of the Legend.
  • 2001: A Space Travesty is known as "The Sixth Element" (as in a parody of The Fifth Element, although there are no jokes about The Fifth Element in the movie).
  • The Pacifier is known as "The Bald He-Babysitter: A Special Task".
    • The double-meaning in the original name is lost in Russian, where "one who pacifies" would be called "uspokoitel'" (although that sounds more like a medicine than a person), while a baby pacifier is called "soska", which is also common obscene slang for a woman that specializes in fellatio. Neither of these makes for a good movie name.
    • The translation may be referencing a 1970s Soviet comedy The Mustached He-Babysitter about a young idler forced to work in a kindergarten.
  • The Shawshank Redemption is known as The Escape from Shawshank.
  • Interesting case with The Fast and the Furious series. The first film was known as Afterburner. 2Fast 2Furious was called Double Afterurner. The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift was called Triple Afterburner: Tokyo Drift. Fast and Furious was called simply Afterburner 4. And Fast Five also became simply Afterburner 5.
  • Cirque Du Freak Vampires Assistant became The Story of One Vampire.
  • In the idiotic case of "Blind Idiot" Translation, Constantine has become "Constantine: The Ruler of Darkness"
  • In a brilliant case of this, Die Hard was translated as "Krepkiy Oreshek" ("A Tough Nut To Crack"). There were also bootleg versions, titled "Die Painfully, But With Dignity"
  • Shaun of the Dead was renamed to A Zombie Named Shaun, even though Shaun doesn't become a zombie in the film.
  • Hot Fuzz was translated as roughly "Sorta Awesome Cops".
    • Trying to cash in on the glory of Hot Fuzz, Observe and Report was called "Sorta Awesome Guard"
  • Zombieland was renamed to Welcome to Zombieland for no particular reason.
    • Adventureland was also renamed to "Park of culture and relaxation", although sometimes called "Land of adventures".
  • Public Enemies was renamed to "Johnny D.", probably trying to cash in on having Johnny Depp in the movie. And an obvious wise pun on him playing Johnny Dillinger, whose name is much more well-known than the original book's title.
  • Fortress (1992) was renamed to "The Final Countdown".
  • Sexy Boys was renamed to "The French Pie". Guess on what they were trying to cash in.
  • I Now Pronounce You Chuck and Larry was renamed to "Chuck and Larry: The Firefighter Wedding". The same Russian adjective may mean "of conflagration", "of firefighter" or "emergency". This pun actually fits the movie theme.
  • Disaster Movie was renamed to "Unreal Blockbuster", with the word "unreal" also having a slang meaning of "awesome". which is more fitting, although nothing can save this movie.
  • Scary Movie was called "Very Scary Movie". The same case with all of the sequels. And with the Epic Movie. Strangely enough, Superhero Movie was an exception.
  • Lost in Translation became "Translation Difficulties".
  • Ocean's 11 became "Eleven friends of Ocean's". Ditto for the sequels, even though not everyone in the list can be accurately called a friend of Ocean's.
  • The Expendables are known as Neuderzhimye (The Unstoppables), a complete reversal of the original title but somehow fitting because the English title is a clear case of Non-Indicative Name. In a case of Translation Matchmaking, unrelated Stallone vehicle Bullet to the Head was promoted as Neuderzhimyi (The Unstoppable).
  • Xchange became "Body swap", which makes a little more sense, especially since it also refers to Mindswap, the original novel by Robert Sheckley, on which the movie is loosely based.
  • The Underworld films are known as "Another world", even though it has nothing to do with the game Another World. This is likely because the word "underworld" is typically translated as "the world beyond the grave", which would not really fit the theme, since, in this setting, vampires and werewolves are not undead.
  • The Darkest Hour is translated as "Phantom", which also kinda fits the theme (i.e. invisible aliens attacking everyone). It's not clear if the film's (Russian) director decided to translate it that way, or if the decision was made by the dubbing company.
  • Tucker & Dale vs. Evil became Killer Vacation.
  • A History of Violence became Justified Cruelty.
  • Ted is called the Russian equivalent of "Odd Man Out" ("Third [Is] Redundant").
  • Carrie became "Telekinesis", which is strange because Stephen King is very popular in Russia.
  • Push is called "The Fifth Dimension" in Russia. All that does is give it a Zeerust feel, especially since even the word "dimension" is never once mentioned in the film. Then again, Pushers in the translation are called Suggesters. Additionally, the direct translation of the word "push", "tolchok", is also a slang for a toilet.
  • In Bruges is Zalech' na dno v Brugge (Laying Low in Bruges).
  • Some Like It Hot was retitled V dzhaze tol'lko devushki (Only Girls in this Jazz Band) in the USSR, and the name stuck well.
  • Bootleg translation of Steven Seagal's Nico: Above The Law better known simply as Above the Law (1988) became Nico. That's fine. But for some reason bootleggers titled the following Seagal's films as sequels: Nico 2, Nico 3, Nico 4...
  • See No Evil, Hear No Evil was titled Nichego ne vizhu, nichego ne slyshu ([I] see nothing, [I] hear nothing), from the usual translation of the phrase associated with 3 wise monkeys.
    • But like the Nico example above, another Richard Pryor and Gene Wilder comedy Another You was titled [I] see nothing, [I] hear nothing 2: second me.
  • World War Z became War of the Worlds Z. Yes, like that novel by H.G. Wells.
  • Silver Linings Playbook was rather verbosely retitled as Moy paren' - psih: Istoriya optimista (My Boyfriend is a Psycho: An Optimist's Story).
  • One of translations titled Beowulf (1999) (the Post Apocalyptic one, starring Christopher Lambert) as Biovolk i.e. "bio-wolf". Some fans argue that the name manages to hint the film's shift to SF, while sounding close to the original.
  • Seeking Justice was renamed to "The Hungry Rabbit Jumps", after the code phrase used by the organization.
  • Inception is an odd example just like Death Proof above: the Title Drop in the dialogue is translated correctly (as "vnedrenie", as in, the inception of an idea into someone's mind), but the movie itself is given the "Blind Idiot" Translation "Nachalo" ("Beginning").
  • Star Trek Into Darkness was renamed to Startrek: Vengeance. Which is almost exactly the same title they gave Star Trek: Nemesis (Star Trek: Vengeance)... The difference is that "Startrek" is transliterated as one word in the new film, while being fully translated in Nemesis.
  • Splice became "Chimera", probably because the title doesn't have a concise direct translation otherwise.
  • The Swedish movie Fucking Åmål gained a title that translates to Show Me Love.
  • There was an old fan translation of Beetlejuice as "Zhuciniy sok" — "bug juice".
  • Similar to the Live-Action TV example (see below), the 2014 version of Hercules is called Heracles (Gerakl) in Russian, since most viewers would be more familiar with the Greek name (and also because in Russian, hercules is now a synonym for oatmeal, thanks to a highly popular Soviet oatmeal brand).
    • Strangely, the Ukrainian translation retains the Roman name.
  • Those Magnificent Men in Their Flying Machines, or How I Flew from London to Paris in 25 Hours 11 Minutes was translated as Air Adventures. Probably to shorten the name.
  • The Dukes of Hazzard became Morons from Hazzard.
  • An interesting case with the Need for Speed film. In order to retain the connection with the game series, the translation pulls a Department of Redundancy Department by listing the title in both languages.
  • Freejack was translated as Immortality Corporation.
  • Tower Heist became How to Steal a Skyscraper.
  • Van Wilder became Party King.
  • Cinderella Man became Knockdown.
  • Safe House became Access Code: Cape Town.
  • About Time became The Boyfriend from Future.
  • 100 Girls became 100 Girls and One in an Elevator.
  • The Men Who Stare at Goats became The Crazy Special Forces.
  • Dan in Real Life became To Fall in Love with Brother's Bride.
  • Tomorrow: When the War Began became Invasion: The Battle for the Paradise.
  • Men of Honor became The Military Diver.
  • No Strings Attached became More Than Sex.
  • The F Word became Friendship and no Sex?.
  • Colossal became My Girlfriend is a Monster.
  • Event Horizon became Through the Horizon.
  • Mr. Right is called My Boyfriend Is a Hitman.
  • Jug Face became Sacrificial Face.
  • Savaged became Freaks.
  • Wicked Little Things became Doom Zombies.
  • Witchboard became Witchcraft.
  • Orphan became The Child of Darkness.
  • Zombie Wars became People Against Zombies.
  • Skin Trade became Slave Trade.
  • Wrestlemaniac became Maniac Killer.
  • The Tooth Fiary 2006 became Ancient Curse.
  • Halloween Night became Halloween: Feast of Death.
  • Zombie Strippers! became Striptease from Zombies.
  • Dance of the Dead became Infernal Party.
  • Time After Time became Travel in a Time Machine.
  • Hoosiers became Komanda iz shtata Indiana ("A Team from Indiana")—one of the "surprisingly spot-on" examples alluded to in the introduction.
  • We Are Marshall became My — odna komanda ("We Are One Team").
  • I Spy became Obmanut' vsekh ("To Trick Everyone").
  • I, Tonya is a special case. Initially, it was announced as Ice Bitch, which resulted in massive backdraft over the internet - enough to force the title to be changed into Tonya Against Everyone, which is still pretty different, but at the very least not as egregious.
  • Mortal Engines is called Predator Cities Chronicles in Russian, which refers to two of the fan names for the book series: Predator Cities Quartet and Hungry City Chronicles.
  • An interesting case with Battle For Sevastopol, a World War II movie about the famous Soviet female sniper Lyudmila Pavlichenko. The name has been translated into English verbatim, but the Ukrainian name is Unbroken. Many agree that the Ukrainian name is more appropriate, given that the battle itself is more of a brief flashback than the focus of the story. Pavlichenko did indeed "not break", despite everything she'd lived through (death of her husband, death of one of her sniper students, surrendering Sevastopol to the enemy after a lengthy siege and heroic defense, a number of wounds).
  • House Bunny is called Boys Like It in Russian.
  • Coppola's The Beguiled became The Fateful Temptation. That is easy to justify. Who is beguiled? Is the man (singular male) "Обманутый" or are the women (plural) "Обманутые"?
  • Glengarry Glen Ross is simply named Americans in Russian, probably because the original name would have been meaningless in translation. It's also occasionally been translated as Dealers.
  • Jumper got translated as Teleport.
  • Italian Vendetta dal futuro ("future revenge") first appeared as bootlegger transtations of various releases outside Italy, including US "Steel arms", German "Pako — the battle machine of death" and possibly some Central European "Cyborg". Later the authorized translation was called "Cyborg the Steel Arms".
  • Bootleggers named Young Doctors in Love "Youth, Hospital, Love" and the name stuck for the official translation too.
  • Fabulous World of Jules Verne is "The Secret of Back Cup Island" in Russian. The original title used in most other languages is "The Deadly Invention".
  • Zombi 2 became Flesh Eaters.
  • V/H/S became EVIL.
  • The Prowler became Stranger.
  • Runaway became Robot Hunt.
  • Tremors became Trembling Earth.
  • Hawk the Slayer became Avenger Hawk.
  • Reefer Madness became Smoky Brains.
  • Tombs of the Blind Dead became Black Mass.
  • Ringu became Call.
  • The Colony (2016) became Colonia Dignidad.
  • The Innkeepers became Secrets of the Old Hotel.
  • Bad Taste became Alien Stew.
  • Jack Frost (1997) became Snowman.
  • The Hebrew Hammer became Slaughter Hammer.
  • Collateral Damage became Compensation for Damage.
  • Don't Torture a Duckling became The Torment of the Innocent.
  • Quigley Down Under became Quigley in Australia.
  • Gutterballs became Big Balls.
  • Jack-O became Jack the Pumpkin Head.
  • The Creeping Terror became Lurking Horror.
  • The Cottage became Trap.
  • Dead Before Dawn became Scariest Movie.
  • Dead Heat became Deadly Rage.
  • Bedeviled became Maddened.

Film (Animation)

  • A surprising amount of movies get their names re-tooled into a 'gangsta' theme even if there isn't one present in the original title. Or movie, for that matter.
    • It seems to have started with Shark Tale that became Podvodnaya Bratva (The Underwater Gang, using "gang" in its criminal sense). The literal translation would've worked fine, but at least the new one fit more or less with its mafia themes. But then Translation Matchmaking ran amok.
    • Over the Hedge became Lesnaya Bratva (The Forest Gang, same subtext. Curiously enough, this is the same name used in the Japanese dub).
    • And after that, Alpha and Omega became Alpha And Omega: The Fanged Gang, and Delhi Safari became The Jungle Gang...
  • Bolt became Volt (Вольт) to explain the lightning-bolt insignia, preserve the shortness of the name and, incidentally, most of the letters, as the Russian V is written the same as the Latin B.
  • Hotel Transylvania became "Monsters on Vacation"
  • Rise of the Guardians became "Keepers of Dreams", even though that would only apply to Sandman (there are two words for "dream" in Russian; the word used here is only for the ones people see when they sleep with no relation to the other word meaning "goals").
  • Big Hero 6 is called The City of Heroes, perhaps implying that everyone in the city is a hero.
  • Food Fight became A Night in Supermarket.
  • Frozen became Cold Heart.
  • Zootopia became Beastopolis (Zveropolis). The Ukrainian version is halfway between the two: Zoopolis.
  • Sing became Beastsing (Zveropoy). Another case of Translation Matchmaking, plus a pun on St. John's wort (zveroboy).

Literature

  • Harry Turtledove's Worldwar novels get this treatment:
    • In the Balance became "Invasion Fleet".
    • Tilting the Balance became "Retaliation".
    • Upsetting the Balance became "Eye for an Eye".
    • Striking the Balance became "The Great Turning Point".
  • Harry Harrison's Stars and Stripes books:
    • Stars and Stripes Forever is "Rings of Anaconda".
    • Stars and Stripes in Peril is "Enemy at the Threshold".
    • Stars and Stripes Triumphant is "In the Lion's Den".
    • Surprisingly, the series as a whole is still called "Stars and Stripes".
  • Also, Harrison's novel The Technicolor Time Machine became "Fantastic Saga".
  • Glen Cook's Passage at Arms became Raid.
  • Alfred Bester's The Demolished Man is best known as "The Man without a Face".
  • A Feast for Crows became A Feast of Vultures. In Ukrainian, it's A Feast of Ravens.
  • Most titles by Brandon Sanderson were not altered except for:
    • Elantris became The City of Gods, probably because publishers shun names as titles.
    • Warbreaker became less ambiguous Destroyer of Wars.
    • The Final Empire became Ash and Steel, which has no excuse.
  • The Woodwalkers series was renamed to Дети Леса (Deti Lesa), which means Children of the Forrest. This name fits because the series is about children who can turn into forrest animals.

Live-Action TV

  • Lost is known as Ostat'sya v zhivyh (To Survive or, if you will, Staying Alive). A rather well-calculated move, because the phrase comes from the theme song for the Russian version of Survivor, a show which shares its castaway themes with the series. Incidentally, Survivor itself was known as Poslyedniy Geroy (The Last Hero). However, many fans of Lost refer to it by its original name, even though it doesn't mean anything in Russian.
  • Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers were named just The Mighty Rangers
  • Interesting case with Scrubs: it was renamed to Klinika (The Clinic), since the original title would just sound silly in a direct translation, and since the word "klinika" can also be used to refer to a silly or crazy situation (so to say, idiotic enough to warrant attention of a mental clinic).
    • The Russian term for "scrubs" is "surgical suit" and doesn't have the same connotation as it does in English.
  • The show Time Trax is sometimes translated as "Through time", although another version of the translation is "Tracks in time", which is a more or less direct translation (except for the annoying "x").
  • Not a case of a completely different title, but the show Hercules: The Legendary Journeys became Amazing journeys of Heracles, since Heracles is more familiar to the Russian audience than Hercules. In fact, Heracles makes more sense, given that the show is about a Greek character, not his Roman counterpart.
  • 90210 is known as "90210: The New Generation".
  • Grey's Anatomy is "Anatomy of passion".
  • Queer as Folk became "Close friends".
  • Home Improvement is "Big repair".
  • The Middle is "It can be worse".
  • Tru Calling is "Bring back from the dead".
  • Leverage is "Influence".
  • FlashForward became "Recall what will happen" or "To recall the future", since there's no good way to translate the play on words.
  • Glory Days is translated as "City of demons".
  • Roswell became "City of aliens".
  • Burn Notice is known as "The black spot". No, it's not a pirate show, and the term is familiar to Russians from Treasure Island as it is to everyone else. Although, it kinda fits the concept. You get the "black spot" (or a burn notice), you're screwed, and nobody wants to deal with you.
  • Better Off Ted is "Do it again, Ted".
  • Cold Case is "Detective Rush".
  • Moonlighting became "The 'Moonlight' detective agency", with the double meaning lost.
  • In an unexplainable fit of Executive Meddlingnote  a UK-Australian TV series Golden Pennies was at the last moment renamed to Chuzhoye zoloto ("Somebody else's gold"). Except the voiceover in the end credits still called it "Golden pennies". The literal translation doesn't convey the nuances very well, but the new name does not fit the series at all.
  • Man vs. Wild became To Survive at any Cost.
  • Broadchurch became Murder on a Beach, while its American remake kept the name.
  • Timeless is called Beyond time.

Video Games

  • In order to retain the acronym, KKnD (which stands for "Krush, Kill 'n' Destroy") was translated as Krushi, Kalech, ne Dumai ("Smash, Maim, don't Think").
  • Neighbours From Hell became How to Pester the Neighbour.
  • Shogo: Mobile Armor Division become Ярость: Восстание на Кронусе (Jarost': Vosstanie na Kronuse, which means "Rage: Rebellion on Cronus").
  • Tachyon: The Fringe is known as Cruel Stars. Also, for unspecified reasons, several characters received different names. For example, the Rebel Leader Susan Bradley became known as Carmen Rojas, while Anna Highfall is called Katya Zapolskaya.
  • Stand-alone expansion pack for Mount & Blade, Warband, is named Age of Tournaments.
  • A minor example with Sins of a Solar Empire, which was released as Decline of a Solar Empire.
  • Hearts of Iron is localised as Victory Day, though the English title is used more often.

Western Animation

  • Family Guy is known as Griffiny (The Griffins), most likely to compare it to The Simpsons.
  • TaleSpin was translated in Russia as Wonders on Loops (Chudesa na virazhakh, where virazh refers to horizontal loops in the air), likely because the pun would be utterly lost in direct translation.
  • Darkwing Duck was translated as Chorny Plashch (Black Cape), which was a bit of Fridge Brilliance on the part of the translators, as Launchpad (named Zigzag in the translation) calls him by the initials "Ch.P." (pronounced "cheh-peh"), which is the same as a common acronym meaning "emergency". Most of the characters were likewise renamed.
    • Unfortunately, the name of the Ukrainian-themed villain Taurus Bulba (a mix of the Greek word for "bull" with the Ukrainian folk hero Taras Bulba) was changed to simply Taras Bulba, even though this is the audience uniquely qualified to recognize the pun. How many Americans know who Taras Bulba was?
  • In a weird case of reversing the above, Exo Squad became "Space Rescuers of Lieutenant Marsh"
  • Similarly, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles have become "The Ninja Turtles"
  • Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (2003) were named "The Ninja Turtles: New Adventures" in Russia, although it was unrelated to the 1989 cartoon. Similarly, The Spectacular Spider Man has become "Spider-Man: The New Adventures"
  • Idiotic case with Earthworm Jim: it was renamed to "Jimmy The Super Worm"
  • Batman Beyond, aka Batman of the Future in Russia is known as "The New Batman"
  • Spider-Man Unlimited oddly have become "The Invincible Spider-Man". Very odd case, since usually "Spider-Man" itself was always directly translated to "Chelovek-Pauk", but this time they left the original name.
  • Chip 'n Dale: Rescue Rangers is known as Chip and Dale Are Hurrying to the Rescue. Also, the names of some characters were changed to be more understandable to the audience. For example, Monterey Jack (or Monty) was renamed to Roquefort (or Rocky), as that type of cheese was better known in Soviet Russia. Gadget Hackwrench became Gaika ("gaika" is Russian for "nut", the hardware kind), simply because the word "gadget" wasn't that well-known in the country.
  • T.U.F.F. Puppy became "Special Agent Dudley".
  • Breadwinners became "Bread Ducks".
  • Wander over Yonder became С приветом по планетам (S privetom po planetam). It literally translates to "With Greetings Across the Planets", but s privetom is an idiom meaning "slightly crazy or ditzy".
  • In order to retain the original acronym, Codename: Kids Next Door became Komanda nashego dvora (The Team of Our (Back)yard).
  • Barnyard became Horns and Hooves.
Top

How well does it match the trope?

Example of:

/

Media sources:

/

Report