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Threats that Link has faced among several games.


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Secondary Villains

    Dark Link 

Link's Shadow/Dark Link/Shadow Link

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/DarkLink_7857.png

Link's Doppelgänger who first appeared as "Link's Shadow" in Zelda II: The Adventure of Link, the surprise final boss. He's something of a popular character with the fandom despite his infrequent appearances and lack of characterization. He appears most notably in Ocarina of Time as the mini-boss in the Water Temple, and in Four Swords Adventures as a Recurring Boss.

There are many different Dark Links, just as there are many different Links. The character is alternately known as Link's Shadow (in The Adventure of Link), Dark Link (in Ocarina of Time), and Shadow Link (in Four Swords Adventures); it is unknown if there are any meaningful differences between these names. In The Legend of Zelda: A Link Between Worlds, you can enter Shadow Link Battles as a StreetPass feature. They represent other players you pass and are equipped with up to two of the items they have.


  • Big, Bulky Bomb: He throws humongous bombs at you several times during Four Swords Adventures. Can also use them in A Link Between Worlds should an opposing player equip them with one.
  • The Blank: In many of his appearances, he has no facial features except for glowing red eyes, and sometimes not even that.
  • Bonus Boss: In the Game Boy Advance version of A Link to the Past and in Spirit Tracks.
  • Degraded Boss: In Oracle of Ages, Veran can create dark Link doppelgangers as easily defeated Mooks.
  • Doppelgänger: He is an evil, jet-black clone of Link.
  • Evil Twin: He is identical to Link... except made of shadow.
  • Enemy Without: In Zelda II, he is explicitly seen jumping out of Link, and in Hyrule Warriors manifests out of Link's shadow.
  • Fearful Symmetry: One of his favorite combat tactics in boss battles.
  • Fighting a Shadow: In Four Swords Adventures, he retreats into the Dark World whenever you beat him.
  • Final Boss: In The Adventure of Link, he is the final boss.
  • The Heartless: The Shadow Link seen in Four Swords Adventures is a manifestation of the original Ganondorf's hatred towards Link.
  • Legacy Character: Each Link copy is a different character and has a different explanation for their existence. In Zelda II, Link's Shadow is the last test of worthiness for the Triforce of Courage. In Ocarina of Time, Dark Link is a Giant Space Flea from Nowhere. In Four Swords Adventures, Shadow Link is a creation of the Dark Mirror and a manifestation of the original Ganondorf's hatred for Link.
  • Mirror Boss: In Ocarina of Time, Dark Link mirrors the real Link's attacks.
  • Paint It Black: The versions in The Adventure of Link, Ocarina of Time, and Four Swords Adventures are jet-black.
  • Red Eyes, Take Warning: In Ocarina of Time, he has glowing red eyes. This was carried over to the unnamed Oracle of Ages and Twilight Princess copies/illusions.
  • Sequential Boss: In A Link to the Past (Game Boy Advance version).
  • The Trickster: In Four Swords Adventures, he and his clones play malicious tricks on Link.
  • White Hair, Black Heart: He is given white hair in his Twilight Princess incarnation.
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    Phantom Ganon 

Phantom Ganon

A spirit that has been summoned by Ganondorf several times, and bears a physical resemblance to him.
  • Cool Sword: A large black sword with a curl at the tip.
  • Dark Is Evil: He started off as a Undead-looking monster at first, then seemed to transition into a Living Shadow.
  • Evil Laugh: Lets one out from time to time.
  • Glowing Eyes of Doom: In all incarnations.
  • Living Shadow: His post-Ocarina of Time incarnation had a design that invokes this.
  • Me's a Crowd: In The Wind Waker, he can temporarily summon four copies of himself that can strike down Link. In Ocarina of Time, he uses a copy as a decoy.
  • Prongs of Poseidon: Wields a trident in Ocarina of Time.
  • Teleport Spam: His post-Ocarina of Time incarnation makes heavy use of his teleportation powers.
  • Tennis Boss: Each incarnation must be damaged by deflecting his energy attacks.

    Twinrova 

Twinrova

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/Twinrova_OoT_1334.png

The twin sisters Koume and Kotake, who were Ganondorf's adopted parents in Ocarina of Time. They presumably taught him his dark magical abilities and set him on his Start of Darkness. Koume uses fire magic and Kotake uses ice magic. Their Fusion Dance forms a composite being that can use both. They were later seen trying to revive Ganon in the Oracle series. Interestingly, their Alternate Universe counterparts in Majora's Mask are good guys who run a potion shop and tour boat in southern Termina.


  • Crystal Ball: They are sometimes depicted as using one of these, mostly in the Oracle series.
  • The Dragon: The twin sisters were Ganondorf's adopted parents. That probably explains a lot.
  • Dual Boss: You fight both witches at the same time, they eventually fuse together.
  • Elemental Rock–Paper–Scissors: Whenever you face them; Koume is weak to ice and Kotake is weak to fire, so the typical fighting pattern is reflecting one's elemental attacks to damage her sister with it.
  • Evil Matriarch: They rule the Gerudo tribe, and whoever disobeys gets banishment or enslavement to their son.
  • Evil Old Folks: They're said to be centuries old.
  • Hot Witch: Their fused form Twinrova is noticeably more youthful.
  • Flying Broomstick: Their mode of transportation.
  • Fusion Dance: Their Twinrova form, which the player usually has to fight.
  • Unexplained Recovery: In the Oracle series, provided they're not the same twins as in Ocarina of Time. That game's Link defeated them and they ascended to heaven, yet they show up just fine in the Oracle games.
  • Wicked Witch: They fit the traditional archetype pretty well: evil, old, green skin, Sinister Schnoz, ride broomsticks, etc. Subverted in Majora's Mask, however, where they run a potion shop and are helpful to Link (if a bit racist towards Dekus and Gorons).

    Vaati 

Vaati

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/Vaati_1111.png
https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/vaati_demon2_9473.jpg

The main villain of the Four Swords sub-series. The backstory from The Legend of Zelda: Four Swords told of how a young hero imprisoned him in the titular Four Sword and how he escaped when the seal weakened. The Legend of Zelda: The Minish Cap is his Start of Darkness, explaining how he used the power of the Minish Cap to transform himself into a human sorcerer, and later a giant eyeball-cloud.


  • The Archmage: Vaati displays incredible magical prowess.
  • Big Bad: He plays this role in the Four Swords sub-series.
  • Blow You Away: Being a wind mage in his later games, his attacks based on wind can send Link flying.
  • Breakout Villain: Vaati is the only villain to have played the Big Bad in more than one game besides Ganon, which led to a rise of popularity and many suggesting a return whenever a new game makes itself known.
  • Came Back Wrong: However he came back to life between The Minish Cap and Four Swords, he didn't come back the same. Instead of wanting the Lightforce to become all powerful, he went and kidnapped any pretty maiden that caught his attention.
  • Curb-Stomp Battle: Vaati won the tournament decisively and then went on to humiliate the soldiers of Hyrule in the beginning of The Minish Cap.
  • The Dragon: To Ganon in Four Swords Adventures. Although he was most likely manipulated.
  • Dark Is Evil: Wore deep purple robes after becoming a sorceror, and became pitch black after becoming an Eldritch Abomination.
  • Eldritch Abomination: At the end of Minish Cap, in Four Swords, and in Four Swords Adventures, he appears as a one-eyed demonic entity.
  • Enfant Terrible: Even though his age is never mentioned, it's pretty obvious that he wasn't an adult in his human and his original Minish form, since his human artwork makes him barely taller than Link and his Minish-sprite is even smaller than that of a regular Minish. Additionally, he's so cute in these two forms that you wouldn't know he's a villain unless someone told you... Of course the knights of Hyrule suspected nothing when a young boy signed up for the tournament...
  • Evil Albino: His pre-Oculothorax form has very pale skin and hair paired with red eyes.
  • Evil Sorcerer: He's a skilled and powerful magician who wants to conquer Hyrule.
  • Faceless Eye: In his demon form, he's an Oculothorax with bat wings.
  • Filler Villain: Fills in for Ganon in the Four Swords games where he isn't present.
  • Foil: To the series' Big Bad Ganon, as Vaati is the only other villain to have filled that role more than once. Ganondorf is a lone male Gerudo with green skin no other Gerudo has, Vaati was a Minish with an odd purple skin color that no other Minish has. Ganondorf turned evil because of jealousy for Hyrule's prosperity and a lust for power that got the better of him, Vaati turned evil because he was bored with his race and was interested in the evil in man's hearts. Ganondorf wears black armor and uses magic but prefers using brute force, Vaati wears purple and red but prefers only using magic in his fights. Both want to take over the world, but Ganondorf wants the Triforce (an ancient power left behind by the goddesses) and that goal stuck until Breath of the Wild, where the Calamity Ganon was a wild beast; Vaati wanted the Lightforce (a power gifted from the Minish to the Royal Family) but his goal ended due to forgetting his past life. Ganon only kidnapped Zelda due to her connection with the Triforce, while Vaati originally wanted just the Lightforce that was within her but he ended up kidnapping her strictly for marriage.
  • Giggling Villain: He laughs like the Happy Mask Salesman.
  • Greed: One of the guards describes Vaati as greedy when the latter is impersonating the king in The Minish Cap.
  • I Have You Now, My Pretty: In Four Swords and Four Swords Adventures, due to forgetting his former life, he's become obsessed with pretty girls. He kidnapped Zelda in the former because he wanted a bride.
  • I Just Want to Be You: This is how he felt about all humanity, according to The Minish Cap. Fascinated by the potential of humans to commit evil in pursuit of their goals, he used the Wishing Cap to take the form of a human to start his quest for the Light Force.
  • Killed Off for Real: Hyrule Historia states that Vaati was killed in the final fight of Four Swords Adventure, permanently writing him off the Child Timeline. His fate in the Adult and Decline timeline is, anyhow, undisclosed.
  • Meaningful Name: "Vaati" resembles "Venti", the Italian word for "Winds". Vaati's Japanese name, "Gufū", translated into English means "tornado".
  • Motive Decay: In Minish Cap, he wants the Light Force, which is located in Princess Zelda. From then on, he desires any girl that catches his eye, with Princess Zelda for a bride. Word of God justifies this, as he has forgotten his life as a Minish and everything in it.
  • Nice Job Fixing It, Villain!: The plot probably wouldn't have been kickstarted after he revealed his true colors had he deduced that Zelda was carrying the Light Force he was seeking, and thus not turned Zelda into stone.
  • One-Winged Angel: At the end of Minish Cap he drains Zelda's light force and transforms into a humungous floating eyeball-cloud.
  • Older Than He Looks: At least after Minish Cap, Vaati is immortal and all of his appearances are the same character.
  • Peek-a-Bangs: Apparently he doesn't even use that eye, since he ditches it when he goes One-Winged Angel.
  • Purple Is Powerful: His Minish and Hylian forms feature different shades of purple, this includes his skin.
  • Really 700 Years Old: At least in Four Sword Adventures, which is the last game in the timeline it appears in and has the same Vaati as the one from Minish Cap, which is one of the earliest games in the timeline.
  • Red Eyes, Take Warning: All his forms have red eyes.
  • Robe and Wizard Hat: His first form in Minish Cap wears this.
  • Sealed Evil in a Can: Vaati releases all the monsters within the Bound Chest when he shatters the Picori Blade. He later becomes the sealed evil when he is imprisoned within the Four Sword.
  • Staying Alive: Each appearance by Vaati is the same character who has managed to live across several generations.
  • Sword of Plot Advancement: He unleashes numerous monsters by destroying the Picori Blade. Fixing and upgrading the weapon is necessary to navigate through the world and ultimately to defeat Vaati.
  • Was Once a Man: Minish Cap reveals that he was once a Minish who transformed himself into a Hylian-like form. Once the Link of that game destroyed his body, he became the Eldritch Abomination that he is for all other Four Swords games.
  • The Xenophile: He grew up studying the evil potential of humans, even to the point of abandoning his Minish form. Even after losing his memories, he spends his time kidnapping human girls.

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Common Monsters

    Armos and Beamos 

Tropes applying to both

  • Distinction Without a Difference: The Guardians of Breath of the Wild largely play their role with their stone bodies and Eye Beams, but their names make no reference to Armos and Beamos.
  • Mecha-Mook: They are mechanical beings made to guard rooms and objects.

Armos

A Living Statue that chases Link. Their abilities and appearance change greatly from game to game.


Beamos

A Living Statue like Armos, but acts more like a sentry.


    Blin family 

Blin family

Common goblin-like mooks whose names all end in the suffix "-blin". Designs have ranged from imp-like to bulldog-like to boar-like (this motif seems to be the most popular). The original subspecies is the Moblin, a large spear-wielding savage that served as common foes in earlier installments. The Bokoblins, introduced in Wind Waker, are smaller and hinted to be smarter than the hulking Moblins. Bulblins are a more recent variation which can ride giant boars called Bullbos.


  • Army of Thieves and Whores: Their role in most games.
  • Barbarian Tribe: Starting with Wind Waker, they are shown to be comparatively civilized and intelligent among the monsters, but they are still savage thieves and raiders who will assault friendly travelers without a second thought.
  • Breakout Character: In early Zelda games, they were just another type of monster in Ganon's stable of minions, only with occassional friendly characters. Starting with Wind Waker, the introduction of the Bokoblins led to all of the Blin races receiving more detailed societal and racial traits on par with friendly races such as the Gorons and Zoras. They are now treated as common footsoldiers and Mascot Mooks since then.
  • Bully Bulldog: In some games, Moblins are humanoid and aggressive bulldogs.
  • Depending on the Writer: Games seem to vary between Blins being mindless magical beings, a sentient race that can be reasoned with, or some combination of the two. Their alliance also depends on the game, as in some games, such as The Legend of Zelda and Skyward Sword, they serve the Big Bad, while in other games, such as the Oracle games and Spirit Tracks, they are simple bandits that Link gets in the way of.
  • Dogs Are Dumb: Dog Moblins aren't portrayed as too bright, speaking with poor grammar in the TV series. In their defense, Pig Moblins aren't any smarter, and few monsters can speak at all in the video games.
  • Elite Mook: Starting with Ocarina of Time, Moblins have been portrayed as one of the bigger, tougher enemies in the 3D games. This set in after Bokoblins were introduced, which have henceforth taken their role as the Big Bad's common footsoldiers.
  • King Mook: Bulldog Moblins are led by King Moblin in Link's Awakening, and Pig Moblins are led by Great Moblin in both Oracle games. A Link to the Past and Nintendo Land make Ganon this to them.
  • Mini Mook: Miniblins are miniature Bokoblins. Their "da-na" noises will haunt your dreams.
  • Mook Carryover: They have served — in chronological order — Demise, Ghirahim, Vaati, and Ganondorf/Ganon. This implies that most Zelda antagonists, not just Ganon, have inherited Demise's curse of hatred.
  • Our Demons Are Different: Skyward Sword implies that they are demons who originally served Demise.
  • Our Goblins Are Different: On the scale between goblin and orc, the Miniblins are the most goblinish and the Moblins the most orcish, with Bokoblins and Bulblins falling in between. Especially in Twilight Princess, they tend to follow the Tolkien style of orc in terms of their characterization, though King Bulblin eventually reveals himself to be more of a Proud Warrior Race Guy in the Blizzard tradition.
  • Pig Man: Moblins and to a lesser extent Bokoblins sometimes have this appearance, which helps establish them as minions to their leader Ganon.
  • Savage Piercings: Both Bokoblins and Moblins have these in Skyward Sword, with Moblins having nipple piercings.
  • Token Heroic Orc: A few Moblins actually help Link on his quest.
  • We Have Reserves: They are fairly expendable. Averted in Breath of the Wild, where Ganon uses his magic to revive his minions.

    Bubble 

Bubble

Despite the name, these things are flaming disembodied skulls that normally curse Link when he touches them.


  • The Artifact: The name "Bubbles" for this monster made a lot more sense when they just looked like blue or red circles. Now that they've been modeled to look more like demonic flaming skulls, the name seems absolutely bizarre.
  • Dem Bones: They appear as a flying skull (sometimes with bat-like wings) that surrounds itself in a globe of ghostly flames.
  • Interface Screw: An effect they can have when they curse Link.
  • Invincible Minor Minion: In several games, it's completely impossible to defeat them; they must be instead evaded.

    Buzz Blob and Cukemen 

Buzz Blob and Cukemen

A Blob Monster which shocks Link when attacked with the sword. Using certain items on it turns it into the mysterious Cukeman creature who spouts weird advice and Fourth Wall Breaking lines.


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    Chuchu 

Chuchu

A fairly weak blob creature available in a wide range of colors and types, with each color normally yielding a useful spoil. Weak blob creatures have featured in numerous early Zelda games (Bits and Bots, Zols, and Buzzblobs), but the Chuchu has seemingly become a default replacement for all of them.


    Corrupted Soldier 

Corrupted Soldier

Soldiers and guards of Hyrule who have been corrupted by evil. They attack in large numbers and can use a variety of weapons.


  • Art Attacker: In most games, they're soldiers of Hyrule who have been corrupted. In A Link Between Worlds, they are paintings brought to life.
  • Artifact Mook: To a degree in a A Link Between Worlds, where it's not explained why Yuga chose to create monsters based off the old uniform for the Hylian army.
    • Averted in the Satellaview sequel to A Link to the Past, where all the guards are friendly NPCs due to it being post-World-Healing Wave.
  • Brainwashed and Crazy: In A Link to the Past, Agahnim brainwashed them when they refused to obey him. Vaati brainwashed or replaced them in Four Swords Adventures.
  • Cannon Fodder: Unlike Darknuts and Iron Knuckles, their armor isn't very protective and Link can cut them down by the dozen.
  • Dummied Out: Several soldier types, including one with a visible face, were cut from A Link to the Past.
  • Elite Mook: Some soldier variants have stronger armor and weapons, with the strongest usually wielding Epic Flails.
  • Faceless Goons: Friendly soldiers normally have their faces exposed, whereas corrupted soldiers do not. Notably, when freed at the end of A Link to the Past their faces are visible.
  • Zerg Rush: One of their primary tactics is to rush Link with numbers alone.

    Darknut and Iron Knuckle 

Darknut and Iron Knuckle

Powerful knights with protective armor. The two, whilst similar, are implied to be separate species.


  • An Ax To Grind: Iron Knuckles in Ocarina of Time wield axes as big as they are that take off four hearts (the max Link can have is twenty) per swing.
  • Animated Armor: Some interpretations of Iron Knuckles suggest this, though at least one case explicitly shows that a person is inside the armor. Darknuts, however, are suggested to be living beings, and when Darknuts lose armor, they are shown to be creatures wearing armor.
  • Attack Its Weak Point: Normally, the only way to damage them is to hit a vulnerable gap in the armor.
  • Beast Man: Darknuts in Wind Waker are depicted as jackal-like creatures underneath their armor.
  • Boss in Mook Clothing: Darknuts and Iron Knuckles are always among the most difficult enemies you will encounter, and are frequently featured as mini-bosses.
  • Lightning Bruiser: Despite their appearance, Darknuts are not slow, which is part of why they're so dangerous. This goes double for when their armor is removed.
  • Mighty Glacier: Iron Knuckles, however, are very slow. They make up for this with the highest damage output of any enemy in the series outside Breath of the Wild, often surpassing even Ganondorf, and by wielding particularly dangerous weapons, like a giant axe or an Epic Flail.
  • Shed Armor, Gain Speed: A gimmick of the Iron Knuckles, though the Darknuts picked up on it too, if at least just for Twilight Princess.
  • Turns Red: In the 64 games, Iron Knuckles will lose their heavy armor after taking sufficient damage and speed up.

    Deku Baba 

Deku Baba

Man-eating venus flytrap-like plants. Comes in several different variations.


  • Attack Its Weak Point: Cutting its stem is a One-Hit Kill. Bio Deku Babas and Baba Serpents keep moving when severed, though.
  • Expy: In The Wind Waker, they are replaced by Boko Babas. They're also similar to Piranha Plants from another Nintendo series, to the point where the ones that appear in Mario Kart 8's Zelda-themed DLC track move and behave exactly like them.
  • Man-Eating Plant: Of the classic "carnivorous plant with a giant mouth-like bulb that lunges forward and attempts to snap you up" variety.

    Dodongo 

Dodongo

Fire-breathing dinosaur dragons that are typically found close to lava. The most well-known method of killing them is throwing bombs down their throats.


    Ghini and Poe 

Ghini and Poe

Ghostly beings that usually can't be attacked by normal means, often requiring an item to make them vulnerable. The difference between the two is that Poes carry lanterns.


    Gibdo and ReDead 

Gibdo and ReDead

Reanimated corpse-like monsters (mummies in the former case), with the former being in more games than the latter.


  • Breakout Character: ReDeads were initially just another enemy in Ocarina of Time, but were featured alongside the series regular Like-Likes and Octoroks in Super Smash Bros. Melee.
  • Everything's Deader with Zombies: Redeads are walking corpses with death masks that slowly lumber to their prey and strangle them. They resemble both the voodoo and Romero zombies.
  • Glowing Eyelights of Undeath: ReDeads get this in The Wind Waker when they scream, while Gibdos have these all the time in Twilight Princess.
  • Golem: The ReDead trophies in Super Smash Bros. Melee and Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS / Wii U state that they are artificial constructs seemingly made of magic and clay. It's debatable if this was always the case (especially in Majora's Mask, where the ones in Ikana are gossiped to have once been members of the castle's dancing troupe), or in The Wind Waker where their figurine explicitly referers to them as undead, but they definitely have an incomplete-looking, clay-like appearance in Tri Force Heroes.
  • Hell Is That Noise: Their screams are just about the most startling thing in a Zelda game. This is especially true in-universe, where their screams are chilling enough to render Link, bearer of the Triforce of Courage, paralyzed in fear.
  • Kill It with Fire: Zigzagged with Gibdos in 2-D games; hitting them with a fire attack doesn't kill them, but it does turn them into the far weaker (and more agile) Stalfos instead.
  • Mummy: Gibdos are Stalfos wrapped in cloth.
  • Night of the Living Mooks: ReDead are — or at least resemblezombies. Likewise, Gibdo are ReDead or Stalfos wrapped in cloth.
  • Personal Space Invader: Both of them, but ReDeads to a memetic extent.
  • Savage Piercings: The Wind Waker ReDeads are decked out with this and tribal paint to give them a morbid appearance.

    Gohma 

Gohma

Arthropod monsters with a giant vulnerable eye.


  • Cyclops: They only have a single, massive eye — which, naturally, is their only weak spot.
  • Giant Enemy Crab: Varies between this and Giant Spider. They are usually said to be the former in 2D titles and the latter in 3D titles.
  • Go for the Eye: From shooting it in the original to pulling it closer to you so you can slice it up with your sword.
  • Hive Queen: Almost all Gohma bosses are identified as female, and often have brood minions.

    Goriya 

Goriya

Demons that resemble anthropomorphic scottish terriers. They are known for using boomerangs. To date, they have only appeared in the 2D top-down games. A different creature with a ratlike appearance, and the ability to shoot fireballs, called Copi, was re-named Goriya, overseas, but in Japan is separate from Goriya.


  • Animal Facial Hair: Particularly noticeable in Adventure of Link, Goriyas have long and well-done mustaches much like a scottish terrier.
  • Battle Boomerang: Their Weapon of Choice in all games.
  • Chuck Cunningham Syndrome: Despite being quite prominent among Ganon's minions in the first two games, and receiving dialogue, they pretty much just disappeared afterwards aside from a few minor cameos.
  • Composite Character: Overseas material attempts to claim that Copis are actually Goriyas.
  • Dub Name Change: The rat-like mimics, Copis, were called Goriyas in the US.
  • Fearful Symmetry: Copis in A Link to the Past; they copy Link's movements, moving in the opposite direction to him. Red Copis also shoot fireballs when Link faces them.
  • Food as Bribe: A Goriya NPC has to be given bait to access certain areas in the first game.
  • What Happened to the Mouse?: An interesting case here. Goriyas were quite common in the series' years on the NES, but they haven't appeared in a main console game since Adventure of Link. Their last appearance in a game was Oracle Of Seasons in 2001, where two boomerang throwing minibosses and a Goriya enemy appeared in the Gnarled Root Dungeon. Only the bosses were visually distinct from normal Goriyas (Looking more like minotaurs), whereas the Goriya enemies were simply Moblins with boomerangs. The overseas version of a A Link to the Past tries to claim Copis are them, but the two are obviously distinct.

    Helmasaur 

Helmasaur

Aggressive beasts that wear metal masks. The mask can be removed or destroyed to make them vulnerable.


  • Attack Its Weak Point: If you can't remove the mask, target its unprotected back.
  • Cool Mask: It can be removed or destroyed to make them more vulnerable. In some games, their face underneath is surprisingly cute.
  • Dash Attack: Their primary move.
  • Dub Name Change: They appear in Majora's Mask, but they are called Hiploops. Even though in the game they look more insect-like than dinosaur-like (which is the case in most games), they are definitely supposed to be Helmasaurs, because they were always called Hiploops in Japan.
    • In Link's Awakening, they are called Iron Masks.
  • Elite Mook: In Twilight Princess, you can encounter the Helmasaurus, a bulkier variant whose armor can't be removed.
  • King Mook: The Helmasaur King, the boss of the Palace of Darkness.

    Hinox 

Hinox

Giant, powerful one-eyed ogres that debuted in a A Link to the Past. They typically attack Link with bombs.


  • Attack Its Weak Point: In Phantom Hourglass and Breath of the Wild [[Go for the Eye Go for the eye.], in the latter game they'll try to cover it up after taking enough damage.
  • Big Eater: In Breath of the Wild, they'll drop lots of roasted meat upon being killed. Whilst fighting Link they clearly intend to eat him.
  • Cyclops: In all appearances, Hinox have only one eye on their face.
  • Giant Mook: In Breath of the Wild they're slightly redesigned to resemble giant Bokoblins.
  • Go for the Eye: In Phantom Hourglass and Breath of the Wild attacking their eye with arrows is a good strategy. Due to a mistranslation, english manual of A Link to the Past implies they need to be attacked in the eye despite this not implying in that game.
  • Mad Bomber: In most games, bombs are their weapon of choice, except in Breath of the Wild. In a A Link to the Past, they can even be found very close to the bomb shop in the Dark World implying they are
  • Sleepyhead: You'll find them sleeping most of the time in Breath of the Wild. You can quietly sneak up on them and steal their equipment without waking them up. Unfortunately not the case for skeletal Stalnoxes, who are always awake.
  • Was Once a Man: It was implied in A Link to the Past that Hinoxes were Hylian thieves under the Dark World's Karmic Transformation and this is explicit in the manga adaptation by Ataru Cagiva.

    Keese 

Keese

Bat-like enemies that have appeared in every game since the original. They reside in dungeons or dark places and tend to swoop down upon Link, but they're usually not much of a threat, even in large numbers. They can come in fire or ice variations; they're still not much more of a threat, but they're bigger nuisances, as they can respectively burn your shield or freeze you solid.


    Like Like 

Like Like

A stomach-like blob monster that swallows Link and devours certain items (usually shields).


  • Bandit Mook: They don't do any damage when they attack, but they steal your shield when they do. There is a variant known as Rupee Like who, you guessed it, steal your Rupees.
  • Decomposite Character: The "Pikit" enemy from A Link to the Past was called a Like-Like in Japanese, but "normal" Like-Likes are added to the the GBA version.
  • Evil Lawyer Joke: Although not referring to lawyers, Super Smash Bros. Melee reveals that Like Likes get their name from an old Hylian proverb: "Shield-eaters and world leaders have many likes alike". Whatever that means.
  • Poison Mushroom: Their Rupee Like brethren disguise themselves as Rupees, and suck up Link's own Rupees if you fall for them. There's also Life Likes, which just damage Link but hide as helpful hearts. There's usually an easy way to distinguish them from the real things, though.

    Lizalfos and Dinolfos 

Lizalfos and Dinolfos

Lizard warriors that normally attack in pairs. Dinolfos are stronger, faster, and can breathe fire.


  • Dual Boss: Usually, they attack in pairs, whether attacking simultaneously or as a Tag Team. Occasionally, you can encounter trios.
  • Dinosaurs Are Dragons: Dinolfos can breathe fire from Majora's Mask onward.
  • Draconic Humanoid: Dinolfos are sometimes depicted as humanoid dragons.
  • Elite Mook: The Dinolfos are this to Lizalfos. Twilight Princess gives us the Aeralfos, a variant that can fly.
  • Hollywood Chameleon: In Breath of the Wild they're modeled after chameleons, even being able to change color to blend in with the terrain.
  • Knife Nut: One of their preferred weapons.
  • Power Fist: In Skyward Sword, they use giant rocky gauntlets.
  • Rouge Angles of Satin: Dinolfos is misspelled "Dinolfols" in Majoras Mask and "Dynalfos" in Twilight Princess.

     Lynels 

Lynels

A group of well-armed and powerful centaurs with Lion features, comprising some of the toughest enemies Link can find.

  • Breath Weapon: Some can breath fire.
  • Depending on the Artist: Not as extreme as many other Zelda monsters like moblins, but sometimes the lower body of a Lynel is based off a Lion complete with paws rather then a horse as in the Gameboy games.
  • Elite Mooks: High health, high strength, and very tenacious.
  • King of Beasts: These Lion like beasts are known as the most proud and fearsome of all Monsters.
  • Mix-and-Match Critters: Lynels in several games are a mix of a Lion, a Hylian/Human and a Horse. Though some games remove the horse part.
  • Our Centaurs Are Different: Horse or Lion from the waist down, humanoids from the waist up with a Leonine head.
  • Sword Beam: They can use this technique in the first game and the gameboy titles.

    Moldorm 

Moldorm

A worm (or centipede) monster, usually with a vulnerable point on the rear segment. Aside from this, they're most known for fighting on high platforms, where it's easy to fall off to a lower room.


    Octorok 

Octorok

An octopus (or squid in some cases) monster that shoots rocks from its snout. Notable for appearing in every single Zelda game, with the exception of Twilight Princess, in which they're replaced by an Expy, Water Toadpoli.


  • Aquatic Mook: They take up this role in the 3D games, completely replacing the River Zora.
  • Depending on the Writer: Octoroks are either aggressive fauna that naturally reside in Hyrule or unnatural monsters made of magic.
  • Dishing Out Dirt: They tend to spit rocks.
  • Everything's Squishier with Cephalopods: They're cephalopodic monsters that spit rocks at their prey.
  • Expy:
    • The Water Toadpoli, a tadpole, in Twilight Princess fulfills the exact same role as the Octoroks from Ocarina of Time and Majora's Mask. It even has similar eyes.
    • Octoroks themselves fight like Deku Scrubs in Skyward Sword.
  • The Goomba: Is often the earliest encountered enemy in many of the 2D games, and one of the most fragile.
  • King Mook: Big Octos, usually found blocking paths creating whirlpools.
  • Retcon: The reveal in Spirit Tracks that mini Freezards are actually frozen Octoroks seems to imply that Octoroks were in Twilight Princess after all!

    Peahat and Leever 

Peahat and Leever

A flying plant root that attacks with sharp leaves and cactus-like blobs found under the sand.


  • "Get Back Here!" Boss: Both annoyingly have a habit of making themselves impossible to harm, making Link wait for them to make themselves vulnerable. Peahats are notable in that they tend to flip from game to game whether they're vulnerable in their stationary state or their mobile state.
  • Man-Eating Plant: Both of them.
  • Money Spider: In several games, Leevers are excellent sources of rupees.
  • Piñata Enemy: Both of them. Peahats, in particular, are likely to drop health restoration items, so hunting them down can be a matter of life and death at times.

     Phantoms 

Phantoms

Appearing in The Legend of Zelda: Phantom Hourglass and The Legend of Zelda: Spirit Tracks, Phantoms are large, armor-clad monsters will an array of supernatural powers.


    River Zora 

River Zora

Water-dwelling merfolk known to spit fireballs at anyone who trespasses their territories, not to be confused with their sleeker Sea Zora cousins.


  • Breath Weapon: Fireballs; they're basically fire-breathing fish-men.
  • Fish People: Though they look a lot uglier than their sea counterparts.
  • Token Heroic Orc: A few River Zoras are helpful to Link, most notably Queen Oren in A Link Between Worlds.

    Skulltula 

Skulltula

Spider monsters with a skull motif on the back.


  • Death Glare: In the Nintendo 64 games, at least, the "skulls" their bodies form look like they're perpetually doing this.
  • Giant Spider: Definitely bigger than normal, and can be bigger than Link.
  • Skeleton Motif: A Skulltula's armored carapace closely resembles a human skull. The actual head of the skulltula is located in the "skull's"' mouth.

    Stalfos 

Stalfos

A reanimated skeleton soldier. If you count the Stalchildren and Ikana Guards in Majora's Mask and the Stal-enemies in Breath of the Wild, these enemies have appeared in pretty much all the games.


  • All There in the Manual: The official Nintendo guide for Majora's Mask confirms the knights of Ikana are Stalfos.
  • Ballistic Bone: Some variants throw them at you. These variants also have a nasty habit of jumping out of the way when you attack them with your sword.
  • Dem Bones: They're the Zelda equivalent of the common "animated skeleton" you tend to see in fantasy settings.
  • Elite Mooks: Certain varieties of Stalfos are given this treatment, almost acting like minibosses, such as in Ocarina of Time.
  • Night of the Living Mooks: In Breath of the Wild, rather than Stalfos, skeletal Stal-enemies emerge at night to harass Link. These include Stalkoblins, Stalmoblins, Stalizalfos and Stalnox.
  • Nocturnal Mooks: In Ocarina of Time and Breath of the Wild, Stalchildren and Stal-enemies emerge from the ground at night.
  • Underground Monkey: They come in a variety of different forms across the different games.

    Tektite 

Tektite

A four-legged spider creature that gets around by hopping.


  • Giant Spider: Fewer legs than in many cases, but still this trope.
  • Money Spider: For whatever reason, they tend to carry plenty of rupees, playing this trope literally. Blue ones, in particular, are likely to carry cash.

    Wallmaster and Floormaster 

Wallmaster and Floormaster

Disembodied giant hands that like to send Link back to the dungeon's entrance (or a cell, in some cases).


  • Helping Hands: Though the helping part comes in if you're actually trying to get to the dungeon entrance.
  • Mook Bouncer: Easily the most infamous one in gaming history.
  • Wall Master: Though they only actually came out of the walls in the NES game (and the CDI games, but lets not talk about those).

    Wizzrobe 

Wizzrobe

Wizard-like enemies that attack with spells.


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