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Left: most people think Mario hits blocks with his head. Right: Mario actually hits blocks with his fist.
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  • Animal Crossing:
    • In many interpretations, jokes and fan artwork, Tom Nook is depicted as sleazy and greedy businessman who forces player character into mortgages, with the game itself being jokingly described as "debt simulator". While some of his sleaziness holds true in early installments, Tom underwent major character development as the series progressed, becoming one of the nicest characters in the whole ensemble (coming as far as buying free coffee for random townspeople and consciously purchasing junk items from the player at a loss). Similarly, the "debt" part of the game is often exaggerated, as loans in the game don't have actual deadlines or interest, and player can easily pay off debt at their own pace or even ignore it entirely. Even his "forcing" the character into mortgages is greatly exaggerated as the player character even in the first game clearly went there looking to buy a home but was woefully unprepared with only 1,800 bells: if anything Nook bailed out an unprepared kid who would have otherwise been homeless.
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    • Many people state that the villagers used to be much more rude and cynical in the first installment of the series and became nicer as the series progressed. This is only partially true, as the villagers' visceral treatment of the player only applies to the English localization of the game, which seemingly felt the need to spice up the script. The villagers are much more polite in the original Japanese version. Later games in the series wouldn't take as much liberties regarding the overseas localizations and thus are much more loyal to their Japanese counterparts.
  • Bungo to Alchemist: That Ozaki Kōyō hates being called old, judging by the "who are you calling granny" line. He actually hates being misgendered, as clearly shown by the latter half of that line ("I'm quite obviously a man!"); he openly acknowledges he's elderly in his other lines.
  • Doom:
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    • The original game, contrary to popular belief, does not take place on Mars, but on Mars' moons of Phobos and Deimos. The third game and the reboot both do, though.
    • It's commonly claimed that the Japanese Sega Saturn version of Doom has "much better" performance than the other regional releases of the game. This is a myth: framerate analysis by Digital Foundry's John Linneman proves the Japanese version is essentially identical to the North American release in term of performance. Likely, the rumour originates from the fact that the first person to make the claim was comparing the Japanese release to the European version, which due to not being properly optimised for the PAL video standard as was common at the time, would naturally run jerkier and slower than the NTSC-based Japanese release. The Japanese Doom is "better" than the other versions in that it has the multiplayer (not present in the original North American release) while retaining the NA's version slightly better framerate, although most claims of its superiority are specifically about its performance.
    • There's a common misconception that the berserk powerup (a black medikit that heals you up to 100 health if you're anywhere below that amount, and massively increases the damage your punch attack does) in the first 2 games only lasts for as long as the screen has a red tint (about 20 seconds), which is likely fueled by the fact that all the other powerups with some visible effect outside of the status bar (invisibility, invulnerability and infrared goggles) having a time limit. It actually lasts until the end of the level or until the player dies. It also increases the punch damage a lot more than most players think (you can usually kill a pinky demon with one punch).
    • The first 2 games also have a powerup called the soulsphere (a blue orb thing that increases your hp by 100, and, unlike the berserk pack, can raise your health over 100 to the maximum of 200). The message when picking it up is "Supercharge!". As such, many players think the powerup itself is named that. An understandable mistake, considering every other powerup, weapon, etc in the game says what it is in the pickup message. It certainly doesn't help that the only place that calls it the soulsphere is the manual.
    • It's commonly believed that the PS4, Xbox One, Nintendo Switch and smartphone versions of Doom and Doom II, which all launched as an infamous Porting Disaster, was actually a secret Video Game Remake that was built from scratch on Unity. In actuality, it's still based on the Doom codebase and merely uses Unity as a wrapper.
  • Eternal Darkness: Sanity's Requiem has a tendency to be labeled as a third-party effort for the Nintendo GameCube. Nintendo had contracted Silicon Knights to work as a second party to create software for the console, and Eternal Darkness was the first result of that effort.note  Right on the title screen it plainly reads © 2002 Nintendo, and a look in the credits shows a screen saying, "All rights including the copyrights of Game, Scenario, Music and Program, reserved by NINTENDO."
  • Fallout 4 received praise from several sources for being the first Fallout game to allow you to play as a woman... despite gender choice being a feature since the first game. The confusion likely came from the fact that a gameplay demonstration at E3 in 2015 showed the character creation screen (showing the PC and their spouse getting ready for a day out) and put emphasis on selecting their gender (chosen by choosing either the husband or wife) likely intended as a retort to rumors present at the time that the game would lack the option. This could easily give the impression that being able to pick the PC's gender was a new feature to someone not familiar with the series and was unfamiliar with the rumors.
  • Fire Emblem:
    • Commentators on Fire Emblem: Shadow Dragon will often tell you that Navarre inspired the Myrmidon classline because while the iconic Mercenary, Ogma, was a Jack-of-All-Stats, Navarre was a Fragile Speedster. Those to have actually played the older games will tell you that both Navarre and Ogma fit the Fragile Speedster mold, and their stats tend to be about the same (in fact, Ogma is the faster of the two at base level, and Navarre has the better HP growth, so you could actually argue the opposite). The first game to introduce Myrmidons had them essentially replace Mercenaries, with them being largely identical to the older class in function. It wasn't until Fire Emblem: The Binding Blade that Mercenaries and Myrmidons were treated as two distinct classlines and developed their signature "Jack-of-All-Stats vs. Fragile Speedster" dynamic. The remake of Shadow Dragon carried this over and adjusted Ogma and Navarre accordingly, but this was the first time in the franchise that it was the case.
    • Fire Emblem: The Binding Blade: Zephiel killed Hector, right? Actually no. Hector was already mortally wounded before Zephiel arrived on the scene, Zephiel merely taunted him as he lay dying, and it isn't until the chapter ends (when Zephiel has already left) that Hector finally passes. Whilst who inflicted those injuries is never stated, it's likely they came from Bern's army. Technically Zephiel killed Hector by ordering the attack on Pherae, but he never dealt the finishing blow himself.
    • It's often held that Roy has bad growths by detractors. In fact, Roy has some of the best growths in his game, being one of only three units to total more than 300%. He does tend to have bad stats, but this is more due to his poor base stats, his lack of a standout growth apart from Luck and his habit of getting stuck at level 20, not to mention bad stats standing out a lot harder in a game with very strong enemies.
    • It's an often-held belief among fans that in Fire Emblem: The Sacred Stones, Eirika and Ephriam get married in the Japanese version's "Where Are They Now?" Epilogue. While the game does have an awful lot of Incest Subtext, this is not true in the slightest. It's just a result of fans believing "any paired ending must be romantic, so they obviously censored it", despite there being several non-romantic paired endings, even in this very game. (Duessel and Amelia comes to mind.)
    • By extension, while it's Common Knowledge that "the Fire Emblem series is full of Brother–Sister Incest!", the only game to feature any actual explicit incest between siblings is the fourth game. And even then, it turns out to be a case of The Villain Made Them Do It. Mostly-optional instances of Kissing Cousins and Incest Subtext have cropped up a lot more frequently, though, which doesn't help.
    • It's a commonly-held belief that the Fire Emblem Awakening Drama CDs canonize the nameless Village Maiden as Chrom's wife. This isn't true since the Drama CD has never been explicitly confirmed as canon, and it also never mentioned anything about whom Chrom married. Fans just inferred it had to be the Maiden due to Lucina being an only child in the CDs. In reality, the Drama CD was explicitly avoiding making any of Chrom's potential wives "canon" (or indeed any options in the game), so that it could be enjoyed by any player of the game regardless of their choices. Further, most fans base this "fact" off one forum post, though the original poster was joking when he claimed the Drama CD made the Maiden canon.
  • Half-Life: because Gordon Freeman is the poster boy for the Heroic Mute FPS protagonist, it's often assumed that he never speaks at all, or even that he physically can't. While he's acknowledged as a "man of few words" in-universe, the series makes it fairly clear that he does sometimes talk, we just never hear it. Scientists occasionally react as if they're being asked a question in the first game, and have to be told to follow you. The second game introduces squad commands where you can order rebels to certain spots, which again, obviously requires Freeman to speak (and the rebels definitely do respond as if they're being spoken to). Opposing Force and Blue Shift, while they have Barney and Shepherd respectively as their protagonists instead of Freeman, both make this logic explicit. For instance:
    Drill Instructor: What's your name, dirtbag?
    (the player hears nothing)
    Drill Instructor: Sound off like you got a pair!
    (the player hears nothing)
    Drill Instructor: Corporal Shephard, huh? Looks more like corporal "Dog Meat" to me!
    • Part of the confusion comes from the fact that Half-Life has an Unbroken First-Person Perspective. A lot of other shooters with silent protagonists (such as Doom 3 and Halo 3: ODST) have cutscenes which explicitly show them as being silent even in situations where they logically should be speaking. Half-Life never does this and leaves the reactions of the player character mostly up to the players' imagination.
  • The console known as the Wii was never supposed to be called the "Revolution." This was a working production name, just like the "Dolphin" (GameCube) or "Nitro" (DS). However, due to Nintendo revealing a great deal of information about the console before it had a name, media sources were forced to use the name Revolution over and over again until the public loved it so much that when the actual, controversial name was revealed, there was a backlash.
  • Thanks to Seanbaby, a lot people are convinced that the spell AMUT in Final Fantasy, which cures Silence, is useless, because no monsters actually cast MUTE. There are actually four: EYEs, PHANTOMs, GrNAGAs, and WzVAMPs. However, all of them cast it infrequently enough that you'll probably never get hit with it in your entire playthrough, but just because it's improbable doesn't mean it's impossible.
  • Final Fantasy VII:
    • If you take into account information not available or clear in the (English) game itself, Aeris wasn't stabbed by Sephiroth. She was stabbed by Jenova, acting as Sephiroth's avatar. These outside sources even retcon her English name into being "Aerith", even though that is decidedly not the case in the original translation. Sephiroth spends most of the game hibernating in the Whirlwind Maze, sending out Jenova clones from there to torment the party. Because Jenova changed its form to appear as Sephiroth and was acting on his orders, saying "Sephiroth killed Aerith" is still correct, just only technically so — while Sephiroth didn't personally stab Aerith, he's still responsible for her death. The "real" Sephiroth is only encountered twice in the entire game: once in the Whirlwind Maze, and once as the final boss.
      • The Japanese frames Jenova as the Big Bad who was imitating/controlling Sephiroth. The English made Sephiroth out to be the big bad who was mostly just empowered but not controlled by Jenova, and rather oddly the Ultimania guide said that the English interpretation was correct.
      • On that note, it was the body of Jenova, shape-shifted to look like Sephiroth, which broke out of Shinra HQ and which the party was pursuing throughout Disc 1.
      • The various "clones" encountered in the game are actually the former residents of Nibelheim, injected with Sephiroth's cells and exposed to Mako energy in an attempt to create duplicates of the fallen Super Soldier (or maybe just to give him some pawns to manipulate).
      • Much of the confusion surrounding these plot points stems from poor localization. See here for further details.
    • Final Fantasy VII is often thought of as one of the games that started the "killing God" concept in JRPGs. Except Sephiroth isn't a god, and neither is Jenova. They are closer to the Gnostic Demiurge — a figure that's perceived to be a god, but isn't one. Jenova has more in common with the monster from The Thing (1982) or Who Goes There? than a god. The fact that Sephiroth's second form is the Trope Namer for One-Winged Angel (complete with Ominous Latin Chanting) and obvious Christian Imagery does help lead to this misconception.
    • Cloud's characterization as "emo" is largely due to the perception that he was.
      • In the game proper, Cloud was a cocky punk who grew into a confident leader at the game's end, and that's after realizing that said "cocky punk" attitude was more of Zack's behavior that Cloud had imprinted onto his own memories. And while Cloud does have some moments of angst in the game (namely about how Sephiroth burned down Cloud's hometown and killed his parents, something anyone would rightly be upset about), the worst of it is after a massive Mind Rape that leaves him stuck in a wheelchair, babbling incoherently. And even then, after Tifa helps him snap out of it with a Battle in the Center of the Mind, Cloud stops angsting about everything and focuses on defeating Sephiroth to save the world.
      • Advent Children has Cloud suffering from the effects of Geostigma, and while Cloud is pretty whiny here (supplementary material explicitly notes that they wanted to play up the angst because it would make Cloud feel "familiar"), it's heavily implied that the disease is messing with his mind and he may even have Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. It stops him from applying boot to rear not very much at all. Notably, after the Geostigma is cured at the end of the movie, Cloud is seen smiling and happy.
      • Properly "emo Cloud" is thought to be mostly a spinoff thing, which for several years, used a version of his Advent Children personality without the Geostigma context and portrayed him as a lot more taciturn, stoic, and generally miserable-looking, not to mention often giving his design a somewhat edgier rework. This version is probably most recognizable through Kingdom Hearts.
    • Cloud's "emo" characterization has itself led to the idea that all Final Fantasy protagonists after him are basically walking balls of tragedy, misery, and whining when they aren't staring off into the middle distance trying to look cool. This fits Squall from Final Fantasy VIII, who was the one right after Cloud and solidified the idea, but it kinda stopped there. Zidane, Tidus, and Vaan are pretty upbeat chaps for the most part (barring one or two points where they react to a significantly bad event), and Lightning (despite being explicitly based on Cloud) is more of a professional stoic hardass than anything. Noctis does fit the stereotype pretty well, but he showed up long after it'd solidified. In fact, more protagonists before Cloud were noticeably angsty (Cecil and Terra are introduced as pretty miserable), but Cloud's still generally remembered as the originator of the whole thing.
    • Tifa is known as having Gag Boobs and the Most Common Superpower... thanks mostly to fan art that depicted her with huge boobs. While Tifa is indeed busty, how big her breasts are in official depictions varies quite significantly Depending on the Artist. For example, her Advent Children design shows her without gag boobs. Even in the original game, her breast size was wildly inconsistent between her field model, her combat model, her FMV sequence model, and even her concept art.
    • You'll often hear people say Aerith is a Hooker with a Heart of Gold (or Compensated Dater) and that this was hidden behind subtext involving flowers. Where this one comes from is anybody's guess, since there's no evidence to back up this idea. Aerith sells flowers, and that's it. At most the job is unusual because Midgar is suffering Gaia's Lament and nothing will grow there.
    • Everyone knows that Aerith was Incorruptible Pure Pureness while Tifa was a Jerk with a Heart of Gold, but a lot of people forget that Tifa was actually quite a Shrinking Violet, and that Aerith once threatened to rip off a mob boss's balls if he didn't talk. This is largely due to the flanderization of Aerith's character over the years. She's lost a lot of her edge and instead become Cloud's innocent Lost Lenore who died a martyr's death. On Tifa's side, she's a Ms. Fanservice who is best known for punching things, so common knowledge is that she's more Hot-Blooded and snappy than she actually is. Final Fantasy VII Remake featured quite a bit of Character Rerailment in this regard, portraying Tifa and Aerith more in-line with their original characterizations.
  • Final Fantasy IX: A lot of people believe that the names of Quina's Limit Glove attack and the boss Valia Pira were mistranslations of Limit Globe and Barrier Pillar respectively. One look at the katakana for both disproves this, as they both deliberately use "v" katakana - Valia Pira's name is written as ヴァリアピラ (Varia Pira)note  and Limit Glove is written リミットグローヴ (Rimitto Gurōvu).note 
  • The Celestial Weapons in Final Fantasy X are generally believed to do more damage the more HP their user has (MP for Yuna and Lulu's weapons), with this being used to promote the CWs as being better than anything the player can otherwise obtain. This is untrue, as the only unique advantage that CWs have other other weapons is their ability to ignore enemy Defense with physical attacks. CWs actually do normal damage when the user is at full HP/MP, and they do less damage the less HP/MP the user has; they have a unique disadvantage compared to other weapons. (Masamune is an exception, as it does more damage the lower Auron's HP is.)
  • The Blazing Star "YOU FAIL IT!" screen appears when you time out a boss, yes, but most people who have not actually seen the screen first-hand think it's part of a Non Standard Game Over. In reality, timing out a boss will simply take you to the next stage; the screen is just the game's way of telling you that you lose your end-of-stage bonuses for taking too long. Not helping this is that the most common screenshot of this text is of the Stage 3 boss, which is set during re-entry into the nearby planet's atmosphere, thus making it look as if said planet is about to be destroyed by Colony Drop.
  • Mortal Kombat:
    • Scorpion and Sub-Zero. One of the most bitter rivalries in gaming, right? Well, not really. Scorpion got his revenge over Bi-Han, the original Sub-Zero at the end of the first game. In Mortal Kombat II, we meet Kuai Liang, the new Sub-Zero (and Bi-Han's younger brother). Scorpion actually becomes the protector of this new Sub-Zero, to atone for killing his brother. Aside from briefly attacking him during the fourth game (due to being Brainwashed and Crazy), Scorpion remains watching over him for the rest of the series (at least until the reboot, which goes in a different direction).
    • Daniel Pesina, the actor who played Johnny Cage and the ninjas in the first and the second game, was not fired from Midway because of the infamous BloodStorm ad that featured him as Cage. He was already out of the company by that point, having left it due to a lawsuit over royalties. So, the Ad, rather than being labeled as a very, very awkward moment, might have been Pesina's snarky revenge against Midway.
    • Shortly after the release of Mortal Kombat 11, a rumor started circulating that obtaining all skins within a reasonable timeframe would require over $6000 in microtransactions. This figure was obtained by taking the total amount of skins in the game and multiplying it by 5 (a skin in the shop costs 500 Time Krystals, which can be purchased with real money for $5), ignoring that only a small amount of skins are available in the store each day, that most Kosmetics cannot be bought from the store, and that both skins and Time Krystals can be earned without payingnote , but it remained common among critics of the game even after it was disproven.
  • The subtitle of Namu Amida Butsu! -UTENA- is frequently written/read as -Rendai UTENA- in non-Japanese fanbases, despite the game's full title's being read aloud on the title screen's saying otherwise. The rendai is not read because UTENA is its Alternate Character Reading.
  • It's common knowledge that Poison and Roxy in Final Fight were made into transgender women because Nintendo of America had issues with "violence against women." In actuality, Poison's gender has been this since her conception. She is referred to as "new-half", the Japanese term for a trans woman. Despite the way she dresses and acts, and the fact that she has handcuffs and a riding crop, Poison isn't actually a prostitute. She's a wrestling manager who just happens to be rather unabashed about how sexy she is.
  • It's sometimes claimed that for Donkey Kong Country, the "Kaptain K. Rool" and "Baron K. Roolenstein" alter-egos of main villain King K. Rool were turned into separate characters for the Japanese translation of the games. Actually they're just disguises in Japanese too. K. Rool's trophy in Super Smash Bros. Brawl makes an odd statement about "his brother Kaptain K. Rool", but it's simply an error, and far from the only one in the game's trophy gallery.
  • Most online parodies of Double Dragon depict Abobo talking in Hulk Speak, despite the fact that the only time he ever talked that way was in Battletoads & Double Dragon, a non-canon crossover which got Machine Gun Willy's name wrong and had a made-up villain in the form of the "Shadow Boss" (which was actually Jimmy Lee's title in the first NES game).
  • Everyone knows that in every Ultima game, Author Avatar Lord British can be killed using a glitch or an exploit in the rules. Actually, this is only true for some of the early games (and even then, in the first game, you didn't even need to do anything special to kill him as long as you could take on his bodyguards) - in the later games, the ability to kill Lord British is a deliberate Easter Egg. The greatest evidence against the glitch theory is in Ultima VII, where to kill him, you need to drop a specific plaque from on top of his castle walls right as he's walking under it, which is an in-joke to the real Richard Garriot being injured by a falling metal bar - all things that would be impossible to be done in the game unless the developers intended you to be able to do it. This idea seems to come from Ultima Online, in which, infamously, a troll actually did manage to kill Garriot's Lord British avatar during an event by accidentally bypassing the invulnerability he had as an admin, but it's not unplanned in any other games.
  • Final Fantasy X has the infamous laughing scene from Tidus and Yuna, where Tidus engages in some very over-the-top forced laughter that sounds incredibly awkward. The scene has generated a ton of mockery over the perceived low-quality voice acting, and some fans also believe that the Japanese version of the same scene sounds better. It doesn't. The laughing in the Japanese version sounds just as out of place and awkward as the English version; in both cases, this awkwardness is intentional. In-context, Tidus had just learned that his father, Jecht, had become the Eldritch Abomination Sin, and was responsible for the deaths of thousands of people. Tidus's laughter, thus, is incredibly forced, because he doesn't have a lot to be happy about. Once Tidus and Yuna catch themselves on how silly they sound with the fake laugh, they burst out into actual laughter, which sounds a lot more genuine and not forcibly over the top. The point of the scene was to show how forcing yourself to laugh or smile makes you look weird. The game even points out how their laughter was supposed to sound forced, as every other character in the scene looks on puzzled at Tidus and Yuna, with Wakka saying he was "worried that you guys might have gone crazy" after hearing it.
  • Kingdom Hearts:
    • Several people believe that the Kingdom Hearts series is a franchise owned by Square Enix with many Disney characters thrown in as cameos. Actually, Kingdom Hearts is entirely owned by Disney. Not only that, all original properties and original characters of the series are owned by them as well. This means Sora, Riku, Kairi, Organization XIII, Xehanort, etc. are all Disney's characters. Disney just hires Square Enix to develop the games. It's all in the copyrights, which generally reads © Disney. Developed by SQUARE ENIX.note  This was acknowledged in a 2004 Official PlayStation Magazine interview with Tetsuya Nomura, the director of the Kingdom Hearts series. The Final Fantasy and The World Ends with You characters are the ones making cameos, as Disney allowed Square Enix to include them in the Kingdom Hearts games. Most of the worlds in the series are the settings of Disney movies, and the handful that aren't are original, not taken from Final Fantasy.
      • As a side note, anything Square Enix does with their own characters in Kingdom Hearts is still owned by them. This is why Cloud, Sephiroth, and Squall can have costumes based on their Kingdom Hearts appearances in Dissidia Final Fantasy.
    • Many fans also, for some reason, choose to believe that the series is also console exclusive to the PlayStation family, when that's never been the case, no matter how much they'd love to make sure newcomers and outsiders think that was true. In reality, the second game in the series was released on the Game Boy Advance. The series has had games released on Nintendo handhelds and mobile and the third entry was released on Xbox One as well as PS4. Nomura has also discussed bringing 1.5, 2.5 and 2.8 to Xbox One as well after production on III has finished, alongside the possibility for a Switch release.
    • Many people believe that Kingdom Hearts III has been in Development Hell since 2007, after Kingdom Hearts II came out. That's not the case, at all. It was only announced as being in development in 2013, not long after the last new installment of the series Kingdom Hearts 3D: Dream Drop Distance.
      • Another reason for the game being in Development Hell is the change to the Unreal Engine 4 (since the intended engine wasn't done yet, and was only used for Final Fantasy XV), as well as Pixar's Creative Differences with Square-Enix and the use of their characters, contrast to Disney whose strictness varies. (Tangled and Frozen's worlds in Kingdom Hearts III are actually because Disney was even more strict than they were with say, Hercules or Big Hero 6.)
    • Related to the above, the idea any game released after KH2 not called KH3 is a Gaiden Game. They're full installments of the series, intended to move the plot forward towards a climax in KH3
    • It's also believed that, depending on who you ask, every Disney world is either the same story retold just with Sora&Co added, or an original story altogether. This isn't true - even the first game had some just retell the story of the IP it's based off of, while some were creating their own story using the characters and setting.
  • Many Bronies assume that the infamous shutdown of My Little Pony: Fighting Is Magic by Hasbro was because the executives believed that a fighting game based off of a series targeted at young children was inappropriate and proceed to cry hypocrisy whenever official Friendship Is Magic media features violence. In reality, the C&D was no different than any usual lawsuit of the sort — it was just because the game was using Hasbro's characters unofficially, and it was getting too much publicity for Hasbro to ignore without risking losing their trademarks.
  • Many BlazBlue fans would assume that Ragna's out to free the world from NOL's tyranny by declaring that he'll take them on single-handedly. So yeah, Ragna is some sort of Robin Hood for the people oppressed by the evil empire NOL, which is about as vile as Palpatine's Empire, right? The more immersed player would gladly point out that Ragna is just minding his own business that is the destruction of the Cauldrons that NOL is operating instead of "doing it for the people" and he just plows through anyone in his way, he couldn't care less about the other normal people who's fearful of his power (but he wouldn't attack them out of blue either). Oh and the NOL? They more or less aren't just your typical evil power hungry empire, their job in regulating the Armagus was actually important to the world tethering to near-destruction, snuff them out and there'll be a high chance that some madman takes the wrong Armagus and unleashes hell for everyone else. So as much as 'tyrannical' they became, they were actually a Well-Intentioned Extremist police force. They just had the misfortune of not knowing that one of their enforcers, Hazama, is actually Yuuki Terumi who's manipulating the whole organization for his own gain and is on the top of Ragna's shitlist.
  • Soul Series:
    • Seong Mi-na is often thought of as just being a female Moveset Clone of Kilik, the latter being the more iconic between them. In fact, when people argue cleaning out the roster of clones, they'll cite Mi-na as the biggest example. Thing is, Seong Mi-na predates Kilik by having appeared in the original game, Soul Blade, whereas Kilik didn't appear until Soulcalibur (the name that the rest of the series is based off of due to Sequel Displacement). While this could be considered Older Than They Think, it's so ubiquitous that it deserves mention here.
      • A new one will likely arise in the wake of Soulcalibur VI: Mi-na is a clone of Kilik at all. Considering that Divergent Character Evolution has made them play little like each other apart from their weapons, it's not even fair to call her a clone anymore, not that it'll stop people from doing it.
    • A lot of people imagine Nightmare as Siegfried and imagine him as using a One-Handed Zweihänder. Actually, this combination didn't happen until much later. Siegfried-as-Nightmare lasted all of two games (Soulcalibur and II), where afterwards the two were made separate characters on the roster due to Siegfried breaking free from Soul Edge and then Zasalamel bonding Inferno and Soul Edge's memories as Siegfried into a discarded suit of armor. It wasn't until III where this was introduced, which was done on purpose to make them stand out from each other, and was maintained in future games. Before that, Siegfried-as-Nightmare would hold Soul Edge with both of his hands (normal and monster). While having Siegfried wield Soul Edge with one hand would indeed happen, this wasn't introduced until 2018's Soulcalibur VIa little more recently than one might think.
    • Everyone "knows" that Soul Edge is the evil sword and Soul Calibur is the "good sword", and imagine that the two are at war with each other because the former wants to reign chaos and the latter wants to prevent that from happening for the good of mankind. Those who still think that would be very surprised that this can only be true if taken at face value. In reality, both swords are evil, but in different ways, and are Not So Different from each other. Hinted at throughout the series, and first made explicit in IV, it wasn't until V did the fact come to light where Soul Calibur was shown to have its own version of Inferno with Elysium, and similarly would've taken over Patroklos as its host to create its version of Nightmare. The overall theme is Both Order and Chaos Are Dangerous, since humanity is screwed no matter who wins. All in all, Soul Edge might as well say to Soul Calibur "Yeah, I'm evil. But at least I admit it".
    • Many players — especially before premiere of Soulcalibur V — "knew" that Aeon Calcos a.k.a. Lizardman was just a glorified mook without actual characterization nor background, with the fact that he is a humanoid lizard being his only defining trait. In reality, like every other character in the games, Aeon Calcos does have his own (quite tragic) backstory. To make long story short: he used to be a human, he was transformed into what he is against his will when captured during his quest to destroy the Soul Edge (and effectively robbed of his life, home and family), and although he was later released from the brainwashing that made him a slave of the bad guys, he is still unable to regain his human form and is gradually losing his own humanity, sentience and sanity, slowly turning into beast. Thus, it came to a great shock for many people, when V was released and they suddenly learned that "Lizardman" does have a name and identity after all.
    • On a meta level, many think Tira was voiced by fan-favorite actress Jennifer Hale — she never was. Same is said for Talim supposedly being voiced by Hynden Walch.
  • Persona:
    • No, Adolf Hitler is not the Final Boss of Persona 2. Persona 2 is a duology, and Hitler is only the first form of the Final Boss of the first game. Even still, it's not the real Hitler - he's actually Nyarlathotep, the actual Final Boss of both games.
    • While Persona 3 is hardly a cheery game, it can come as a surprise that the game received an M rating (the gaming equivalent of an R) from the ESRB - not only are M ratings practically unheard of for JRPGs, the game's content isn't particularly extreme, and seems like it could have easily been settled with a T rating (the equivalent of PG-13, and what it received from the UK's PEGI and Japan's CERO ratings boards). The general assumption among fans is that the existence of Mara or Yaksini pushed the game to an M rating, but this actually isn't the case - neither Mara nor Yaksini appeared in vanilla Persona 3, only showing up in the Updated Re-release FES. It's more likely the constant references to teenage suicide through the use of Evokers (mimicking shooting oneself in the head in a disturbingly realistic manner, though there's no blood or gore present) pushed the game to an M rating. While the Lighter and Softer Persona 4 and Persona Q also got saddled with M ratings, these probably were specifically because of Mara and/or Yaksini.
    • Persona 4:
      • Nanako is not, as many people (even those who have actually played the game!) seem to think, the Protagonist's little sister. She is his cousin. Although it's easy to get confused, given that she refers to him as "Big Bro" constantly throughout the game, and Yu (the protagonist)'s title in Persona 4: Arena is "The Sister-Complex Kingpin of Steel", referring to his Big Brother Instinct towards Nanako. The confusion arises from a translation problem; when addressing a relative like a cousin in Japanese or talking about such a relative, the words used are the same ones like those used for actual siblings. This goes even further (and thus makes it more complicated) when addressing, say, an uncle or just young man who simply isn't that much older as "Onii-san" even though there is no family relation whatsoever.
      • It's a common belief in some circles that Naoto is a transgender boy. This isn't true, as Naoto clearly identifies as female in the game itself. In fact, most of her problems stem from the fact she feels that a woman, she wouldn't be taken seriously in her line of work, and that being a girl didn't fit her idea of a "cool, hard-boiled detective", a stereotype instilled by society Naoto is meant as a critique of Japan's rigid gender roles, something that goes over most western fans' heads due to Values Dissonance.
      • The fandom also tends to say Kanji is a well written gay character - except, well, his character arc isn't about him being a repressed homosexual because he has "girly" interests. This despite the fact he shows interest in Yukiko (who is female) early on and has a crush on Naoto.
      • It's commonly stated that Ryotaro Dojima was originally planned to have been the killer. While we do know the killer was someone different during development, it's never been stated exactly who it was.
      • Numerous persistent rumors surround Marie, a character introduced in Persona 4's Updated Re-release, Persona 4 Golden. Namely, nearly the entire fandom believes that the game is filled with Ship Tease that makes her the protagonist's Implied Love Interest, and that several romantic events play out identically even if you don't romance her. In reality, there is only one scene in the game that contains explicit Ship Tease between Marie and the protagonist that goes unchanged even if the player stayed platonic with her.
    • The fandom tends to claim that Goro Akechi from Persona 5 is not a Phantom Thief, largely in part due to his Guest-Star Party Member status in the original game, his status amongst the western fanbase and his lack of presence alongside them in crossover content, such as Super Smash Bros. Ultimate, which also results in those familiar with Persona 5 through such crossovers parroting these claims. This conflicts with Akechi being listed amongst the Thieves in popularity polls officially released by Atlus, his frequent appearances in official merchandise alongside them, as well as his expanded presence in Persona 5 Royal where he is outright calling him a Phantom Thief in promotional material.
  • Batman: Arkham Series:
  • Final Fantasy Tactics:
    • So Grand Duke Barrington forced himself on an underage Rapha, right? The original game only had dialogue that could be interpreted that way, nothing is confirmed. Ironically, the retranslation in the updated rerelease War of the Lions amps up the rape imagery in that speech, but at the same time essentially confirms that he had not forced himself upon her (though he outright states he would eventually).
  • Final Fantasy Tactics Advance:
    • The main character, Marche, is sucked into a fantasy world with his friends and he tries to find a way to return home while his friends don't want to go back. Many fans strongly believe that Marche was being a bully by forcing his friends to go home against their wills, even if it meant that they are miserable again and that his brother, Doned, is confined to a wheelchair again (he can't walk in the real world). In actuality, Marche actually attempts to reason with his friends and brother before he does anything else, but they all ignore him. Doned hires clans to fight Marche and capture him, Ritz eventually fights Marche herself to stop him from changing things back to normal, and Mewt uses all of his power as a prince to get Marche arrested. Ritz and Mewt eventually accept the fact that they can't stay in a fake world to run away from their problems and Doned even apologizes to Marche for going against him and is willing to go back home, even if it means he will be wheelchair bound again. It is still ambiguous if he is right or not, especially because the English version does not touch upon the "fake" nature of the world as much.
    • Most people consider Ritz's reason for staying extremely selfish (compared to Mewt's mother and Doned being able to walk), she doesn't want to return because her natural hair is white instead of pink, but when the game ends, Shara convinces her that white hair is beautiful so she doesn't even have a problem anymore right? Except that is not the case. Ritz problem isn't a hair color she doesn't like, it's the fact that she is bullied because of that AND because she is a girl. Her online description says she is an ace in classes and sports and yet people "give her a wide berth", which means she isn't popular at all. When she tries to convince Marche to stay she says people will respect him and he can have many friends, but Marche never had those problems, he was the new kid, he was never bullied for real or tried hard to make friends. Those are Ritz's problems, but she will never admit it, she would rather lie to herself and blame the hair. Then when Shara convinces her the hair was never the problem at all, Ritz wants to stay to fulfill her Feminist Fantasy.
  • Story of Seasons:
    • Many players outside of Japan seems to think Natsume created the games when they are only responsible for translations and creating the English title. Natsume does currently make games under the Harvest Moon name however they're not the actual Harvest Moon titles. The Japanese games are now being translated under Story Of Seasons by XSeed.
    • Harvest Moon fans often believed that the classic blue-capped hero from the game is named "Jack". In fact, certain fans are often shocked when they find out that his official name is actually "Pete" and this was first made clear in the Game Boy Color game. "Jack" is a nickname dating from the original title having a beanstalk you could purchase.
    • Harvest Moon 64 and Harvest Moon: Back to Nature are often mistaken for the same game but fans will make it clear that they're not. The latter was meant to be a port but the porters ended up changing so much they just completely retooled the game. The two games have the same cast and Super-Deformed artstyle but otherwise play like two completely separate installments. The characters personalities, relationships, and roles were changed quite a lot. The remake Story of Seasons: Friends of Mineral Town makes the differences clearer by redesigning the characters to fit their Back to Nature characterizations more than their 64 ones.
    • Lumina from Harvest Moon: A Wonderful Life is not eleven to twelve no matter what fans say. Her age on the Japanese website for the first game is given as fourteen, before she was given an Age Lift to sixteen (eighteen internationally) in Another Wonderful Life so Rock could have a crush on her.
    • It's often assumed for A Wonderful Life Special Edition that you can only get a daughter if you married Lumina. In actuality, you can have a son or daughter with any wife. A mistake that even the Wiki makes. The error probably persists because Lumina's son and the generic daughter design are extremely similar as toddlers.
  • One regarding Shin Megami Tensei that's pervasive on this very wiki is the idea that whether the events of Shin Megami Tensei I or Devil Summoner and Persona happen depends on whether the events of Shin Megami Tensei if... happen. Not quite. The events of If... explicitly happen in both timelines. What makes the difference is whether they're noticed — in the Shin Megami Tensei timeline, the events are largely swept under the rug, leading to The End of the World as We Know It. In the Devil Summoner and Persona timeline, enough of the right people notice this event to realize the impending threat of demons and prevent nuclear apocalypse.
    • Then there's the cell phone spinoff Hazama's Chapter. For the longest time, English speaking fans believed that it was a combined prequel to and remake of if... that explains how Hazama became the Demon Emperor, what Lucifer was up to during the events of if..., and features Tamaki Uchida freeing Hazama from the Demon Emperor's possession and foiling a coup against Lucifer. Then someone found footage of the game on Nicovideo and realized it didn't match up with the supposed plot summary at all. While the game is a prequel to if... and explains how Hazama became the Demon Emperor, Tamaki and Lucifer aren't in it, and Zurvan is only the ruler of the Infinite Tower (which Hazama turns into the Tower of Confinement after defeating him).
  • In Star Control, the Mmrnmhrm are a race of robots who have lost their memory and have no idea who made them or why. A lot of fans believe they were made by the Precursors. Actually, the game never gives even the slightest hint as to who made the Mmrnmhrm. And while the Precursors did create one of the game's races, it wasn't the Mmrnmhrm: it was the Mycon.
  • The Twisted Tales of Spike McFang has a persistent rumor surrounding it that the player character in the Japanese version ate hearts to recover health, but the Bowdlerised North American replaced them with tomatoes, turning Spike into a Vegetarian Vampire. Actually, the tomatoes are also in the Japanese version; it's just that kind of a game. (The game's Japanese-only predecessor, Makai Prince Dorabocchan, even has separate meters for hearts and tomatoes.) This seems to be the result of Gossip Evolution based on typical descriptions of the game comparing and contrasting it with more typical Action-Adventure games like The Legend of Zelda, where Hearts Are Health (and Heroes Prefer Swords).
  • Thanks to Memetic Mutation, everybody "knows" that in Portal, the cake is a lie. It's not! The Stinger reveals there's really a Black Forest cake somewhere in Aperture. Whether GLaDOS really intended to give it to Chell is another story.
  • Castlevania: Symphony of the Night:
    • The game has an ending screen with the quote "Let us go out this evening for pleasure. The night is still young." Many think this is a quote from Dracula, but it actually isn't. note 
    • One of the most iconic lines from the game is "What is a man? A miserable pile of secrets!" Except it's not original to the game at all; it's actually an uncredited Andre Malraux quote. It's also a case of Beam Me Up, Scotty!, as the actual quote is "[...] A miserable little pile of secrets!"
  • Street Fighter:
    • The canonical ending is Ryu defeating Sagat with a Shoryuken and scarring him, right? Nope; in Alpha 3 it was retconned that Sagat beat Ryu, almost to death, in the tournament, and that he was scarred by a cheap-shot Metsu Shoryuken from Evil Ryu.
    • Akuma is not the bloodthirsty demon that most adaptations make him out to be. In actuality, he is very careful to maintain his own personal code of ethics which includes but is not limited to never fighting somebody weaker than him, and even then only fighting at his full potential against a truly worthy adversary. Akuma has only ever actually killed one person; his master Goutetsu, who accepted Akuma's challenge of a fight to the death. He didn't even kill M.Bison at the end of Street Fighter 2; Bison committed suicide to escape the Raging Demon.
    • Most people assume that Final Bison is Bison utilizing all of his power at once. This is actually pretty far from the truth; Final M.Bison is not even close to his full potential, it is simply him channeling as much of his power as possible at once without disintegrating his host body, and even that causes it to slowly degrade.
    • People looking at 90s material involving the cast of II tend to wonder why so much of it focused on Guile and Chun-Li, when Ryu is "the main character." For the most part, Capcom actually did regard Guile and Chun-Li as the main characters of II; they're definitely the most important newcomers and the ones who have the most connection to the main antagonist, while Ryu is kind of just there. In fact, almost every Street Fighter series has had a different "protagonist". For Alpha, it was originally Charlie. In III, Alex. In IV, Abel. Even V is focused more on Rashid than anyone else. While Ryu showed up first, him being the protagonist for the series as a whole is very much Newer Than They Think, starting with Alpha 2 (and by extension, Alpha 3).
  • Despite the stereotypes about its fanbase, World of Warcraft is not a straightforward Sword & Sorcery High Fantasy saga—it's a Fantasy Kitchen Sink featuring both fantasy and science-fiction elements, and it parodies fantasy tropes (or plays them for laughs) nearly as often as it plays them straight. Yes, it does include elves, dwarves, orcs, trolls, wizards, knights, and most everything that you'd expect from a Tolkien pastiche, but it also features extraterrestrials as one of its playable races—with their own crashed spaceship, to boot— magitech robots, firearm technology roughly on par with that of the 18th century, and Steampunk-flavored airships as a form of mass transit. In fact, while it's not focused on as much, a lot of the races are actually extraterrestrials who got to Azeroth via teleporters; orcs were presented as alien invaders from another planet right from the first game. You can usually spot a Shallow Parody of WoW by whether or not they're aware of all of this.
  • Super Smash Bros.
    • Everyone knows that having a long and rich history with Nintendo is a prerequisite for being a Guest Fighter in Super Smash Bros., as stated by Masahiro Sakurai himself. "History with Nintendo" is a line often used either for or against the inclusion of a guest character in online discussions, depending on the character in question. Except for one thing: Sakurai never said that, not even once. What he actually said was the he doesn't let "just anyone" be a guest in Smash Bros., most likely giving some that impression, but he didn't go into specifics beyond that. What he was likely referring to was that he wanted characters that were famous enough to be marketable in the series, not that they were Nintendo-related. This goes back to the very first guest: Solid Snake. His series has had several games on Nintendo platforms (an NES port of the original, Ghost Babel on the Game Boy Color, and The Twin Snakes on the Nintendo GameCube), but he is overall much more associated with Sony and his series didn't even technically debut on a Nintendo platformnote . To show this trope in action, when Cloud Strife was revealed for Smash 4 as DLC, many accused Sakurai of going back on something he never said. Once again, this happened with the announcement of Joker as DLC for Ultimate.
    • On the same subject, the presumption that Cloud never appeared on a Nintendo system isn't true either, as while Final Fantasy VII was never released on a Nintendo system at the time (only receiving a Switch port in 2019, after Ultimate's release), Cloud himself appeared in Kingdom Hearts: Chain of Memories. Technically Sakurai's statement that he never actually made still holds.
    • People often claim that when a game stars a fighter in Super Smash Bros., their game would gain popularity, and people would often point Fire Emblem as an example. This however is false as many popular franchises in Super Smash Bros. were already big to begin with. Even the cited example, Fire Emblem, was struggling despite their inclusion in Super Smash Bros. Melee. That they see Fire Emblem Awakening as a make-or-break release for the franchise should practically imply that Super Smash Bros. wasn't helping at all.
  • If you've ever had discussions on which giant robot is the strongest, you've probably heard Demonbane mentioned. It's common knowledge among people who talk about it that "Elder God Demonbane" is omnipotent and grows so large it pops the universe. The second one is partially true: a form of Demonbane in the prequels does grow so large it pops the universe. However, that was War God Demonbane. Elder God Demonbane, in its one and only appearance, does not grow beyond its base size of 55 meters. Furthermore, Elder God Demonbane is never suggested to be omnipotent in the franchise: for one thing, it may be capable of defeating Outer Gods like Nyarlathotep, but it does not possess the means to destroy them. It has to settle for sealing most of them away, and Nyarlathotep is immune to even that! The only reason it was able to seal up Azathoth was because, well, Azathoth's a sleeping mindless idiot, and if it ever woke up and actually tried to break free of Demonbane's prison, it's stated that it could do so without problems.
  • Giana Sisters:
    • The character that most people think of as Giana's twin is not her sibling. Giana does have a twin sister named Maria, but many people who know the series simply as "That Mario knockoff" think that Punk Giana is her sister. It's not a case of Sibling Yin-Yang, Punk Giana is Giana's Super Mode, akin to Super Mario. Giana's sister Maria is green-haired and is usually only playable as Player 2 (ala Luigi).
    • Everyone knows The Great Giana Sisters is a blatant ripoff of Super Mario Bros.. However, that's only partially true. On the surface the games are very similar, and it's obvious that the creators wished they could have just made a Mario port, but they're not nearly as similar as people make them out to be. The first six levels are obvious ripoffs from Mario (especially the initial two) but by the end the design is vastly different from anything in the original Super Mario Bros. The power-ups also differ quite a bit from Mario's. By the DS' series revival the series completely dissociated itself from its Mario clone roots.
  • There is a frequently cited quote that the famous line from The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim about several characters "taking an arrow to the knee" is an old-fashioned Danish/Scandinavian slang phrase for getting married. Thus the guards didn't get injured, they simply settled down. The problem is there is no evidence that such slang, Scandinavian or otherwise, has ever existed before the game's release. Even the writer of that line said that he picked "arrow to the knee" simply because it seems like the kind of injury that's debilitating enough yet survivable. And it's actually "I took an arrow IN the knee."
  • In most Touken Ranbu doujin that ship or at least feature the two Kanesada swords together, Izuminokami either calls Kasen nidaime ("the second", referring to Kasen's swordsmith being the second-generation Kanesada) or by name. In game canon, he calls him Nosada.
  • Undertale:
    • The fandom often portrays the main character as completely mute. In fact, this is impossible since they have phone conversations with the other characters (like Toriel) over the course of the game, and they occasionally speak in the form of player-chosen responses.
    • Everyone knows Sans's Trademark Favorite Food is ketchup, right? While he does chug it in an optional scene, there's nothing that indicates it's his favorite food, and it's never brought up again. The reason this idea was perpetuated is probably the fact that you can find ketchup, mustard, and relish hidden in one of his sentry stations, but considering the fact that he later sells hot dogs to you, they're just as likely simply condiments for them.
    • Spaghetti isn't Papyrus's Trademark Favorite Food, either. The anniversary Q & A confirmed both that he makes it all the time because he thinks everyone else likes it, and that his actual favorite food is dinosaur-egg oatmeal.
    • The phrase "you dirty brother killer" is very often associated with the final battle of the Genocide route in which you fight Sans. While Sans does say this to you at one, and in the same location no less, he does not say it any time during said boss fight - it's actually an optional line of dialogue he can tell you if you in the final hallway in a neutral run in which you kill his brother Papyrus, if you answer his Comes Great Responsibility question with "no". The confusion here is likely because every monster needs to be killed in order to get to Sans' boss fight, including Papyrus, and his death still plays a major thematic role regardless.
    • Certain fan productions, including Undertale the Musical, depict Flowey as bribing Muffet into attacking you midway through Hotland. It's never made specific who paid her in-game, but it's heavily implied to be Mettaton; she mentions that the person who warned her about the player character was able to offer a lot of money, has a sweet smile, and is capable of shapeshifting — while the last traits do apply to Flowey (and is likely the source of this belief), the only character that hits all three is Mettaton.
    • On the subject of Muffet: it's obvious she attacks you because she holds a grudge against humans for disliking spiders, right? Not really- it's because she was paid to and was told the player character specifically hates spiders and actively antagonizes them. Once she realizes she was wrong about you, she calls off the battle and lets you pass without so much as a spiteful remark.
    • It's often believed that Sans retains memories from previous timelines, due to his behavior before and during the final battle of the Genocide route. Actually, although he is aware of their existence, he does not remember what happened in previous timelines.
    • Due to the fact that it's commonly referred to as the "No Mercy" route, many players believe that sparing a single monster will end the Genocide route immediately. Sparing a Random Encounter (with a few exceptions) will not end the route, though it also won't help you progress. One strategy to make progress faster actually involves sparing the hard-to-kill Stone Wall-type monsters so you can move on to fighting easier enemies.
  • Mega Man is sometimes referred to by critics and journalists as a Cyborg, when all official sources consistently treat the character as being purely robotic. This is only in play assuming they're using "cyborg" correctly.
    • Wily's attempts to try and Take Over the World are obviously due to jealousy against his former partner Dr. Light...except that this plot detail only exists in the English manual for the first game and nowhere else. This didn't stop every adaptation of the Mega Man (Classic) series from running with this interpretation, though, and Mega Man 11 finally did decide to make Wily's jealousy and personal resentment towards Light canon within the games themselves (though it started when they were university students instead of professional roboticists).
    • Air Man in Mega Man 2 is widely remembered as being That One Boss. In point of fact, this mostly comes from "Airman ga Taosenai" a popular fan song, which was dealing with a specific narrative that got somewhat garbled by memes; the song was not claiming that Air Man was unbeatable, but that the singer, who is meant to be a rather inept player, can't get past him. note . General opinion among most speedrunners or Challenge Gamers is that Air Man is middle-of-the-road at best in terms of difficulty; his tornadoes don't do a lot of damage and he takes extra damage from the Mega Buster, making it pretty easy to outdamage him as long as you have most of your health when you fight him, even without his weakness.note  Back when the game was released, Nintendo Power even recommended fighting him first.
  • X from Mega Man X wasn't originally a member of the Maverick Hunters - he was more like a lab aide who happened to be built with an X-Buster. The game's manual states that X requested to help Zero and the Hunters in the field during Sigma's first rebellion. He didn't really plan to join them until the end of the conflict, when their leader Zero is dead and someone needs to help finish off the rebellion in X2. Of course, in the alternate Maverick Hunter X continuity he is a Maverick Hunter at the start, which is likely how this misconception started.
    • Similarly, X is not Mega Man. He is his successor, something like a "Mega Man Version 2" based on the original model. His sapience - his main difference from Mega Man - is such an important plot point that you'd think it'd be clear, but inaccurate journalism and promotional material hasn't helped with the misconceptions (even the translation of X3 refers to him as Mega Man, and it is the only game to do so).
    • It's a joke at this point that Zero is constantly dying before coming back to life... except that Zero's only really died 3 times (he doesn't actually die in X3, despite what many people believe). These deaths occur across 15 games in 2 different series, and the last one (depending on how you view the nature of Biometals in Mega Man ZX) actually stuck.
  • In Mega Man Zero, Zero's drastically different design (and by extension, everyone's designs in the series) is not supposed to be a literal, canonical redesign of his armor from the X series. Instead, it's merely a different depiction of the same character. Allegedly Makoto Yabe wasn't satisfied with how Zero's X series design looked in his Zero art style, so he decided to just completely redo it.
  • Everyone knows that the skill system in Final Fantasy II was widely hated, which led to its absence from Final Fantasy III. However, these two games were under development at the same time (and every line of code was written by the same person!), making it impossible for the team to take feedback into consideration when deciding fundamental aspects of the third game's play mechanics. In reality the level/experience system was kept for FF 3 because the game's main gimmick, the class system, had already been decided upon, and it would have been far too difficult to incorporate it with the FF 2 skill system that they were working out at the same time.
  • It's very difficult to find online humor about the Metal Gear Solid games that doesn't claim that Snake is irritated by Otacon to the point of loathing. While it is true that Snake found Otacon's naivete inconvenient and annoying when they first met, they soon begin developing a friendship which eventually matures into a Heterosexual Life Partnership that lasts the rest of their lives. They definitely bicker, but it's Like an Old Married Couple—it goes both ways.
  • Pokey's parents in Earthbound are considered abusive by many, not helped by Nintendo of America toning down what actually takes place upstairs when you return him and Picky to their house. All Aloysius actually did in Mother 2 was spank and reprimand the two boys for disobeying a simple order he and Lardna had given them (obviously for their own safety); while the former action isn't well-looked upon these days, it was a common form of corporal punishment.
  • Ultima has the persistent rumor that there was going to be an Ultima VIII: Part 2. This was never the case, as work on Ultima IX began almost immediately after Ultima VIII was released. (Strangely enough no one seems to remember Forge of Virtue 2, a standalone RPG which had Arcadion the daemon as either a protagonist or antagonist, which was real but ended up on indefinite hold when other projects (like Bio Forge) took priority.)
  • Assassin's Creed: Unity's development director said they couldn't include female playable characters because they were too hard to do. What they actually said: they wanted to include female characters in co-op, but it was impractical to "double their workload"note . This was immediately strawmanned to the better-known version, and people are still pissed off at Ubisoft over it... though the game did still turn out to be a buggy unfinished mess. However, the actual stated reason garnered criticism from within Ubisoft's other teams, including the model rigger for Assassin's Creed III: Liberation, who stated that roughly 80 percent of Aveline's animations were Connor's and he felt like it wouldn't have been as big of a task as stated. It also didn't help that the same director stated that the multiplayer characters were all canonically the game's lead, Arno Dorian, implying that Arno somehow had multiple copies of himself in specific missions.
  • Later printings of Bubsy 3D included two positive quotes on the cover, which due to the game's extremely negative reception, lead to the popular claim that both blurbs were obviously invented. While the EGM quote is a classic case of Quote Mining (it was from a preview of the game and the magazine's actual review was far more negative), the 93% score and "Gold X Award" from PS Extreme is no invention: PS Extreme is a real magazine and really did give ''Bubsy 3D'' the award and score in its October 1996 issue­.
    • Some people also think that Bubsy 3D's atrocious controls and camera were because it released before Super Mario 64 (which codified a lot of rules for movement and camera control in 3D platformers.) In reality, it released over a month after the game. Series creator Michael Berlyn even saw a demonstration of Mario 64 at the Consumer Electronics Show a good 10-11 months before the release of Bubsy 3D and realized how terrible their game was in comparison, but Accolade refused to allow the game to be cancelled or delayed.
    • For that matter, even the belief that Bubsy 3D was an immediate critical disaster. The game, upon release, actually garnered So Okay, It's Average reviews from most of the gaming press. Including a mediocre-but-not-terrible 5.5/10 score from Gamespot. Of course, 3D platformers were still an unproven genre at the time, so reviewers naturally treated the game with kid gloves. It wasn't until the genre was well established and hindsight kicked in that the game developed its current reputation as one of the worst games ever made.
  • Regarding Metroid, it is sometimes claimed that Samus Aran originally had green hair before it was later retconned to blonde. This is likely due to how well-known the Justin Bailey code has become over the years, letting players start a game as Samus outside her Power Suit and depicting her with green hair. However, green has never been her "natural" color, even in this game. The Justin Bailey password actually starts Samus with a number of upgrades... including the Varia Suit, which was a palette swap at the time. For suitless Samus, the Varia upgrade turns her hair green; her normal color scheme (i.e. the equivalent of a Power Suit without the Varia upgrade) gives her brown hair, which is also seen in the helmetless and suitless ending screens. In addition, Captain N: The Game Master comics from the early 90s (which, unlike the TV show, are very faithful in depicting Metroid characters according to their original designs) depicted Samus with blonde hair, suggesting that the in-game brown hair might have actually been a hardware limitation that prevented a more accurate blonde color, much like Princess Peach in the NES Super Mario Bros. games.
    • It is often claimed that the Samus Is a Girl twist in the first game was more elegantly executed in the Japanese version by referring to Samus with gender-neutral pronouns in the manual. Supposedly, the English manual's use of male pronouns is an example of clumsy localization. In reality, however, the Japanese manual goes out of its way to refer to Samus with male pronouns several times.
    • "Ridley killed Samus' parents" is a bit of an oversimplification that tends to get thrown around a lot. In the manga (whose canonicity is debatable) Ridley is responsible for personally killing and eating Samus' mother, but Samus' father sacrificed himself to repel the Space Pirates and Ridley never actually laid a finger on him. The games are even more vague, only really showing a still flashback in Metroid Fusion of Ridley attacking while Samus' mother protects her. Either way, the relationship between Samus and Ridley in the games has never been about avenging Samus' parents, so this plot point isn't really that important anyways, and there's a tendency for fans to blow it out of proportion.
    • Related to the above, many fans believe that Samus' infamous Heroic BSoD when facing Ridley in Metroid: Other M was a PTSD attack due to the childhood trauma of Ridley leading the attack that killed her family. This was exacerbated by the visual metaphor of her turning into a little girl. Fortunately, this was not the intended effect, but it was rather meant to convey how useless and powerless she felt upon seeing Ridley's return after what she thought was his final death on Zebes. This failed usage of imagery landed Nintendo the ire of Metroid fans for years.
  • God of War:
    • Kratos is often thought of as having No Indoor Voice and constantly shouting all his lines. Except most of the time, when he actually does talk to someone instead of deciding to just murder them outright, he speaks in a normal tone of voice. The only times he ever seems to yell is when he's talking to Atlas and Gaia, and given that those two are Titans and therefore much larger than Kratos, it's likely that he has to yell just so they can hear him.
    • A great number of people seem to think that God of War (PS4) is the first time Kratos went through any Character Development at all, and before that all he did was just angrily murder everything nonstop for no good reason. This ignores the entire character arc Kratos went through in the old games, going from a Glory Hound, to fluctuating between a grief-stricken self-loathing wreck after the death of his family, to a living avatar of rage when the Greek pantheon just won't stop toying with him, and then finally calming down and realizing all the collateral damage he's caused throughout his multiple rampages, finally forgiving himself for his past sins and performing a Heroic Sacrifice to release the hope he absorbed from Pandora's Box to aid mankind in their recovery. Not to mention there are times where he shows genuine sympathy for people, displays an actual reluctance to kill others, eventually ends up with an actual, non-backstabbing ally in the form of Pandora, and at one point in the series he even ends up forsaking everything to rejoin his lost daughter in Elysium, only to have to abandon her to stop Persephone from destroying everything, being willing to burn the last bridge he has with her for the sake of keeping her safe in the afterlife. All years before the franchise "grew up" with the PS4 game.
  • Overwatch has quite a bit of this due the sparse amount of lore available and headcanons being taken as fact, but also misconceptions in general:
    • Tracer is considered to a prisoner of time if she isn't wearing her Chronal Accelerator. In reality, she only needs to be near it for it to work.
    • Overwatch is disbanded, and it's still inactive with the former members being adventurers taking sides in other conflicts? That was true when the game was first revealed, but it was established that Overwatch was indeed being reformed with the animated short Recall being about, well, the recall of Overwatch agents. Much of the plot since has been about the return of Overwatch. This makes the whole idea that Overwatch is shut down rather brief in the overall scale.
    • Bastion is often believed to have female programming, because of fanon portrayals. In reality, Bastion is considered genderless in the setting and referred to as "it" as opposed to Zenyatta (male) and Orisa (female). While an omnic obviously doesn't have a biological sex being that they're robots, they still have genders, but Bastion has none.
    • It's commonly believed that there are no real superpowers in the setting of Overwatch and it all comes from gear while every character is a Badass Normal outside of it. While this is mostly the case, there are quite a few exceptions: Soldier: 76 is an enhanced Super Soldier; Reaper has wraith powers; Tracer can manipulate time; Winston has the Primal Rage state where his genetic modifications make him stronger; Zenyatta's orbs are quite possibly actual divine magic; Genji and Hanzo can summon spirit dragons; Reinhardt and Roadhog are so big as to be biologically impossible; Doomfist is a superhumanly strong Cyborg who punched his way out of his maximum security jail cell, punched a OR-15 in the wall, then picked up his gauntlet; Widowmaker has Improbable Aiming Skills and a resistance to the weather due to extreme genetic modification; D.va is actually manually shooting down every single bullet she hits with her defensive matrix; and Moira has a number of powers due to experimenting on herself.
    • One of the biggest examples was the idea that Mercy turned Gabriel Reyes into Reaper due to a very vague line. Then it was revealed not to be her, but rather Moira. Except, Moira didn't have total involvement in his transformation — he already had genetic issues by the time he recruited her.
    • A very confusing example was regarding D.Va specifically being a Starcraft pro. While she is definitely a professional gamer, official lorenote  never directly namedropped Starcraft, though it was extrapolated it was the case due to several factors, namely Blizzard's fondness for cross-referencing their own franchises, and D.Va being first teased with a fake Starcraft profile. As such, the definitive and explicit confirmation in early 2018 that this was not the case (specifying that while she plays Starcraft, she was a professional in an unnamed fictional game whose interface was more transferrable to that of her MEKA) ended up creating a pretty massive fan backlash where the writers were accused of retconning the lore and lying about it to their faces, when in reality it was more a case of unclear communication.
  • Paladins. Despite the stigma, the poorly-researched clickbaity videos and articles by "professional" reviewers, and stereotypical image given to it by Overwatch fans, the game is not just "Overwatch in a Tolkien-esque fantasy setting where everyone happens to have guns". In fact, similar to the World of Warcraft example above, you can tell apart a Shallow Parody or a user making blind statements based on whether or not they're aware of this.
    • To begin, Paladins is actually a Dungeon Punk setting, where both technology and magic exist. Its fantasy aspect is actually a blanket term for including as many different fantasy-type characters as possible. The game also creates as many unique fantasy ideas as much as they use from established ones, and even the ones inspired by the greats have been given new interpretations. The cast is as diverse as including Asian-inspired fantasy characters, zombies wielding giant axes, rabbits riding on twin-headed lizards, shonen-inspired demon heroes, bomb-throwing robots, bipdeal foxes, walking trees, ice witches, angels, and demons, just for starters. Also, there's a good portion of the cast that don't use guns, and magic plays a heavy role in making a lot of characters unique.
    • Additionally, the idea of it being an "Overwatch clone" bares mentioning. Because it was first released in beta during the height of the Overwatch hype, Paladins is often regarded as a Captain Ersatz version because both are Hero Shooters featuring a colorful and diverse Cast of Snowflakes, and of course that meant Hi-Rez was "copying" Blizzard as if Blizzard was doing something that had never been done before. In reality, much of their similarities originates from the fact that both games were actually inspired by Team Fortress 2 and make use of common character archetypes found in fiction. While Paladins made some changes to attract Overwatch players to be fair, they've done far more to differentiate themselves from the game as well. Anyone who's seriously played both games, or even looked at Paladins enough, will tell you it's a completely different style of Hero Shooter with vastly different mechanics and the similarities being mainly superficial from having a similar template rooted in the genre.
  • It is common knowledge that at the end of XCOM: Enemy Unknown, the Volunteer sacrifices him/herself to destroy the Temple Ship. However, if you watch the ending cutscene carefully, you can see that the Volunteer disappears in a psionic flash moments before the Temple Ship explodes. Since it happened so fast, so many people missed this detail that Jake Solomon had to clarify this on Twitter (spoiler in the link).
  • Dark Souls:
    • Being a game with such murky lore and encouraging speculation, there are plenty of out-there fan theories surrounding the game. One, however, which has no basis whatsoever in the game's canon is the idea that the Lord Souls consist of the Light Soul, the Life Soul, the Death Soul, and the Dark Soul. Of the Lord Souls, only the Dark Soul is ever named anything, the others are merely referred to as "Lord Souls" or "powerful Souls". A fair number of fans, however, seem to think these other Soul names are canon.
    • Seath betrayed the ancient dragons by telling Gwyn of their weakness to lightning, right? Actually, it's unclear. The game only states that Seath the Scaleless betrayed his own, not what he did to betray them.
    • Some believe that Sen's Fortress is a mistranslation, and that its real name is "The Fortress of a Thousand Deaths" or something similar. This is mostly based on the Japanese word for "thousand" being "sen". In fact, "Sen's Fortress" is a direct and literal translation of the area's name, with "Sen" being written in Japanese like a name, not a number.
  • Five Nights at Freddy's:
    • Fazbear Entertainment is run by Corrupt Corporate Executives who knowingly and more or less intentionally run a death trap establishmentor the management, there wasn't enough information early on in the series to truly determine how much they actually knew or planned. As the series went on, their corrupt nature became double subverted. One of the founders is a Serial Killer, the Big Bad and has designed killer animatronics. On the other hand, this was neither planned nor known by the company as a whole, and he even managed to become a suspect of the murders early on, ending his involvement in the company fairly early on. The other founder of the company is actually the closest the series has to a Greater-Scope Paragon. Having been affected by the killings himself, he devotes his life to hunting down the villain, trapping him, and killing him for good (as well as releasing the souls of the victims). Although he does partially succeed in releasing the victims, the villain managed to survive.
    • The protagonists of the games must be Too Dumb to Live for returning to such a death trap every night, especially for a meager paycheck. However, there actually isn't that much reason to believe the position to be dangerous in-universe. No security guard was killed or seriously injured until maybe the Bite of '87 (the details of which are never specified), and the original protagonist doesn't learn about Phone Guy's death until near the end of his week. In other words, even considering Phone Guy's warnings about the animatronics, in any playthough in which you successfully live (which is the canonical outcome), the protagonist has no reason to believe that they aren't just dealing with normal animatronics in a wander mode, anymore than someone would expect their job to be guarding slasher villains in real life.
    • For the original game, the unpredictable behavior of the AI, coupled with the game's sudden burst of popularity, has led to numerous misconceptions spreading like wildfire that contradict the game's actual coding.
      • Many believe that Foxy will run for the office if the cameras are trained on him too many times. In truth, looking at the cameras (not just Pirate's Cove but any camera) will completely prevent Foxy from moving, and after the cameras are lowered Foxy is unable to attempt to move again for a random period from 1 to 16 seconds. Foxy will only run for the office if he succeeds at his random chance to move four times, all of which must happen when the cameras are off. This misconception probably stems from taking the hint that "he hates being watched" as meaning it aggravates him, rather than that it intimidates him.
      • Another hint that was misinterpreted was the "play dead" hint, leading to the belief that if the power goes out, not moving will give you more time before Freddy kills you and possibly letting you stall until 6:00. In reality, the game makes no checks as to whether you make any inputs at this time; how long it takes Freddy to reach the office, play his song, kill the emergency lights and finally attack are completely at random.
      • There's a persistent rumor that if you try to stall out the last hour of the night by keeping both doors locked, Freddy will automatically materialize in the office as punishment for a cheap tactic. In actuality, Freddy cannot enter the office if the right door is locked. The confusion seems to stem from a popular Markiplier video where he closes both doors and is killed by Freddy seconds later. What actually happened was that Freddy had already been in the office for some time; unlike Foxy instantly killing the player and Bonnie and Chica waiting for the cameras to go up before they attack, once Freddy enters the office he has a random chance of killing the player, a 25% chance every second when the cameras are down. This means that Freddy can potentially hide in the office for seconds or even minutes at a time, making it unclear when he actually got in.
  • Marvel vs. Capcom:
    • Everyone knows that the Marvel vs. Capcom series prior to Infinite had a creative Marvel roster full of picks free of Executive Meddling that was based entirely on the comics themselves and it was only when Infinite came around where the series was forced to be a plug for the Marvel Cinematic Universe. Sort of, but not quite true. While the series did feature some adventurous picks such as Shuma-Gorath and M.O.D.O.K., in reality the real-world popularity of characters from adaptations, and indeed Executive Meddling, did influence the games heavily. The highly regarded Marvel vs. Capcom 2: New Age of Heroes for instance had X-Men characters taking up 18 of 28 characters including two Wolverines. The main reason why this doesn't get cited as much is because this was many years before the MCU existed, and the X-Men were very much at the heart of the Marvel Universe so they were the ones who were promoted instead. There's a certain hilarity in seeing a generic Sentinel, or D-listers like Marrow, Silver Samurai and Spiral getting to duke it out over today's stars like Thor and Black Panther. As for the non-X-Men characters? Mostly A-listers like Spider-Man, Hulk, Captain America, and Venom (the most popular Spidey villain back then). It only came into light when Ike Perlmutter blacklisted Capcom from using X-Men characters to spite 20th Century Fox, over not having film rights to them (at the time), and combined with a lack of polish with severe roster cuts, highlighted this much more than in the past, but with MCU characters rather than X-Men ones. Furthermore, in Marvel vs. Capcom 3, Capcom had to fight for the inclusions of several characters like Storm, Sentinel and Shuma-Gorath, and had to put in Doctor Strange with very specific ideas for the move set, because there were strict guidelines to how they could make 3. The series may not have been as meddled or influenced by non-comic media in the past, but to say that it never was is incorrect.
    • Related, but the infamous quote about the X-Men not being in the game because modern fans may not be familiar with them is often attributed to Peter "Combofiend" Rosas. While Combofiend is guilty of the just as infamous "Functions" quotenote , it was actually producer Mike Evans who made the preposterous claim that players may not know who the X-Men are.
    • Similarly, some fans claimed that the reason why the X-Men and Fantastic Four villains like Doctor Doom didn't make the cut in Infinite was because Fox owned the rights to them. In reality, Fox only owned the movie rights of those characters, they had no problem appearing in Marvel vs. Capcom 3 years earlier. The reason was because Marvel (specifically Ike Perlmutter) enforced an embargo on characters Fox owned the movie rights in an attempt to sabotage their movies to get their rights back, which ended after Disney bought Fox.
  • Yakuza's protagonist Kazuma Kiryu is a member of the Yakuza, right? Well yes, but only very briefly ( the prologue and epilogue of Yakuza 0 and the prologue of the first Yakuza). For a vast majority of the series he's an ex-member who gets embroiled in Yakuza-related conspiracies as a private citizen. This is more intuitive in the Japanese title for the series, which translates to "Like a Dragon".
  • The entire Modern Warfare trilogy is often written off as being an American jingoistic, pro-war power fantasy where you shoot lots of Middle Easterners. In reality, you spend far more time fighting Russians than Middle Eastern troops, America is portrayed as far from perfect, even accidentally sparking World War III with a failed op and one of the major villains turns out to be an American general who helped start World War III for his own personal glory, and though the message may get lost in the increasing spectacle of the trilogy, it has a very clear War Is Hell message, with playable characters frequently having to be replaced because they died mid-campaign, and infamously horrifying scenes like the nuclear explosion in the first game and No Russian in the second. Also, the two only recurring playable characters in the series are British SAS soldiers, not Americans.
  • NieR: Automata:
    • It's well known that 2B is an unabashed Ms. Fanservice character with her butt hanging out for half the game thanks to Clothing Damage, the camera zooming in on it whenever she climbs up a ladder, and even having a realistically-modelled anus. Except that said Clothing Damage only occurs after performing and surviving a secret self-destruct move (which 9S can perform as well, blowing off his pants and leaving him in his boxer shorts) and only lasts until the player Fast Travels. The camera also doesn't actually look up 2B's skirt when she's climbing (if you want an upskirt shot you have to force the camera to do so while she's standing, upon which 2B will immediately step back and cover up,) and this "realistically-modelled anus" was never in the game, but in an unofficial porn model of 2B that was mistaken for her official model. She is a Ms. Fanservice to be sure, but the emphasis on it tends to get blown out of proportion by those unaware of the game as a whole. What may also lead to this idea is that Taro Yoko was pretty unabashed about having a Ms. Fanservice protagonist, with the famous "I like girls" comment he gave in a streamed interview when asked why 2B has Combat Stilettos.
    • On the flipside, many artists draw A2 with way more clothing than she actually wears. The only article of clothing she has is a midriff-covering scrap of cloth, basically performing a Full-Frontal Assault for the entire game. All those other black patches on her body are actually missing skin exposing the black material underneath (that conveniently take the shape of a backless top and hot pants) combined with Barbie Doll Anatomy due to being an older android model.
    • Going with the two above, there's the misconception that Automata is just a fanservice game that got big thanks to horny 13-year-old boys. One may be surprised to learn that the story itself has deep philosophical messages, multiple endings, characters memorable for reasons besides fanservice, and that a great portion of the fans are women — 2B was actually the most cosplayed character of 2017.
  • A lot of people "know" that Daikatana has mostly robot frogs and mosquitos as enemies. In fact, said enemies only appear in the first couple levels (which make sense as it's a swamp/toxic waste dump). That said, those levels are among the worst parts of the game. As such, many players quit before they ever make it past those levels, thus adding to the misconception.
  • The original U.S. NES model was known for either not running games after a while or the games displaying very messed up graphics. People attributed the problems to dirt/dust in the game cartridges or inside the NES itself, thus they would blow into them or try to clean them with rubbing alcohol or other cleaning solution. It worked for some, so many others spread the knowledge around as the solution to fix a game/system that wasn't working properly. This would actually make the problem worse since blowing on the cartridge connectors would put water vapors on them due to your breath and putting on any liquid in general is asking for trouble. In actuality, the problems came from bent pins inside the cartridges due to the constant pressing up/down on the cartridge to load it inside or remove it from the system. Nintendo addressed the design flaw by making a second model that was a top loader instead of a forward one.
  • Minfilia in Final Fantasy XIV had memes made from her for "always being kidnapped and never does anything". This stems from her being a non combatant compared to her fellow Scions which all have combat experience. Many players forget that Minfilia performs a lot of research vital to the story and has political clout with the city leaders. While she does get kidnapped, she is only kidnapped twice and both times she was held captive by someone far stronger than she is and she was willing to die both times to not give her kidnappers what they wanted.
  • Given its vast and once-inaccessible lore, Guilty Gear has suffered this trope among fans thanks to the likes of Gear Project and various mistranslations, and it doesn't help that Gear Project continues to argue their canonicity.
    • A very, very popular claim among fans is that Johnny's last name is "Sfondi", as stated by Ky Kiske in a Guilty Gear X drama CD. In reality, Ky actually said "Johnny's family" in Japanese-accented but legible English. This particular bit has lasted well into the present day, though more experienced translators and lore masters have helped to dispel it, and Johnny still has yet to have a last name revealed or even given to him.
    • Another is that Slayer possesses a magical dagger that is one of the "Outrage" weapons. In reality, while he does have it and its stated it can kill Forbidden Beasts with "the right art," it was never explicitly confirmed as an Outrage and is nowadays not considered one.
  • It is sometimes claimed that the reason Knights of the Old Republic II: The Sith Lords is such a vicious Internal Deconstructor Fleet towards the Star Wars universe is that Chris Avellone hated the series and resented having to write for it. This is not quite true; Avellone actually loves Star Wars, and in fact became a fan after the intense research he did into the canon when writing the game. What he did hate was parts of the original Expanded Universe, especially the way bad EU writers tended to use the Force as a Happy Ending Override and portray the Jedi/Sith conflict as an Eternal Recurrence without any care for the Fridge Horror inherent in those ideas. The game's Deconstruction aspects were meant as a Take That! towards those parts of the EU, not the franchise as a whole.
  • Inklings and Octolings in Splatoon and Splatoon 2 are made out of ink, so they can't swim or even drink liquids without being killed instantly... right? While they have Super Drowning Skills in-game, supplementary materials note that this is because of the sudden shock of falling into water breaking their thin skin and causing the ink inside to leak out, effectively deflating them like a balloon — not because liquids are dangerous to them. Even in-game dialogue makes this mistake; suffice to say, hearing Marina or Pearl claim that water is lethal and then returning to Inkopolis Plaza to find an Octoling drinking out of a soda cup can be pretty jarring.
  • A common pastime in The Sims series is to lure Sims into pools and then delete the ladder so that they get stuck and drown. While this does work in The Sims and The Sims 2, Sims don't need ladders to get out of pools in The Sims 3 and The Sims 4. They can simply climb out at any open side. To trap Sims and drown them, the player also has to build fences or walls around the perimeter of the pool.
  • Kid Icarus: Eveyone knows that Viridi, being the Goddess of Nature and having a vendetta that leads her to attack humanity for their mistreatment of nature and selfishness, has also a hatred of technology typical in characters of similar motivations, right? Except not really. At no point it is stated that she has anything against machines, in fact one of her commanders even has a highly technologically advanced base in the shape of the moon intended to be actually a prison for the Chaos Kin, and there's also that the guards to the pods of the Reset Bombs she deploys are stated in the game's Idols to be robots. That's not to mention she's known to play video games like most of the main cast.
  • Minecraft: Story Mode: The shutdown of Telltale Games and the mixed reception of Minecraft: Story Mode resulted in it becoming a scapegoat regarding the shutdown. The shutdown of Telltale Games was actually caused by management issues and failure to make a profit back on their games after the success of the first season of The Walking Dead. In fact, Minecraft: Story Mode was actually the only game after The Walking Dead to make a profit.
  • Crash Bandicoot:
    • Fake Crash is said to have been created by Naughty Dog as a joke based on a low-quality bootleg Crash toy from Japan. However, the truth is that Fake Crash was actually created for a series of Japanese commercials for Crash Bandicoot 2: Cortex Strikes Back. The toy aspect of the story comes from when Naughty Dog founders Andy Gavin and Jason Rubin were shown a prototype for a Crash Bandicoot plush doll made officially by Universal, not a bootleg. The plush was so bad and Off-Model that it reminded them more of Fake Crash, which is what spurred them to put Fake Crash in Crash Bandicoot 3: Warped as an Easter Egg.
    • It is often said that Naughty Dog sold the rights to the Crash series following the release of Crash Team Racing, except they never actually owned Crash in the first place. The actual rights to the series were always owned by Universal Interactive Studios, while Naughty Dog were the developers who were tasked with making the games. Universal Interactive later became Vivendi Games, and Vivendi was later bought by Activision-Blizzard, which is why Activision now owns the rights to both Crash Bandicoot and Spyro the Dragon.
    • Tawna, Crash's girlfriend, was infamously dropped from the series following the first game, and didn't resurface until many years later in the franchise's history. Depending on who you ask, the blame for her disappearance either lies on a marketing director at Universal, who took offense at Tawna's sexualized design, or Sony Japan believing she was inappropriate. The truth is a bit more complicated than that. There was indeed a higher-up at Universal who didn't like Tawna, but she only succeeded in getting Naughty Dog to tone down Tawna's outfit from the concept art, a midriff-baring tank top and high heels, to a more modest t-shirt and sneakers. Naughty Dog weren't happy with the forced redesign, and decided to work with Sony Japan to replace Tawna with a character that would appeal more to the Japanese market. Takamitsu Iijima, character designer for Ape Escape, came up with the first concept art of Tawna's replacement, which was later taken and tweaked by Crash series artist Charles Zembillas, and thus Crash's sister Coco was created.
  • Mass Effect:
    • There's a very common fan idea, often showing up in crossover fan fiction, that the species in the setting are stagnant technologically and only ascended to their current level because the Reapers engineered their technological path. For the former, the codex notes several advances that have taken place in recent years, such as kinetic barriers (which didn't exist in an earlier age of space warfare) or improved FTL drives that can keep a ship going forever without the need to refuel or discharge heat (upon which the whole plot of Andromeda is based), so that's outright untrue. For the latter, the confusion appears to have come with one line from Sovereign: he did say that the younger races evolved with the Reapers' technology, but he was very specifically talking about the mass relays, not anything else they use. Not to mention the geth, who built a Dyson Sphere, a mega-engineering project on a scale that the Reapers never managed. The backstory of the rachni was also that they had discovered eezo yet didn't have FTL warships until a salarian ship crashed in their system and was reverse-engineered, so clearly all species didn't embark on the same "tech route" just because they used eezo. The kett in Andromeda further disprove this fanon: while it has some differences, a lot of their technology is similar to what the Milky Way younger races use (railguns, kinetic barriers, Alcubierre drives, etc.) despite the Reapers not existing in their galaxy, suggesting that any intelligent species with eezo (and real-world physics otherwise being in place) would end up with those things because those are the only possible ways to accomplish the feats. Similar to how civilizations on Earth independently developed things like the printing press.
      • An additional source of confusion seems to be humanity's rapid rate of advance, having ships on par with everyone else's just a few years after discovering eezo. The codex explicitly states that it wasn't discovering eezo that let them advance so quickly, it was that the Protheans conveniently left an extensive archive of blueprints and guides on Mars. This was why the humans advanced to modern technology before first contact, and this was never stated to be the case for any other species.
      • An extension to this is the idea that all tech is based on eezo and that all the younger races just jumped straight from modern level to their current level after discovering it. It's specifically noted that humanity already had large deep-space stations and deuterium/helium-3 fusion power (among other things) decades before discovering eezo, and Thane implies that getting deuterium/helium-3 fusion reactors before making use of eezo is standard. A lot of their more impressive technology also doesn't use eezo at all, such as artificial intelligence (based on quantum computing) and nanofabricators.
    • Humanity's strength relative to other species. It's commonly believed among the more "Humanity, Fuck Yeah" portions of the fandom that humanity is equal to or stronger than the other great powers of the galaxy like the turians, asari, and salarians, but this is never actually stated anywhere and contradicts a lot of known lore like population figures,note  and fleet numbers.note  Supplemental material and Word of God have both clarified that humanity is actually a middle power that just happens to be more ambitious than other middle powers, and is nothing compared to the economic, industrial, scientific, and military strength of the great powers, but the myth still proliferates. note 
    Systems Alliance Office of Naval Intelligence: The elcor economy is small, only slightly larger than the [human] Alliance's, but extremely well-developed.
    Systems Alliance Office of Naval Intelligence: The salarian economy is the smallest of the three Council races, but still far larger than the Alliance. It is based on "bleeding-edge" technologies; salarian industries are leaders in most fields.
    Chris L'Etoile:note  The power vacuum at the end of Mass Effect 1 is purely at the Citadel. The Council defense fleet there gets pasted, but the overall turian, salarian, and asari fleets outnumber the humans 10:1.note  Despite rah-rah-Earth-First rhetoric from Udina, it's utterly impossible for the Alliance to militarily best the Council on anything more than a local and temporary scale. All they have to do is gather their fleets and steamroll us. Also, the Council races each have hundreds of colonies, many old enough to have populations in the billions. We can't out-produce or out-populate them, either.
    • The idea that the salarians and asari don't have real militaries, only intelligence operatives, special forces, militia, and patrol fleets. While it is shown several times that they (and Citadel Space in general) are very under-militarized compared to where they could be due to 1,500 years of peace, the former idea is a massive exaggeration that seems to have come from assuming Planet of Hats was meant to be played straight instead of subverted. The War Assets terminal in 3 specifically notes that this is an in-universe myth (held, ironically, by prejudiced humans), and that being great powers they do in fact have massive fleets that are a match for any human equivalent on a per-ship basis (more than a match, in the case of the salarians) while being more numerous. The codex additionally notes that more than 3% of asari and salarians serve in their militaries, which is both stated to be a larger proportion than humanity and indicated to lead to a military establishment of at least tens of billions of troops given the consistently-given population figure of "trillions" for Citadel Space (this is almost certainly counting reservists though). We're given no indication that these troops aren't as heavily-equipped and well-trained as what you'd expect from galactic empires. In fact, the turians have an old saying that asari are the finest warriors in the galaxy, presumably due to their long lifespans and wealth allowing them access to decades of experience and the best gear to complement their natural psychic abilities.
  • Many people who played the first StarCraft game instantly assumed that a demolitions operative who accompanies the squad of marines in "Battle on the Amerigo" cinematic is a Ghost, for absolutely no reason except (apparently) the fact that he doesn't wear power armor and is equipped with night vision goggles (none of which are the defining characteristics of a Ghost). That "common knowledge" was so embedded in fandom and general gaming populace that it may still be found in the internet forums, video commentaries and even this very wiki. This is in spite of the fact that there is absolutely nothing about this guy that would indicate he is a Ghost, from the fact that he is a lowly auxiliary operative dealing with mundane job of blowing up things marked for demolition (while Ghosts are elite, carefully selected telepathic assassins who take part in special operations) to his equipment, which includes an ordinary personal armor and somewhat old-fashioned carbine (while Ghosts use state-of-the-art, sealed environment suits that boost their psychic abilities, allowing them to enhance their strength or even turn invisible and are primarily armed with sniper rifles of whopping 25-milimetre calibre) to the fact that when the titular battle breaks out, he is completely frozen with fear like a rookie (while Ghosts — apart from being badass commandos — are known for their absolute ruthlessness and indifference to horrors of the battlefield).
  • A common misconception among Resident Evil fans is that the Samurai Edge pistol used by the S.T.A.R.S. team was developed by gun shop owner Robert Kendo, the man encountered in the original Resident Evil 2 as well as its remake and the remake of 3. While Robert is a known gunsmith and has an original model Samurai Edge in his Ghost Survivors loadout, a file in the original RE3 and supplemental material establish that it was actually his unseen brother Joseph Kendo who developed the Samurai Edge (and Leon's Silver Ghost handgun) as part of a contract with the Raccoon City Police force. Robert did submit a gun for the S.T.A.R.S. gun concept trials after hearing about the contract, but it was disqualified due to not meeting any of their criteria, while Joe's Samurai Edge design passed both the criteria and the ensuing test trials. Joseph also made four further customized Samurai Edge pistols for Chris, Jill, Barry and Wesker per their specifications, the third of which is an unlockable weapon in the remake of Resident Evil.
  • Every single Touhou Project game ends with the protagonists having tea with the final boss, right? Nope. Lotus Land Story is the only game in the series to feature a tea party ending, and it was only between Reimu and Marisa. Drinking parties, on the other hand, have happened much more frequently.
  • MGCM: There're a few glaring misconceptions that are easy to make for outsiders unfamiliar with the game and operating on Small Reference Pools:
    • "This is a game labeled as an eroge and has sexy characters, so there's gotta be a lot of gratuitous sex involved." In fact, while the game isn't shy to offer helpings of Fanservice, it's relatively tame, and actual sex scenes only appear in the DX version.
    • "The DX version is stuffed full of hentai." There's only a number of scenes accessed through upgrading UR-rarity (and a number of SR-rarity) dresses, beating bond episode requirements, finishing certain limited-time event storylines and going through the main story - in other words, players mostly have to go out of their way to find them, and they're not as common as may be believed. All together, playing the DX version isn't any different from the SFW one, and those expecting lots of gratuitous hentai are only going to be disappointed.
    • "Since this is a Magical Girl Genre Deconstruction, the demons are all corrupted magical girls." This misconception is reinforced by the infamous Gut Punch scenes of certain girls' deaths and corruption into demons. However, the overwhelming majority of demons are born from what's essentially mitosis on the demon homeworld, fueled by consuming the existence of humans they hunt and kill. There's some half-and-half chance of a killed magical girl being raised as a demon, but it's not guaranteed either - and demons do not actively seek out to corrupt more magical girls to join them. According to some analysis, there are two types of demons (further differentiated by their hairtstyles): Deceased Magical Girls who are corrupted into demons have hairstyles identical to heroines, while the ones who are born from Demon Realm aren't. It’s also implied that all Nymphs, Mao from some limited-time events, Demon Twins, Enbi (the Arc Villain from the light novel Magicami ~Evil of Tail Court~), etc. all originate from the Demon Realm.
    • "This is an eroge, so demons must rape the fallen girls to corrupt them." While it does appear that rape leads to guaranteed corruption, most of the time demons simply kill the girls outright ; there's a 50-50 sort of chance that a slain magical girl will turn into a demon instead of dying. All together, the rape scenes are only appeared in the DX version, while the aforementioned scenes are replaced with logical ones in the regular version. There are only 3 such scenes in the entire game, all of them concentrated in a couple chapters, with the rest of the game free of anything like that.
    • It's widely believed by the fans that Omnis' ability is to create a new universe with desired possibilities and then leave the remaining heroines from his previously failed universe alone after he screws up. This leads to another misconception in chapters 12-13 of the 2nd arc, in which Nemesis Iroha is the original Iroha from the end of Chapter 4 (where Kaori was slain and corrupted into a demon) and Nemesis Iroha wants a vengeance against Omnis for ignoring them. Actually:
      • Iroha from Chapter 4 is the same Iroha as the one from the main universe. She's revived after being merged with the copy of her that Omnis made, as Omnis has Reality Warper, Reality Maker and Merged Reality abilities combined into one.
      • According to Ultimate Magica Iroha's dress, it's heavily implied she has to fight enough demons and learn any skills to awaken her dress step by step, from 2019 Magica, 2020 Magica to Ultimate Magica at the highest end. It's therefore impossible for Iroha to immediately awaken her dress from SR 2019 Magica dress to Ultimate Magica. It helps that when Nemesis Iroha's Executor is teleported into another universe by Vivian, the remaining heroines lose their powers and are unable to transform or awaken their dresses. If this misconception is unfixed, most fans will ignore the main story because of how dark and edgy the story is, as they believe that our Iroha isn't the original, while the original main universe Iroha becomes a Rogue Protagonist.
    • "The regular version is the DX version without the pornographic scenes. So the DX version is the original." While the regular version does have the pornographic content removed, both versions were released simultaneously. They're both equally 'the original version'. What really helps is the fact that the crossover events with The Quintessential Quintuplets and Is It Wrong to Try to Pick Up Girls in a Dungeon? are only playable/available in the regular versionnote , while the DX version has its own collaboration with Elf's infamous Hentai Visual Novel Kisaku.
  • Life Is Strange:
    • A lot of players are under the impression that Chloe threatened her step-father with a knife. While there is a photo of her glaring at him while holding one (from her 18th birthday), she's clearly using it to cut her cake rather than threatening him with it.
    • People who've never played the sequel are sometimes under the impression the protagonists lived in the USA illegally (to the point even some reviews made the assumption) prior to the events of the game. The game quickly establishes them as the American born sons of a naturalised Mexican immigrant and a white American woman.
  • In the wake of Cyberpunk 2077's notoriously shaky launch in 2020, with developer/executive controversies surrounding its Troubled Production emerging out of the woodwork, one common claim about the game's development was that it had begun all the way in 2012, with many using it to express bafflement at how a game with an 8-year development cycle could be so unstable. This claim is actually quite misleading — CD Projekt did publicly announce Cyberpunk 2077 in 2012, but that was merely the year when they contacted Cyberpunk creator Mike Pondsmith and opened up preliminary discussions of an adaptation. By all accounts, the actual pre-production of the game didn't kick off until late 2016 following the studio's completion of The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt, effectively half the alleged length and more in line with an average production time for a triple-A game (some developers have argued that given the game's ambitions, they didn't have enough time).
  • The Streets of Rage series is often held up as an example of media sending the message that Police Are Useless at best and corrupt at worst, and a recurring meme features what appears to be a screencap of the second game with the text "ONLY TRUST YOUR FISTS - POLICE WILL NEVER HELP YOU." While it is true that the game consists of ex-cops who quit their jobs after realizing that the police of Wood Oak City as a whole were in Mr X.'s pocketbook, this text never appears in any of the games. Also, the screenshot minus the text isn't from any of the official games, but from Streets of Rage Remake, as the cop car appears as part of a special attack in that game, something that was phased out from canon after the first game.
  • Konami:
    • The 2015-2016 debacle between Konami and Hideo Kojima which ended with Konami taking the flak and becoming one of the most hated video game companies ever. Usually, fandom would believe that Kojima was basically the totally innocent guy (who also won many many awards to back up his reputation as a respected developer) being utterly abused by the draconian company, but those who reads through the situation further can spot that Kojima was not completely blameless anyway: Kojima got too over his head about his artistic vision that he ignored Konami's ailing financial states at the time, making sure that his projects would be super expensive and heavily drained their resources against their new directions. Whether he did that to spite on Konami's draconian actions or attempt to switch focus to either mobile or pachinko was another story, but all in all, it actually gave Konami a legit reason to want him gone from the company (albeit doing it in an over-the-top way it damaged their reputation anyway). So, while Konami did a big mistake back then, the share of the blame isn't fully theirs.
    • Pachinko and pachislot adaptations of Konami games are often thought of as a recent cash-grab, however their pachinko divison has existed since 1994, and their pachinko adaptations largely went without controversy until the 2015-16 scandals. If you go on the comments for, say, Gradius: The Slot, you'll see many anger-loaded comments assuming it was made in the wake of "Kojima-gate", even though this slot game was released in 2011, four years prior.
  • Many more people are familiar with Death Stranding esoteric first trailer than the actual game itself. Because of that, many think that the scene where Sam wakes up naked on a beach, with a crying baby that's connected to him with an umbilical cord is an actual thing that happens in the game fully literally. In reality, it's more like a dream or a vision, and not an actual event that happens in-universe, and has to be treated more like a metaphor.
  • For a long time, it was assumed that the titular protagonist of the Shantae video games was 16 years old due to a post from WayForward Technologies' Twitter account saying so when asked about the half-genie's age. This led to some discomfort in the fandom for a while due to Shantae frequently wearing revealing outfits in the games and notably having a story on her Character Blog that involved losing her clothes while skinny dipping. Eventually, James Montagna, who was in charge of the level design of several games, was asked about Shantae apparently being a sexualized underage character and he clarified that the characters of Shantae were never created with a specific age in mind, the tweet that said Shantae was 16 was made by an intern who came to that conclusion without the staff's knowledge and should not be taken as official, and even if Shantae was 16 in her first game, enough time has passed between the series' installments that she would be legally an adult now.

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