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    N 
  • Necktie Leash: Done more and more as times goes on, but averted in his review of Batman & Robin. They took it away so he wouldn't hang himself.
    • In their battles, The Angry Video Game Nerd had a special fondness for pulling it for the sake of pulling it.
    • Three words, given by Spoony: "ride the pony".
    • The Game Heroes also pull his tie while forcing him to promote their t-shirts. Slightly unnecessary as he's also tied up, at gunpoint and clearly not going anywhere, but nobody's complaining.
    • Even the fans join in the fun during the Ponyo on the Cliff by the Sea credits, to punish him for his dislike of Howl's Moving Castle.
    • Santa Christ in Took a Level in Jerkass mode pulls it in Son of the Mask, with Rob saying later that moment is one of his favorites.
  • Nervous Wreck: He's pretty easy to stress out.
  • Never Bareheaded: He rarely takes off his hat on the show. Exceptions are his Batman and Robin review and his Siskel & Ebert tribute.
  • Never Be Hurt Again: Along with the Friendless Background Freudian Excuse, the second episode of Pop Quiz Hotshot had him say three times that he had to kidnap people before they could capture him themselves (context: he's been a Distressed Dude a lot).
  • Never Hurt an Innocent: He's seriously upset when Quest for Camelot makes him kill innocent Disney characters.
  • Never My Fault:
    • When Dark Side Of The Internet ends with the aesop that people can't just act like nothing is wrong because cyberbullying keeps happening, he gets angry and complains that it's his right to dodge responsibility.
    • While he might know it deep down (as he's the one who wanted Tamara to hurt him in the first place), he tortures and humiliates her and Malcolm whenever they try and get back at him for making them suffer originally, and never fully acknowledges the last part is why they try and hurt him back.
  • Nice Hat: His baseball cap. He's one of the few men over the age of twenty who can make it look cool.
  • Nightmare Fetishist: His perfect ending for the Santa Claus movie (an awkwardly sweet piece of camp) would be that it was all a Dying Dream caused by being out in a blizzard.
    • What later causes Tamara to be hired in-universe; he realizes people find his pain sexy, and after she succeeds in her scheme to make him talk about the Bee Torture scene in The Wicker Man (2006) and why it became a meme, he decides she's worth keeping around.
    • He's delighted to be playing the Emperor in the PQH Star Wars edition, and to be saying all the Cold-Blooded Torture lines.
  • Nightmare Fuel Station Attendant: Who wants to know where he got that skull from and what he's actually drinking?
  • Nobody Calls Me "Chicken"!: He could never resist a challenge from the Nerd, no matter how hard he'd got his ass beat the previous time.
  • No Good Deed Goes Unpunished:
    • He hates his audience for being sadistic, ungrateful pricksnote  but will put himself through an ungodly shitty film because they requested it all the time. This usually doesn't end well for him.
    • Even though the Ghost Of Christmas Future has been an annoying, stalker-like bastard throughout the Babes in Toyland review, when the Critic sees that he's depressed, he acts very fatherly and comforting towards him. He then makes the mistake of letting the ghost choose what movie he should suffer through next, and the ghost immediately picks The Grinch.
  • Non-Action Guy: Even with his gun, whenever he gets into a fight, he mostly ends up on the ground or running off making girly whimpery noises.
  • No Sense of Personal Space:
    • With the Chick. Seeing as how she's just as bad, she doesn't seem to mind too much.
    • In Star Trek Insurrection, he was close enough to That Sci-Fi Guy to look particularly molesty. Not to mention they were lying in bed together.
    • With Tamara in the Disney Afternoon episode, who so doesn't enjoy it that she lets out a scream when he suddenly hugs her. It's up for debate whether he's too wrapped up in his cuckoo to notice, or is just doing it to make her feel vulnerable.
  • No Social Skills: In Steven Universe vlogs, Doug compared Critic to the heavily-autistic-coded Peridot.
  • No Sympathy: To girls sexually abused in Canada. He makes fun of the awareness psa in “Dawn Of The Commercials” for being a killjoy, repeats the joke in The Purge review saying it'd be unsafe to go there, and brings it up again in “Rise Of The Commercials”. The sexual abuse statistic is one in two girls by the way.
  • Not Distracted by the Sexy: Although he's shown a lot of attraction to the Chick before, he's more annoyed that even she enjoys Moulin Rouge! than anything else. He doesn't even seem to notice that she's wearing burlesque.
  • Not So Above It All:
    • At the end of his Lost in Space review, he rants to the first appearance of Dr. Smith about nobody can trust him, but then he's easily manipulated and gets shot by his own gun. This gets explained (and quite sad) many years later when it's revealed Dr Smith is Critic's dad[[/spoiler.
    • He calls out the Care Bears for falling for Christie's and Darkheart's trap, but her screaming breaks him down and he goes to help, getting bagged in the process. He can't resist their The Power of Love moment either, and shouts out for Santa Christ.
  • Not So Different: There are an essay's worth of similarities between him and The Nostalgia Chick. Ask That Guy is also his Evil Counterpart.
    • In his review of Bio-Dome, the Critic screams "ASS!" to express rage - a trademark of his rival.
    • Oddly enough, his reboot self to the (fictional) head of TMZ. Both are loud, both are hypocrites, both abuse their underlings until they cry, both like crossdressing and act obnoxiously manly to compensate for any queerness, and both have a lot of Weight Woe issues.
    • He and Hyper have actually a lot in common, like he snuck into a woman's bedroom, watched her sleep and it ended badly, while she snuck into his room and kidnapped him, but because she refuses to see his flaws (or that he doesn't want her in the first place), she doesn't go for that angle and tries to be One of the Boys (also not bothering to get that he's more femme than that.)
    • After fuming about the Hotter and Sexier Onceler from The Lorax, he's upset to learn that he's been calculatingly marketed to cater to hipster fangirls too.
  • Not-So-Harmless Villain:
    • Shown in Kickassia where he's willing to commit mass murder-suicide through dynamite if anyone threatened the power he'd finally managed to gain.
    • Erod gets a reminder in the Transformers 4 crossover, having electrocuted Critic onto his knees, but then when Critic's eyes are replaced with electricity (which then go to his hands), he says he forgot Critic has ambiguous Came Back Wrong powers.
  • Not That There's Anything Wrong with That: In the Masters of the Universe review. Even Doug and Rob admitted soon after that the review was not one of their finest moments, and maybe it's not a coincidence that the Critic character started getting progressively girlier in later episodes.
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    O 
  • Obliviously Evil: Played with in reboot. He'll do something wrong, get called out, and then openly and maliciously continue doing the awful thing. Like The Shining, he treats Rachel and Malcolm terribly in the opening, is genuinely disappointed when they leave, but abuses her and tries to kill him when they come back.
  • Older Than They Look: Lampshaded when he's hitting on Catherine Zeta Jones. He tries to get with her by saying he's really eighty four. (He's really thirty+ but looks like a teenager with a beard.) In the Hocus Pocus behind the scenes, when he's shaving his beard off, Doug mentions that people think he looks younger without it and that's only because his “chipmunk cheeks” are more emphasized.
  • One-Note Cook: He can only make cereal. Lampshaded in "Fuck Ups Part Three" where he notes he should probably spend more time in the kitchen and less time gobbling junk food. A trait he apparently shares with Doug, who admitted in the AT vlogs that he can only make Mac and Cheese.
  • Only in It for the Money: In the reboot he's almost refreshingly shameless about it, telling various women that they need to be exploited for views, bringing in a Dr. Hack so he can lazily stick to a formula while making loads of cash, and in Foodfight!, has literal money signs in his eyes when he realizes he can make a profit of getting on the bandwagon. the last one ends up biting him in the ass.
  • The Only One Allowed To Insult You: When he thinks Linkara is calling The Nostalgia Chick a wussy, he tells him he's not allowed to insult her in that way.
  • O.O.C. Is Serious Business:
    • In Kickassia (and it lasts throughout the show), Film Brain starts to realize there's something wrong when Critic says for the first time that he doesn't want to review movies anymore.
    • Even disregarding angry cluster f bombs, swearing is a fairly natural part of his vocabulary. So when he goes Goshdang It To Heck or doesn't swear at all, something's either gone very wrong or very right.
    • If he thinks a child getting hit is funny rather than horrible, you'll know the child character is incredibly annoying.
    • Speaking of children, he sold his soul in early reboot, which might explain not regretting hitting Evilina in The Cat in the Hat and the pedophile jokes in Sailor Moon.
  • Ooh, Me Accent's Slipping: When Doug did top elevens or tributes in the earlier days, he could never quite stop his real Chicago drawl coming through Critic's broad everyman accent. Luckily he eventually managed to hide it completely. (Except in bloopers obviously.)
  • Opinion Myopia: Sometimes acts like almost everyone agrees with him, even if the movie was pretty popular like the first two Pirates of the Caribbean sequels. There are plenty of other times he fully acknowledges a Broken Base and offers his take.
  • Oral Fixation: That joystick can't have tasted all that nice. Exaggerated in Critic Tank when he's a judge openly pushing and pulling the pen into and out of his mouth.
  • Out-of-Character Moment:
    • In the middle bit of Airborne, he comes across (unintentionally) as a bit of a Heteronormative Crusader who thinks the lead isn't a proper man because he wants to be a pacifist and not fight. He gets out of it near the end, but it was a weird period for a Sissy Villain who hates morals of "solve problems by fighting".
    • In the Tank Girl review, he freaks over a possibly horny woman director wanting a Shirtless Scene for a man. He never acted like that before, he's never acted like that again and he's even made much use of the Female Gaze himself.
    • In the Child's Play 2 review; "Yeah, when you're going to tie up a child, do it for the same reason I would. To beat him." Because that sounds like the guy who invokes Godwin's Law on someone who is an asshole to their kids and then leaves them.
    • Early reboot Critic could be a sexist asshole like he was in earliest prime days, but is "proud to be a sexist" rant in Catwoman was extreme and in later years he went back to at least trying (his abusing Rachel and Tamara is meant to be a bad thing).
    • When Soulless is pressuring him with an Annoying Laugh and everyone is waiting for him to come out with it and praise Jim Carrey in The Grinch, he acts more like a Shrinking Violet than usual Hot-Blooded, hiding his face while begging it to stop and only raising his voice once. Considering his lack of soul at this point, it makes sense.
    • “Top 11 GOOD Things from the Star Wars Prequels” is one of those editorials where it can't be considered as anything but Doug instead of Critic talking, as it's all about appreciating the good bits in something considered bad, even Malcolm has expressed discomfort on how much Critic can dig his claws into actors, and while one of the spots was less Jar Jar as the movies went on, it was only a week ago that Critic had bombed the creature in an act of crazy.
    • Although Doug defended it (and then pushed the thread into Canon Discontinuity), his conclusion in Dawn Of The Commercials that men can't and have no idea when they're getting hit on doesn't match at all with his history (Spoony, prom night, the massive amounts of Homoerotic Subtext and Ship Tease with nearly every producer) or his future (the Hyper Fangirl storyline where he hates her for always ignoring him when he says no).
    • A couple of 2013 episodes had Critic see crossdressing as gross and humiliating, even though he'd done it plenty of times before. By 2014 he was back to being proud that everyone on his show was into crossdressing and gender fuckery.

    P 
  • Papa Wolf: Even if he thinks the kid's a Bratty Half-Pint, treat a child badly or don't take responsibility, and Critic will hate you.
  • Pet the Dog:
    • Because making fun of Lupa's death threats would just make Doug look terrible, Critic is a lot kinder to the Dark Side Of The Internet than the other 5th year segments, and outright says after her part that he can't find anything to make fun of. It's also the only one he calls flawless.
    • After a long while of treating them terribly, he's glad that Malcolm and Tamara are smiling for a change at the end of The Matrix Revolutions and agrees to go out for a drink with them.
    • He tells Chester in "I'll Be Home For Christmas" that he's sorry for not always taking best care of the bum, and thanks him for always being kind despite that.
  • The Perfectionist: One of his major problems is that he always expects too much out of everything and so sets himself up for disappointment.
  • Persona Non Grata: In his review of Jaws 3D, NC states that due to an incident, he can never go back to Nevada.
  • Person of Mass Destruction:
    • In his Quest for Camelot review, he got so angry with the movie for not explaining anything that he accidentally caused a massive explosion that destroyed an entire city. Twice.
    • In the TMNT Christmas Special, his Christmas obsession destroys the world. Mixed with Reality Warper again as he casually tells Tamara he'll make it non-canon.
    • For Christmas 2016, his love for the holiday went to the extreme of happily destroying an entire planet.
  • Perverse Sexual Lust: For Catherine Zeta Jones, as we find out in his Top 11 Villain Songs video. It's an inverted example as the Critic is a fictional character while Catherine Zeta Jones is a real life actress.
  • Phrase Catcher: On occasion, his getting something wrong about something has led him to be labeled an "anti-[INSERT NOUN HERE]-ite". Mainly occurs in the Fuck-Ups videos.
  • Ping-Pong Naïveté: His intelligence and competence will vary depending on who he's with and if it's funny for him to be stupid or not.
  • Pink Means Feminine: His bedroom has pink curtains. Amusingly, the first time we saw them was when he was writing in his diary like a teenage girl in the My Pet Monster review.
  • Playing with Fire: When reviewing the "Top 11 Avatar episodes" he learns to firebend. Unlike the powerful blasts Dante Basco shot, Critic was firing Mario-like fireballs. Firebending was also what he tried in “Top 11 Adult Jokes We Never Got As Kids”. He failed there too, blowing up the guy overseeing him by accident.
  • Please, I Will Do Anything!: Quite frequently. He did it when Tom and Jerry were going to sing another song, when he was made to review the Star Wars Holiday Special and even though it wasn't begging, he did say he would give Devil Sage everything if he took his memories of Sequel Month away. By Hyper's 2015 Midwest Media Expo vlog, he's exhausted enough of this Abhorrent Admirer storyline to ask even if he did whatever she wanted would she leave him alone. When she says no, he pretends to be into her until he gets the chance to push her out of a window.
  • Plot Armor: Notable in Alice in Wonderland (2010), where he dope slaps a woman who has killed three people for much less and just gets away with her being pissed off at him and holding her knife to him as warning.
  • Politically Incorrect Hero:
    • He was like this at the start, making sexist and ableist jokes a lot, but starting 2009 he started to develop and call stuff like that out.
    • The Suburban Knights and To Boldly Flee reviews were less genuine analyzing of the flaws and more attacking the men for being "pansy", making rape jokes with the Chick and bringing up Joe's, Malachite's and Ma-Ti's ethnicities like they matter.
    • In The Shining, he takes great joy in making Rachel hysterical, and chases down Malcolm with intent to kill him just because it's rule that Black Dude Dies First.
    • He's in unrepentant sexist asshole mode in The Monster Squad, not allowing Tamara in his boys club, calling her worthless to her face, leaving her vulnerable to the reality monster, and when she kills it doesn't thank her.
    • He shocks Film Brain in Forest Warrior by agreeing with Chuck Norris's homophobia, calling him misunderstood and the world has turned against him. (to clarify, Doug gets past this potential shitstorm with much Sarcasm Mode about how Chuck Norris is in a Transparent Closet, and Critic's meant to be an oblivious idiot)
    • The Top 11 Best Avatar Episodes is a pretty good sum-up of his racist tendencies, with leaving Malcolm to die, his only insult to Dante calling him a “Filipino Benjamin Button”, and confusing him with Dev Patel.
    • In TMNT 2, to make fun of Bay's misogyny, he tries to get Tamara to dress up like Harley, and when she refuses, replaces her with Aiyanna.
  • Prematurely Balding: Lampshaded this, noting that he used to have a mop of hair back in high school. He promptly breaks down in tears.
  • Pretty Boy: He and others certainly think so: he calls himself pretty rather than handsome in his Battlefield Earth review, Spoony made him dress in drag and took pictures while raping him, the Chick went into bad touch land after chloroforming him, the Game Heroes had fun manhandling him while he was their Distressed Dude and both Linkara and Film Brain have fairly obvious crushes on him. The Wicked Witch in the first reboot commercial episode uses her "my pretty" line on him.
  • Prima Donna Director: Goes right back into Mean Boss mode with Rachel and Malcolm, and comes to a head when he demands Rachel to come back from California to shoot her punishment death scenes because he accidentally deleted the video. Thankfully, as she's now away from him she can say no and do things her way. And in the beginning of The Shining review, he makes Rachel and Malcolm haul the heaviest props, and chipperly expects them to arrange them in order of his least and most favorites.
  • Princess Phase: Ironically, considering he hates the Princesses Rule trope, but he's said he wants to be like the Disney Princesses, keeps asking if he's pretty in a tiara over on Hotshot, and wants The Adventures of Rocky & Bullwinkle to treat him like Snow White.
  • Professional Butt-Kisser: Turbo consists of him being one to the fans, while also insulting them. The power of his sappy speech about how the franchise was never meant for him is subverted in the ending theme song which has the line "this song is here to praise your heroes and suck up".
  • Prone to Tears: Luckily he mixes this with more Hotblooded tropes, but he breaks down in tears often for no reason. The Honest Trailers parody in Planet of the Apes calls him a crybaby.
  • Properly Paranoid:
    • He drives himself crazy trying to decipher the Nerd's "compliment", but when he's ready to give up and admit that the Nerd might be a nice guy, he finds the insult.
    • When he's ready to snap and cry because he thinks he and his world is all Alec Baldwin's delusion, he's only a couple steps away from the truth.
    • Played for sadness in “Why Do We Love Zombies”, as a year after talking with his creator about him being a character (which was sweet, just went wrong a few months later), he comes to the conclusion that he can never really be safe.
  • Prophet Eyes: When he merges with the Plot Hole in To Boldly Flee, and used three more times in reboot title cards for Fallen Hero purposes. He's demonic in Master Of Disguise, useless in The Last Airbender, and just decaying in Why Do We Love Zombies.
  • Proud to Be a Geek: He calls himself enough of a dork to purchase the Tom and Jerry limited edition DVDs.
  • Psychotic Smirk: He spends most of “The Review Must Go On” with this.
    • In The Purge title card. Another case of Covers Always Lie, as for once he's not actually the villain in an episode, Film Brain is.
    • He has a very creepy one in The Shining when Rachel turns into a Hysterical Woman, enjoying her fear and doing whatever he can to make her more scared.
    • He has one in the Transformers 4 crossover when it turns out he rigged Erod's chair to electrocute him every time he tries to bring logic into the review.
    • He looks a little too evil-happy in Fantastic Four when he learns he can summon explosions at will.
  • Psychopathic Manchild: He's like a twelve year old kid with a gun. During his Disneycember review, Doug says he took a lot of the character's "pathetic whiny brat in a grown person's body" part from the Red Queen in Alice in Wonderland.
    • The Pop Quiz Hotshot pilot has him gleefully taunting a contestant about to die, fake crying and even the host compliments him on his bloodlust.
    • Taken to new heights in Disney Afternoon where he makes the studio look like his bedroom, pretends to be a kid coming home from school, dresses Malcolm and Tamara up in what a white boy thinks black kids and girls would wear, and gets violent if anyone tries to break his delusion. Even when he comes out for a while after being sad about nothing changing, he still goes right back to childlike at the end.
    • In "Alvin and The Chipmunks: The Squeakuel", he's in Control Freak mode wanting a successful formula, and whips the D'aw Girls out of the room.
  • Puppy-Dog Eyes: Usually a side-effect of when he's really suffering, and not just because of bad movies. Turns into Quivering Eyes occaisonally.

    R 
  • Raging Stiffie: The target of the odd joke or two.
  • Raised as the Opposite Gender: He was raised as a girl for a short while in childhood and his identity issues are a bit of a Running Gag. He also cries literally in his first commercials special that he's not a man, which even if you take as just thinking he's too pathetic, is still pretty relatable to people with gender issues. And he goes between being proud of and sulking about his dick, a common trait of trans men.
    Critic: Now granted I didn't grow up as a girl... for long. *looks embarrassed and about to cry* I have a history.
  • Raised Catholic: Quite conservatively so, which provides a good excuse for his moments of uncertainty as to if being gay is a choice or not.
  • Rape as Backstory: On his prom night, even. Low blow. That trauma monkey plushie also raises a few questions.
  • Raven Hair, Ivory Skin: He's incredibly pale (he even disappears due to Cool as Ice being far too white), and is at least meant to be attractive. The downside of this is that it makes it very obvious when Doug demonstrates his lack of familiarity with sunscreen.
  • Reality Warper:
    • Word of God is that he's spending his time trying to learn how to transform himself into different things, not just being a muppet. By the Linkara cameo in December, he mostly seems to have got it to work.
    • There's a few hints in the reboot that he still has this power, like at the end of “Top 11 South Park Episodes” where he changes into a South Park version of himself, or After Earth where he brings out the muppet Critic from the Plot Hole, or the numerous Your Mind Makes It Real moments. Confirmed in The Matrix Revolutions, where he has the power of “ruining”, creating the Plot Hole again (or a blue hole very similar to it) and making things go back to normal with no more Sickly Green Glow, no more fetish gear, and everyone at least having a personality.
  • Really Gets Around: Just not quite in the way he wants. This quality increased for insecurity reasons in 2012. In the PQH Star Wars edition, he's glad for "what happens on [], stays on []" rule cos he's a massive slut.
  • Real Men Hate Affection: In his amnesia persona, he complains that TBF!Critic gets "too much" Character Development, and is disgusted with him for telling the Chick how depressed he feels.
  • Real Women Never Wear Dresses:
    • Believes in this pretty heavily. As an example, Princess Peach using a frying pan to knock out an enemy disgusts him. As another example, he calls the possessed person in Star Trek with "no emotions, no feelings and no needs" the perfect woman. Although like Chick and Lindsay, this is just meant to be the character being an idiot and not Doug's real feelings on the subject. In Doug's own reviews of Disney movies, he even argues why leads like Ariel, Cinderella and Snow White aren't the feminist nightmares they're made out to be.
    • His reason for hating the women in Pearl Harbor is that they giggle. Not what they're giggling about, not that they do it too much, not that they're flat characters, just hates them from the first laugh.
  • Redemption Rejection:
    • When Sage calls him out in The Guyver on having being an insulting invoked Fan Hater ever since his return, they argue and have an angry staredown, giving him ample opportunity to be a good person and apologize. But instead he walks out in a Downer Ending.
    • Goes all out at the end of The Uncanny Valley, as Dougnote  writes two hope spots where Critic angsts about possibly being fixable but is completely unable to.
    • At the end of Alice in Wonderland (2010), Critic makes a move (with familiar triumphant music) to understand that all artists can make good things, but then Burton lets him down again and he angrily says he forgot what he was supposed to have learned.
  • Red Oni, Blue Oni:
    • Does this to himself. The Nostalgia Critic's the red oni, to the real life Doug Walker's blue oni.
    • Nicely swapped round with Linkara in Star Trek Insurrection. To perhaps show Critic has grown up a bit, he shouts very little and tries to be optimistic while Linkara spends a lot of time angry and yelling.
    • He's the blue oni to Erod's red for the first half of the Transformers 4 crossover, coming off as bored and jaded in comparison to the latter's more exaggerated hammy persona. At one point when Erod is ranting, he puts on headphones and listens to “Pig Power In The House”. this turns out to be Bait the Dog, as he shoots Bay when Erod can't, has evil electric powers and does an old-school bat credit card reaction.
  • Reduced to Ratburgers: The reviewing variant. By Son of the Mask, he's been reduced to wandering around in the snow and finding movies in trash-cans.
  • Reluctant Fanservice Girl: Male version. Whenever someone else (Game Heroes, Spoony, Chick etc.) makes him the victim.
    • In the “Is Eyes Wide Shut Artsy Porn” title card, he's shirtless, but hiding himself and looks terrified.
    • In the executive-demanded music video at the beginning of Jem, he's fine dancing in drag and making flirty poses, but when the camera starts to do some Female Gaze he gets uncomfortable and twitchy.
  • Reluctant Psycho: In “Top 11 New Halloween Classics”, he describes the feeling quite succinctly as “imagine you're at the Mad Hatter's tea party, but you're tied to a chair and aren't allowed to leave”. The priest in The Adventures of Rocky & Bullwinkle notes that Critic isn't so much slipping in sanity, it's that he was always broken.
  • Repressed Memories: From the review of Hook: "I have the same unquestioned repressed childhood memories that everyone has." beat "What?"
  • The Rival: To The Angry Video Game Nerd, who really doesn't know why he hates him so much.

    S 
  • Sad Clown: Under all the jokes and snark, he's really quite depressed. He even takes it one step further by feeling insecure about his abilities for comedy.
    • In particular, the Canada commercials jokes are not well-liked (especially the rape whistle one, as girls getting abused is more important than a "killjoy PSA") but in The Purge he said he made them because he was scared. "Battle Of The Commercials" had him clarify this even more.
    • He literally says in Christmas with the Kranks that he thought if he could make people laugh, they'd stop hurting him and it would fix things.
  • Sand In My Eyes: In Romeo and Juliet, Why is Arthur Christmas a Masterpiece?, The Looney Tunes Show - Good or Bad? and the E-Sults advertisement, his eyes are red and worn-out looking, a bit like he'd just been crying before filming. In no video is this addressed.
  • Say My Name: "NERRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRD!!!"
  • Screams Like a Little Girl: Very often and typically for long periods of time.
  • Secretly Wealthy: Sage is actually shocked when he sees it all come through. So much so that he offhandedly tells Critic to go jump off a cliff afterwards instead of using the More Than Mind Control to his advantage.
  • Security Blanket:
    • The big monkey toy with a tie. Behind the scenes show it's always at the studio, the opening of Pop Quiz Hotshot has him cling onto it while rocking back and forth, and Doug has talked before about how when you're mentally ill and in a panic, you can imbue stuffed animals as the only safety you have.
    • Literally in the TMNT watching during the Transformers 4 crossover, as he wraps himself in a pinkish purple duvet and is nearly crying with happiness. He also trails it along with him when they go back to the review.
  • Selective Obliviousness: In some ways he knows the Chick better than anyone, but he blinded himself to what she was doing in Kickassia because he thought she had his Undying Loyalty, he assumed she would feel the same pride that he did when he sat through a bad movie, and he views her as a lot tougher than she really is.
    • Not just with Chick. He's pretty good with denial as a whole, like when he was complaining about his job for years but only sank into major depression when a director inadvertently made him realize his life was meaningless.
  • Self-Serving Memory:
    • He remembered Kickassia as becoming a God when he just sat on his ass all day, and the titular crossovers as teaching Linkara, Chick, Phelous and LordKaT a lesson about going into his territory when in reality, he broke down in all of them and had to be comforted.
    • He tells Shyamalan in After Earth that he killed him twice, but that's not remotely true. Aang killed him in The Last Airbender while Critic was useless, and the Devil sent him back to hell in Devil while Critic was a Distressed Dude about to get talent bended for the second time.
    • Intentionally bullshit in his speech about Food Fight, with the camera zooming in while he talks about doing the film for us (when his face was literally on a hundred dollar bill twenty minutes ago) and then it cuts to him being upset because Malcolm is telling him that he didn't get money because the film's passé.
    • Inverted in The Lorax when he asks the analysts didn't he kill them both in The Cat in the Hat. He didn't actually kill them himself, he just drove them to suicide.
    • In Scooby Doo 2, he tells Roger-in-disguise that the first movie nearly killed him, when even flashbacks show the context that he tried to commit suicide from self loathing and that it was a Taking You with Me.
  • Sensitive Guy and Manly Man:
    • Sensitive Guy to the Other Guy's Manly Man.
    • He also acted as the Sensitive Guy to The Angry Video Game Nerd's Manly Man in their crossover.
    • He also has this dynamic with Snob, especially in The Passion of the Christ where he's nervous and guilty about what happened to Santa Christ and Snob is snarky and thrilled.
  • Serial Killer: Technically, he is this, even if he's never called one In-Universe, as he has murdered numerous people over the years, from Dr. Bitch Spasms, to Lucky the Leprechaun, to the Madison family in Eight Crazy Nights, to destroying entire planets with his love of Christmas.
  • Seriously Scruffy:
    • In Mad Max: Fury Road, as he gets more stubbly as the review goes on. It's unclear whether the amount of work caused Doug to forget shaving again, or it was to parody Max's Perma-Stubble.
    • In What You Never Knew About National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation, his clothes are askew and he hasn't shaved because he doesn't actually want to do a video and just wants to celebrate Christmas.
  • Sex God: The idea that he's really good at oral (due to Doug's Oral Fixation with the Ask That Guy pipe and fellating joysticks as Critic, plus many other objects) was given a nod in The Last Angry Geek's Bad Future episode, as the site has been taken over and all he's allowed to do is give oral as a Sex Slave.
  • Sex Is Violence:
    • He looks suspiciously post-coital after he causes a mass explosion. And the chaos note  of the "Pink Elephants On Parade" makes him exhaustedly ask "Was it good for you?".
    • Also, Star Trek: Insurrection has him pawing That Sci-Fi Guy enough to raise some eyebrows. What makes it this trope is that three episodes before, Sci-Fi Guy killed him.
  • Sexy Coat Flashing: Done in his review of the Flinstones Movie, where he acts out Halle Berry trying to comfort the audience.
  • Sex Slave:
    • In the Bad Future, he's not allowed to do anything but prostitute himself for Snob's pleasure.
    • In The Wicker Man (2006), he asks if he can vacation on Summerisle when he hears that he'd have no responsibilities other than to have sex, Stay in the Kitchen and not talk to anyone.
    • In her fourth vlog, Hyper blissfully wants to control and break down Critic's brain so he'd be in love with her. Malcolm admits that would be a possibility for him as well.
    • In The 6th Day, That Sci-Fi Guy accidentally creates a clone of the Critic, who has a 50% chance of being beamed back to original Critic's place and having to be this for him. (And no we're not making that up.)
    • If you know Alice: Madness Returns (where Malice comes from), there's a Black Comedy reference when she asks if he's escaped from the same asylum she did. The villain of the sequel owns an asylum and is a pimp to both girls and boys there, so on top of realizing/assuming Critic's mentally ill, she's also assuming he's a victim of that too.
  • Sexy Stewardess: In the first DVD menu, he bizarrely (but not problematically) dresses up like a flight attendant who has a lot of skin showing.
  • Shameless Self-Promoter: He can't seem to stop himself, even when there's a gun to his head.
  • Show Some Leg: In Shark Jumping, she's his silent partner that he wants to pawn off, and he tells Beth and Tim that he did it to get her to leave him alone and that he hates her.
  • She Is Not My Girlfriend: He really wants to do a review with JesuOtaku in the Heavy Metal episode, and denies being attracted to him just because he's a guy who wants to do a crossover with a girl. (And then he turns into Shipper on Deck for CR/Phelous.)
  • Silly Rabbit, Idealism Is for Kids!: Although he's an easily emotional, giggly kid himself, he's nearly never impressed with The Power of Love, a lot of picks for his Top 11s are actually kinda sad and he has a big rant about believing in dreams in his A Troll in Central Park review.
  • Silly Rabbit, Romance Is for Kids!: No question that he likes the determinator kind of love, it's mushiness that he can't stand.
  • Sinister Surveillance: He managed to get a camera into every site member's house, so he'll know when they're apparently trying to steal his spotlight.
  • Sir Swears-a-Lot: The only episode where he didn't swear was in Follow That Bird, which is very sweet.
  • Sissy Villain: He's a pathetic jackass, but not because he's "sissy". That's just part of his personality. In the Transformers 4 crossover, he badass boasts that he's the Nostalgia Critic, he's the original movie basher and his face used to be the site logo, but then ruins it by obsessing over wondering how Erod thinks he looks like Edward Norton.
    • Really pronounced in Pop Quiz Hotshot, as he's obsessed with how pretty he looks in a tiara, hits on most of the men and is accepting of how he's fucked up in the head.
  • Sitcom Archnemesis: The Angry Video Game NEEEEEEEEEEEERD!!!
  • Skewed Priorities: He thinks child abuse, even the more minor stuff, is worse than rape. Done intentionally, as while the Critic complains about the Starchaser sexbot abuse scene as creepy for the kids, Doug rants on the commentary about the disgustingness of her character being forcibly changed from unwilling to slut.
    • Confusing Kyle and Paw in the Les Misérables review, he thinks bread stealing is worse than rape and murder. Doug in the bloopers doesn't go that far, but he does think that french bread is the best thing ever.
  • Slouch of Villainy: When Doug gives him the answer he wants in “The Review Must Go On”.
  • Slowly Slipping Into Evil: CR made a pointed comparison to Critic and Baby-Doll from Batman: The Animated Series, trying to get him to see that he'll end up as a White-Dwarf Starlet if he keeps on stressing about people taking his job.
    • More generally, and overlapping with Came Back Wrong, the main Story Arc in the reboot. Sometimes it's played for Black Comedy, while at other times (like The Guyver) it's played for angst, and episodes like The Shining, it's there for horror.
  • Small Name, Big Ego: No matter how many times it gets beaten out of him, he's an egotistical prick. What makes a little more interesting, though, is his self-esteem is pretty low and pathetically easy to break. Critic Tank (a Shark Jumping episode) self-deprecates that he turned loving the sound of his own voice into an online empire, but can barely pay his rent on time.
    • In the DVD review of The Review Must Go On, he's firmly up his own ass, calling it an astounding achievement and knocking away any chart proof that it was pretentious and egotistical. This comes back at the end, lampshading that he's biased but calling it amazing before he gets a smackdown from Doug.
  • Smart Ball: Invoked in The Chipmunk Adventure. When he gives a too-well-reasoned argument about the Chick growing out of the site-planned Girl-Show Ghetto and doing her own thing, Chick meta-brags that what he's saying sounds like her writing.
  • Smarter Than You Look: He doesn't have a whole lot of faith in his intelligence, not helped by all the mistakes he makes, but he really is smarter than he seems.
  • Soapbox Sadie: Nobody can accuse of him of not genuinely caring about kids, racism or sexism (and if you have for the first one, what have you been watching?), but it's like he can only be OCD-like about one of those things an episode, while the rest get pushed to the side slightly.
  • So Beautiful, It's a Curse: In Prime, he was never too lucky on who he was a Lust Object to, but at least he was happy to be a sexually active Mr. Fanservice. Not so much in reboot where all he wants is women he can humiliate, Rogue figurines to give him handjobs, and to stalk Emilia Clarke, but catwomen, men and witches get in his personal space, Rachel and Malcolm both grope him when he doesn't want them to and even Zod's threats are based on mutilating his looks until nobody recognizes him as human.
  • Some of My Best Friends Are X: Parodied when people accuse him of being an anti-groundite. He goes on to say they're hard-working, have feelings and some of his good friends are floors. His own floor then tries to shoot him.
    • Real life example with Sailor Moon, as in Connecticon Doug mocked the people who didn't like the review with the fact that he's become friends with some of the cast.
  • Sophisticated as Hell: Showcased in The Room where he ends up shouting the "Dead Parrot Sketch" from Monty Python's Flying Circus, and uses a quote from William Shakespeare seconds later.
  • So Proud of You: Doug most likely knew that Lindsay didn't invent the concept of The Smurfette Principle, but Critic acted like the Chick did.
  • Sore Loser: When he loses the third match against Angry Joe, he's a whiny, angry brat who accuses Joe of cheating.
  • The Soulless: He lost it to Malcolm's devil in return for a good Zod impression.
  • Speech Impediment: He starts stammering when he's scared or nervous.
  • Speak of the Devil: He pops up in the Chick's review of Transformers when she says the word "manchildren". Also when Maven says the words "nostalgia nostalgia nostalgia" in her Count Chocula review.
  • Split Personality: Done in the more realistic fashion. Three times now something bad has happened to really trigger him off, he'll react with intense distaste (Hearing Voices with the Doug bullies, long angrish with how childish The Haunting (1999) was, exploding cities with Quest for Camelot) and then he'll come back with apologies or would have to be made aware of what he just did.
  • Squee!:
    • As the "Follow That Bird" review proved, he can go higher than a teenage girl when he's excited.
    • He even squees the trope name in his review of Alaska. The image of him bouncing is a pretty popular reaction gif on tumblr.
    • While it gets steadily darker in reboot, he always gets little boy excited over Christmas.
  • Stalker with a Crush: In his teenage years, he broke up with someone three times.
    Nostalgia Critic: How many times can you break up with someone before they turn into a psycho and start stalking you? *looks around scared and whispers* Three.
    • He himself approaches stalker territory when he first pretends to be Rasputin to have a conversation with the Chick and secondly hides in the bushes to capture her and make her watch Bratz. She finds the former endearingly annoying and doesn't seem to mind the latter, however, probably because she chloroformed him first.
    • He's a fully fledged stalker to Emilia Clarke, having her number on speed-dial despite her hating him in the commercials special, and ignoring Joe in Man of Steel to look at naked pictures of her.
    • In North, he says he's familiar telling people to stop following him or he'll call the police.
  • Steel Ear Drums: Played straight most of the time and subverted once. All that shooting in close spaces doesn't affect him, but a girl's annoying voice pierces right through.
  • Stepford Smiler: A mix of type C/type A.
    • A good example of stepfordness is in the beginning of The Blues Brothers video game where he's waking up in the morning. In Last Angry Geek's review of Spider-Man and the X-Men, where Brian asks whatever happened to Dr. Smith and Critic (with a giant frozen smile) tells him “Cancer. Very sad.”, and it cuts back to Brian mouthing “ouch”. If it weren't for the much sadder take at the end (where he also reveals Dr. Smith was his father), one would assume Lack of Empathy.
    • The Psychopathic Manchild version for the first half of Disney Afternoon, especially when Malcolm is unconscious, he has blood on his hands and his response to Tamara wanting to take Malcolm to the hospital is a Dissonant Serenity “it's too late for him”. It's only when reality breaks in that he's still commenting on cartoons that he calms down, and even that is just sadder and more cynical.
  • The Stoner:
    • While he bears none of the character traits associated with the trope, he does make a few references. His plan for the 100th episode was to show a crummy clip show and smoke some pot. He's also on an ongoing search for "Pot Land" according to his review of The Super Mario Bros. Super Show.
    • When he sees Malcolm and Tamara in bunny ears, with guns and hiding behind the desk, he says he usually has to take something to see stuff like this.
    • In The Sixth Day crossover, he asks how long it takes for a powdered horse scrotum to leave your system after you smoke it.
      That Sci Fi Guy: Um, I'm just gonna move on.
      Critic: Yeah, you better.
    • In Iron Man's Coke, he snorts some coke to calm himself down from getting annoyed that the challenge was done too fast.
  • Strawman Emotional: In his worst moments. The fact that he doesn't seem to even realize he can be like this makes it easier to stomach.
  • Straw Hypocrite: Goes into this territory a lot in reboot, like when he says “I'm not one to disagree with other's opinions, unless they're stupid and not mine”, when nearly all of his (intended) Finale Season had him learning the opposite.
  • Stubborn Mule: He calls himself a stubborn old curmudgeon in the "Willy Wonka" Old vs New.
  • Stupid Sexy Keith David, Hugh Jackman and Will Smith.
    *slaps himself* BOOBS! YOU LIKE BOOBS!
  • Survival Mantra: Until the Burger King runs away in terror from Twister, "elephant" serves as his call back to reality.
  • Sweet Tooth: He downs an entire bag of candy in Nicktoons.
  • Sympathetic P.O.V.: It's his show, so we get to see him break down, fanboy, be a victim, be a jackass, be smart, be dumb... the works. If we knew him from Film Brain's POV for example, he wouldn't nearly be as likable.

    T 
  • Take a Third Option: When Spoony gives him a choice of reviewing the Reb Brown's Captain America movie or letting the forced crossdressing pictures of Spooning With Spoony 2 leak out, he chooses a noose instead.
  • Take This Job and Shove It: When he didn't get promoted in his Crusty Caretaker job, we get to see Doug's video of that "I QUIT!" Shirtless Scene.
  • Talkative Loon: When he gets worked up.
  • The Tease: An aesop that comes up every now and then is that he can be as slutty and attention seeking as he wants, doesn't mean he's not allowed to be traumatized by abusers like Spoony and Hyper.
  • Testosterone Poisoning: Literally. He takes pills that he owns to make him sound like Kevin Conroy, and his voice drops much lower as well as his balls.
    • He almost certainly was trying to invoke this at the beginning. Sexist, homophobic, a lower-pitched voice, still wasn't smart but had much more common sense, owned a Hair-Trigger Temper, slobby, easily bored and none of the femmy, childish behavior we know him for.
    • Darker in The Shining, as right after admitting his dick both doesn't work anymore and is the only thing keeping him a man, he has a more masculine costume change, has zero patience for any talk of feelings, and acts like an abusive partner to Rachel.
    • Realistically (especially for someone Raised as the Opposite Gender) in "Old vs New Cinderella'', as right after Devil Boner calls him full of estrogen and Hyper's "ladyfriend", he suddenly gets more concerned about his masculinity being undermined, when he was fine talking about "girl movies" before.
  • That Man Is Dead: In the beginning of Forest Warrior, he refuses to do the Chuck Norris Running Gag because that was the old him, and the new version needs to create new memes that he can be obnoxious about.
  • Then Let Me Be Evil: To Boldly Flee-Critic complained because "everything [he does] has a negative impact on someone" and was desperate for a way to fix it. But his fixing got screwed over by The Review Must Go On making it a paradox, and reboot-Critic practically makes it his mission to hurt people. Sage calls him out on this, but Critic ignores him.
    • For an example that happened in the same review, Reality Ensues for the Master Of Disguise breakdown and he gets in trouble, but he lucidly punches Rachel in the gut at the end of the episode and leaves her on the ground, not caring what that must look like in context.
  • Thinking Tic: Has a tendency to pucker his mouth when he's thinking something over.
  • Thousand-Yard Stare: The Bad Future 2019 in Geek's Future's End episode gives the implication that he's in permanent about-to-cry mode. And he actually does when Snob shows up.
  • Throw the Dog a Bone: Santa Christ showing up to erase his memory of The Star Wars Holiday Special. And "Poor Critic" at the end of his Commercials Special has him getting his self-confidence back.
    • In the NickComs episode, Tempting Fate actually works in his favor for once and gives him The Adventures of Pete & Pete.
    • After being so deathly boring for the majority of time, Junior gets funny and stupid with Arnold in a dress and spouting one-liners.
    • Double Team more than satisfies him with the "BEST! DEATH! EVER!".
    • After going through hell with Sequel Month, he gets to enjoy himself with Dungeons & Dragons.
    • Considering how depressed he was that he couldn't muster up the courage to talk to the Chick during the failure date, their relationship becoming Dating Catwoman probably counts.
    • In To Boldly Flee, his creator telling him how good of a character he became. Plus saving the world.
  • Too Dumb to Live: Plenty of instances. Examples include taunting Disney villains, tempting an angel to kick his ass and God to strike him down, trusting people he shouldn't and following the orders of Sage when he believes he's the devil.
  • Took a Level in Badass: In To Boldly Flee. Suicidal motivation aside, he stood up to Mechakara even when he was frustrated, terrified and being held at gunpoint.
  • Took a Level in Dumbass: Not a bad thing, but he wasn't always lacking in a lot of common sense.
    • His IQ dropping since the intelligence of the Plot Hole appearances has been lampshaded twice, with Doug complaining that he's been written so stupid and it taking him twenty-two seconds to realize Sage calling him an airhead in the Guyver review.
    • Again lampshaded in "The Dark Knight Returns", where he quips that Two-Face (who has two bombs, and wants 22 million dollars in the next 22 minutes) must really like the number "3". Last Angry Geek quietly corrects him. He also later confuses LAG for Linkara, and runs off at the end of the review.
  • Took a Level in Kindness: Steadily until To Boldly Flee, lampshaded by Doug himself. But...
  • Took a Level in Jerkass/Sanity Slippage: Things started to go wrong really quickly. There was "The Review Must Go On" where he gaslighted Doug, "An Odd Life Of Timothy Green" where he killed a cat, and both "Son Of The Mask" and "Food Fight" have him broken to a degree that the Scooby-Doo breakdown can't reach. The "Master Of Disguise" review had Reality Ensues when he's forced to go an asylum for a freak out, then he went Jack Nicholson on Rachel during The Shining review, and it's just gotten worse from there. He's seriously injured Malcolm for extremely petty reasons, and outright MURDERED the Happy Maddison audience. He's reached a level of Ax-Crazy that is unprecedented by anything seen before. Perhaps taking him out of the plot hole WASN'T the best idea.
    • Lampshaded in The Shining, as when he's abusing Rachel on the phone, she snarks back that he's never been nice while she's known him.
    • "The Dark Knight Returns" review intentionally contrasts his excited righteous happy post To Boldly Flee, with his smugly insulting, stupid, going-through-the-motions personality in current times.
    • The Sanity Slippage was lampshaded in Ghost Dad, where he says he can't talk about the twist because he already has fears about his mental health and doesn't want it to get worse.
    • Disney Afternoon is all about him losing it. He desperately wants to recreate his childhood, even before violence happens he makes Tamara back off because he's so angry about her thinking he was talking about the Saturday morning version, and he's even more of a Mood-Swinger than usual. It's only really when reality hits that “nothing's changed” and he's still stuck in a job commenting on cartoons that he moves into the more normal depression and not just being stepford psychotic.
    • By The Adventures of Rocky & Bullwinkle, it's got to the point where other characters are forced to realize he was never really sane.
  • Too Kinky to Torture: When he's parodying being a Distressed Dude in the Sidekicks review, he sounds less defiant and more excited about being electrocuted.
  • Trademark Favorite Food: He has a rarely-mentioned obsession with breakfast cereal, which shows up in his cereal mascots review (obviously) and a crossover sketch with the Nostalgia Chick and The Maven of the Evantide.
  • Tragic Hero: Tragically funny. He genuinely wants to be a Nice Guy or at least feel more optimistic about things, but he can never quite quell his temper. Played for Drama in Scooby-Doo and To Boldly Flee.
  • Tragic Monster: Gets so close to it in “Why Do We Love Zombies”, as the ending has him as a zombie, the title card has him as a gored zombie, and there's a Despair Speech about humanity being beaten out of him.
  • Transgender: At some point he grew up as female, he takes testostorone pills, and he has repeatedly asked if he was born as a girl. Plus he's able to get pregnant by Chick, even if it is by Ferngully magic.
  • Transparent Closet: The door will be opened and closed for Rule of Funny and Rule of Cute. Sometimes he'll valiantly attempt to be all about the boobs, other times he'll fangirl guys without the slightest bit of regret. Lampshaded bitterly in the Les Misérables review, where he, Paw and Kyle fall out of a closet and he says “enter coming out of the closet joke here”.
  • Trauma Conga Line: It is profoundly entertaining to see what horrible thing will happen to him next, either in the present or in his childhood.
  • Trauma-Induced Amnesia: The Guyver review makes a point of him not remembering Kickassia, Suburban Knights or To Boldly Flee as well as he should. Just what he's forgotten about remains to be seen. Bloodrayne has him not being able to remember the big fight in Suburban Knights.
  • Trigger Happy: This bites him in the ass twice; when he panics and shoots Santa Christ in Kickassia and when he kills his childhood icon, Mary Poppins, after Quest for Camelot.
  • Trophy Wife: He wants to marry Malcolm and leech off his money in Demolition Man, and he's for a moment okay with being Hyper's hostage boyfriend when he sees the inside of her Big Fancy House.
  • Troubled Abuser: He's horrible to Rachel, uses Malcolm and tries to break down Tamara, but there's something horribly wrong with him and he's been abused himself and still has issues over this.
  • Troubled, but Cute: He's a slutty Mr. Fanservice with an abusive past, stockholms for rapists and abusers, tries really hard to be good but can't make it (after he did in To Boldly Flee, Real Life Writes the Plot and did a retcon), is mentally ill, stuck in a job he hates and abuses others to make himself feel better.
  • Troubled Child: "I had issues." Made explicit in "What Happened To Great Disney Villains", when he says he used to be like Sid in Toy Story.
  • Troubling Unchildlike Behavior: The first nod to his abusive childhood was him saying that he shot his Ninja Turtle doll.
  • Tsundere: Showcased in pretty much the entirety of the "Follow That Bird" review.
    Nostalgic Critic: Big Bird! Oh my god! He is just as big as I remember him! Some things never change when you're a chi- IT'S A MAN IN A COSTUME! ...A big...loveable...heartwarming costume...
    • In Alaska he switches between horror at polar bears eating people to fawning over the movie's animal lightning fast.
  • Twitchy Eye: Towards the end of his "lawyer tastes like deep-seated insecurity and bitterness" joke in Jurassic Park. Only Doug knows why. Referenced in The Monster Squad where he says “we all get nervous twitches like that sometimes”. Quite understandably, his whole face is a twitching mess in the Man of Steel review when Joe is giving Zod ideas on how to torture him. When he's hallucinating at the start of The Christmas Tree review, his eye jolts in time to his tapping of the coffee machine.
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    U 
  • Uke: Even Chester lampshades the implications of "Nerd-On-Critic action". Not to mention that if he spends any time with a woman, it'll end up in Masculine Girl, Feminine Boy. Also heavy with the Snob, as he's been the Sex Slave in the Bad Future and Brad makes jokes about Critic being naughty and needing spanking from "daddy".
  • Undying Loyalty: As lampshaded by Ma-Ti in Kickassia. If he does actually care for someone, he'll cling on tight and do anything for them.
  • Unfazed Everyman: Despite his cowardice, he's perfectly accepting of characters from the movies he's watching talking to him.
  • Ungrateful Bastard: As a Became Their Own Antithesis of his Undying Loyalty in pre-reboot. He never thanks Rachel, Malcolm or Tamara for what they do for him, and he lampshades in Nerd's roast that while Nerd saved him twice in To Boldly Flee, he still hates him because he has to.
  • Unkempt Beauty:
    • He looks much better with a rumpled suit and baseball cap than he does in 'proper' clothes.
    • Defied in The Shining, as he wears a flannel shirt, no tie, is more beardy and loses his glasses, meaning he looks more masculine and people won't be distracted by the usual flattering clothes.
    • Deconstructed in The Lorax, where he realizes he's dressed the way he is to attract a female audience, and he's just as packaged as the new Onceler.
  • Unreliable Narrator: Reboot has him having hallucinations, explicitly reality warping to fit what he wants and going through Sanity Slippage far worse than anything previously, so suffice to say he's not always right about what goes on.
  • The Unsmile: The very beginning of "Top 12 Santa Clauses". He's genuinely excited, but can only grimace uncomfortably.
  • Unsportsmanlike Gloating: Maybe it's a good thing that he never wins, because when he does (and that's rare), he acts like a prick.
  • Unstoppable Rage:
    • In response to the Adventures of Sonic the Hedgehog, the Nostalgia Critic shoots the show so many times it literally goes up in a giant explosion.
    • And then again for Blank Check.
    • For Quest for Camelot he gets so angry that the movie keeps making shit up with absolutely no explanation that his anger destroys a town with a nuclear explosion. Then it happens again mere moments later when one of the characters makes a horrible Dirty Harry pun.
    • The Neverending Story 3 certainly did piss off the NC to no end, but the last straw was, instead of the theme song to the series, they place Rockbiter singing "Born To Be Wild" during the motorcycle scene on the end credits. This sends the NC laughing all the way to Home Depot, buying a crowbar, coming home, and then mercilessly beating and raping the DVD to pieces.
  • Used to Be a Sweet Kid: Not in the "was nice but is now evil" way, but the "hoped for far more than this" version.

    V 
  • Vanity Is Feminine:
    • He frantically paws at his face before running off to print out pictures of it in the photocopier. This is apparently his secret hobby.
    • In Hyper's second vlog, he gets distracted from hating her by happily going on about how nice silk feels.
    • In the Shark Jumping review of Glee, the only thing that tempts him to do singing again (though he still refuses until the end) is being promised “fabulous costume changes”.
  • Verbal Tic: The Critic has an extremely prevalent one that typically appears multiple times in the span of every single review. Once you notice it you'll hear it all the time. note 
    • He will almost always provide a summation of his review along the lines of "The <noun> is <adjective>, the <noun> is <adjective>, the <noun> is <adjective>... In short, it's an <adjective> <noun>."
  • Villain Protagonist: There are a lot of signs that he Came Back Wrong from the Plot Hole, hitting kids, his reason for hating Stephen King downgraded to "he entertains people", and suggesting torture that even the devil is surprised by. Notably, in Blues Brothers 2000, he refuses to help someone dying because he wants to get ranting about the movie off his back, and the camera follows him while keeping the said dying a Meaningful Background Event.
  • Vitriolic Best Buds: With Chester. Critic steals Chester's drugs and lets him search for the necronomicon by himself while Chester is somewhat of an Ungrateful Bastard who will blow up cities just to upset Critic. However, Critic gave Chester a job, a safe place to stay and is the only one on the site to give him money, while Chester will be one of the first to defend Critic against anyone else.
  • Vocal Evolution: The Nostalgia Critic's voice was much more drawling and manlier in his earlier episodes with Doug's real Chicago accent coming through, with almost none of the high-pitched screaming and animated excitement he'd become known for.
    • His Arnold Schwarzenegger impression is improving as well. Impressions in his Schwarzenegger month videos are deeper than his earlier reviews, and pretty close to the real thing.
    • His female voice got better too. In early reviews, it was just slightly more high-pitched than his child voice. In 2011 it sounded like a woman was talking.
      • Inverted too. Doug used to be able to do both the male and female sex noises in an especially porny episode of Ask That Guy and for a joke in Jaws 3. But for the sex gag in 8 Crazy Nights he had to get Rachel to do the female voice.

    W 
  • Walking Disaster Area: Computers, stuffed animals and kitchen appliances have all blown him up or gone wrong in some way before he even managed to touch them.
  • Wants a Prize for Basic Decency: Played for Laughs in The Shining, where he wants a medal for not making racist pedophila jokes about the little boy and the black guy called Dick.
  • Weak-Willed: In the Top 11 Cereal Mascots, he goes out (twice) immediately to buy something because advertising told him to. And Devil!Sage manages to control him easily even after he's said he's not the devil.
  • Weapon of Choice: A Cool Gun he uses with wild abandon. Word of God says it was done for the funny, the menacing aspect and also because it's really quite pathetic.
  • Weight Woe: As he gets thinner, he insults Hollywood Pudgy actors more and more. Even The Cinema Snob doesn't escape in the review of Paranoia. In the Dragonbored review, he even bitches that Jimbroth (obviously played by Doug) is too doughy and could only bench-press two pounds at most.
  • Weirdness Magnet: Being the main character of of the site, everything bad in their world seems to happen to him most of the time (when it's not happening to Linkara). Played for Laughs in the Fantastic Four (2005) review, when a meteor occurs just outside the studio.
  • Well, Excuse Me, Princess!: He says the line to Lupa in Suburban Knights and immediately regrets it, and Phelous says it to him in the Child's Play II review, putting him in the girl spot and all.
  • Well-Intentioned Extremist: It's great that you want the Chick to be proud of herself, but forcing her to watch Bratz is kinda harsh.
  • We Used to Be Friends: “Nostalgia Critic Talks Transformers 4” has the Critic/Chester friendship completely gone, with Critic knocking Chester out so he can have his rant, and when Chester buys into the pretty speech, Critic kicks him again showing what he's really like.
    • One that isn't actually his fault for once, but Film Brain was his confidant in To Boldly Flee, but tries to kill Critic in the Purge review.
    • Maven happily eats cereal with him in a crossover before he died, and had a skull with a baseball cap as remembrance for a while, but is completely disgusted with him a couple years later. For his part he calls her a prejudiced bitch when she forces him to leave.
    • Discussed in Can An Ending Ruin A Film, where he compares bad endings to a good friendship being over down to one bad decision.
  • What Beautiful Eyes!: Their prettiness is lampshaded by Lindsay in the Moulin Rouge! review.
    Lindsay: Your eyes are so blue.
    Doug: I know, you just look at them and…
  • When He Smiles: Look at the top picture of the three Critics on his blip page. The first is him being goofy, the second is him looking angry while pointing a gun, and what does the third involve? A cute smile with his dimple showing.
    • Played darkly at the end of The Cat in the Hat. First time he grins at all in the episode (as he spent it very dead-eyed and depressed) is when the Devil is proud of him for suggesting torture.
    • Used for sad effect in The Dark Knight Returns, as his first eyes-meeting genuine grin in ages is a Call-Forward comment about how deep and awesome Demo Reel will be.
  • White Male Lead: He doesn't fit the description (you couldn't really view him as privileged other than having a fair amount of money and he's not overshadowing any minority), but he views himself as one.
    • Played straighter in the reboot, as he gets the most airtime, often explains the obvious to the bad guys, and the black guy and woman are relegated to one-note characters on the side.
    • In "Disney Afternoon", he forces Tamara and Malcolm to dress up like what he thought girls and black men wore in the nineties (hair decorations to the extreme and "ghetto" respectfully). They tell him instantly how wrong his perceptions are.
    • Lampshaded in The Monster Squad review, as Malcolm asks why he gets the most focus seeing as how he's the least interesting of all the characters on the show.
  • White Man's Burden: In Care Bears Nutcracker, Malcolm tells Tamara he loves the White Guilt movies (like Film/12YearsASlave) because Critic tries to make up for his own racism by always taking him out for dinner after.
  • Wholesome Crossdresser: On the TGWTG Vol. 1 DVD, he dresses up like an airline stewardess.
    • Douchey has a picture of him wearing Marilyn Monroe's dress, which Critic gets embarrassed by.
    • He once dressed up as a female irish janitor and recorded things in the girls locker room.
    Critic: Why don't you just forget I said that?
    • And there's Suburban Knights, where he wears a very skimpy costume. Critic didn't know what he was doing, but Doug evidently did.
    • When his early teenager self says "I like to wear women's clothing" and dresses up in a blonde wig, present!Critic's already high embarrassment goes through the roof. When his memory has been tampered with and he goes back to them, he calls 12 year old Doug in drag “a young man trying to work some things out”.
    • The cheerleading outfit in Christmas Story II was to prove a point (if a fanservice one), but the accompanying vlog has him put the mini-skirt to his waist and swing it around curiously. Hyper then interrupts, lunging at him and making him freak before the video cuts out. It also got spoilered in the "Carpet Diem" vlog, as the review aired a few days later and Doug says that because he's been in drag a million times and will be again, the fans mock him constantly and say he's Transgender.
    • In his DVD review of The Cinema Snob Movie, he dismisses a guy “having an interesting night-life” (with women's clothes) because dude hasn't got the hips for it.
    • Lampshaded in The Monster Squad where Critic dismisses Tamara crossdressing because everyone crossdresses on the show.
    • In the Princess Diaries II commentary, Doug reveals that when the characters were walking by the Jack Nicholson head, that was actually him with a pink dress shirt wrapped around his legs. Even Malcolm was impressed with how much his bottom half in pink looks like Anne Hathaway's legs.
    • In The Phantom of the Opera (2004), his immediate reaction to Beth being missing is to tell Tim to get in the Christine dress.
    • Aside from the pink gear in the beginning of the Jem review, he eye-rolls at the girls complaining about having to try on dresses and having someone do your make-up because both those things are fun.
  • Who's Laughing Now?: He's killed people who bullied him about Doug.
  • Wicked Cultured: He may have lost out on smarts, but he knows opera, theater, how to take care of himself, and has a fuckton of beautiful art in his house.
  • Wife-Basher Basher: Due to that scene in A Clockwork Orange, he shoots the lead in Singin' in the Rain because he thinks he's a rapist.
    • A bit more noble example occurs when he tries to shoot Lady Tremaine for her abuse of Cinderella.
  • Windmill Crusader: As he so paranoidly put it...
    Critic: Hel-lo I'm the Nostalgia Critic. I remember it so you don't have to. But that hasn't stopped people from trying!
  • With Great Power Comes Great Insanity: He was never great friends with sanity, but could always be relied upon (even if it took a while or a beating) to crash on the ground and do the right thing. Post-reboot however, he's got power learned from "The Review Must Go On" and Word of God has even apologized when Critic in The Shining proved too scary for Rachel to handle.
  • The Wonka: His number of issues are a mile long, but people follow him willingly and he's genuinely great at his job. Just don't tell him that last part or he might cry.
  • Woobie, Destroyer of Worlds: He pouts pretty hard when he learns his temper tantrum destroyed a whole city in Quest for Camelot.
  • Workaholic: Doug being Doug, this creeps into Critic every now and then. Like in Ghost Dad, he says death is no excuse to stop working, or the Gut Punch in Jurassic Park III, when the doctor says his dying mom didn't want to bother him from his work.
  • Worthy Opponent: The Angry Video Game Nerd. He even says "You are indeed the most worthy adversary" during the second episode of the feud.
    • Arnold Schwarzenegger is probably the only reoccurring person in his reviews that he can both make fun of and have affection for.
  • Would Hurt a Child: He makes Evilina cry twice in The Cat in the Hat, once by hitting her and yelling at her for crying, and in The King and I he dances happily at the thought of a teenage girl getting whipped.
    • In his review of Bridge to Terabithia (2007), he points out how much Jesse has to put up with all the shit from the male bullies in his class, and after Leslie dies, the bully says a line so unforgivably insensitive towards Jesse's situation that sends the Critic off on a tangent where he feels it is totally Justified to strike that kid. Jesse immediately sends the bully reeling with a right hook when he returns to the review. He also spends an extortionate amount of time mocking Anna Sophia Robb's attractiveness for no reason, the nastiness of which he lampshaded next review in The Shining.
    • After a fairly bittersweet Friend to All Children editorial on why you should lie to your kids about Santa, he reminds everyone of what he's now like by not caring that he made children cry.
    • Played for stepford horror in Maven's “Monster Mash”, as a “cute little girl” thought he was the Angry Video Game Nerd and he bludgeoned her to death.
    • Lampshaded in Maximum Overdrive, where he shows you the one shot of a child's head exploding “because he has a sick obsession for violence that he should probably question more”.
  • Would Hit a Girl: Mostly The Nostalgia Chick. Naturally, she likes beating on him just as much.

    Y 
  • Yank the Dog's Chain: Looking forward to The Neverending Story theme at the end of The Neverending Story III Escape From Fantasia, Critic? How about a montage of extreme Character Derailment instead?
    • When he starts to be sure that Jingle All the Way has ended on an at-least-not-so-bad note, the movie proves him wrong. He doesn't take it well.
    • He was on the verge of solving world hunger and cure all unknown diseases when DuckTales popped into his head and broke all concentration.
    • After having an adorably fun time with the creators of Animaniacs, he fucks up at the end because of an immature request.
    • In Simon Sez, when Obscurus Lupa accepts him not wanting to do a crossover with her, he's almost heartbreakingly delighted that someone actually listened to him. Of course she's only messing around.
    • At the end of Exorcist II: The Heretic review, the "great spirits" let him know that he doesn't have to do Nostalgia-Ween anymore. What he has to do instead? Doug's 1st Movie. And not even that exchange was enough, as 2013 brought another Nostalgia-Ween that portrayed him as both a psychotically racist Domestic Abuser and a depressed zombie.
    • As soon as he says he doesn't want anything more to do with Doug after making it through without having to hear the dreaded theme song, guess what plays?
    • He spends most of Star Trek month paranoid that Linkara will show up and nitpick in his usual way. When he thinks it's over and he's free, guess who shows up?
    • The Critic is overjoyed that the next film he is going to review is The Avengers. He thought it would be the Joss Whedon project, not the film adaptation of the British spy series.
    • Particularly painful for him is his happy ending in To Boldly Flee getting retconned into a paradox. Two years later and he's still bitter, even as he's forgetting details about what happened.
      • He was also ruling over an entire universe, but then as shown in Dawn Of The Commercials, he had to go back to living with his abusive mother until she died in Jurassic Park III.
  • Yaoi Fanboy: He sees the Ho Yay in Superman/Lex Luthor, Frodo/Sam, Simon Cowell/Ryan Seacrest, Batman/Robin and Leonardo/Raphael.
  • Youthful Freckles: Not on his face, but the rest of his body. Which is fitting for how many times he's taken his clothes off.
  • You Wouldn't Like Me When I'm Angry: As pathetic as he is and as pathetic as even the gun is (according to Word of God), you can't really say he doesn't leave an impact when he's genuinely pissed off.

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