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In 2014, it was announced that, following the expiry of IDW Publishing's contract to publish licensed Doctor Who – Expanded Universe comics in the USA, new Doctor Who comics would be published by Titan Publishing Group, previously best known for their collections of 2000 AD strips. Titan promptly announced not just an ongoing title, but a whole range of them that debuted by year's end. The original three, featuring the Tenth, Eleventh, and Twelfth Doctors, have recently completed their third "years" — each year's issues, roughly, are treated as a complete "season" and renumbered from one — before the line is relaunched to coincide with the TV debut of the Thirteenth Doctor.

    The Tenth Doctor 
  • Doctor Who: The Tenth Doctor is alternately written by Nick Abadzis and Robbie Morrison. Artists on the series vary. They are set during the period of the 2009 Doctor Who specials, and feature Ten travelling with a young woman from present-day New York City, Gabby Gonzalez. Year Two adds an additional companion, Cindy Wu, and Year Three a third, Anubis the Osiran.

    The Eleventh Doctor 
  • Doctor Who: The Eleventh Doctor Year One was written by Al Ewing and Rob Williams, who co-wrote the first issue and then alternated. Simon Fraser, Boo Cook, and Mark Ellerby have similarly rotated on the art. Set at some stage between "A Christmas Carol" and "The Impossible Astronaut", the Year One stories give Eleven no less than three original companions: Alice, Jones, and ARC. Year One was mostly bound in to a very long Myth Arc dealing with the Doctor's conflict with the malevolent Peace & Love, Incorporated firm ServeYouInc and their Mephistophelean representative the Talent Scout.
  • Si Spurrier and Rob Williams took over as writers for Year Two, but retained the tradition of the Eleventh Doctor's series being much more serialised than the others. Eleven continued to travel with Alice, but Jones and ARC were replaced by the Squire and two surprise established Who characters from other continuities: Abslom Daak and the infamous River Song.
  • Year Three sees the Doctor and Alice united with an alien "genocide child" called the Sapling who has absorbed both of their memories; the two try to help him to find his place in the world, while unknowingly being pursued by a powerful Silent known as the Scream.

    The Twelfth Doctor 
Doctor Who: The Twelfth Doctor debuted less than two months after the character's first full-length TV adventure aired. His series is written by either Robbie Morrison or George Mann most of the time, with art primarily by Dave Taylor or Brian Williamson in Year One and by Rachael Stott or Mariano Laclaustra from Year Two onwards.
  • Year One, bookended by multi-part stories about an evil race of sentient stars, features Twelve and Clara Oswald between "The Caretaker" and "Dark Water" (the Skovox Blitzer is referred to in dialogue and Danny Pink is alive) in Issues 1-11 and the Four Doctors crossover event, while Issues 12-15 and the 2015 Christmas one-shot are set between "Last Christmas" and "The Magician's Apprentice".
  • Year Two sets Issues 1-5 between "The Zygon Inversion" and "Face the Raven" (there are two Osgoods again and Clara's alive). Supremacy of the Cybermen, Issues 6-15, and Issues 1-4 of Year Three are set between "Hell Bent" and "The Husbands of River Song", as he takes on short-term original companions.
  • From Issue 5 onwards, Year Three and the Lost Dimension crossover switches to Series 10's Team TARDIS of Bill Potts and Nardole between "Empress of Mars" and "The Eaters of Light" (Bill recognizes Ice Warriors and Missy's only been out of the Vault once).
  • Ghost Stories was a Twelfth Doctor miniseries released alongside the monthly title over 2016-17, a sequel to the 2016 Christmas special "The Return of Doctor Mysterio" (2016-17) and teams him up with Grant Gordon/The Ghost, Lucy Fletcher, and their now eight-year-old daughter Jennifer.

    The Thirteenth Doctor (Upcoming) 
Doctor Who: The Thirteenth Doctor, the next monthly title, is scheduled to debut in the Fall of 2018, coinciding with the arrival of Series 11 on television. As befits the first female incarnation of the Doctor, this title will feature an all-female creative team: Jody Houser (writer), Rachael Stott (artwork), and Enrica Angiolini (colorist).
  • The Road to the Thirteenth Doctor is a three-part 2018 miniseries written by James Peaty that serves as a prelude to the ongoing, with the first part featuring the Tenth Doctor, the second the Eleventh, and the third the Twelfth; each part also has a serialised short story from the Thirteenth Doctor creative team. After that is The Thirteenth Doctor Issue 0, "The Many Lives of Doctor Who" by Richard Dinnick, leading into the ongoing proper.

In addition to the main Doctors, Titan regularly releases miniseries focusing on other Doctors:

    Other Doctors 
  • Doctor Who: The Eighth Doctor, a 2015 5-issue miniseries by George Mann and Emma Vieceli, and collected as "A Matter of Life and Death". According to the companions mentioned in the introductory paragraph, this shares a continuity with the Big Finish Eighth Doctor dramas. It pairs Eight with original companion Josie.
  • Doctor Who: The Fourth Doctor ("Gaze of the Medusa"), a Hinchcliffe-era tribute by Gordon Rennie, Emma Beeby and Brian Williamson featuring the Fourth Doctor and Sarah Jane Smith (2016).
  • Doctor Who: The Third Doctor ("The Heralds of Destruction"), a Third Doctor story by Paul Cornell, featuring Jo Grant and UNIT and set after "The Three Doctors" (2016-17).
  • Doctor Who: The Seventh Doctor, by the era's script editor Andrew Cartmel and one of its subsequently most successful writers, Ben Aaronovitch, with art by Christopher Jones. Features the Seventh Doctor and Ace. (2018)

Additionally, the ongoing series also have annual crossover miniseries that bring their Doctors together:

    Crossover miniseries 
  • Four Doctors (2015): Written by Paul Cornell and featuring the Tenth, Eleventh, Twelfth, and War Doctors alongside the Titan companions in a celebration of the tenth anniversary of the twenty-first century TV series. Set within Year One.
  • Supremacy of the Cybermen (2016): A sequel to certain events in the Series 9 finale "Hell Bent" in which Nine, Ten, Eleven, and Twelve confront the cyborgs Four Lines, All Waiting style when they gain the ability to time travel and Make Wrong What Once Went Right; a Milestone Celebration of the 50th anniversary of the villains' first televised appearance, written by George Mann and Cavan Scott. Set within Year Two for Ten, Eleven, and Twelve.
  • The Lost Dimension (2017): The Doctors and their companions are challenged when The Void, a sentient dimension, begins to consume their universe. Unlike previous miniseries, this 8-issue, 3-month storyline is a Crisis Crossover of the monthly Tenth, Eleventh, and Twelfth Doctor titles featuring their regular writer/artist teams; it starts and ends with standalone "Alpha" and "Omega" issues, and also includes three more "Special" one-shots respectively featuring the Ninth Doctor, Rose and Jack; the Fourth Doctor and Romana II; and River Song.

Finally, the Ninth Doctor proved a special case of a miniseries that spun off into a short-lived monthly title.

    The Ninth Doctor 
  • The original Doctor Who: The Ninth Doctor miniseries was writen by Cavan Scott; set between "The Doctor Dances" and "Bad Wolf", it followed the Ninth Doctor, Rose Tyler and Captain Jack Harkness dealing with a war between two alien races, the Unon and the Lect. This was collected as the first volume of the Ninth Doctor's ongoing title (as "Weapons of Past Destruction").
  • Following the Ninth Doctor's miniseries, Titan gave him an ongoing series of the same name in April 2016, with Cavan Scott returning as writer. In addition to Rose and Jack, the series added an original companion, 1970s (or '80s?) UNIT agent Tara Mishra.
  • Though the ongoing series ended with Issue 15, a one-shot "Ninth Doctor Special" tied in to The Lost Dimension miniseries (see above), featuring Madame Vastra and the Silurians.

These comics were initially published in the UK to newsagents as two Anthology Comics called Doctor Who Comic (originally featuring all three ongoing titles, later reduced to the Eleventh and Twelfth Doctor comics and Four Doctors) and Tales from the TARDIS (featuring the later Tenth Doctor comics and other miniseries). Tales from the TARDIS is the only one that remains and currently only features the Tenth, Eleventh, and Twelfth Doctors' monthly titles, possibly due to the tendency of the miniseries to suffer Schedule Slip.

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    Third Doctor comics tropes 

The Third Doctor comics include the following tropes:

  • Battle in the Centre of the Mind:
    • The Doctor and Jo battle the mind of the nanomachines in Jo's unconscious when they try to Grey Goo her.
    • Later, in a double-page spread, a mental struggle between the Doctor and the Master is represented by them having a kung-fu fight.
  • Bluff The Imposter: The Brigadier catches the Master impersonating a superior officer by asking after the man's wife with a false name.
  • Bondage Is Bad: Salamander creates an unnecessarily kinky-looking ball gag from nanotech when he wants to silence someone.
  • Brick Joke: There's a joke about the only people who have access to the Doctor's lab at UNIT HQ being himself and the tea lady. It's later revealed that the Master impersonated the tea lady and bugged it.
  • Call-Forward:
    • There are multiple hints at the directionlessness and green impulses that will drive Yates to join the villains in "Invasion of the Dinosaurs".
    • Jo is implied to have first coined the phrase "timey-wimey".
    • Corporal Osgood is seen using an asthma inhaler, confirming his status as a relative of the Osgood from the Eleventh and Twelfth Doctors' era.
    • When the Master tries to take over the nanotech, he begins a speech similar to his big speech from the climax of "Logopolis".
  • Continuity Nod:
    • The Doctor's first appearance has him suggesting that he is a familiar friend of infamous Cambodian dictator Pol Pot, a joke referring to the controversial line in "The Mind of Evil" when he talks positively about Mao Zedong.
    • Benton mentions Zoe and how, from his perspective, she got into the TARDIS and was never seen again.
  • Criminal Doppelgänger: The real villain of the story is Ramón Salamander, the Second Doctor's human Mad Scientist evil double from the 1960s story "The Enemy of the World", who first appears impersonating the Second Doctor.
  • Enemy Mine: The Doctor and the Master are forced to team up as usual.
  • Giving Radio to the Romans: Salamander intends, as his first move on achieving time travel, to take his nanotechnology to Victorian England and use it to rise to power.
  • Incorruptible Pure Pureness: The Doctor is surprised to discover that Jo's unconscious contains no hidden "dark side" whatsoever.
  • Latex Perfection: The Master's masks appear prominently, and are given additional powers as well as an explanation.
  • Muggle Power: Salamander is driven by the desire to become the first human to take on the power of the Time Lords.
  • Nanomachines: The villain of the story's main tool is a flock of them.
  • No One Should Survive That: Salamander turns out to have survived his brief exposure to the Vortex and to have been pulled out of it along with the TARDIS when it materialised at the start of "The Web of Fear".
  • No-Sell: The Brigadier can now No Sell the Master's attempts to control him.
  • "Not Making This Up" Disclaimer:
    The Brigadier: The Master got away, using his face as a parachute, and yes, I'm aware how absurd that...
  • Perception Filter: The Master applies one to a UNIT helicopter to avoid causing problems in the nineteenth century.
  • Reading Your Rights: The Brigadier's No-Sell to the Master is performed while reading him, not the usual UK police arrest formalities, but the Queen's Regulations on the rights of a prisoner of the British Army.
  • Running Gag: Salamander is confused about whether he arrived on Earth (during the events of "The Web of Fear") in the 1960s or a later decade.
  • Shout-Out:
    • The sky in Jo's unconscious bears the message "IT'S MY PARTY IN THE AGE OF AQUARIUS AND IT FREAKS ME OUT", a reference to the famous "It's my happening and it freaks me out!" line from Beyond the Valley of the Dolls (and also notably quoted in the original Austin Powers International Man Of Mystery).
    • Salamander's nanotech Power Armour at the end bears a strong resemblance to the battlesuits occasionally assumed by Lex Luthor in Superman comics.
    • The Master's dialogue exchange with the UNIT characters at the start of the fight in the time machine's control room is taken from the spoken-word opening to "Ballroom Blitz" by The Sweet.
    • The illustration of the Vortex includes Kronos from "The Time Monster", a Reaper from "Father's Day", and a Vortisaur from the Big Finish Doctor Who drama Storm Warning.
  • Shut Up, Kirk!: The nanomachines respond to the Doctor's speech of welcome to Earth by shooting at him.
  • Slave Liberation: The Doctor finally takes control of the nanomachines and releases them on an uninhabited planet to develop on their own.
  • Smart People Play Chess: The Doctor and a disguised Master are playing chess at the Doctor's club at the beginning of the story.
  • Unexpected Character: At the end of the first issue, the Second Doctor, of all people, shows up. And then, at the end of the third issue, he turns out to be Ramón Salamander in disguise!
  • Villain: "Exit, Stage Left!": The final panels show Salamander escaping from his cell with the aid of a few remaining nanomachines, in a Sequel Hook.

    Fourth Doctor comics tropes 

The Fourth Doctor comics include the following tropes:

    Eighth Doctor comic tropes 

The Eighth Doctor comics include the following tropes:

  • Actual Pacifist: The Eighth Doctor is strongly characterised as this, and usually manages to find peaceful resolutions.
  • Art Initiates Life: The first issue has paintings painted by Josephine Day come to life and terrorise a small town.
  • Body Horror: The Silversmith's mooks, which are horrific partial humans or combinations of them created by partial reflections of people.
  • Call-Forward: The Eighth Doctor's introduction in the first issue is similar to his introduction in "The Night of the Doctor".
  • The Cameo: The Twelfth Doctor and Clara Oswald have one at the end of Part Five.
    Clara: You're a big softie, really, aren't you?
    The Twelfth Doctor: Me? No. Never. Whatever gave you that idea?
    Clara: Oh, I dunno? Maybe the hint of a tear in your eye. Remembering happy days?
    The Twelfth Doctor: Pfft. It's just cold out here, is all. No one should have to come to Wales in February. Remind me of that next time I'm stupid enough to suggest it.
  • Continuity Cavalcade: As well as the original Witherkin, the monsters in Josie's paintings that come to life include Krotons, Ice Warriors, and a Cyberman.
  • Continuity Nod:
    • The Doctor says that he's always worried by empty theatres because of the chance of being attacked by a homunculus or a giant rat.
    • The Doctor's house where Josie squats is the same cottage the Third Doctor used as a home on Earth in the comic strips published in TV Action in the early 1970s, hence the Eighth Doctor's references to "white hair and frills" having lived there (Compare this image from TV Action with this one from the Eighth Doctor comic). Josie refers to it as having been "falling down" when she moved in and thinking it had been abandoned. Presumably it had been empty since the Third Doctor regenerated into the Fourth Doctor and left Earth. It's one of the Doctor's collection of houses, including Smithwood Manor (the house in late-twentieth/early-twenty-first century England that the Doctor owns in the Doctor Who New Adventures and Eighth Doctor Adventures prose continuities) and Nest Cottage (from the Fourth Doctor BBC Audio plays).
  • The Corpse Stops Here: The Doctor and Josie find a murdered Bakri, and are immediately accused of killing him.
  • Covers Always Lie: The cover of #3 suggests that the Doctor and Josie will end up fighting evil duplicates of themselves, which never actually happens.
  • The Fair Folk: The Nixi show all the characteristics of this, but are actually aliens.
  • Immortality Immorality: The new bodies created by the Bakri to give rich people extra lifetimes are actually sentient and have their own minds suppressed.
  • Magicians Are Wizards: The Silversmith uses a conjuring act as an excuse to use real evil mystical powers to replace audience members with evil duplicates.
  • Mirror Universe: An evil parallel of the main universe which is literally behind a mirror.
  • Missing Reflection: Evil mirror universe duplicates have no reflection.
  • Nice Job Breaking It, Hero!: Josie's paintings turn out to be animated by a TARDIS spare part in the Doctor's house that he accidentally activated
  • Obliviously Evil: The Spherions are desperate to reproduce after their normal hosts were wiped out, and initially don't realise that the Calaxi are sentient lifeforms who shouldn't be used as parasitoid hosts.
  • Plant Aliens: The Nixi, who are also capable of animating Earth plants to attack.
  • Stable Time Loop: Turns out that the Twelfth Doctor purchased Josie at an auction and brought her into contact with Eight, because he remembered their adventures.
  • The Virus: People being hit by the weapons of the Spherions get turned into Spherions.

    Ninth Doctor comics tropes 

The Ninth Doctor comics include the following tropes:

  • Amazon Brigade: The Unon in "Weapons of Past Destruction" are mostly-female temporal warriors.
  • Arm Cannon: In "The Bidding War", Addison gets one after being Cyber-converted.
  • Auction of Evil: Addison tries to set one up for the Doctor's memories in "The Bidding War". Unfortunately, the Cybermen launch an attack by force before any bidding can occur.
  • Bad Habits: During his missing years, Jack spent some time impersonating a priest in seventeenth-century Brazil.
  • Beware the Superman: Subverted in "The Transformed" - it's hinted that the empowered people may be being fundamentally morally corrupted but the problem is actually different.
  • Black Market: The Fluren Temporal Bazaar in "Weapons of Past Destruction" is the Bazaar of the Bizarre version.
  • Call-Back:
    • In "The Bidding War", Rose discovers Jack's presence on Nomicae when an Experience Sphere puts her in one of his memories from "The Empty Child"/"The Doctor Dances".
    • Addison was inspired to sell off the Doctor's memories by his offer to do so in "Weapons of Past Destruction".
  • Call-Forward:
    • In "Weapons of Past Destruction", Rose believes that the Unon have disintegrated the Doctor when actually it was a violent-looking teleportation. Just as would happen with their places interchanged in "Bad Wolf". Jack has exactly the same experience in "Secret Agent Man"/"The Bidding War".
    • Evja forsees Jack's death, his becoming immortal, and his killing of his own grandson in "Children of Earth".
    • In "Doctormania", Rose creates the phrase "timey wimey".
    • In "Sin Eaters" the Hesguard facility is said to have previously been a Stormcage - possibly the one River Song spent some time locked up in?
    • In "The Bidding War", the Cybermen have the same instant-Cyber-conversion-via-nanotech ability displayed in "Nightmare In Silver".
    • The Shreekers from the Tenth Doctor Titan story "Echo" turn up in "The Bidding War".
  • Bond One-Liner: Discussed when Mickey beats up Glom's bee-like minions:
    The Doctor: OK, you know I can't condone that.
    Mickey: The violence, or the fact that I didn't tell them to "buzz off"?
  • Church Militant: The Unon think of themselves as such.
  • Cliffhanger:
    • There's an inter-story one between "The Transformed" and "Official Secrets" in which Dean the Gargoyle comes out of the punchway in Britain in "Sometime in the 1970s. Or maybe 80s", and his appearance is reported by two UNIT agents to Dr. Harry Sullivan and Sergeant Benton.
    • "The Slaver's Song" ends with an In Medias Res one with the Doctor being arrested for murdering Tara.
  • Continuity Cavalcade: The sequence at the Fluren Temporal Bazaar is filled with in-jokes referring to various Doctor Who continuities.
  • Continuity Nod:
    • The Doctor mentions the Rani and the Corsair when the Unon put him in the Void.
    • In "Hacked", the Doctor takes Rose and Jack to the Eye of Orion and notes that it looks "like Wales".
    • Taggani is said to have been formerly employed by the Braxiatel Collection.
    • The fake "Doctor Who" in "Doctormania" has robot enemies called "Chumbleys", a misspelling of the "Chumblies" from "Galaxy 4", and a flying car that looks like the Third Doctor's "Whomobile" and has the same registration plate.
    • One of the panels in "The Transformed" recapping what Mickey's been up to since "Journeys' End" shows him fighting a Weevil from Torchwood.
    • Mickey says that he and Martha initially thought the Gargoyles were Krillitanes from "School Reunion".
    • The Doctor says that the particularly bad effects from the "punchway" in San Francisco are due to reality weaknesses from the city's history, probably a reference to the events of Doctor Who: The Movie.
    • In the opening sequence of "Official Secrets", Tara's T-shirt appears to say "Bad Wolf", although it isn't shown in full.
    • The Doctor refers to The Astonishing Karkus as a fictional superhero comic in the Who universe.
    • In "Sin Eaters", the rehabilitation system is known as the "Bad Wolf" process.
    • A flashback to the Time War in "The Bidding War" features the Great Vampires from "State of Decay".
    • Rose gets a brief flash of an alternate timeline memory of herself being Cyber-converted in "Supremacy of the Cybermen".
  • Corrupt Corporate Executive: Addison Delamar, the ruthless social media billionaire in "The Bidding War".
  • Defector from Decadence: Lpupiara and Yiara in "The Slaver's Song" left their imperialistic and violent culture in disgust.
  • Die or Fly: In "The Transformed", Rose's superpowers kick in when she accidentally falls off a roof.
  • Does Not Like Guns: "Weapons of Past Destruction" is set directly after "The Doctor Dances", leading to several arguments between the Doctor and Jack over firearms.
  • Electronic Telepathy: The Experience Spheres in "The Bidding War" are a far-future form of social media that allow this.
  • Enemy Without: The Hesguard process accidentally creates a superpowered entity with the intelligence and emotions of all the Doctor's dark side.
  • Engineered Public Confession: Done to Jasper Corrigan, the Albion Defense leader, in "Official Secrets", with a little re-editing to avoid breaking The Masquerade.
  • Enthralling Siren: Yiara's powers in "The Slaver's Song", which also extend to making her appear more of a humanoid mermaid than she is.
  • Explosive Leash: Slist plants a subcutaneous bomb on Rose.
  • Fake Defector: In "Official Secrets", Tara appears to be about to break The Masquerade and humiliate UNIT, but actually makes up a convincing story that explains away the monsters and blames Albion Defense for faking them.
  • Fangirl: Yani is a parody of the stereotypical 21st-century Doctor Who fangirl.
  • Fish People: The Sereia in "The Slaver's Song".
  • Generation Xerox: In "Weapons of Past Destruction", the Unon and the Lect are directly paralleled with the Time Lords and the Daleks respectively.
  • Get into Jail Free: The Doctor gets sent to Hesguard by altering police records to show himself as wanted for murdering Tara.
  • Green-Eyed Monster: Rose becomes jealous when Tara joins the TARDIS crew and the Doctor seems to get on well with her.
  • Have We Met Yet?: The Ninth Doctor accidentally answers a distress signal from a post-"The End of Time" Mickey, and has to prevent him and Rose from meeting.
  • Hunting the Most Dangerous Game: Rose and Slist end up being the targets of one by the Raxas Alliance.
  • It May Help You on Your Quest: In "Weapons of Past Destruction", Rose puts on a bracelet which turns out to be a "tachyon inhibitor" that saves her life when she falls into the Vortex without a TARDIS.
  • Just One Second Out of Sync: The Fluren Temporal Bazaar exists in a moment of recycling time before the planet it is on gets destroyed by a supernova.
  • Kaiju: "Official Secrets" has them terrorising the West Country.
  • Kill 'em All: Tara lampshades the fact that "Sin Eaters" ends with every character except the TARDIS team dead.
  • Knight Templar: The Unon have good intentions to replace the Time Lords as guardians of the timeline, but like them rapidly become unduly ruthless and arrogant.
  • Legendary Impostor: In "Doctormania", the Doctor arrives on a planet to discover that a "Doctor Who" who looks very like him is already a celebrity there. The imposter is a Slitheen.
  • Letter Bomb: The Cybermen launch their attack on Addison's auction in "The Bidding War" by arranging to have a "sealed bid" sent in that is actually a package containing a Cybermat.
  • Making a Splash: Lpupiara in "The Slaver's Song" can control water.
  • Master of Illusion: Yaxley in "Official Secrets" developed this power through a secret military experiment.
  • Mistaken for Own Murderer: The superteens in "The Transformed" assume that the Gargoyles have been murdering their fellows - in fact the superpowers lead to mutation and the Gargoyles are the same people.
  • Monumental Damage: In "Official Secrets", Clifton Suspension Bridge gets destroyed by a giant monster.
  • Multi-Armed and Dangerous: Jack fights a four-armed mook in "Secret Agent Man".
  • Noodle Incident: In "The Bidding War", Tara mentions UNIT once fought off a Cyberman invasion of Halifax without the Doctor.
  • Our Wormholes Are Different: The superpowers and mutations in "The Transformed" are due to an irresponsibly-created "punchway", a type of crude artificial wormhole.
  • Peace Conference: Slist and Gleda both plan to sabotage one among the members of the Raxas Alliance.
  • Pensieve Flashback: This is one power of the Experience Spheres in "The Bidding War".
  • Perspective Reversal: Yani fangirls all over the Doctor in the same way that he did all over Charles Dickens in "The Unquiet Dead". He doesn't take it well.
  • Petting Zoo People: The Harrigain in "The Bidding War" are hippo people.
  • Private Military Contractors: Albion Defense, the villains of "Official Secrets".
  • Proud Warrior Race: Although we don't see a great deal of them, the Harrigain in "The Bidding War" are implied to be one.
  • Reality Warping: Josh's power in "Official Secrets", as his father's ability was amplified in him.
  • Ret Gone: The Time Agency has "Eradicator" weapons capable of this.
  • The Reveal: The Lect are actually the cyborg survivors of the Excrothians, after the Unon massacred them.
  • Reverse Mole: Tara goes undercover as a Hesguard guard in "Sin Eaters".
  • The Right of a Superior Species: In "The Slaver's Song", Portuguese slavers in early-modern Brazil are very unhappy when alien invaders try to enslave them.
  • "Scooby-Doo" Hoax: In "The Slaver's Song", Jack used holographic fake ghosts to keep the neighbours away from his secrets.
  • Shout-Out:
    • In "Weapons of Past Destruction", Rose calls her cephalopod temporary employer "Squidward".
    • The Lect's speech patterns are taken from Zen's in Blake's 7.
    • The Doctor says that a gun-toting Jack is "barely even Moore".
    • Yani is said to be a member of the Doctor Who Appreciation Society, which is the oldest-established real-world Doctor Who fan organisation.
    • In the same conversation, it's revealed that the "Prohibited Sphere" bookshop referenced in other Titan Doctor Who comics (a reference to Forbidden Planet, a famous real-world comic and SF/fantasy book shop in London) has interstellar branches as well.
    • In "Official Secrets", Rose calls Benton "Sergeant Bilko".
    • In "Sin Eaters", Highsmith, the director of the Hesguard facility for criminal rehabilitation, may be named after the crime writer Patricia Highsmith.
    • Rose compares Hesguard to Arkham Asylum from the Batman franchise.
    • Rose tells Highsmith to "make like Zebedee".
  • Stable Time Loop: In "Weapons of Past Destruction", Jack cues his past self to use his vortex manipulator to jump into the TARDIS and a few seconds back in time, to let Rose into it.
  • Superior Successor: In "Official Secrets", Josh Yaxley has much more effective powers than his father.
  • Take That!: The operator of the environmentally-destructive and badly-designed "punchway" in "The Transformed", which is set in San Francisco, is the Celestial Hyperloop Corporation. In the real world, "Hyperloop" is a proposed form of maglev vacuum-tube transportation conceived by tech entrepreneur Elon Musk and operating from San Francisco to LA, which is mocked by its detractors as an Awesome, but Impractical distraction from a more practical conventional high-speed rail project.
  • Talk to the Fist: Harry to the Minister in "Official Secrets", which gets him arrested.
  • Too Spicy for Yog-Sothoth: The Doctor persuades the non-Cyber bidders for his memories in "The Bidding War" to leave by giving them enough of a taste of his memories of the Time War to show them how truly disturbing they are.
  • Vampiric Draining: The sin-eaters in "Sin Eaters" are granted this ability through the Doctor sin-eater's intelligence.
  • Villain: "Exit, Stage Left!": At the end of "The Bidding War", Addison escapes, no longer mentally under the control of the Cybermen but still in a partially-converted state.
  • Was Once a Man: The gargoyles in "The Transformed" are mutated humans.
  • Well-Intentioned Extremist: Taggani claims to be teaching the over-confident a lesson about over-estimating how powerful they are. Unfortunately that includes genocide.
  • What the Hell, Hero?: Various characters react this way to the Doctor's apparently uncaring acts in "Official Secrets", some of which are actually part of his plan but others of which are genuinely ruthless.

    Tenth Doctor comics tropes 

The Tenth Doctor comics include the following tropes:

  • Alien Abduction: The Monaxi kidnap people from different worlds to sell into slavery.
  • Ambiguous Gender: The Shan'tee have no actual gender, but humans tend to assign them to them because of their preconceptions. The Shan'tee known as "Smokey" is perceived by Gabby as male and Allegra as female.
  • Animal Espionage: The birds in the Monaxi gladiator arena are robot spies.
  • Art Shift: Sections of "Sharper Than a Serpent's Tooth" are in mock-Chinese art style.
  • Ascend to a Higher Plane of Existence: It's revealed that all the Osirans except Anubis did this after Sutekh was imprisoned. Anubis plans to do this, but his technology is too degraded. The Osiran cultists were under the impression that he would take them with him, and are not happy when he has no intention of doing so.
  • Auction of Evil: The "Ebonite Rooms" in "The Fountains of Forever" are an underground auction room for alien artefacts.
  • Bad Boss: The Minaxi leader Iktra treats his subordinate Vozmorth very abusively and finally tries to shoot the Doctor even though the shot will also kill him.
  • Bittersweet Ending: "Music Man". Clearly more bitter than sweet, as the Doctor and Gabby end up defeating the Nocturne, but it was only achieved by the sacrifice of the musician Roscoe, in an attempt to save his sister's life. When Gabby is forced to tell Cindy this (as Cindy was in a relationship with him and wasn't there at the time), Cindy immediately puts two and two together. The last shot of the story is Gabby and Roscoe's sister trying and failing to comfort a crying Cindy, all while the Doctor stands forlornly, staring at Roscoe's corpse and his broken trumpet.
    Gabby POV captions: Now I understand why he doesn't ever really explain. Sometimes, you just can't find the words.
  • Black Bug Room: The Paranestene consigns the Doctor, Gabby, Cindy, and Noobis to one in "Breakfast At Tyranny's".
  • Bottomless Pit: Zhe's "apprentice" turns a stairwell into a Bottomless Pit to trap the Doctor.
  • Brainwashed and Crazy: Mr. Ebonite brainwashes various characters, including Gabby, to force them to fight each other in "Arena of Fear".
  • Brown Note: The Nocturnes in "The Singer Not the Song" are sentient Brown Notes capable of transforming other beings into themselves.
  • The Bus Came Back: A Nocturne returns as the antagonist in "The Jazz Monster" and "Music Man", after a whole fleet of them were also antagonists in the opening Year Two story, "The Singer Not the Song".
  • Call-Back:
    • The Doctor says that Zhe trained in block-transfer computation on Logopolis, and later says that he only encountered autonomously sentient block-transfer constructs once before.
    • When Gabby is empowered by the "apprentice", she briefly comes into telepathic contact with the Ood collective.
    • Ten is briefly transformed back into the Ninth Doctor by a time anomaly in "The Fountains of Forever".
    • In "The Fountains of Forever", the Doctor says this when Vivian asks the Doctor to bring Dorothy Bell back to life:
    The Doctor: I can't. Everything has it's time...
    • In "Sins of the Father", the Time Sentinel and its servitors appear to be the same kind of being as Shayde from the Doctor Who Magazine comics continuity. The Sentinel later refers to an "Aspect Black" having been corrupted after spending time as a "lone operator", confirming this.
    • Sutekh's Legion of Doom includes entities that resemble a God of Ragnarok from "The Greatest Show in the Galaxy", the Destroyer from "Survival", the Beast from "The Impossible Planet"/"The Satan Pit", and the King Nocturne.
    • In "Revolving Doors" the Tenth Doctor's sad memories of all three companions he picked up in London are recalled and used as weapons against him.
    • The same story begins with an activation of the TARDIS's randomiser from Season Seventeen.
  • Call-Forward:
    • When Zhe's "apprentice" accuses him of being a critic, Ten says that critics wear bow ties, and then muses that bow ties aren't a bad look.
    • A somewhat grim one when the Doctor tells Vivian that he can't prevent Dorothy from dying:
    • "The Singer Not the Song" contains multiple references to the Arc Words "No song lasts forever" from Ten's final stories.
    • In "The Good Companion", the Time Sentinel turns out to be worried that the Doctor will break the lock on the Time War.
    • Gabby has visions of Clara and Bill among the Doctor's other companions.
  • Chekhov's Gift: At the end of "The Singer Not the Song", a Carbonadium Box (a music box that changes its tune depending on the listener's mood) is given to Gabby as a gift from visiting Wupatki. This device proves important for two occasions, with the first one being when the Doctor uses it to pull a "I Know You're in There Somewhere" Fight for Gabby (as she is under the control of Mr. Ebonite) in "Arena of Fear" and the second consisting of Gabby activating it with a trumpet in order to weaken the Nocturne in "Music Man".
  • Clones Are People, Too: The Paranestene's clones of Cindy achieve individuality and pull a Heel–Face Turn.
  • The Coats Are Off: In "The Singer Not the Song", Ten takes his overcoat off as soon as he discovered that there's actual trouble on Wupatki.
  • Continuity Cavalcade: Gabby's drawings of the people they meet on Ouloumos include the Giant Robot, a Quark, an Ice Warrior, and an Alpha Centaurian.
  • Continuity Nod:
    • The Doctor mentions Cameca when he and Gabby discuss the Aztecs' magical use of mirrors.
    • American newscaster Trinity Wells, who regularly appeared in Davies-era TV stories, appears on TV to describe events in the contemporary-Earth stories.
    • In "The Weeping Angels of Mons", the Doctor talks about meeting H G Wells.
    • In "The Fountains of Forever", the alien hairdryer from "Dalek" is being sold at the Ebonite Rooms, still mistaken for a weapon.
    • "The Fountains of Forever" includes a mention of Department C4, a malevolent British government black ops organisation from various Big Finish Doctor Who dramas.
    • In the "Laundro-Room of Doom" short, various past Doctor and companion costumes can be seen in the TARDIS wardrobe room.
    • In "The Singer Not the Song", Ten was trying to take Gabby to The Eye of Orion.
    • In "Cindy, Cleo, and the Magic Sketchbook", Gabby finds Turlough's old sketchbooks in the TARDIS.
    • Gabby's psychic textbook warns Gabby of a coming evil analogous to The Beast, the Destroyer, and the Vampires.
    • In "Medicine Man", the Doctor talks about manipulation of humanity's history by the Jaggeroth, the Fendahl, and the Osirans.
    • Sunzberro in "Medicine Man" is a Terileptil, although nicer than the ones the Fifth Doctor met in seventeenth-century Heathrow.
    • The Monaxi are said to have supplied gladiators to the early Time Lords for the Game of Rassilon.
    • "The Wishing Well Witch" contains a reference to Stockbridge, the English village which is the scene of alien events in various Doctor Who Magazine comic strip stories.
    • In "Old Girl", the Doctor alludes to the cat nuns from "New Earth".
    • In "Breakfast at Tyranny's", the Paranestene briefly torments the Doctor by making him hallucinate himself as an Auton, with the sonic screwdriver as his Arm Cannon.
    • The TARDIS showroom in the Doctor's hallucination in "Breakfast at Tyranny's" includes the white classical column form assumed by the Master's TARDIS in "Logopolis" and "Castrovalva".
    • The wasted Nestene duplicates of the Doctor look like his previous regenerations.
    • In "Sharper Than a Serpent's Tooth", the Doctor says that he once lived in China for a time without access to the TARDIS, which may be a reference to "Marco Polo".
    • In "Vortex Butterflies", Gabby refers to Turlough, Izzy, Fitz, Liv, Rose, and Donna.
    • The Twelfth Doctor says that Ten really doesn't want to know how old he is.
    • Sarah alludes to Davros accusing the Doctor of turning his companions into weapons in "Journeys' End".
    • Sarah refers to an evil android duplicate being created from her in "The Android Invasion".
    • In "The Good Companion", Zhe offers to get Gabby Manussan Salted Snakebite Strudel.
    • Cleo refers to the Doctor as Doctor Mysterio.
  • Creepy Changing Painting: Gabby's sketchbook changes to give Cindy messages, by implication because its pages are psychic paper.
  • Culture Justifies Anything: In "Echo", the Shreekers falsely claim that hunting the Echoes is an ancient cultural tradition.
  • Dark Action Girl: Cleo, the very pragmatic and not very faith-driven Osiran cultist from "The Fountains of Forever".
  • Defector from Decadence: Aspect Blue recognises that the rest of the Time Sentinel is becoming corrupted and helps the Doctor and friends.
  • Deliberate Values Dissonance: In "Music Man", walk-on people in the club are visibly horrified and disgusted to see that the Chinese-American Cindy and the black Roscoe are in a relationship.
  • Didn't Think This Through: In "The Weeping Angels of Mons", the Angels start attacking soldiers during World War One because extra disappearances won't be noticed, only to end up with malnutrition because most of their prey had only weeks, days, or minutes to live.
  • Downer Ending: "The Good Companion", the Year 3 finale. The Doctor uses the TARDIS to successfully stop the Time Sentinel's plan to regulate time, but at a severe price: Gabby doesn't get to the TARDIS in time, and ends up in the Twelfth Doctor's TARDIS. Since that Doctor realizes that it is Gabby, this means that she can never go back to the Tenth Doctor, or possibly any of her friends and family (if Ten told them about her fate). And Cindy will end up emotionally scarred over losing the girl who only recognized her feelings at the last moment.
  • Dragon with an Agenda: The Para-Nestene's Red TARDIS is recruited as a servant by the Time Sentinel, but ends up corrupting and possessing it.
  • Education Mama: Gabby's father acts like this to her, although it's only education that will be useful for his businesses.
  • Elemental Rock–Paper–Scissors: Used by the Doctor, Gabby, and Noobis, and Master Wu Wei and his followers, in "Sharper Than a Serpent's Tooth" to defeat the Paranestene's elemental monsters.
  • Emotion Eater:
    • "Revolutions of Terror" features the good Pranavores and evil Cerebravores.
    • The Reach tries to use the Doctor's angst over his past Davies-era companions to escape into the main universe.
  • The End... Or Is It?:
    • "The Weeping Angels of Mons" ends with an elderly Jamie visiting a war cemetery. As he and his family leave, his granddaughter, Gabriella, ends up tripping. She tells her family that she must have "tripped over a stupid stone or something", not knowing that she has actually tripped over a Weeping Angel's hand, sticking out of the grass...
    • The end of "Sins of the Father" hints that Anubis may be slipping into his father's more evil ways.
    "Horus and Sukteh. Am I more the one, or the other? Is the weight of my heart too light, or too heavy? Am I worthy to enter 'The Afterlife'? And if not - why not? What did Horus see that I cannot? I have an inkling now of how Sukteh felt. For him, the universe was a prison - the emptiness of the sky was no illusion... but a temptation. A philosophy. An aspiration to correct the imbalance of nature. Perhaps I am mistaken. Perhaps the sky is not filled with light. Perhaps there is, after all, a purity in darkness."
  • Enemy Without: Zhe's "apprentices".
  • Energy Being:
    • The Shan'Tee are living musical tunes.
    • The Monaxi are part energy and part corporeal.
  • Evil Knockoff: The Paranestene creates an evil copy of the TARDIS and multiple clones of Cindy, and assumes the Doctor's form in their climactic confrontation.
  • Expy:
    • Father Monaghan in "The Weeping Angels of Mons", with his wartime conflicts of faith, has a lot of similarity to the Reverend Wainwright in "The Curse of Fenric".
    • The Time Sentinel's "aspects" have quite a bit in common with the Auditors of Reality in the Discworld series.
  • Fastball Special: Used by Noobis and Gabby in "Sharper Than a Serpent's Tooth" to get Gabby into the Paranestene's fortress.
  • Fatal Family Photo: In the Cold Open of "The Weeping Angels of Mons", Harry shows off a photo of his fiance shortly before being caught by an Angel.
  • Floating Continent: Wupatki's "bridgeweb", a series of cities floating in the atmosphere of a gas planet.
  • Flying Saucer: The Monaxi spacecraft look like this, copying the upper sections of their jellyfish-like bodies.
  • Foreshadowing: The constant references of butterflies, which hint at Gabby's block transfer powers that she gains in "Arena of Fear" due to her being possessed by Mr. Ebonite:
    • In "The Arts In Space", when one of Zhe's assistants transfers some of his power into Gabby, she sees black butterflies as well as events from the previous story, "Revolutions of Terror".
    • In "Spiral Staircase", Dorothy Bell tells Gabby this:
    "Look at you, all those possibilities and glowing things clustered around you! Thoughts like so many butterflies..."
  • Fusion Dance: Dorothy Bell merges with the Key, a reality-warping Osiran AI device.
  • Future Me Scares Me: The entity in "Vortex Butterflies" is a potential version of Gabby, empowered by her interactions with Zhe and the Osirans, and abandoned by the Doctor when she got powerful enough to scare him.
  • Girl of the Week: Gabby develops a romantic attraction to Jamie, the soldier who survives "The Weeping Angels of Mons".
  • Gladiator Games: The Monaxi force their captives into these.
  • Gone Horribly Right: The Cerebravores were created by an alien culture as a weapon against their enemies, but they got loose and destroyed all life on the planet.
  • Halloween Episode: The story where the Doctor meets Gabby has a gang of evil Emotion Eaters attacking New York during the Dia de los Muertos.
  • Heroic B.S.O.D.: How well does the Doctor and Cindy react to seeing Anubis and revealing that he is the son of Sukteh? Cindy ends up fainting, and the Doctor has fallen to his knees, trying to comprehend this impossible fact. There is even a closeup of the Doctor's eye, to further hit the point home.
  • Heroic Sacrifice:
    • Both Captain Fairbairn and Father Monaghan in "The Weeping Angels of Mons".
    • Dorothy sacrifices her own life to send Sutekh back into limbo.
    • Crossland breaks out of the Reach's influence and sacrifices himself to save the world in "Revolving Doors".
  • Homoerotic Subtext: There's a strong innuendo that Dorothy Bell and Vivian are more than just friends.
  • Honey Trap: Noobis's girlfriend Siffhoni is actually a Time Sentinel manipulating him.
  • How We Got Here: "The Singer Not The Song" begins with Gabby in danger of death as the research centre collapses.
    Gabby: Oh, Doctor... this time you're gonna be too late. It was so... so—
  • Human Resources: The Paranestene created the Cindy clones from all the people who previously lived in the Valley of the Tiger.
  • Human Subspecies: Both Neanderthals and early Homo sapiens sapiens appear in "Medicine Man".
  • I Know What You Fear: The Cerebravores' main attack.
  • Inevitable Mutual Betrayal: Sutekh views his allies merely as tools and kills most of them for lulz.
  • Just Train Wrong: In "The Weeping Angels of Mons", the Angels send two soldiers back in time to a train near Dundee, just before it is destroyed with no survivors in the real Tay Bridge Disaster. The train interior is drawn correctly as a compartment carriage, but the corridor is much too wide. Externally, both the carriages and the locomotive look very, very American.
  • Kick the Dog: An Angel sends Wullie and Joe back to nineteenth-century Scotland just in time for them to die in the Tay Bridge railway accident.
  • Laser-Guided Amnesia: Inflicted by Mr. Ebonite on all the various people in his arena.
  • Mad Artist: Zhe is simply neurotic rather than truly "mad", but it still means that her attempts to create sentient life by block-transfer computation go very wrong.
  • Mind Rape: Suffered by the victims of the entity in "The Wishing Well Witch", which "consumes" parts of their mind leaving them insane in different ways.
  • Neglectful Precursors: Averted, it turns out that the Osirans took precautions to clean up after themselves when they ascended.
  • Nice Job Fixing It, Villain!: In "The Weeping Angels of Mons", the Angels turn out to have sent Shuggy back only about fifty years and a few miles. Leading to him turning up to rescue everyone else in a stolen German tank.
  • Noodle Incident: The Doctor apparently helped the ancient Osirans defeat various enemies, including the Racnoss.
  • Now or Never Kiss: In "The Weeping Angels of Mons", Gabby and Jamie kiss while, they think, blowing themselves and all the Angels to pieces with a stock of explosives. Only for the Doctor to materialise the TARDIS around them as the explosion goes off.
  • Offing the Offspring: Sutekh tries to kill his own son, inevitably.
  • One Steve Limit: In "The Weeping Angels of Mons", the Doctor and Gabby team up with a Scottish soldier called Jamie. The similarity is alluded to.
  • Pocket Dimension: Cindy is briefly trapped in one due to a TARDIS system failure in "The Infinite Corridor".
  • Pocket Protector: Jack Harkness gave Erik a portable force field that protected him from Mr. Ebonite's weapon.
  • Poke in the Third Eye: Happens to the psychic in "The Wishing Well Witch" when she sees the return of Sutekh in Cindy's future.
  • The Power of Rock/Psychic Static: The best defence against the Cerebravores is your favourite song.
  • Puppeteer Parasite: The Nocturnes possess various musicians in "Music Man".
  • Race Lift: A flashback reveals that the incarnation of Borusa who was the Doctor's tutor was black in human terms.
  • Rage Against the Heavens: The Osiran cultists are not happy to discover that their gods were Sufficiently Advanced Aliens and that the only one who is still present has no interest in rewarding them.
  • Ray of Hope Ending: Year 3. By the end, the Time Sentinels have been stopped, but Gabby ends up being separated from the Tenth Doctor, Cindy, Cleo and Anubis. After some shenanigans involving the Moment, she is transported back into the TARDIS... notably, the Twelfth Doctor's.
  • Reality Warper: Zhe and her "apprentices", via block-transfer computation.
  • Rebus Bubble: Briefly used in "Breakfast at Tyranny's" when Noobis breaks through the illusion to communicate with Cindy.
  • Religion of Evil: Subverted - it turns out that although Namin was genuinely evil, most of the members of his religion were actually trying to keep Sutekh entrapped.
  • Sacrificial Lion: When Erik tries to mortally harm Anubis out of anger at his faith being destroyed, Anubis's Seeker shoots his beam at Hanif, Erik's close friend who did literally nothing wrong in the previous two stories, as penance for Erik's actions.
  • Sealed Evil in a Can:
    • It turns out that Sutekh escaped his apparent death by fleeing into the void.
    • The Reach is an alien criminal sealed in a pocket universe.
  • Self-Duplication: The Shan'tee are capable of this in emergency.
  • Sequel Episode: The end of "Spiral Staircase" is revealed to be a direct sequel to the Fourth Doctor TV story "Pyramids of Mars".
  • Shout-Out:
    • The Doctor compares the Cerebravores to Zuul and himself to Peter Venkman.
    • In "The Weeping Angels of Mons", the Doctor recovers consciousness in a military field hospital and launches into a chorus of Edwin Starr's "War".
    • Gabby introduces the Doctor to Captain Fairbairn as "Doctor Strange".
    • In "Echoes", the Doctor claims to have been present at the time of the events of King Kong.
    • In "The Fountains of Forever", FAB I from Thunderbirds can be seen parked outside the Ebonite Rooms.
    • Cindy confuses the Cerebravores with Cerebro from X-Men.
    • The Key that Dorothy merged with is also referred to as the "Hand of Sutekh" - a joking reference to a famous blooper in "Pyramids of Mars" when part of a member of the studio crew strayed into shot.
    • "Dogface", Dorothy's affectionate nickname for Anubis, refers to Dogfaces, a type of anthropomorphic character common in US comics and animation.
    • In "The Singer Not the Song", a research facility promoting communication between humans and sentient music is called the Presley Foundation, and one of the living tunes is nicknamed "Smokey" by humans, probably a reference to the great Motown singer and songwriter Smokey Robinson.
    • When confronting the mother Nocturne, the Doctor breaks into the music hall song "My Old Man's A Dustman".
    • In "Music Man", the Doctor is outright using "Dr. Venkman" as an alias.
    • "Music Man" contains a passing reference to a bandleader called "Morton" - presumably Jelly Roll Morton.
    • In "Music Man", the Chicago studio is called "Kayoh", which is a reference to the (later) music label Okeh.
    • In "Sins of the Father", Cindy makes a string of Star Wars jokes to cover up her fear of Anubis.
    • In "Revolving Doors", the Doctor alludes to "Break on Through to the Other Side" by The Doors.
    • In "The Good Companion", there is an exchange taken verbatim from The Empire Strikes Back, when Gabby ends up being unable to get to the TARDIS safely.
    Cindy: I love you!
    Gabby: I know.
  • The Siege: "The Weeping Angels of Mons" is a classic Base Under Siege story with a World War One British field hospital being attacked by Weeping Angels.
  • Sinister Subway: The Doctor and Gabby are attacked by a Cerebravore while travelling on a subway train.
  • Sound-Only Death: The guy who jumps off the subway train to escape the Cerebravore and lands on the third rail in "Revolutions of Terror".
  • Stable Time Loop: "Sharper Than a Serpent's Tooth" implies that Cindy is descended from one of the clones that the Paranestene created of her in ancient China.
  • Swirly Energy Thingy: The Circle of Transcendence appears as this when the Time Sentinel uses it to threaten Aramuko to blackmail the Doctor.
  • Throwing Down the Gauntlet: Captain Fairbairn taking on a horde of Weeping Angels.
  • Tortured Monster: The titular being in "The Wishing Well Witch", which is a gestalt of seven children from ancient Gallifrey who for unknown reasons were thrown alive into the Untempered Schism.
  • Translator Microbes: Subverted in "Medicine Man", when the TARDIS has problems making some things said by the Doctor and Gabby comprehensible to Munmeth because his Stone Age culture hasn't developed those concepts or anything analogous to them yet.
  • Trap Is the Only Option: Alluded to by the Doctor when he goes to rescue Gabby in "Revolving Doors".
  • Turned Against Their Masters: Zhe's block-transfer "apprentices" end up manifesting her neuroses and attack her.
  • Villainous Rescue: Sutekh rescues Cindy from the King Nocturne, but only because he wants to kill her himself.
  • "Well Done, Son!" Guy: Gabby's father to her. He finally respects her when she saves New York from the Cerebravores.
  • What Happened to the Mouse?: In "The Weeping Angels of Mons", the fate of the wounded soldiers and nurses after the Angels attack is not shown, although it was probably unpleasant.
  • World War I: The setting of "The Weeping Angels of Mons".
  • Wham Shot:
    • At the end of the first part of "The Fountains of Forever", the Doctor is shot by a time reversing gun. In the process, he regenerates backwards... into his previous incantation.
    • The reveal of Anubis in "Spiral Staircase".
    • "Old Girl: Primeval" contains the return of Sutekh.
  • The Worm That Walks: Mr. Ebonite turns out to be made of a multitude of duplicates of himself.
  • You Are Number 6: The Paranestene assigns numbers instead of names to the Cindy clones to stop them developing individuality. It doesn't work.
  • You Shall Not Pass!: Gabby blocks the Cerebravores from following the Doctor back to their homeworld through the portal.

    Eleventh Doctor comics tropes 

The Eleventh Doctor comics include the following tropes:

  • Amnesiac Dissonance: The Year Two arc is based around this, with the Doctor being accused of committing a horrific genocide during his period as the War Doctor, which at this stage he can't remember. It is eventually revealed that his companion Alice went back into the Time War, became associated with the War Doctor, and activated a device that led to the genocide itself, as seen in "Kill God" and "Fast Asleep".
  • Anachronic Order: The stories involving ServeYouInc are out of order from the Doctor's perspective, which makes things a bit confusing.
  • Arc Words: In Year Two, "Exterminhate".
  • Armed with Canon: Some of the words Ewing and Williams put into Alice's mouth sound like metafictional criticisms of Doctor Who writers and fans who think it's cool when the Doctor acts arrogant and condescending to people who aren't villains and are obsessed with having him constantly be the smartest guy in the room.
    Alice PoV captions: He made a cup of tea. He didn't make silly remarks. Or condescend. Or judge. Or pity. Or act like he was the important one in the room. He just listened.
  • Art Imitates Art: A panel of Jones talking about feeling "low" in 1976 Berlin is a direct homage to the cover of David Bowie's album Low, recorded in Berlin at the same time.
  • Ascend to a Higher Plane of Existence: The Doctor finally manages to help the Cyclors and Overcaste to do this together, and defeat the Volatix Cabal's attempt to hitch a ride.
  • Been There, Shaped History: The Emperor Constantine's vision at the Battle of the Milvian Bridge that converted him to Christianity turns out to have been a combination of a crashing Cyberman spaceship and a hallucination the Doctor created to drive them off.
  • Book-Ends: For the entire Year One. "After Life" revolves around Alice suffering from the loss of her mother, with her sadness depicted in mostly grey colours, before a giant, multi-coloured Chinese dog and the Doctor re-sparks control to her life. When it comes to the final story, "The Comfort of the Good", the same thing happens to the Doctor himself, after his TARDIS ditches him in favour of the Talent Scout (disguised as the Doctor's mother), until a giant, multi-coloured dragon and Alice brings the Doctor back to save the day. For bonus points, the first page of both stories (with the latter being the second part, as it is a two-part story) are nearly identical, taking place in a graveyard.
    Grey captions: ("After Life") The sky was a cold, slate grey when Alice Obiefune buried her mother. Everything was grey. Grey and barren and as cold as sharp stone. After a few days, she returned to the library, working her usual shifts. Assisting the computer-illiterate, or just plain illiterate. Usually people the Department for Work and Pensions had turned away, since actually helping wasn't in their remit. Once, thoughts like that had made her burn inside. Now she felt nothing. And when she read to the children at story-time, she felt no joy. She felt nothing but empty. Empty and grey. Alice had looked after her mother for years; gradually, Ada Obiefune had become the cornerstone of her life. Without that stone... her life seemed to crumble. Everything just seemed to get worse. The grief. The greyness. The emptiness. Alice started to wonder if the greyness would ever end. If she'd ever feel anything but numb and empty again. Maybe she needed to see somebody. Maybe she needed to see a—
    Alice PoV captions: ("The Comfort of the Good, part 2") The sky was a cold, slate grey on the day the Doctor died. Oh, his eyes were open. He stayed on his feet. He kept moving, kept walking. But he went nowhere. There was nowhere to go. The Doctor had lost his hearts. The Doctor had lost his home. Ejected. Rejected. The TARDIS's gravity fields turned against him — forcing him out of the doors — and into this. Everything he was — gone. All hope, torn away. Hearts cracked by the enormity of loss, the dead, damned Doctor walked, going nowhere, feeling nothing. What else could he do?
  • Brainwashed and Crazy: The Talent Scout turns the Doctor into his own evil minion, the Chief Executive.
  • Brown Note: The dimension at the end of the Amstrons' wormhole is so beautiful that everyone who travelled there just sat there looking at it until their oxygen ran out.
  • Call-Back:
    • The Doctor considers the possibility that the fake Ava might somehow have her real mind, after remembering Auton Rory.
    • When the Doctor and Alice find one another inside the Scream's memory construct in "Hungry Thirsty Roots", the events echo their original meeting.
  • Call-Forward:
    • In "Space In Relative Dimension And Time", when the Eleventh Doctor finds out that a Time Vortex Leech has been responsible for all the jumps backwards in time, he states that the leech only latched onto the TARDIS simply because it wants to go back to something, and that we all want to go back to something.
    • "Strange Loops" includes flashbacks to the Eleventh Doctor's memories of the War Doctor activating the Moment, which isn't revealed until "Day of the Doctor", set after the Eleventh Doctor comics which, according to All There in the Manual, are set in between the Eleventh Doctor's first two TV seasons.
  • Clock Roaches: The Time Vortex Leech is a rare benevolent one, whose interference saves the lives of Jones and everyone on Datastore 8.
  • Company Town: ServeYouInc has a Company Planet.
  • Compound Interest Time Travel Gambit: In "Strange Loops", the villains turn out to be making money with stolen technological innovation through an unusual combination of this and Giving Radio to the Romans.
  • Continuity Nod:
    • The Doctor discusses some people he previously encountered who remembered him as "Very rude. Tasteless coat."
    • The Doctor remembers that a "wise man" once said "There will be no battle here".
    • Jones speculates that the Cyberman spaceship crashing is what wiped out the dinosaurs. It was actually a different spaceship full of Cybermen.
    • In "The One", the Doctor finds an old "office" within the TARDIS that is filled with references to the Fourth Doctor's era, including a Mona Lisa, a seemingly-inactive K-9, the Doctor's coat, scarf and hat, and jelly babies.
    • The Doctor feels unhappy when River mentions libraries.
    • Year Three issue 2 opens with memories of various characters saying "Doctor!", similarly to the Doctor's Continuity Cavalcade memories during his regeneration in "Logopolis".
    • At the beginning of "Time of the Ood", the Doctor dismisses chess as a game for "control freaks and robot dogs", presumably referring to the Master and K-9.
    • When the Doctor, Alice and the Sapling are fleeing through simulations of the Doctors' memories in "The Memory Feast", the scenes are Skaro, I M Foreman's scrapyard, and a quarry in Kent.
    • In "Hungry, Thirsty Roots", the Doctor refers to encountering the Monoids, Aridians, Voord, and Krotons.
  • Continuity Snarl: Everything concerning Absalom Daak in Year Two:
    • He is shown to still have the frozen body of Taiyin, despite the body being unfrozen and incinerated in Emperor of the Daleks. In addition, that story saw him cured of his obsession with her in that story.
    • He refers to Taiyin as his wife, despite the fact that in his debut, they knew each other for all of a few minutes before she got killed. Hardly time for a wedding, although he does get called on that at one point in the comic.
  • Despair Event Horizon: The Doctor has one after his TARDIS teams up with the Talent Scout (disguised as the Doctor's mother), which is reminiscent of Alice's initial depression from the very first Year One story, "After Life".
  • Diabolus ex Machina: ARC and the rest of the Entity have been reunited, Jones has come into his power, and it's time for a happy ending. Oops, the TARDIS has teamed up with the Talent Scout...
  • Emotion Eater: The Khartite Joy-Beast is a rare benevolent one, which eats people's negative emotions to make them happy.
  • Evil Costume Switch: The Chief Executive initially wears an all-black version of the Doctor's costume.
  • Flanderization: In the Year Two comics, the Master's TARDIS is depicted as a white classical column, with the Doctor recognising it as such solely through Alice's description and a splinter-group Sontaran banner. In the TV show, it only assumed this form in the later episodes of "Logopolis" and the opening of "Castrovalva", although it is recognised as the "standard" form of the Master's TARDIS by many fans, especially among Sexy/Lolita shippers. (Yes, it's a thing.)
  • Fluffy the Terrible: The first story has a terrifying but innocent alien pet rampaging through London.
  • Forever War: The "Eternal Dogfight" between the Amstrons and the J'Arrodic.
  • Getting Smilies Painted on Your Soul: The people running Rokhandi world do this to the staff and visitors.
  • Ghost Ship: The Xerxes memory ark in "The Memory Feast".
  • Gods Need Prayer Badly: The Cyclors were drawn into the universe by the faith of the Overcaste.
  • Going to Give It More Energy: The climax of "The Memory Feast", as the Doctor overfeeds the Thrakes to death with the contents of the memory ark.
  • Good Hair, Evil Hair: As the Chief Executive, the Eleventh Doctor's wildish hair is replaced by an eighties-yuppie-style slicked down look.
  • Got Volunteered: Alice stumbles upon a form of words that will prevent the Amstrons killing everyone, and then discovers that she's volunteered for an extradimensional mission that nobody has ever returned from.
  • Heroic Sacrifice: A double example at the end of "Strange Loops", when the Orphaned Hour allows herself to be absorbed into the TARDIS to prevent herself from violently self-destructing with apocalyptic results, which effectively kills her and almost destroys the TARDIS.
  • Historical-Domain Character: Robert Johnson appears in a story about the Talent Scout appearing to black people at a crossroads in 1931.
  • "I Know You're in There Somewhere" Fight: How Alice brings the Doctor out of the Talent Scout's control.
  • I Was Born Ready: Alice makes this response when she and the Doctor prepare to race back to the TARDIS in "Time of the Ood".
  • Imagine Spot:
    • Alice's daydream about Ava's resurrection turning out happily.
    • The Doctor's interrogation in "Pull to Open" turns out to be an imaginary one by his former incarnations.
  • Ineffectual Sympathetic Villain: Zzagnar, a "living fiction" who tries to enslave humanity, but is really a pathetic and pitiful creature who wants to be appreciated. He takes the Doctor's suggestion that he simply tries being a writer.
  • It Is Dehumanising: The Doctor has a rant on these lines when Alice refers to the Sapling as "it".
  • Last-Second Chance: After the Doctor and Alice show the Scream that he can duplicate himself inside his memory construct, they are obviously considering leaving him there in the hope that he can be happy with his own company. However, when he is still determined to take over the universe, they trick him into destroying himself.
  • Let's You and Him Fight: The Doctor manipulates The Then And The Now into fighting the security systems of Shada so that he can get in.
  • Little Green Man in a Can: The Amstrons turn out to be intelligent hamsters in human-sized mecha.
  • Majority-Share Dictator: The Doctor buys 51% of ServeYouInc through rich friends and Compound Interest Time Travel Gambit, but ends up getting corrupted by the Talent Scout.
  • Mass Hypnosis: The Talent Scout controlling all of the juke joint customers in 1931 Mississippi.
  • Mass "Oh, Crap!": When the Doctor, Alice and the Sapling realise that the Scream has all of the Doctor's memories and could potentially build himself a time machine.
  • Merlin Sickness: In "Space In Dimensions Relative And Time", the Doctor finds himself travelling backwards through the previous hour or so, which allows him to retcon a disastrous series of events involving a rogue Nimon hijacking the TARDIS and Jones being killed.
  • Mind Virus: Zzagnar, a narrative virus, who somehow uses a fiction about himself to try bringing humanity under his control.
  • Mood Whiplash: The first issue of "Year Three" goes from Brexit-related comedy to the revelation of Jones's death.
  • More Expendable Than You: Alice tries to use the Psilent Songbox to save the Doctor's life and prevent him from being the one to commit genocide.
  • My Future Self and Me: When the Earth's timezones start colliding due to the 68'ers' activities, happens to Alice's neighbour Kushak.
  • Nice to the Waiter: When the Doctor and Alice first arrive at Rokhandi World, Alice points out that ranting at and browbeating low-level workers about how evil their employer is isn't exactly speaking truth to power.
  • Nightmare Fetishist:
    • Daak encounters a dealer in Dalek memorabilia. The fact that a market for such a thing exists is clearly an example.
    The Doctor: Whoever sent this is very powerful and almost certainly probably a machiavellian, universe-ending plan-style evil genius. Squeeeeee. Excited!
  • No Celebrities Were Harmed: John Jones (the Chameleon of Pop, Xavi Moonburst, the Tall Pale Earl) is clearly David Bowie.
  • No Man of Woman Born: The Squire is able to survive the time-based defence mechanism of Shada because she has no known history for it to use to attack her.
  • Noodle Incident: The weird events referred to that happened in the Doctor's earlier visit to Zoline in "Strange Loops".
  • One Nation Under Copyright: Taken to extremes in societies where ServeYouInc is in full control, where they will capture and brainwash you if you create anything without their permission.
  • Out-of-Character Alert: Alice recognises that the resurrected Ava is a fake because she didn't recognise Jones, her lifelong favourite singer.
  • Out of Order: The UK reprint. The story got left on a massive cliffhanger (see Brainwashed and Crazy above) when they interrupted the storyline in order to reprint Four Doctors.
  • Painting the Medium: In "Pull to Open", the panel arrangement on each page is made to look like the front of the TARDIS, with a text panel where the notice sits.
  • Peace & Love, Incorporated: ServeYouInc will provide you with everything you want, at the cost of your freedom and individuality.
  • Perception Filter: John Jones's "chameleon" powers initially manifest as making him unnoticeable, which is a bit of a problem for an aspiring rock star. (Once he learns how to use the powers, he becomes extremely visible.)
  • Petting Zoo People: The Jarrodic are raptor-headed avian humanoids.
  • Polluted Wasteland: The planet Zoline has become this in "Strange Loops", due to an irresponsibly accelerated industrial revolution, complete with unbreathable air and corrosive rain.
  • Posthumous Character: Alice's mother Ava is buried on the first page, but is a strongly felt presence throughout.
  • The Power of Rock: Robert Johnson uses The Power Of Blues to de-brainwash his neighbours. Using the TARDIS as an amp.
  • Psycho Sidekick: The TARDIS is overloaded with them in Year Two, what with the Squire, Abslom, and River Song.
    The Doctor: Violence and so forth. It's not really what I do. But I know someone who does.
    River: Hello, sweetie.
  • Psychological Torment Zone: The Scream's mental construct in "Hungry Thirsty Roots", where he has trapped the Doctor and Alice.
  • Punny Name: Rokhandi, a reference to the song "Big Rock Candy Mountain".
  • Reset Button: All of the events of "Space In Dimensions Relative And Time" end up being erased by the end of the story thanks to the Doctor living it in reverse.
  • The Reveal
    • The Year Two stories "Kill God" and "Fast Asleep" contains many answers towards a lot of mysteries from previous Year Two stories.
      • Who banished the Cyclors to a higher dimension, robbing the Overcast of their gods? Alice herself, when she activated the Psilent Songbox.
      • What is the Malignant? The result of a Volatix Cabal Dalek mutant and the energy from the Psilent Songbox, which deformed it further.
      • What is The Then and The Now? A chrono tracker (which was collected by the creature in the future) that had it's origins reversed by the War Doctor, combined with the Psilent Songbox.
      • The child who has accompanied the War Doctor in flashbacks is not a young Squire, but the War Master.
  • Scared of What's Behind You: When the Year Two crew visit a Bad-Guy Bar, the Doctor initially thinks the clientele have recognised him and are scared of him, but it's actually Abslom they're reacting to and talking about.
  • Screw the Rules, I Have Money!: The Doctor tries to defeat ServeYouInc by buying them (thanks to wealthy friends and Compound Interest Time Travel Gambit) but ends up getting corrupted by them.
  • Sapient Ship: Alice has a direct conversation with the Master's TARDIS, who is as creepy as you'd expect from who she keeps hanging around with.
  • Shaming the Mob: The Doctor to the people from 1985 in the 68'ers arc, with direct references to the Third Reich.
  • Shout-Out:
    • In a panel of Piccadilly Circus, the Criterion Theatre is advertising a stage version of "Lily Mackenzie", a Two Thousand AD strip written by one of the Eleventh Doctor comic writers, Simon Fraser.
    • The "Prohibited Sphere" book and comic shop in the Zzagnar story is a reference to the famous real London comic and SFFH book shop Forbidden Planet.
    • In "Four Dimensions", the red, blue and yellow tinges to the panels set in different sections of the splintered TARDIS are the same as the colours used for different dimensional splinters of Moya in the Farscape episode "Through the Looking Glass".
    • Also in "Four Dimensions", the Talent Scout appears to Jones in the form of Jareth from Labyrinth.
    • The Doctor grimly compares the Cyclors to Looney Tunes characters.
    • The security system of Shada has developed a personality reminiscent of Marvin from The Hitch Hikers Guide To The Galaxy.
    • The city of Disch in "Strange Loops" is probably a reference to the SF novelist Thomas M Disch.
  • Silly Reason for War:
    • The Amstrons and Jarrodic used to be allies, until an ambiguous transmission from extradimensional explorers that they had "seen the face of the Creator" led to arguments about which one of them the Creator looked like.
    • The Master once started a Sontaran civil war by persuading a group of Sontarans to grow his Beard of Evil.
  • Souvenir Land: Rokhandi World, a theme park devoted to being an effective corporate drone, and secretly using evil organic technology to brainwash people into being effective corporate drones.
  • Take That!: The opening of Year Three involves a deranged "brixit" Earth colony populated by clones of Nigel Farage and a Humongous Mecha-cyborg Boris Johnson.
  • Took a Level in Badass: Bessie reappears. The Doctor upgraded her into a monster truck.
  • Tortured Monster: The mysterious entity when separated from its brain.
  • Tracking Device: The Then And The Now hits Alice with one.
  • Transferable Memory: Used as a theme in the overall plot of Year Three and in some individual stories, such as the Thrake memory eaters in "The Memory Feast" and the memory thief in "Fooled".
  • Trauma Button: The TARDIS telepathically reminding Abslom Daak of his wife's death drives him to a violent meltdown. Similarly the mere mention of the word "Exterminate!".
  • Waxing Lyrical: Quite a bit of Jones's dialogue comprises paraphrases of Bowie lyrics (or, presumably, his own).
  • We Will Use WikiWords in the Future: ServeYouInc has a name in this format.
  • Well-Intentioned Extremist: Haliburton in "Time of the Ood" is trying to "save" a small group of still-enslaved Ood post-"Planet of the Ood" by driving them insane and getting them killed. She ends up getting killed by them.
  • What the Hell, Hero?:
    • The TARDIS ends up abandoning the Doctor for his recklessness and fall into corruption while fighting ServeYouInc.
    • In Year Two, Abslom nearly kills the Doctor in rage for manipulating Alice into taking the Master's TARDIS back into the Time War to investigate.

    Twelfth Doctor comics tropes 

The Twelfth Doctor comics include the following tropes:

  • Air-Vent Passageway: Bill ends up having to use some in "A Confusion of Angels", and is Genre Savvy enough to see it coming shortly before.
  • Ancient Astronauts: Kali turns out to be an evil alien superbeing who inserted herself into Indian culture.
  • Animal Motifs: "Clara Oswald and the School of Death" continues the series' association of Clara with ravens by having the name of the school be Ravenscaur, located on Raven's Isle, Scotland. In the TV series, she wears a raven pendant in "The Bells of Saint John" and "The Woman Who Lived" and has a mother whose maiden name was Ravenwood. All this presages her being Killed Off For Real by a quantum shade in the form of a raven in "Face the Raven".
  • Arc Words: In "Terrorformer" and "The Hyperion Empire", "Hyperios rises".
    • "Clara Oswald and the School of Death", set within Series 9 of the show, incorporates that season's Story Arc and primary Arc Word via having the Sea Devils create "hybrids" of their hatchlings and the human students of Ravenscaur.
  • Artistic Licence History: Mostly deliberate in "Terror of the Cabinet Noir". However, Verlock threatens Julie with the guillotine well before it's invented, and when she is nearly executed it's with an axe and block.
  • Asshole Victim: The truly repugnant estate agent who is the first victim of the Fractures.
  • Attack of the 50-Foot Whatever:
    • "The Swords of Kali" features the Attack of the Giant Alien-Possessed Clara Oswald! In the denouement, Clara admits that it was cool to be a giantess (with an extra two arms to boot) temporarily — had she stayed huge it would have been easier to keep her students in line.
    • "Robo Rampage" in the 2016 Free Comic Book Day anthology features the K2 Robot, a UNIT prototype created from the same living metal that created the K1 Robot. It has predictably — as far as the Doctor's concerned — Gone Horribly Wrong, grown to giant size, and is now tearing apart London.
  • Attack Pattern Alpha: In "A Confusion of Angels", "emergency protocol 13-9" means let Missy remote control the TARDIS.
  • Bar Brawl: Both Part One and Part Two of "Clara Oswald and the School of Death" have the Doctor getting threatened in bars! He undoes some space mercenaries in the former with the help of his sonic sunglasses, but winds up getting tossed through a window by the patrons of the Slaughtered Whale in the latter.
  • Bare Your Midriff: Kali; since she is possessing Clara's body, this crosses over with Sensible Heroes, Skimpy Villains.
  • Bathtub Scene with Censor Suds: Played for Laughs in Part Two of "Clara Oswald and the School of Death": Clara is enjoying a nice bubble bath when the TARDIS appears right in her bathroom and the Doctor emerges to discuss his recent misadventure at the Slaughtered Whale tavern with her! She handles this intrusion well, apparently amused by his cheery obliviousness to the inappropriateness of the whole business. Hey, humans need to bathe, it's nothing special...
  • Becoming the Mask: In "A Confusion of Angels", DI Margaret Jingatheen is still using the Margaret Blaine human appearance of her former self as a Shadow Proclamation member after her Raise Him Right This Time, now apparently some kind of illusion instead of a body-suit, for no comprehensible reason at all. Especially bizarre given that it's the appearance of someone she killed and skinned...
  • Beethoven Was an Alien Spy: The punchline of "Unearthly Things": Charlotte is Charlotte Bronte, and the adventure she has with the Doctor and Clara is the direct inspiration for Jane Eyre. The personalities of the twosome will inform those of Mr. Rochester and Jane, respectively.
  • Belligerent Sexual Tension: Sonny and Val in "Invasion of the Mindmorphs". The Doctor initially suspects it, then rejects it as they finally kiss behind him.
  • Big Ball of Violence: In the gag comic, the Master's attempt at a Villain Team-Up with previous incarnations promptly descends into this, whereupon they are blown up by the unhappy viewers of Battle of the Bands Beyond the Stars.
  • Bigger on the Inside: The seemingly Haunted House in "Playing House" — because it's actually a dying TARDIS.
  • Big "NO!": The dark matter-possessed Cardinal Richelieu gets one upon his comeuppance.
  • Bittersweet Ending: The 2015 Christmas special ends with the Doctor stopping the Celestial Toymaker's rampage by taking the Zero Room of his TARDIS and turning it into a Small, Secluded World (separated from the vessel and floating through space) for the villain to "play" in, to spare him from having to deal with the vast, lonely universe now that the barrier between his world and it is fading. Clara realizes that the Doctor identifies with such loneliness all too well.
  • Black Eyes of Evil: Those possessed by living dark matter in "Terror of the Cabinet Noir" reveal these when they're ready to move in for the kill.
  • Bland-Name Product:
    • The comic books the Doctor and Clara examine in "The Fourth Wall" include The Bat, Amazonia, and the like. In addition, they're shopping at Prohibited Sphere Megastore — a Shout-Out to London's biggest comic book shop, Forbidden Planet Megastore; Prohibited Sphere previously appeared in the Eleventh Doctor title.
    • In "The Great Shopping Bill", Bill and Nardole talk about a supermarket called "Aldoh's", a reference to the real European supermarket chain Aldi.
  • Bond One-Liner: In "A Confusion of Angels", Kathryn says "What a blast", after offing a Weeping Angel with an industrial sandblasting machine.
  • Book-Ends:
    • Year One starts and ends with multi-part stories involving the Hyperions.
    • For the penultimate four part story "The Hyperion Empire". When the Hyperion meteors head towards the International Space Station, one of the people inside, Jamie Weir, tries to communicate back to Earth, requesting them to tell her family that she loves them, but is killed before she can finish her request. When she is transmutated into a Hyperion angel and sides with the Doctor instead, she decides to hold off the Hyperions in the destabilising Hyperion fusion web, requesting the Doctor the exact same failed request. Luckily, the Doctor won't let her sacrifice her own life that easily...
    • The Twelfth Doctor's two encounters with punk rock guitarist Hattie bookend the Year Two/Three stretch of adventures set between "Hell Bent" and "The Husbands of River Song".
  • Boarding School of Horrors: Ravenscaur, a gothic castle on a remote Scottish island with absurdly strict rules ("no smiling policy") and a horrible caste system among the kids. It turns out it's all a front for the Sea Devils.
  • Brain in a Jar: The Harmony Shoal queen brain's servitors in "Ghost Stories".
  • Break Them by Talking: Grant talks down the Smoke in "Ghost Stories" by making him see what a failure he's been as a superhero and what destruction he's caused.
  • Breather Episode: Most of the one-issue-long stories.
    • "Unearthly Things" ends with only the villain dead (even then the Doctor tries to save it) ahead of its light punchline; it's sandwiched between the two-issue "Gangland" and four-issue "The Hyperion Empire". The latter was the Year One finale and the longest story the title published up to that point.
    • The 2015 Christmas Special released alongside the "Hyperion Empire" issues features a Continuity Cavalcade and a Bittersweet Ending in which, effectively, the Doctor compassionately gives an old enemy a gift.
    • "The Fourth Wall", which follows "Clara Oswald and the School of Death" and precedes the first post-Series 9 Story Arc, sees the Boneless strike again — this time via comic books, dragging helpless readers (including the Doctor) into them to take their place in the real world and seek out victims. Much playing with the titular wall ensues, and in the end Everybody Lives.
    • Zig-zagged with "The Boy with the Displaced Smile", an "interlude" published between Parts One and Two of "Beneath the Waves". While the story itself fits this trope — it's a one-off adventure with a happy ending and the only regular character is the Doctor — the reason it appears within another story's run is because the Doctor recalling its events helps him figure out how to solve the "Beneath the Waves" crisis.
    • "The Great Shopping Bill" followed both "The Wolves of Winter" and The Twelfth Doctor's one-issue contribution to the Lost Dimension crossover and has the heroes go on a shopping expedition in the universe's biggest "Ubermarket". Matters go awry when Bill is separated from the Doctor and Nardole and encounters a lost little girl.
  • Butch Lesbian: Rani Jhulka in "The Swords of Kali" is a ferocious gay warrior woman who was deeply disappointed to be relegated to the role of harem guard instead of something more aggressive.
  • Call-Back:
    • The Doctor uses old-style red/green 3-D glasses to track Void material again.
    • The Doctor gives Kate Stewart a sonic cannon to fight the fractures, which he got in one of the Titan Tenth Doctor stories.
    • In "The Hyperion Empire", the Doctor allows Weir to survive as a psionic entity using the TARDIS's telepathic circuits. He says that he perfected the technique after failing to save someone else that way in the past, probably referring to River.
    • In "Playing House", the Doctor realises that the labyrinthine house is actually a (dying) TARDIS when he stumbles upon a room similar to the "Arch Recon Room" seen in "Journey to the Centre of the TARDIS".
    • The container ship Jeden in "A Confusion of Angels" is owned by Max Capricorn from "Voyage of the Damned" and it's revealed that the Doctor named the Titanic while undercover in Capricorn's business.
    • The anti-cyborg bigotry on the planet Sto is referred to again, and the Doctor does something about it.
  • Call-Forward:
    • As noted above in Animal Motifs, Clara continues to be associated with ravens in "Clara Oswald and the School of Death", and the Doctor also calls her out for her recklessness in investigating the threat at Ravenscaur; all this presages her being Killed Off For Real in a Senseless Sacrifice in the final stretch of Series 9.
    • "The Great Shopping Bill" calls forward to the final three episodes of Series 10 as the Doctor says he will not allow Missy in the TARDIS again...yet, and later that he's vowed to protect Bill, while — unnoticed by the other characters — Pilot!Heather makes The Cameo in the Ubermarket, just keeping an eye on Bill.
    • At the end of the Twelfth Doctor Year Three comics, Missy warns him that "One day, you'll come across a lost ship drifting in space, that you can't save", with subsequent dialogue also heavily foreshadowing "World Enough and Time"/"The Doctor Falls".
  • Celebrity Is Overrated: At the top of "Beneath the Waves", Hattie is struggling with life in the limelight since she last saw the Doctor, and is glad to travel with him again to get away from the nosy press.
  • Changed My Jumper: When Clara bugs him to dress up a bit for 1960s Las Vegas, the Doctor wears his regular Series 8 outfit ... with a fedora!
  • Character Development: Due to paralleling/arriving in the wake of the unfolding adventures of Twelve on television, his and Clara's character development is reflected in the comics. Series Eight/Year One has him gradually soften from his initial Grumpy Old Man persona into a more compassionate figure, and the opening stretch of Year Two has him firmly in Cool Old Guy territory with Clara as his Distaff Counterpart in the wake of Series Nine. Later, he hugs Hattie at the end of her initial TARDIS tenure without a bit of discomfort.
  • Character Name and the Noun Phrase: "Clara Oswald and the School of Death", the first Year Two storyline.
  • Christmas Episode:
    • The 2015 Christmas issue sees the Twelfth Doctor and Clara face off with the Celestial Toymaker, an enemy of the First Doctor and the first TV series villain to appear in Twelve's comics, unless one counts the various Masters turning up in the one-page gag comics that fill out certain issues.
    • Ghost Stories was a direct tie-in to the 2016 Christmas Episode, launched the day after it aired, and opens at Christmastime eight years after that story's events. That said, Did I Mention It's Christmas? applies — just like in the special!
  • Clear Their Name: The Doctor and Hattie must help Jakob clear his name for the murder of a prominent politician in "The Twist". The culprit is actually... Jakob! The politician knew about the Foxkin but wanted the two societies to live in peace with each other; Jakob killed her in hopes of setting the stage for them to be destroyed instead.
  • Clock Roaches:
    • The Fractures claim to be a natural phenomenon that polices interference between alternate universes which risks destabilising the multiverse, but the Doctor is unimpressed with their claims.
    • The Spyrillites in "Playing House" feed off the energy created by time anomalies or dying time travellers.
  • Colony Drop: The Scindias plan to sacrifice millions to their goddess by luring people aboard a huge orbiting space station colony and then deliberately crashing it into Mumbai.
  • Come with Me If You Want to Live: In "The Twist" the Doctor says exactly that to Jakob, and then "Always wanted to use that line".
  • Companion Cube: The Doctor takes on one in "Clara Oswald and the School of Death": A stuffed swordfish, which he made use of and "rescued" in the course of his Bar Brawl at the Slaughtered Whale tavern. He calls it "Sonny" and demands Clara not hurt his (the fish's) feelings by pointing out what he is, giving him a cuddle as he says so. He is heartsbroken when Sonny ends up destroyed in the climactic battle; when Clara reiterates that he was a stuffed fish, he says he was "Stuffed full of courage and nobility."
  • Continuity Cavalcade:
    • The 2015 Christmas story has several panels/spreads of these, owing to the story's setup of the Celestial Toymaker creating a party attended by the Doctor's various television companions (including, crucially, his granddaughter Susan) — actually toys of his that quickly undergo Glamour Failure — as a trap for him. Later, the Doctor "summons" an army of playing card soldiers who have the faces of companions and his previous selves (the Jack suit is Captain Jack Harkness, etc.).
    • "Invasion of the Mindmorphs" Part Two opens with a similar extended sequence — first the Doctor's previous three incarnations and many of their companions are seen as a Mindmorph tries to steal his mind; after this many aliens (mostly evil ones) are conjured up by them, including three incarnations of the Master, the Daleks, several varieties of Cybermen, the Zygons, the Menoptera, Scaroth, the Veil, an Ice Warrior, some Silents, the Morbius creature, and the comic-specific Hyperions, to pursue him and his friends. The Doctor is actually happy to see that his old enemies are all the Mindmorphs can summon, because it proves they have Creative Sterility.
    • The opening sequence of "Beneath the Waves" has the Doctor visiting an undersea temple as part of a tour group featuring well-to-do members of such races as the Silurians and Zygons.
  • Continuity Nod
    • Clara is serving as the model for the Mona Lisa in her first scene in "The Swords of Kali" Part One.
    • Twelve's cigarette case filled with jellybabies also appears in that issue.
    • Twelve has fought and defeated Robin Hood with a spoon and used a daffodil in a swordfight. In "Clara Oswald and the School of Death" Part Two he fights off baddies with a stuffed swordfish.
    • Later, Twelve recommends the students he and Clara rescue Google him. "I dare you. It'll blow your mind."
    • The gag comic "The Day at the Doctor's" has the sickly Doctor recount various ways he's been forced to regenerate — absorbing huge amounts of radiation (twice!), mortal injuries sustained in a fall, spectrox toxaemia...
    • In "The Twist" Part Two he notes that a computer he's reactivated is purring like a motor and references his beloved car from his third incarnation: "Those were the days, eh, Bessie?"
    • The gag comic "Planet of the Rude" has the Doctor use his Prydonian Academy name "Theta Sigma" as a forum handle.
    • In "Playing House", the Doctor talks about Holly's house growing rooms "like a Krynoid growing tentacles".
    • In the falling action of "Playing House", the Doctor idly examines a toy version of the K1 Robot — or is it the identical-appearing K2 Robot that appeared in "Robo Rampage" a few months prior to this?
    • The Doctor once again produces a cup of tea from his pocket in "Invasion of the Mindmorphs" Part Two.
    • In "Invasion of the Mindmorphs", the Doctor shows once more that he can speak Tyrannosaur, as in "Deep Breath".
    • In "The Wolves of Winter", the Doctor talks about fighting a werewolf with the Koh-i-Noor.
    • The Twelfth Doctor gets mistaken for Odin again.
    • On the Arctic island, the Doctor gives Bill the fur coat that the Second Doctor wore in "The Abominable Snowmen".
    • The Doctor mentions meeting Skaldak.
    • Bill is unhappy about wearing a pressure suit following the events of "Oxygen".
    • "The Great Shopping Bill" starts with the Doctor comparing the events of Back to the Future to his experiences in "Father's Day". Nardole refers to Bill as "baby doll", this time in the real world rather than a simulation. Continuity nods go on to run rampant upon arrival at the Ubermarket: jellybabies, Impossible Souffle Dishes, and carrot juice are among the wares sold, Pilot!Heather has a cameo...
    • The cyborg refugees in "A Confusion of Angels" include some Vinvocci from "The End of Time" and at least one Ogron.
  • Continuity Porn: "The Wolves of Winter" is a prequel to "The Curse of Fenric" that also features the Ice Warriors and the Flood from "The Waters of Mars".
    • The next multi-parter, "A Confusion of Angels", features the Weeping Angels and Heavenly Host, plus the Shadow Proclamation as represented by the Judoon and the Slitheen once known as Margaret Blaine.
  • Cool Old Guy: Usually the Twelfth Doctor's attempts at coolness come off as Adorkable at best, but he ends up regarded as this by the intrigued concertgoers when he takes the stage with Space Pirates in Part Three of "The Twist".
  • Cool Teacher: Discussed in "Terrorformer", with Clara insisting that she's this when the Doctor tells her about the unflattering gossip and comments her students are making behind "Miss Oddbod's" back (which he likely heard over the course of "The Caretaker").
  • The Corpse Stops Here: In "A Confusion of Angels", Bill is accused of killing Dr. Scend after picking up her goggles.
  • Creative Sterility: The Mindmorphs are affected by this, which is why they need to steal the minds of others.
  • Curse Cut Short: In "A Confusion of Angels", Nardole is interrupted while talking about "kicking ar...".
  • Dark Is Evil: The Cabinet Noir (Black Cabinet) has an evil fate in store for those lured into it, for it contains a being composed of living dark matter.
  • Dark Is Not Evil: The Eremites of Andurax in "Ghost Stories" look like cowled skeletons with glowing eyes, but are the crew of a space station with equipment that prevents the universe from being poisoned with excess dark energy.
  • A Day in the Limelight: Several stories put this Doctor's TV companions center stage.
    • The Twelfth Doctor story in the 2015 Free Comic Book Day anthology is told from Clara Oswald's point of view as she helps to save the day once again.
    • "Clara Oswald and the School of Death" (Issues 2.1-2.4) was her penultimate appearance in the comic, with the Breather Episode "The Fourth Wall" her last (not counting the gag strips), so she effectively has the Doctor's role for most of the former as she did in the Series 8 episode "Flatline". She sets it in motion by going to investigate her friend's concerns and gets a pair of temporary companions during her adventure. In the meantime, the Doctor provides comic relief until midway through Part 3. And she accomplishes quite a few heroic feats in Part 4, including saving the Doctor.
    • Bill Potts gets this in the Breather Episode "The Great Shopping Bill" as she tries to reunite a lost girl with her parents.
  • Deadly Game: Played for Laughs in the Planet Karaoke Story Arc in the gag comics; losers of Battle of the Bands Beyond the Stars are promptly blown up.
  • Demonic Possession: Type 2 example, crossed over with Puppeteer Parasite: Powered by the souls of those the Scindias killed in her name, the fourth-dimensional alien who is known as "Kali" on Earth is able to possess the helpless Clara's body and grow into a monstrous physical form. Freeing the trapped souls frees Clara as well.
  • Determinator: In "The Swords of Kali", Clara manages to temporarily resist a millenia-old alien superbeing occupying her body. The Doctor, for his part, is not surprised that she can.
  • Didn't Think This Through: The Doctor dismantles the K2 Robot in "Robo Rampage" with his sonic screwdriver, and realizes too late that he shouldn't have done that while he was in the robot's clutches. Osgood saves him from falling to his doom by tossing him his old scarf.
  • Dirty Coward: Kano Dollar runs away from his failed terraforming product and leaves everyone else to die. (The result is a Karmic Death.)
  • Doppelgänger Replacement Love Interest: "Fractures" begins when a scientist for an alternate-universe version of UNIT, whose wife and daughters died in a car crash, breaks through into the main universe, where he died and they survived, so that he can recreate his family.
  • Dragon with an Agenda: In "The Wolves of Winter", the Haemovores end up siding with the Doctor when he points out to them that Fenric appears to intend to discard them as his minions in favour of the Flood.
  • Electronic Eyes: Jakob in "The Twist" has one which records his murder of Idra Panatar.
  • Emotion Eater:
    • Aranox technology is fuelled by draining psychic energy from sentient beings.
    • Pathicols, in "The Great Shopping Bill", feed on the empathy of others. The Reveal is that the child Pathicol was pretending to be lost because she sensed Bill's kindness and was hungry.
  • Everybody Lives:
    • In "Fractures" all the characters survive including the people apparently killed and duplicated by the Fractures, who were still alive in the Void.
    • "The Fourth Wall" is implied to have a happy ending for all the prisoners of the Boneless.
    • "Playing House" ends this way unless one counts the dying TARDIS as a character.
    • "The Great Shopping Bill" ends this way, as the aliens pursuing Bill and the lost girl are the latter's parents.
  • Everyone Is a Tomato: Happens in "The Twist", in which all the human inhabitants are not the descendants of the original colonists, who all died when their Human Popsicle system failed, but were genetically recreated by the Foxkin.
  • Everything's Squishier with Cephalopods: The Cybock Imperium are sentient octopi in mechanical exoskeletons.
  • Evil All Along: The murderer who's set Jakob on the run in "The Twist" is... actually Jakob, who is lying about his innocence.
  • Evil Costume Switch: Once Kali has possessed Clara's body (and in the process destroyed the outfit she was wearing), she is clad in golden armor and ornaments.
  • Evil Counterpart: In Ghost Stories, The Ghost encounters The Smoke. He was a business mogul of the future who was inspired by legends of the Ghost to become a superhero himself — via acquiring one of the three sister gems to the one that gave Grant his powers. Unfortunately, the mogul was a more ruthless person, and became a tyrant so powerful that New York City was destroyed not by him, but the military trying to stop him!
  • Eyepatch of Power: Spoofed: To pump the patrons of the Slaughtered Whale for information on Ravenscaur and its environs, the Doctor includes an eyepatch in a disguise which an amused Clara calls out as merely a collection of "salty old sailor" costume props: captain's cap, turtleneck jumper with an anchor decoration on the front, etc.
  • Face Palm: Clara does this at the end of the gag comic "Planet of the Rude" as the Doctor celebrates his first rude Internet forum post, possibly thinking My God, What Have I Done? at the same time since she gave him the idea.
  • Fighting from the Inside:
    • Clara heroically and painfully tries to do this when Kali possesses her body, and — shortly after Kali taunts the Doctor with details of how the poor human is suffering — manages to temporarily reassert herself, though it isn't enough to stop the villain for good.
    • In "A Confusion of Angels", Kathryn's "pet" host Gabriel manages to fight off the Weeping Angel transformation.
  • Flashback: Much of Part One of "Terror of the Cabinet Noir" is devoted to an extended flashback as Julie d'Aubigny reflects on her life up to the point the story begins.
  • For Doom the Bell Tolls: The chiming of a grandfather clock turns out to be counting down to the potential destruction of Earth by a dying TARDIS in "Playing House".
  • The Fourth Wall Will Not Protect You / From Beyond the Fourth Wall: The Boneless's modus operandi in "The Fourth Wall": Comic book readers are being sucked into their books by them so they can wreak havoc in the real world while the prisoners are struggling to break free and pleading with readers for help. It is constantly teased that the story itself is one of these books! In the end, the Doctor calls upon all the readers to concentrate their minds on setting everyone free...The gag comic at the end of the issue also invokes the former trope when the Boneless drain the color and detail from the Doctor and Clara and they leap out at the reader.
  • Getting Crap Past the Radar: In "The Wolves of Winter", one of the Vikings compares the TARDIS to a garderobe. "Garderobe" doesn't mean "wardrobe", as innocent readers might assume, but is a Middle Ages term for an indoor toilet.
  • Giant Woman: Clara grows to tower over the Doctor when she's possessed by Kali.
  • Gilligan Cut: At the beginning of "A Confusion of Angels", the Doctor says that the crew of the ship must be scared and desperate. Turn over the page to... a birthday party.
  • Glamour Failure
    • The "guests" at the Christmas party trap the Celestial Toymaker sets for the Doctor resemble his various companions but quickly undergo this; they are actually giant nutcracker versions of said characters.
    • Getting the Sea Devils wet in "Clara Oswald and the School of Death" causes this with regards to their human disguises.
  • Glowing Eyes of Doom: Kali has these; when Clara is temporarily able to reassert herself, they change back to her own brown eyes.
  • Gone Horribly Wrong: Ordered by a greedy government to look into the potential of Professor Kettlewell's living metal years after they were entrusted by its formula by the Fourth Doctor, UNIT tried to create a new and improved, controllable, more powerful version of the K1 Robot. Oops! The Twelfth Doctor is disgusted with the sheer stupidity of this scheme.
  • Harsher in Hindsight: Intentionally invoked throughout "Fractures", where Clara's reactions to the plot-driving deaths of characters in a car accident are used to anticipate the later death of Danny in a road accident in the TV series (broadcast before the comic was written and published).
    • The Call-Forward to the events of "Face the Raven" via Animal Motifs and the Doctor worrying about Clara's reckless heroics in "Clara Oswald and the School of Death" also intentionally invokes this trope, making its happy ending — with Clara declaring the TARDIS is her true home — extremely poignant. Even the Doctor mourning the demise of Sonny the stuffed swordfish gets a melancholy twist when the television episode's events are taken into account...
  • Haunted House: The Doctor and Hattie investigate what seems to be one of these in 21st century England in "Playing House". But its ghosts are actually creatures that feed on time-travel energy residue, and the house is, as revealed in the Cliffhanger of Part One, a dying, malfunctioning TARDIS.
  • Have We Met Yet?: In his introductory scene in "Clara Oswald and the School of Death", Twelve confronts a Space Pirate called Lucifer Van Volk, who has a grudge against him after being defeated at a previous (for Van Volk) meeting. Twelve doesn't recognise him, implying that this is going on.
  • He Who Fights Monsters: In "The Swords of Kali", the Twelfth Doctor paraphrases the trope-naming quote to warn Rani Jhulka about the dangers of seeking revenge...and then adds "Should never have given that quote away [to Nietzsche]. Could've dined out on it all across the universe."
  • Heroic Sacrifice: In "The Wolves of Winter", the Lamprey Haemovore and Torkal sacrifice themselves respectively to destroy the Flood and to help the Doctor escape.
  • Hidden Heart of Gold: At the end of "The Hyperion Empire" after he finds a way for Weir to survive after a fashion, Clara notes that the Doctor is showing his softer side. He tells her not to let that get out, because he has a reputation as a Grumpy Old Man to uphold.
  • Historical-Domain Character
    • Leonardo da Vinci has a cameo in "The Swords of Kali".
    • Charlotte Bronte in "Unearthly Things".
    • "Terror of the Cabinet Noir" has opera singer Julie d'Aubigny on the Doctor's side, though not by choice. Part One includes a post-story text piece that discusses the real d'Aubigny's colorful, scandalous life.
  • Historical Villain Upgrade:
    • The Scindia family were and are the actual royal house of Gwalior, and were not and are not mass-murdering werebat vampires.
    • Cardinal Richelieu summoned the "Terror of the Cabinet Noir" into this dimension and became the first victim of the Puppeteer Parasite. On the bright side, it allowed him to live decades after the historical record the Doctor knows says he died. King Louis XIV also falls to this parasite as well.
  • History Repeats: The sad trend of crises involving Prime Ministers post-Harriet Jones in the Whoniverse (previously seen in Series 3 and Torchwood: Children of Earth) continues with Mr Claremont in "Clara Oswald and the School of Death".
  • Hope Spot: In the Cliffhanger of Part Two of "Terror of the Cabinet Noir", the Doctor and Julie reach King Louis XIV to warn him to cancel the sun festival that will be used to finalize a Puppeteer Parasite's hold on Earth. Alas, he's already under the control of said parasite.
  • Horny Vikings: In "The Wolves of Winter". The Doctor explains to Bill not to expect horned helmets.
  • Incredibly Lame Pun: The Doctor cries "Evening, Wood-Shock!" to the crowd during the impromptu concert in "The Twist". ("See what I did there? Power trees...? Anybody?")
  • Info Dump:
    • The Doctor summarises the previous stories involving the Sea Devils in Part Three of "Clara Oswald and the School of Death".
    • For readers who may only be familiar with the contemporary TV series, "Robo Rampage" gives a few panels over to this as Osgood summarizes 'Robot' (the Fourth Doctor's first adventure) by way of delivering the origins of the K2 Robot.
    • "The Wolves of Winter" has a whole page explaining the events of "The Curse of Fenric", although this still doesn't stop the story from being almost incomprehensible for readers who aren't familiar with the latter.
    • Towards the end of "A Confusion of Angels", the Doctor gives Bill a two-page recap of his interactions with Blon Slitheen in Series 1.
  • In Medias Res
    • "The Swords of Kali" begins with Rani meeting the Doctor in nineteenth-century India and then flashes back to how he got there.
    • "The Fourth Wall" starts with the Doctor telling the reader of the comic book he's trapped in not to turn the page and continue reading, but she does and winds up another prisoner of the Boneless. From there, the action flashes back one hour to show how the Doctor got trapped.
  • Insult Backfire: See You're Insane! below.
  • I Surrender, Suckers: The Doctor gives up the final sword of Kali to the false goddess...and then reveals that he's actually tied his sonic screwdriver to its blade, just as it is about to transmit a sound perfectly pitched to shatter the prison that holds the souls of the dead...
  • I Was Quite a Fashion Victim: The Twelfth Doctor again expresses embarrassment over the fashion senses of his previous selves, specifically Eleven's fondness for fezzes and insistence that Bowties Are Cool, in "Terrorformer". Why, Twelve wouldn't even use the word "cool" anyway!
  • It Is Dehumanising: In "A Confusion of Angels", the Doctor upbraids Bill not to refer to any possibly-sentient being as "it"... except mummies.
  • Killed to Uphold the Masquerade: The Twelfth Doctor and his friends are faced with this trope or becoming prisoners of the Foxkin, with Jakob pointing out that they probably invoked the trope with Idra, the woman he's accused of murdering. Luckily, a third option is made available soon enough: beyond just escaping, there are Foxkin who want to break the masquerade anyway and volunteer to help; also, Jakob is lying, as he killed Idra.
  • Kneel Before Zod: "Bow before Kali!" is a frequent demand of hers. Her servants obey; the Doctor and his allies, not so much.
  • The Lad-ette: Julie D'Aubigny in "Terror of the Cabinet Noir" is a boozy, bisexual, duel-loving rake.
  • Lamprey Mouth: One of the Haemovores in "The Wolves of Winter" has a head that has no facial features except a huge Lamprey Mouth.
  • Late-Arrival Spoiler: "The Great Shopping Bill" has several for Series 10 from "Extremis", the season's midpoint, onward. It's Missy in the Vault, and Pilot!Heather is still keeping track of Bill's whereabouts after the events of "The Pilot".
  • Leeroy Jenkins: Grant repeatedly attacks enemies unthinkingly in "Ghost Stories", with unfortunate results.
  • Life Drinker: The Scindia family in "The Swords of Kali".
  • Look Both Ways: A Fracture is hit and temporarily incapacitated by a bus, before possessing the driver.
  • Magic Feather: At the end of "Ghost Stories", where Grant finds that he no longer needs the gem to be superhuman (although this was only true at that point in the story, because of the effects on him of holding the gem for such a long time).
  • Magic Pants: Averted in "The Swords of Kali". Clara's clothes are seen to be tearing away when Kali possesses her body in the Cliffhanger of Part Two. When Kali next appears in her "final" form, she is clad in golden armor and ornaments; when she is defeated and Clara is returned to normal, the outfit appears to be loosely hanging off of her, so the Doctor gives her his Crombie coat to wear to preserve her modesty.
  • Make Wrong What Once Went Right: In "The Wolves of Winter", Fenric is trying to do this to prevent its defeat in "The Curse of Fenric", taking advantage of the Doctor's unwillingness to cause a paradox.
  • Mama Bear: Holly in "Playing House" kicks a door that the Doctor can't open down to rescue her two kids.
  • Masquerade: The Wainscot Society of the Foxkin exists alongside that of the humans on "The Twist" but very, very few of the humans know about it because the Foxkin know they will not be accepted...even though The Reveal in Part Two is that the Foxkin are the reason any humans exist at all, having evolved to the point that they figured out how to clone the long-dead human colonists. In Part Three this becomes The Unmasqued World.
  • Medium Awareness: Most of the "The Fourth Wall" has the Twelfth Doctor addressing in-universe comic book readers (both trapped and free), but constantly suggests The Fourth Wall Will Not Protect You / From Beyond the Fourth Wall at the same time. But at the very end, the Doctor notices and addresses Real Life readers of this particular comic...leaving Clara asking who he's talking to.
  • Mineral MacGuffin: The four gems in "Ghost Stories".
  • Minor Injury Overreaction: The central joke/punchline of the gag comic "The Day at the Doctor's" is that the Doctor is having this to what Clara recognizes as a common cold, feeling like he's going to have to regenerate and insisting he be looked at by a physician on the legendary medical planet Hippocrates.
  • Mona Lisa Smile: "The Swords of Kali" reveals that Clara was the model for the Mona Lisa, during one of the Doctor's various visits to Leonardo. (This would make her the "dreadful woman who wouldn't hold still" that Four spoke of back in "City of Death". If he only knew!)
  • Monster Clown: Parodied. The time-looped Doctor wears a very evil-looking clown mask as a disguise in "A Confusion of Angels", and claims that he had no idea anyone would be scared by it.
  • Monumental Damage:
    • The battle-scarred Westminster Abbey that the TARDIS materialises in at the start of "The Hyperion Empire".
    • The K2 Robot tears apart the London Eye in "Robo Rampage".
  • Multi-Armed and Dangerous: When Kali takes over Clara's body, the first visible sign of her physical transformation is an extra two arms — there's a reason "The Swords of Kali" number four.
  • Mustache Vandalism: In Part Four of "Clara Oswald and the School of Death", it's revealed that the image that appears on the Doctor's cell phone whenever Kate Stewart calls is a photo of her...with a mustache added to it by the Doctor himself, playfully reflecting their prickly professional relationship. Clara warns him that if Kate ever finds out about this, she'll kill him!
  • Mythology Gag: When Missy remote-controls the TARDIS in "A Confusion of Angels", she announces "trip of a lifetime!", the tagline of early trailers for the first season of the revived Doctor Who TV series.
  • Nasty Party: In "Unearthly Things", the possessed Lord Marlborough throws a party intending to feed the guests to the Aranox.
  • Negated Moment of Awesome: Spoofed in the climax of the gag comics' Planet Kareoke arc: The Doctor's about to unleash an epic guitar solo to win Battle of the Bands Beyond the Stars and save his skin when Clara just pulls a plug and shuts the whole show down, which allows them to escape.
  • Never Heard That One Before: Sam, a firefighter in "The Hyperion Empire", constantly has to deal with Fireman Sam jokes coming to the minds of those he meets — including Clara. He is glad to learn that the Doctor is not familiar with that show and thus doesn't see anything "funny" about the combination of his name and profession.
  • No Celebrities Were Harmed: The "Wolf Pack" in "Gangland", who are clearly the Rat Pack (specifically Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, and Sammy Davis Jr.) with slightly different names. (The closing gag of the story has the Doctor quote Sinatra's song "My Way", though.) In the same story, Sonny Lawson is based on the real-world mob-connected African-American boxer Sonny Liston (whose story ended much less happily).
  • Non-Malicious Monster: The alien entity in "Beneath the Waves" is simply trying to alert the humans to its distress instead of attacking them.
  • Not Me This Time: In "A Confusion of Angels", the Doctor, Bill and Nardole arrive on a troubled space freighter owned by Max Capricorn with a large number of Host included in the cargo. In fact, Max doesn't appear to have anything to do with the problems, and the Host are perfectly helpful until they start getting transformed into Weeping Angels.
  • Odd Name Out / Rule of Three: In "Robo Rampage", Osgood boasts to the K2 Robot that the Doctor is "The Bringer of Darkness. The Oncoming Storm. The Roaring Wind of Righteousness." The Doctor is taken aback by the last one, which she admits she came up with, as he finds it "A little too flatulent."
  • Oh, No... Not Again!
    • Kate Stewart is not happy to learn that another crisis involving a Prime Minister being revealed as an alien villain has arrived in Part Three of "Clara Oswald and the School of Death".
    • In the gag comic "Surfshock" (2.6), the Doctor and Clara have arrived on a beach planet and are ready for fun in the sun when a Silurian and Sea Devil ask them to leave because they were there first. The Doctor has this reaction and launches into a speech about how everyone must compromise and live peacefully...before they can explain that they only mean that particular spot on the beach; they've already laid down their towel. (The embarrassed Doctor responds to this by taking Clara back in time with him to the planet's rather less beachy prehistory. "This'll show 'em.")
  • One Steve Limit: Averted in "The Swords of Kali", which introduces yet another significant Whoniverse character called "Rani". (The classic series has The Rani, a villainous outlaw Time Lady scientist. The Sarah Jane Adventures has Rani, one of Sarah Jane's allies.)
  • Other Me Annoys Me: The Doctor feels this way about the comic book character he's inspired in-universe, "Time Surgeon". He decides to visit its creators to give them some pointers on making it more accurate to his adventures in "Invasion of the Mindmorphs".
  • Our Dark Matter Is Mysterious: "Terror of the Cabinet Noir" features sentient dark matter that can possess people and is plotting to blot out the sun.
  • Our Gargoyles Rock: "Terror of the Cabinet Noir" has automaton henchmen that appear to be living gargoyles.
  • Our Prime Ministers Are Different: Mr Claremont, the PM in the Ravenscaur storyline is actually a Sea Devil, so he's also Prime Minister Evil.
  • Parody Names: All of Colin Bell's gag comics have titles that play on those of Doctor Who television serials/episodes: "The Five Masters", "One! Two! Three! Four! to Doomsday", "Epilogopolis", "Surfshock", etc.
  • Petting Zoo People: The Foxkin are borderline petting zoo people; they evolved from actual foxes over centuries and eventually gained enough intelligence to clone the long-dead colonists of the Twist, meaning they are responsible for humans existing there in the first place.
  • Phlebotinum Rebel: Colonel Weir, who was turned by the Hyperions into a Fusion Angel, uses her fire powers to fight them after the Doctor debrainwashes her.
  • Phony Veteran: In "The School of Death", the PE teacher Mr. Beck very unconvincingly boasts about having been in the SAS. (Note that he's trying to impress Clara, who knew an actual soldier who went on to become a teacher — Danny Pink. He didn't teach PE though, no matter what the Doctor said.)
  • Plot Coupon:
    • The titular "Swords of Kali". The Doctor and his allies are forced to retrieve the last one lest Clara be killed, but while they are doing so, the Scindias use her as the unwilling human host for Kali.
    • Ghost Stories has the Doctor enlisting The Ghost to help him track down the three sister gems to the one that gave Grant Gordon his superpowers.
  • Plot Parallel: In "A Confusion of Angels", the unexpected presence of the Slitheen once known as Margaret Blaine on the side of good parallels Missy taking another step forward towards a Heel-Face Turn by not turning this crisis to her advantage despite having every chance to. Both situations are only happening because of encounters with the Doctor in their respective pasts.
  • Politically Incorrect Villain: The Sea Devils in "The School of Death" sneer at Clara's "companions" of the story for being respectively black and nouveau riche. Presumably pretending to be a public school for a century rubbed off on them!
  • Portal to the Past: The four-dimensional room in the Scindias' palace.
  • The Power of Rock:
    • The Twelfth Doctor reconstructs this trope into a more realistic form in "The Twist", drawing upon the long history of popular musicians using their work and/or media presence as a platform to advocate for socio-political causes. When the human authorities reach the edges of the Wainscot Society of the Foxkin, he organizes an impromptu concert there to take advantage of the resultant media presence. A crowd of humans gathers to rock out, bringing in even more media attention. With that, he publicly reveals the truth about the Foxkin, thus allowing The Unmasqued World to begin.
    • In "Beneath The Waves", the Doctor and Hattie power up the stranded alien's spaceship with rock music to allow it to leave Earth.
  • Puppeteer Parasite:
    • Kali combines this trope with Type 2 Demonic Possession, as she cannot take over a host body without being powered by the souls of humans killed in her name.
    • "Clara Oswald and The School of Death" reveals that juvenile Sea Devils are capable of acting as this, initially as a defence against predators, although it came in useful when they became civilised.
    • The living black matter of "Terror of the Cabinet Noir" does this to humans, starting with its summoner, Cardinal Richelieu.
    • The Harmony Shoal from "The Return of Doctor Mysterio" reappear in the second section of "Ghost Stories".
  • The Quincy Punk:
    • Subverted in "The Twist", as the punk rockers and their followers have the aesthetics of this trope and can be quite tough, but are not depicted as villainous at all. The characters that are causing trouble in both the human and Foxkin societies represent the establishment, whereas this trope played straight traditionally portrays the "old guard" as heroic and the punks as villainous. This subversion fits in with the traditional portrayal of the Doctor as an anti-establishment figure who often sympathizes with outcast/oppressed societies, as well as the Actor Allusion of this particular Doctor's interest in rock/punk (Peter Capaldi was a punk musician in the early 1980s).
    • Time Surgeon is also a subversion — imagine the Twelfth Doctor gone totally punk, tattoos and all!
  • The Quisling: Martyn Grove in "The Hyperion Empire" wants to be one, but the Hyperions aren't interested.
  • Really 700 Years Old: All of the Scindias, thanks to Kali's powers.
  • Reasonable Authority Figure: In "The Wolves of Winter", both the Viking leader Sundvik and the Ice Warrior Grand Marshall Sskoll are sensible and unprejudiced, and even manage to get their followers under control and remain allies when a brief skirmish breaks out.
  • Red Herring: In "A Confusion of Angels" Ojei and Scend act very shiftily, but they're actually the crewmembers who are involved in the time-looped Doctor's Underground Railroad.
  • Remember the New Guy?: Tiger Maratha in "The Swords of Kali" is a previously unknown companion of the Fourth Doctor who reappears just to be killed off.
  • Removing the Head or Destroying the Brain: How Rani kills a Scindia:
    The Doctor: When in doubt, decapitate.
  • Russian Roulette: The Gallifreyan version is called Rassillon's Roulette and is played with a "time gun". Loser gets Ret Gone.
  • Sadist Teacher: The Sea Devil headmistress of Ravenscaur, Miss Mariner. Also the PE teacher Mr. Beck, even before he gets possessed.
  • Sadly Mythtaken: "The Swords Of Kali" falls into the usual misconception that Kali is "the Hindu God of Evil".
  • Save the Villain: The Doctor tries to save the Aranox from being destroyed by fire in the climax of "Unearthly Things", but Clara and the others get him away.
  • Ship Tease: With regards to Twelve and Clara, numerous covers have been shippy in nature (most notably Vol. 1 No. 13 — yes, this was the newsstand cover, not an alternate). This ends after 2.5, Clara's last story as a regular; two covers for 2.15 feature her with Twelve, but are not shippy.
    • Vol. 2, No. 3 ("Clara Oswald and the School of Death"), the first Titan story set in the Series 9 continuity, features a sequence where the Doctor visits Clara while she's taking a bath, and she doesn't actually mind at all.
    • "The Hyperion Empire" teases a possible romance between Clara and Sam the firefighter, but he is suddenly killed by a giant fireball, just as he is about to make a Heroic Sacrifice.
    • There is some apparent mutual interest between Bill and Kathryn in "A Confusion of Angels", but nothing comes of it before Team TARDIS departs. It's worth noting that both this and the Clara/Sam tease not working out were more or less foregone conclusions, as they were published alongside or after events in the televised continuity that confirmed the regulars wouldn't be able to revisit those relationships.
  • Shout-Out:
    • The via points on the destination blind of the bus the Fractures attack include "Fenn St", a reference to the British school-set sitcom Please Sir!, set at Fenn Street school, and Hob's End, a reference to both the TV and film versions of Quatermass and the Pit.
    • In "Gangland" the two gangsters who see the Cybock spaceship land discuss Them!.
    • In "The Hyperion Empire", UNIT helicopters use "Bigglesworth (Number)" as call signs.
    • Also in "The Hyperion Empire", the Doctor summarises the Hyperions' plan to destroy the Sun with "Winter is coming".
    • Another one in "The Hyperion Empire" - the Doctor describes Roald Dahl as one of the few people with a sense of humour as dark as his.
    • And the Doctor describes the heat-protective suits he gives the others to fight the Hyperions as being made from "smart but unstable molecules".
    • The Doctor claims to have given Ernest Hemingway the phrase "grace under pressure".
    • At one point a Hyperion responds to a superior's order with "By your command".
    • In "Clara Oswald and the School of Death" Part One, the Doctor notes to the leader of the space pirates threatening him at a bar that he once knew a Van Dyne who you needed a magnifying glass to see and a Von Doom who like said leader was "a real tin-pot".
    • The Doctor is enjoying a Pan-Galactic Gargle Blaster at the time of the above conversation. Much later in "Terror of the Cabinet Noir" Part Two, he has a quip about trying to sound coherent after a few "Pan-Galactic Gargoyle Blasters" as he and Julie consider the gargoyle automatons.
    • The luxury starliner that the aforementioned bar is on is owned by the Onedin Interstellar Line.
    • The pub in "The School of Death" is named "The Slaughtered Whale", probably a reference to "The Slaughtered Lamb" in An American Werewolf in London.
    • The gag comic "Planet of the Rude" (2.7) sees the Doctor discover the joys of anonymously being rude to others on the Internet. His first forum post? "WORST EPISODE EVER."
    • Part One of "Terror of the Cabinet Noir" has the Doctor noting that the earbuds he's wearing are "turned Up to Eleven", referencing This Is Spın̈al Tap.
    • In "Terror of the Cabinet Noir", the Doctor lends Julie what looks very much like a Star Wars lightsaber.
    • In "Invasion of the Mindmorphs", Sonny expresses fear of fans pestering him in the toilet at a convention — a reference to the notorious actual incident that led Alan Moore to end all fan interaction.
    • The entities Sonny and Val create to attack the Mindmorphs include Lawyer-Friendly Cameo versions of Astérix and Obelix, King Kong, and Godzilla.
    • In the opening of "Beneath The Waves" the Doctor alludes to Raiders of the Lost Quark.
    • The setting of "The Boy with the Displaced Smile", Sweet Haven, appears to be named after Popeye the Sailor Man's stomping ground of Sweethaven.
    • The covers for "Ghost Stories" include one paying homage to the iconic cover of Batman #9, with Grant and the Doctor replacing Batman and Robin in the spotlight, and another in the style of Jim Steranko's famous work for Nick Fury: Agent Of S.H.I.E.L.D..
    • In "The Wolves of Winter", Bill refers to the Ancient Haemovore as "the Creature from the Blue Lagoon".
    • Bill jokes about Bond villains in volcanoes.
    • "The Great Shopping Bill" opens with the Doctor, having just watched Back to the Future for the first time at Bill's urging, complaining about the recklessness of the leads with regard to time travel. He also mistakenly refers to Marty as Morty, and Bill quietly notes that's "a whole different thing..." Later, the Doctor exclaims "Great Scott!" and goes on to quote the original Star Wars ("Boring conversation anyway"), much to Bill's amusement.
      • Later in "A Confusion of Angels" the Back to the Future bit is revisited with Missy in the Vault, who doesn't understand the title.
    • In "A Confusion of Angels", Bill and Nardole react to the discover that the ship they're on is called the Jeden by making "Jedi" puns.
    • Captain Brew has a costume highly reminiscent of Mal Reynolds. He even bears a mild facial resemblance to Nathan Fillion.
    • Bill suggests that a bandage might have instead been toilet paper left by a puppy, a reference to a famous and very long-running series of British TV adverts for Andrex toilet paper featuring cute labrador puppies playing with the product.
    • When Bill telephones Missy, Missy pretends to be an answering message quoting the chorus of "Hello, This is Joannie", a Teenage Death Song by Paul Evans.
    • When the time-looped Doctor protests against anti-cyborg prejudice on Sto, he is holding a placard reading "Not in my name", a common slogan of protestors against the 2003 USA-led invasion of Iraq.
    • During her Air-Vent Passageway hunt for Angels, Bill makes repeated references to the similar scene in Alien.
  • The Slow Path: In "A Confusion of Angels", the Doctor is sent a century back in time by the Angels, and has to find his way back to the Jeden. He keeps himself busy on the way.
  • Something Only They Would Say: "Would you like a jellybaby?" Priyanka met the Fourth Doctor as a child, and realizes that Twelve is who he claims to be when he makes her this offer as well.
  • Star-Crossed Lovers: Rani and Khair-Un-Nissa Kapoor in "The Swords of Kali".
  • Story Arc:
    • The gag comic has the Planet Karaoke storyline stretch over several issues.
    • Twelve's post-"Hell Bent"/pre-"Husbands of River Song" adventures with original companions are bookended by a mini-arc involving Hattie and her fortunes as a musician.
  • Straight Gay: Priyanka Maratha in "The Swords of Kali".
  • Sword Fight:
    • The Doctor engages in one with Kali, but even with his skill he can't last too long against an opponent who towers over him and wields three swords at once. Finally he gives up that last sword to her...and she gets a nasty surprise.
    • The Doctor is challenged to this by Julie d'Aubigny, but their duel is cut short — as dueling has been outlawed in Paris this gets both of them in trouble with Cardinal Richelieu's men. At the end of this storyline they pick up where they left off, leading to a cheeky use of The End... Or Is It?
  • Take That!: In "The Hyperion Empire", the evil would-be Quisling Martyn Groves tells Clara to "Calm down, dear" — a notorious putdown once directed by David Cameron to a female shadow minister during a Parliamentary debate.
  • Tempting Fate: In both "Invasion of the Mindmorphs" Part One and the second adventure of Ghost Stories, the Doctor discusses how a planet he and his companions are about to visit is a beautiful, advanced civilization...only to find it has have been invaded and conquered by an evil race (the Mindmorphs in the former, the Shoal of Winter Harmony in the latter).
  • Terraform: The story "Terrorformer", as the title suggests, describes a terraforming project gone badly wrong.
  • Terrifying Rescuer: In "The Hyperion Empire", Clara first meets Sam as a masked axe-wielding figure in a filthy fire service uniform, and assumes that he's a monster of some kind.
  • The End... Or Is It?: "Terror of the Cabinet Noir" ends with the Doctor and Julie about to have that Sword Fight, so it ends on the text "The End?"
  • Throwing Your Sword Always Works: Julie does this to rescue the Doctor's sonic screwdriver from being destroyed by the Puppeteer Parasite of "Terror of the Cabinet Noir". It slices off its tendril neatly. Julie's thoughts reveal that her father told her to "never, never, ever, ever throw away your blade in a sword-fight. I now officially have no more rules to break."
  • Thrown Out the Airlock: Happens to Sonam Scindia at the hands of Priyanka.
  • Total Eclipse of the Plot: The dark matter entities in "Terror of the Cabinet Noir" intend to use a total eclipse of the sun to possess everyone in Paris.
  • Underground Railroad: The time-looped Doctor sets one up to help people escape anti-cyborg persecution in "A Confusion of Angels".
  • Villain: "Exit, Stage Left!": Kraxnor escapes in a fighter ship before the Sycorax mothership explodes in "Ghost Stories".
  • Villain Team-Up: Played for Laughs and played with: In the Planet Karaoke gag comic story arc, several different lives of the Master team up to beat the Doctor and Clara on Battle of the Bands Beyond the Stars. This promptly falls apart because unlike the various lives of the Doctor, they can't get along with each other at all.
  • Villain with Good Publicity: The Scindia family in "The Swords of Kali" are a family of philanthropists and celebrities who are actually ancient servants of an alien evil and plotting mass murder.
  • The Virus:
    • The dark matter entity in "Terror of the Cabinet Noir".
    • In "A Confusion of Angels", Margaret tries to trap the Weeping Angel posing as a Host by ordering them all to look at each other, not aware of the Angels' creepy assimilation power if you look at one for too long.
  • Viva Las Vegas!: "Gangland", which takes the Doctor and Clara to 1960s Las Vegas and its gangsters, celebrities, etc.
  • Voice of the Legion: Kali has this, though as with her Glowing Eyes of Doom, when Clara is temporarily able to reassert herself it is her own voice that speaks instead.
  • Vomit Indiscretion Shot: A surprising on-panel example in "Ghost Stories", when the Doctor spins the armed robbers in a revolving door.
  • Who Would Want to Watch Us?: In "The Fourth Wall", the Doctor and Clara discover the comic book Time Surgeon, which is clearly inspired by them — he blames the Internet for spreading stories about their adventures. As far as he's concerned Time Surgeon lacks all the timeless class and elegance of reality (Time Surgeon travels in a wardrobe). In the final Year Two storyline, he visits the creators of the comic to give them some fresh, and more accurate, artistic inspiration. This story opens with scenes from the latest Time Surgeon adventure, which reveals that its world is a mix-and-match of various Doctors' eras.
  • Whole Plot Reference: The gems in "Ghost Stories" are clearly inspired by the Marvel Universe's Infinity Stones.
  • World-Healing Wave: When the villains of "Gangland" are rendered Ret Gone, all of the damage they did to Las Vegas is instantly undone.
  • The X of Y: "The Swords of Kali", "Terror of the Cabinet Noir", and "Invasion of the Mindmorphs" — which for bonus points opens with an excerpt from the Time Surgeon comic story "Day of the Deathroids!"
  • Yin-Yang Clash: In "Ghost Stories", the Shoal's gem is the opposite one to Grant's, causing him to become temporarily depowered when close to it.
  • You Are Not Alone: In "The Fourth Wall", the Doctor tells comic book readers (both trapped and free) that they might each think they're alone in the world, but in fact they are part of a spiritual family with all others who love and are inspired by the stories they read. With that in mind, he tells them to unite in thought to free themselves from the Boneless' trap.
  • You're Insane!:
    • One of the students cries "You're bonkers!" to the Doctor as he takes control of the situation and reveals he's President of Earth in Part Three of "Clara Oswald and the School of Death". Cue the Insult Backfire: "Cheers! Nicest thing anyone's said to me in ages."
    • Four issues later in "The Twist", Jakob declares "You must be mad!" as the Doctor leads them further into the domain of the Foxkin. His reply? "Quite possibly. But you're on the run for murder, so I think that makes us even."
  • Zerg Rush: Clara is attacked by a horde of "skunkeys" under Hyperion control in "Terrorformer".
  • Zombie Apocalypse: The result of the Saprophyte's attack on Sweethaven.

For tropes contained in the crossover event stories, see their individual pages:

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