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In 1987, Orion Pictures had a hit in RoboCop (1987) and naturally, they wanted a sequel. Unsatisfied with original writers Edward Neumeier and Michael Miner's ideas for a sequel, called "Corporate Wars" (that'd later become the loose basis for the pilot of RoboCop: The Series), Orion turned to Frank Miller, fresh of his success on Batman: The Dark Knight Returns, to write the sequel. However, even then, they considered the script to be "unfilmable" and it was rewritten to what'd actually become RoboCop 2.

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However, the script became the stuff of legends and thus was born Frank Miller's RoboCop, a comic miniseries by Avatar Press from 2003 to 2006, written by Steven Grant and drawn by Juan Jose Ryp. Reception to the comic has been mixed, with some thinking that the original script was better than what was actually released for 2 and others thinking it was a good thing Orion intervened.


Tropes present in Frank Miller's RoboCop:

  • Attempted Rape: A man tries to hire a hooker and when she rejects him, he threatens to rape her. He doesn't do more than threaten her, as Murphy drives by and kneecaps the punk.
  • Author Tract: As noted on the the page for 2, Miller isn't fond of Political Correctness Gone Mad or pop psychology, hence the villain being a pop psychologist who's obsessed with political correctness.
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  • Big Bad: Dr. Love, who'd become the basis for Juliette Faxx.
  • Bittersweet Ending: Murphy's not cleared of Reed's murder or the subway massacre, is officially declared dead, and cuts off ties with Lewis, but he's now free of his directives and fighting OCP.
  • Black Dude Dies First: Of the named police officers, Sgt. Reed is the first to die.
  • Brain Uploading: Love uploads a program based on her mind into RoboCop 2 while she's dying from burns and injuries Murphy inflected on her.
  • Cold-Blooded Torture: Love has Murphy shocked twice: once after Murphy is just repaired and trying to talk to him, and later after forcing Murphy to talk to his ex-wife and mocking him. Additionally, she later has a system installed to inflict pain on Murphy if he acts "anti-social" and has doctors operate on a still-conscious cop considered for the RoboCop 2 project under the pretext of "reality therapy".
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  • Comic-Book Adaptation: Of Frank Miller's original script for 2.
  • Contemptible Cover: Some of Ryp's covers show of woman is sexy outfits and most notably, his cover for issue 4 features a bloodied Lewis posed on a streetlamp like she was a pole dancer.
  • Cop Killer: Much like in the third film, the Rehabs attack the Metro West officers in the climax, killing some of them. Additionally, their plan to discredit Murphy is kicked off by the assassination of Sgt. Reed.
  • Covers Always Lie: Miller did covers for the story—and none of them really reflected what was inside the book. Case in point, the cover to issue 4 involves a bald woman in glasses hugging Murphy's limbless torso. No such scene happens and if the woman is supposed to be Love, Love doesn't wear glasses and has a head full of blonde hair. Then again, Ryp's cover for that issue isn't better, depicted a bloodied Lewis posed on a streetlamp post like a pole dancer when, likewise, no such scene happened.
  • Death by Adaptation: Reed is killed by the Rehabs in order to frame Murphy.
  • Depraved Homosexual: Kong kisses Stillson's corpse, a Rehab Murphy kills—and Kong is also a sadistic bastard, killing several people as both a Rehab officer and as RoboCop 2.
  • Fanservice: As expected for Avatar Press, there's a lot of scantily-clad women, including (much against what was ultimately decided by Paul Verhoeven in the original movie) Lewis. One of the covers for issue 4 even features Lewis posed on a streetlamp akin to a pole dancer.
  • Frame-Up: Love and the Rehab frame Murphy for the murder of Reed and Kong's subway station massacre.
  • Gatling Good: Unlike the machine gun/rocket launcher/flamethrower combo from 3, Murphy can switch out his left hand for a minigun attachment.
  • Gonk: Kong, who has a rather nasty scar running down the right side of his face.
  • Heroic Red Ring Of Death: Happens to Murphy twice.
    • The first time is at the start of the story, where he's been active for 76 hours since repairs and was introduced as being dented up even before busting a child slavery ring.
    • The second time is after the combination of combating Love's new directives and the first battle with RoboCop 2 damaged him.
  • Hotter and Sexier: Outside of a few seconds of bare breasts in two scenes (once in the police locker room and the other in the scene where Murphy goes to a nightclub to find Leon) in the original movie, there isn't much in the way of fanservice in the original trilogy. This being put out by Avatar, there's a lot more scantily-clad women here.
  • Ms. Fanservice: Dr. Love, her assistant, and Lewis are given this role, being clad in revealing outfits and the former two posing proactively.
  • Political Correctness Gone Mad: As in 2, Murphy's programmed with a bunch of directives to make him seem more PC in order to undermine his effectiveness. Biggest difference here is Murphy's more resistant to them.
  • Politically Incorrect Villain: The Rehabs, who mimic stereotypes of Native Americans when they're torturing Whittaker.
  • Production Foreshadowing: During the climax at the police station, the Rehabs compare the trap they putting Lewis in the remaining police officers in to Battle of Thermopylae, what'd become the basis for 300.
  • Show Within a Show: In addition to MediaBreak, there's The Luke Spindle Show, featuring the eponymous Smarmy Host, and Lilac, hosted by a transgendered woman whose show is used to introduce Margaret Love.
  • Smarmy Host: Luke Spindle, who repeatedly insults his guests and audiences, and at one point punches a guy who's rightly pissed off at Spindle kissing his girlfriend, and calls people he disagrees with a homophobic slur. Tellingly, one of the cops he interviews and makes lewd remarks to uppercuts him and later, someone actually tried to kill him, though he survives.
  • Underestimating Badassery:
    • One of the Rehabs gets into a knife fight with Lewis and is killed by her.
    • After deleting Murphy's programming at his behest, Love assumes he's dead, only to find out he's still alive.
  • Would Hurt a Child: One of the first thing Murphy deals with is a child slavery ring.
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