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Comic Book / Godzilla: King of the Monsters

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A comicbook set around Godzilla, following him after he surfaces in USA and rampages through Marvel Universe for twenty-four issues (August, 1977- July, 1979). After the later Showa films of The '70s made Godzilla into more of a heroic character, Marvel's comic run portrayed him as an animal Anti-Hero who's just too danged big for the era he lives in. He smashes lots of stuff but also ends up saving humanity from other monsters. He's been described as a giant lizard version of The Incredible Hulk.

As is generally the case with licensed properties that are set in the Marvel Universe proper, Marvel still owns the villains and supporting castmembers they invented for this comic, and they still show up from time to time in other Marvel books — mainly the giant robot Red Ronin and the mad scientist Doctor Demonicus.

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This version of Godzilla was later retconned into being its own beast known as the Leviathan (and given a new appearance) as a way of Writing Around Trademarks, ultimately meeting its demise by the hands of the X-Men.

Since this series ran, Toho has used its particular logo for Godzilla (shown in the upper-left corner of this page's image) as the basis for the trademark stamp of Godzilla on their own merchandise.

Written by Doug Moench, creator of Moon Knight — and he clearly had a lot of fun doing it.


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This comic has the examples of:

  • Arbitrary Skepticism: Despite being in a universe filled with superheroes and various other monsters, Dum-Dum Dugan refuses to believe in the Abominable Snowman.
  • Arch-Enemy: Poor Dum Dum Dugan of SHIELD has to bang his head against Godzilla for 24 issues without any lasting success.
  • Artistic License – Paleontology: In a Marvel Godzilla book, a time-travel crossover with Devil Dinosaur was inevitable. The latter lives in a fun Theme Park Version of the Stone Age with cavemen and dinosaurs, so there you go.
  • Broad Strokes: The writers used the general storyline of the films which had been released prior to the comic as the backstory for their Godzilla, but the flashbacks shown never actually depict specific events that ever happened in the movies.
  • Canon Foreigner: Professor Takiguchi, his grandson Robert, Tamara Hashioka and Doctor Demonicus. In fact, aside from Godzilla himself, pretty much none of the characters from the movies appear. The fact that these characters were created by Marvel rather than Toho meant that they were still able to be used after the company lost the Godzilla license. Case in point, Doctor Demonicus went on to appear in books like West Coast Avengers, while Takiguchi would later appear in several issues of Matt Fraction's X-Men run.
  • Chainsaw Good: Rhiahn, with his rotating "helicopter blades of buzzsaw death" tail.
  • Humongous Mecha: Red Ronin, a Samurai-themed robot constructed to fight Godzilla.
  • Last Stand: The final two issues have this in New York, both for Godzilla and for the heroes he's facing.
  • Mugging the Monster: Shrunken Godzilla provides a surprise to two muggers as he is led around New York disguised in a coat and a hat.
  • Nuclear Nasty: A yeti encased in ice is released from its slumber thanks to nuclear radiation, which also grows it into Godzilla-size.
  • Shrink Ray: S.H.I.E.L.D. contacts Giant Man to provide them with gas that shrinks Godzilla for several issues.
  • Time Travel: The Fantastic Four use their time machine to send temporarily shrunken Godzilla to prehistoric time, where he fights against and alongside the Devil Dinosaur and Moonboy.
  • Ultimate Showdown of Ultimate Destiny: The final issue, Godzilla versus the Avengers!
  • Viva Las Vegas!: After breaking a dam, Godzilla wanders into Las Vegas, ruining one loser's chance to get rich at gambling.

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