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"Rick, the only connection between your unquestionable intelligence and the sickness destroying your family is that everyone in your family, you included, use intelligence to justify sickness."
Dr. Wong

Beware of spoilers!


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    General 
https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/27515_rick_and_morty_rick_drinking.jpg


  • Adults Are Useless: Rick, Beth and Jerry are all selfish and egotistical. The most stable and morally sound characters are the children, Summer and Morty, at least for now, and Morty is already cracking up with the trauma of the multiple murders Rick has made him commit during their adventures taking a toll on him.
  • Aww, Look! They Really Do Love Each Other: They do have their moments that show they care for another despite toxic dysfunction. Deconstruction as those moments unfortunately are moments, they don't last and their toxic dysfunction remains an ongoing problem that none of them want to work to resolve. Even if at the end of Season 3, the family has returned together, it's more or less as a self-conscious facade and charade, i.e., rather than true appreciation and growth for one another.
  • Badass Family: They're dysfunctional as hell, but are a force to be reckoned with during a fight.
  • Brother-Sister Team: Morty and Summer, often. They are usually teamed up as the sanest members left in the family and shield each other from the craziness that surrounds them.
  • Dysfunctional Family: To put it bluntly, they are a crazy family. Several characters have remarked that it is astounding how they manage to stay a family for as long as they do, and more or less break apart three years after Rick Sanchez enters their life.
    • Gets discussed and downplayed after Beth and Jerry's divorce and over the course of Season 3 as the family starts really assessing what is actually so toxic about themselves (Summer's tendency to shift blame to others and rely on escapism rather than solving her problems, Morty's Kid Sidekick nature to Rick, Beth's dependence on her father's love and approval and the subsequent crippling fear of being left by him (as well as wondering if she's too much like her father for her own good), and Jerry constantly using his Butt-Monkey status to garner pity from people rather than actually do anything to improve himself as a person) and work on getting past it. By the Season 3 finale the status quo from Season 1 has been restored with an intact family under one roof, except now everyone seems to be genuinely happy with their lives and are better people, with only Rick as the odd man out because he relied on the family's dysfunction as a means of both validating his worldview and to guarantee a place in their lives regardless of his antics and adventures.
  • Four-Philosophy Ensemble: Morty is the Optimist, Rick is The Cynic, Summer is the Realist, Beth is the Apathetic, Jerry is the Conflicted.
  • Limited Wardrobe: All of them will wear the same piece of clothing unless there is a special occasion. Summer's new top in Raising Gazorpazorp was an important plot-point in the same episode.
  • What You Are in the Dark: Rick's actions and inventions often puts the family into situations where they can perform some truly dubious things with little-to-no-consequences if they so choose to. Needless to say, their better angels are often ignored.
  • With Friends Like These...: Despite being a family, all of them at one point have physically hurt and/or emotionally abused one another for one reason or another.
  • You Are Number 6: Rick drags the family (with the exception of Jerry due to being The Anti-Nihilist) into decadent nihilism once he keys them into the fact that the multiverse makes everything and everyone by default unremarkable and of little worth. It's implied Morty isn't his first grandson and Morty himself is (at least) on his third version of his family. Beth (or maybe a clone of her) throws this back in his face during the Season 3 finale, telling him that he can either try to coexist with his current household or leave them alone and go find another version of the Smiths to harass.

Main Family Members

    Rick Sanchez 
See his folder here for tropes regarding Rick Sanchez.

    Mortimer "Morty" Smith 
See his folder here for tropes regarding Morty Smith.

    Jerry Smith 
https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/jerryandmorty_8364.png
"Okay, I guess I'm just this entire family's toilet paper."
Voiced by: Chris Parnell

"I'm not an evil person. I'm lazy...I'm cowardly and... I do not know what I'm doing. Look, I got someone pregnant when I was 17; we're getting a divorce. None of this is on purpose. I was excited to date someone cool because it would make my ex notice me."

The father of Morty and Summer, and the husband of Rick's daughter Beth. Jerry is a meek, indecisive, and, not least, extremely insecure person who has trouble balancing his job, family, and marriage, none of which are helped by the influence of Rick's escapades, which he sometimes finds himself unwittingly weaseled into. He is effectively the Butt-Monkey of the family, with Beth both having a more stable employment situation than him and harboring some low-key resentment towards him, even on the best of days, and Rick not bothering to make any secret of the fact that he has absolutely no respect for him, and while Summer and Morty both clearly love him, they are also acutely aware of his numerous character flaws. While he is occasionally shown to have the aptitude to be quite capable and brave when push comes to shove, it never really sticks and he always reverts back to his old whimpy self when the danger is over.


  • Amazon Chaser: He has a fetish for strong women that borders on the obscene.
    • Despite their dysfunctional marriage, Jerry was attracted to Beth's tough, bordering on sociopathic attitude.
    • When he's being chased by alien huntress, Kiara, whom he briefly dates to get Beth to notice him, he's simultaneously fearful for his children's lives and aroused at how hard she's trying to kill them all.
  • Ambiguously Bi: Has a male lover in "Total Rickall" who turned out to be an alien parasite. Since their memories together were manufactured and the parasites are incapable of making unpleasant memories, it's hard to say if he would have actually enjoyed it.
  • The Anti-Nihilist: Despite being the Butt-Monkey of the family, Jerry refuses to cave into nihilism, as he states:
    Jerry: Life is effort and I'll stop when I die!
    • This becomes much more important throughout the seasons, especially when compared to Rick. While it's assumed in-universe (and a large portion of the fanbase) that Jerry is merely too stupid to understand the meaninglessness of existence, Jerry has never really spouted anything about the universe having meaning. In fact, being the Cosmic Plaything means that Jerry would have a good understanding of the multiverse being terrible, yet he continues to strive on. This is one of the biggest things that make him a fascinating Foil to Rick, who espouses hedonistic nihilism. It's this clash of ideals that could be partly why Rick works to usurp Jerry as The Patriarch of the family back in the beginning of Season 3, but as seen at the others' pages, they end up taking Jerry's view rather than Rick's, inevitably leading to Jerry remarrying Beth.
    • Heck, on some level, Rick seems to admire this about Jerry (which could explain partially Rick's disgust with Rick, he thinks Jerry could be so much better and not living up to his potential.) Best seen in a segment in the comics showing Jerry go through the banality of his life. The next day, he is about to continue the routine before seeing Rick at the table, with Rick complimenting Jerry on being able to go through in spite of being the Butt-Monkey.
  • The Baby Trap: Jerry and Beth's marriage was built around Summer's conception and the marriage is clearly dysfunctional. They had a one night stand and Jerry took advantage of the pregnancy to marry Beth. The only reason they've stayed together this long is that both are too stubborn to admit their problems and because Beth pities Jerry. While they do show affection for each other sometimes, it's largely overshadowed by their disagreements. They eventually divorced but soon got back together when Beth started having an identity crisis, as she saw the marriage as unconditional love.
  • Berserk Button: Rick's actions, in general, annoy him but when Beth defends these actions, that drives him over the edge. In the episode "Auto Erotic Assimilation" he and Beth have a nasty argument when Beth tries to defend Rick having an alien locked up in a secret lab he built. Another example is in "The Wedding Squanchers" when Beth and the kids were willing to be galactic fugitives and do whatever Rick wants so that they could have him in their lives.
  • Book Dumb: In defending his right to continue to call Pluto a planet, he quips that if he can't do so, we might as well burn Galileo at the stake for claiming the sun is round.
  • Bumbling Dad: He's not necessarily a bad dad, but he blurts out a pretty big bombshell in the pilot by telling Rick that Morty has some sort of disability right in front of his own son's eyes (in all fairness, he then gently told Morty that he'd always love him, but he felt the responsible thing was to be honest with Morty so he could take steps to address it instead of just ignoring the problem). In other instances, he's shown to be a pretty effective dad, and the "bumbling" aspect of the trope is better applied to his role as a husband and his Butt-Monkey status.
  • Butt-Monkey: Most likely the biggest example in the show, possibly more so than his son. Just to give some examples:
    • The best day of his life was an alien simulation of life running at minimum capacity, which he never caught on to until Rick broke the illusion.
    • Dozens of problem-serving assistants from another dimension couldn't take two strokes off his golf swing after two days of effort, driving them to homicidal misanthropy.
    • While trying to reconnect with Summer, complementing her on all that she's achieved, the conversation suddenly veers off the moment he mentions she's got a job and he doesn't, leading to him pleading her for some money to borrow. In fact, that was the whole point he was trying to do with her since the beginning of the episode; get her to loan him money.
    • In "Mortynight Run", it's revealed one version of Rick made a Jerry daycare if Ricks happen to find themselves with a Jerry they can't just send back home. According to our Rick, Jerrys tend to die quickly if allowed off Earth. The daycare is shown to work based on the fact that Jerrys are all unilaterally easily-controlled simpletons. When prime Jerry gets fed up and leaves (upon realizing that that was always allowed), he comes back in under five minutes because he can't deal with the weirdness around him.
    • "Look Who's Purging Now" sums it up:
      Jerry: I'm this entire family's toilet paper.
    • Subverted in the comics with the Jerry of Doofus Rick's universe, who is successful in everything he does and is able to defeat Rick to the point that he single-handedly conquered the Council of Ricks and enslaved them to conquer other dimensions.
    • Rick doesn't like the man so much that he apparently plotted a long complicated plan that involved causing a lot of galactic political chaos just so his daughter could be convinced to leave the man from the family.
    • After the divorce, his Butt-Monkey status seems to have grown. The wind keeps calling him a loser and a coyote ate his welfare check over a bag of chips just to make him suffer.
  • Character Development: His solo adventure with Rick in Season 3 helps Jerry realize that he can't keep using his character flaws as a shield as that actively prevents him from trying to overcome them. That being said, when he has to break up with an alien warrior girlfriend, he blames it on his kids rather than manning up and telling her his real feelings. Time will tell where this goes.
  • Les Collaborateurs: The Galactic Federation gives him a job at the end of Season Two. The first episode of Season Three has him working in a government office, wearing a government uniform with three metals and a federation armband. He has no idea what his job actually is, though. In an alternative dimension from the comics in which Morty is a universal dictator, Jerry is The Mole in Summer's resistance group.
  • Commuting on a Bus: This happens to Jerry in Season 3 after he and Beth get divorced.
  • Crouching Moron, Hidden Badass: Like his father-in-law, he can kick some monster ass if needed. This is best demonstrated in "Rick Potion #9" where he takes on the mutant apocalypse- and wins. Jerry seems to do best when lives are on the line, and miserably the rest of the time. In "Big Trouble in Little Sanchez", despite starting off simply trying to cower in a hole, he eventually guns his way to rescue his wife while also thinking up how to deal with the monster version of Beth. During "The Wedding Squanchers" when the Galactic Federation attacks the wedding, he picks up a gun to defend his family. That it was a harmless confetti gun should not count for lack of trying.
    • Jerry can prove himself to be a capable, respectable man when he's not constantly emasculated. This is one of Rick's problems with him. Rather than be a man or step up to the plate and take charge (as Rick mentioned in "Pickle Rick", he likes doers), he sees Jerry's attempts at being a wimp not as a sign of vulnerability or weakness; but rather one of manipulation to get others to carry his load. If Jerry could just stop acting like a wimp and step up like they both know he could, Rick wouldn't be such a hardass to him.
  • Dark and Troubled Past: It's implied that Jerry was in a rape situation in the past.
  • Deadpan Snarker: He can be as sharp-tongued and passive-aggressive as the rest of his family.
  • Dirty Coward: He tends to be somewhat cowardly in most dangerous situations, having once locked Beth out of the car when they were chased down by a crazed hobo. However, he can be doggedly determined when he has a goal in mind. On the other hand, when he wants to break up with an alien warrior woman, he tells her his kids are to blame, even though the real reason is that they're moving too fast and he is both slightly racist and sexist. The result is that the woman doesn't just go after Jerry, but she tries to kill the kids too.
  • Don't You Dare Pity Me!: Inverted. He deliberately tries to make other pity him so they can help him in some way. According to Rick anyway, who isn't exactly the most trustworthy judge of character.
  • Dumbass Has a Point: Jerry may be a ditz, but he's not wrong in saying that Rick's activities are dangerous and are going to get the family in trouble or that Beth's selfishness and fear over her father leaving again is the reason she turns a blind eye to his craziness even though said craziness puts the family at risk.
  • Face Death with Dignity: For all the whining he does when danger strikes, he can be very calm when death seems inevitable even if the death itself would be terribly undignified and potentially painful.
  • Fan Boy: Of the movie Titanic, to the point of dragging his wife to a lame reenactment cruise.
  • Fatal Flaw: He is insanely insecure. He is desperate for approval and affection, has no spine and at times he rival's Rick in the selfishness department. It's not played for laughs and it causes problems for other people, including his family.
  • Foil: To Rick. Rick is a sociopathic, brave, and brilliant scientist who the family will go along with despite being aware of his craziness, but despite all that, Rick will give up on things quite often when he personally decides it's too much work (i.e., abandoning Beth when she was a child when he couldn't handle parenthood). Jerry is a moral, downplayed Dirty Coward, a bit of a ditz who serves as the family's resident Butt-Monkey despite making good points about Rick's toxic influence, but despite his bad luck is a Determinator.
  • Grew a Spine: Finally stands up to Rick in the season 3 premiere, putting a Him or Me scenario on the table. Which is exactly what Rick wanted, cause he knew Beth would choose him over Jerry.
  • Has a Type: Jerry is an Amazon Chaser.
  • Henpecked Husband: Has a fairly belligerent relationship with his wife. In "Big Trouble in Little Sanchez", Beth's mental image of Jerry is a pathetic worm-like creature that is subservient to Monster!Beth, which even the actual Jerry finds utterly pathetic.
  • Hidden Depths: In timelines where Summer wasn't born, Jerry has a tendency to make it big in Hollywood as an actor or a writer/director.
  • Honor Before Reason: Pluto is still a planet to him, and he will argue that point endlessly, even if his son gets a bad grade on his report. Or if four billion lives are put in jeopardy. Almost. He's just insecure, you know?
  • Ink-Suit Actor: He looks a lot like his voice actor Chris Parnell.
  • Innocently Insensitive: He can periodically be condescending towards his family without realizing it, especially saying that Beth isn't a real doctor. They've been in several fights over this.
  • Insecure Love Interest: Jerry constantly fears that Beth may not truly love him.
  • It's All About Me: Jerry can be very, almost absurdly, selfish at times. For example, in "Look Who's Purging Now", despite Rick and Morty being in clear danger he still fixates on getting attention from Summer continually distracting her, ignoring their peril, and almost getting them killed. Made much worse when it's revealed he wasn't really even trying to reconnect with his grown-up daughter... he just wanted to mooch cash from her. His selfishness can also be seen in "Interdimensional Cable 2: Tempting Fate" when he tries to weasel his way out of donating his penis to a civil rights leader who needed it for a new heart by exposing the leader's heroin dependency to the public instead of suggesting to hold a fundraising event for a synthetic heart and then changing his mind on donating just to improve his reputation with the alien public. When the Galactic Federation occupies Earth he's too pleased to be employed to care that the planet has become a Police State with rights being subverted and human food being replaced with pills, all to the displeasure of every other native of plot relevance.
  • Jerk with a Heart of Gold: He is an incredibly insecure, an Extreme Doormat, and even self-serving but he does think of his families best interests, is an honest Kindhearted Simpleton, and has shown to occasionally adapt to his inner strength to save those he loves.
  • Kindhearted Simpleton: The main reason why Beth decides to remarry him by the season 3 finale. She realizes how incredibly lucky she is to have Jerry, a simple and honest man who still loves her even after all the crap he's been given by her (and the family as a whole).
  • Know-Nothing Know-It-All: Subverted. Jerry is very sensitive about how smart he is (which isn't much) and doesn't take people pointing this out very well. Likely the result of having an Obnoxious In Law like Rick.
  • Manchild: Jerry behaves in a very childish way a lot. This is shown through his wimpy behavior, his laziness in getting a new job after getting fired, and he whines very frequently.
  • Masculine Girl, Feminine Boy: The feminine boy to Beth's masculine girl.
  • Mr Seahorse: One of the clips from the first season's opening sequence shows him giving birth. The scene never shows up in the show proper, so we can only speculate how such an event came to pass.
  • No Respect Guy: Nobody has any respect for Jerry. Least of all him.
  • Not So Above It All: He tries to take the moral high road on Rick due to his manipulative behavior, but, as Rick points out in season 3, Jerry is just as manipulative, he just has a different strategy. Instead of doing stuff for himself, he simply cowards and whimpers until someone feels pity enough to do it for him. Whether one chooses to believe Rick though is a different matter entirely.
    Rick: You act like prey, but you're a predator!
  • Only Sane Man: Where Rick is involved at least. While his wife and children welcome Rick's presence in their lives Jerry is the only one to recognize and bring up the concerns that having a Mad Scientist living in the house creates.
  • Out of Focus: He has a much smaller role in Season 3 thanks to his and Beth's divorce.
  • Playing the Victim Card: Rick claims that this trope is Jerry survives in the world, eliciting pity from other people so he won't get into trouble.
  • Power Incontinence: He learns basic telekinesis from an alien warrior near the end of Season 3, but he flubs any act more complex than picking up small objects with his mind.
  • Put on a Bus: Twice over. The show's original Jerry was left behind in Dimension C-137 after Rick and Morty 'Cronenburged' it (and is possibly dead after being frozen by a Rick squad in The Rickshank Redemption)). And it's heavily implied that our Rick and Morty's new Jerry also got lost in a mixup at the Jerryboree, meaning that as of Season 3, we are now technically on our third Jerry.
  • Straight Man: Which is odd because he's also the dimmest of the main characters. But despite his awkwardness, he rivals Beth as the most normal of the family.
  • Straw Loser: He rarely catches any breaks, no one in his family takes him seriously, and his marriage is constantly hanging on by a thread due to the fact that Summer was an accident. Later on his wife actually divorces him and he has to move in an apartment in a seedy neighborhood. A wolf even chews up and spits out his unemployment check just to see him suffer, and an unseen voice whispers "loser" to him at least twice. By season 3, Rick accuses him of actually invoking this so people would pity him and help him.
  • Strong Family Resemblance: When his parents come to visit the family for Christmas dinner, it's shown that Jerry got all of his facial features from his father.
  • Throw the Dog a Bone:
    • The Season 2 premiere has the B-plot end with Jerry successfully performing a romantic gesture for Beth, and the final scene is him being consistently funny enough to put her in a laughing fit.
    • The Season two finale has him getting a Federation-mandated job after him being nagged for being unemployed for the past season.
    • While he still has to admit to his own frailties at the end of it, the penultimate episode of Season 3 has his apartment getting cleaned up by a very attractive alien huntress named Kiara (who has had sex with him a few times by that point), him learning a bit of telekinesis, and then managing to get away with dumping her through what Morty lampshades as a Deus ex Machina with a free answering machine thrown in for good measure. Rick also leaves him a friendly message on said answering machine, calling him "J-man" and saying he killed Kiara's ex, who'd been coming to kill Jerry, for him. Then leaves another message apologizing for having sex with Kiara.
    • The Season 3 finale ends surprisingly great for him. He still has his telekinesis from the previous episode; Him and Beth remarry after she finds out how much of a bad father Rick is and that she's grateful that such a "simple" man like Jerry still loves her. Both Morty and Summer, for once, take his side over Ricks, likely due to them losing some respect for him. He is finally re-established as the "patriarch" of the family after Rick angrily admits that he does a better job at it than him. But most notably, Beth defends him when Rick insults him by calling him a "dipshit", meaning that Jerry is finally respected by the family.
  • Took a Level in Badass: In "Rick Potion #9", though it apparently doesn't carry over to the reality Rick and Morty settle down in where the situation that turned him into a badass is resolved (or didn't go far enough for his badassery to happen). In "Big Trouble in Little Sanchez" he is fed up with Beth's perception of him as a meek worm and decides to fight back to rescue her from a monster perception of herself.
  • Toxic Friend Influence: A mutual case of toxic lovers between him and Beth. During a therapy where the couples watch their most negative traits perceived by the other personification kill each other, Beth and Jerry's are co-dependent since his submissive laziness and her aggressive ego works too well together. Both of them due to genuinely love each other, but they're such screwed up people that they have an unhealthy co-dependecy on one another. When the Season 3 divorce happens, they start crumbling to pieces, more notably Beth.
  • Ugly Guy, Hot Wife: Downplayed. It's implied that he married way out of his league, though Jerry is more average-looking than truly ugly. But this isn't helped by the fact that the father of his wife very much thinks this and constantly reminds him of it.
  • Unfazed Everyman: He is essentially surrounded by the family of a Mad Scientist, whose family pet named Snuffles even outsmarts him. While some of his moments do involve a Troubled Fetal Position, he takes Rick's realities comfortably well, but not for very long.
  • "Well Done, Dad!" Guy: Besides his insecurity with Beth, he also fears that his children may favor Rick over him.
  • Wounded Gazelle Gambit: In "The Whirly Dirly Conspiracy", Rick tells Jerry that he relies on this to get whatever he wants. By the end of the episode Jerry rejects going into the house bruised up so he can avoid depending on this tactic. Naturally, Rick briefly compliments Jerry before going inside and exploiting the very same trope.
  • Yank the Dog's Chain:
    • Gets one in "M. Night Shaym-Aliens!", when he has the best day of his life, but is pulled out right at the best moment by Rick, who reveals it was all just a simulation. It actually gets worse near the end when he tries to use the same "award winning" pitch from the simulation and is promptly fired over how bad it is.
    • He gets yet another one (if you think about it from the perspective of the series) in "Rick Potion #9", when he wins the pure affection of his woman by becoming a total badass in a Crapsack World, only for Rick and Morty to completely ditch that reality altogether and return to one where he and Beth are apparently back where they started. Badass Jerry is still out there, he's just... never important to the show again.
    • Yet another one in "Close Rick-counters" where he meets "Doofus Rick", the only person who respects him... who is then taken away by the rest of the Council, and Jerry is mocked by the other Ricks for being friends with him.
    • In "The Rickshank Redemption", he gets a great job and loves living in the Galactic Federation. Then Rick destroys the Federation's economy, causing chaos and making him unemployed again. He forces Beth to choose between him and Rick. She chooses Rick.
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    Beth Smith (née Sanchez) 
https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/bethandmorty_8075.png
Voiced by: Sarah Chalke

Beth: I feel like I've spent my life pretending you're a great guy and trying to be like you. And the ugly truth has always been-
Rick: That I'm not that great a guy and you're exactly like me.
Beth: Am I evil?
Rick: Worse. You're smart.

Jerry's wife, Summer and Morty's mother and Rick's daughter, Beth faces the problems that follow her unstable marriage and her dad living with her family, though she's the least affected family member by the latter of the two. She has a job as a heart surgeon for horses. As the series goes on, it becomes increasingly clear she has some darker sides to her personality; both as a consequence of being Rick's daughter as well as issues stemming from his abandonment of her in her childhood.


  • Abusive Parents: Not really shown often and is mostly shown to be a good mom but there are times where she is emotionally abusive to her son and daughter, as well as genuinely neglectful. Beth even admits at one point that deep down she doesn't have a "maternal instinct", and that she has to be especially encouraged to come to the aid of her children.
  • Actually a Doombot: The end of season 3 seemed to suggest (though not confirm) that Beth had abandoned her family to travel the world/universe/multiverse in order to find herself while Rick created a clone of her programmed with all her memories and personality to take her place so no one would be the wiser and allow Beth the option to return to the family if she so desired. See A.I. Is a Crapshoot for more.
  • A.I. Is a Crapshoot: An inverted example. As previously stated above, the end of season 3 ended with the possibility (though not the confirmation) that Beth had left her family while Rick created a clone to take her place. The inversion came about as the alleged clone-Beth began to consider the possibility that she was the clone (despite Rick's insistence that she wasn't) but rather than go insane or "go Blade Runner" as Rick put it, she ultimately decided to roll with it along with rejecting some of Beth's more negative personality traits; becoming a better mother to her children, learning to appreciate Jerry for being the anti-thesis of her father and getting back together with him, as well as beginning to draw the line with Rick and his behavior; even outright telling him that if he can't learn to coexist with the rest of the family on THEIR terms then as far as she was concerned he could just vanish from her life completely.
  • The Alcoholic: While not to the extent of Rick, she can really put away wine when things get down. In "Rixty Minutes", she goes through several boxes of wine while lamenting her lost opportunities. In "Total Rickall", Summer has at least one memory of Beth getting wasted and accidentally hitting her in the eye with a wine bottle, which is followed by her rushing to fill a wine glass after she shoots Mr. Poopybutthole under the mistaken belief that he's a shapeshifting alien parasite.
  • Alcoholic Parent: She got it from Rick. She isn't bad as him though, but a flashback with her and Summer shows that she's had her problems.
  • Ambiguous Situation: A whole lot of these appear about her and her true character in "The ABC's of Beth". It doesn't help that on both sides of the issue, you have Unreliable Expositors, with Rick tendencies to twist the truth and Beth attempts to protect her pride by lying.
    • Was she as much of a violently deranged child as Rick thinks she was? According to her, she only asked for dangerous weapons in a desperate attempt to get Rick's attention, while Rick believes she had full intention of using them for dangerous acts of violence.
    • Beth vehemently denies pushing Tommy into the honey swamp and leaving him to die in Froopyland, the world her father built for her as a child. As a grown woman, she has no recollection of it, even believing that Froopyland was a figment of her imagination. In her mind, she believes that Tommy got lost and she invented Froopyland to cope with Tommy's death. Tommy swears he was pushed into the swamp — but he is not a trustworthy source, starting and perpetuating a cannibalistic and incestuous cycle to survive. Rick believes on spot that Beth did it though, and she denies it through the episode.
    • At the end of the episode, is Beth still the real Beth? As she comes to terms with how similar she is to her father in a bad sense, Rick offers her to create a clone that will care for her children and go to her work and do everything she needs, while Beth herself gets to go to adventures and explore her new found dark side free of consequences. Rick states that, whichever she chooses, she will finally be happy to have chosen a life for herself. At the end of the episode, she is nice to her kids and chirpy about ordering pizza, but it's not clear and never stated whether that is Beth finally happy and at peace with herself or her clone in a "perfect mom" mode.
      • Even then, there's also the question of if she took the clone, does she intends to come back? Rick said the clone can take over for how long she wants. She can leave forever or come back in a few days, at which point, Rick will simply turn the clone off and she can take her life on earth from there, and even then, it would be possible for her to leave and make another clone at any given time. There's no way to know when Beth is there or isn't.
  • Ax-Crazy: Revealed to be closeted example in "The ABCs of Beth". It hasn't been a dominant trait, as she either hides it, or outright refuses to acknowledge it's even possible. However, in her youth she asked Rick for toys were are suited for a serial killer (including stickers that track whoever wears them and a pink sentient switchblade), creeped him out enough that had to create another dimension to protect their neighborhood from her (so he wouldn't have to keep replacing children and animals) and is implied to have attempted to murder her friend Tommy out of jealousy. In a failed attempt to bring him back from Froopyland, she gleefully slaughters him and his subjects.
  • Beauty Is Never Tarnished: She is seldom victim to the show's Comedic Sociopathy compared to the other Sanchez, who are regularly beaten up or outright dismembered. Even the odd times she is graphically involved in one of their antics, she is on the delivering end.
  • Because You Were Nice to Me: The main reason Beth would keep her verbally and mentally abusive, alcoholic, arrogant, lazy, manipulative and irresponsible father around her children, irregardless of all the havoc he leaves behind, is because she thought he was a great father to her when she was a child. But this is ultimately subverted when she begins to realize that he was very neglectful of her, having him build dangerous toys to spend time with him, which led him to assume she was crazy, so he created Froopyland to keep her away from the neighbour and keep her occupied, instead of doing it himself.
    • Also the main reason for her relationship with Jerry. Despite her supposed disgust or annoyance over his faults, it turns out that she actually needs those faults because it makes her feel special and good about herself. Furthermore, Jerry has put with alot of nonsense from Beth, especially when it comes to Rick and he has stayed by her side despite it all. Despite their Season 3 seperation, she chooses to get back together with him because she finds she is happier with him.
  • Berserk Button:
    • Implying she's not a real doctor seems to be a sore spot.
    • Also the few times that she has stood up to Rick come when he tries to pass off problems caused by his own carelessness as being Jerry's fault.
    • Calling out how unhealthy her devotion to Rick is.
  • Buxom Is Better: In the Rick and Morty rushed license adventure, Summer wears a DD bra believing she will grow into it because Beth herself has large breasts.
  • Calling the Old Man Out: Finally realizing just how disposable she is in the eyes of her father, Beth stands up to Rick at the end of season 3 and tells him that she's fine with him leaving her for a more compliant Beth if he won't make an effort to get along with the family he currently has.
  • Character Development: She remains static between the first two seasons, but the third sees her begin to inch closer to the slippery slope that is her father's ideology. It's implied that this is due to the divorce between her and Jerry. Beth relies on Jerry's spinelessness because it results in him fawning over her and this making her feel good about herself and using it to fulfill her self-worth in contrast with the desperation of getting her dad's attention. Without having that constant ego boost and romantic reassurement, she ends up becoming more and more bitter towards her children and their lives for "ruining" hers. During the penultimate episode of the third season, it's revealed that she was a Creepy Child, and that she may be even more twisted and violent than her father. She ends up reaching a point in trying to find out who she is, in that she is like her dad in the worst ways possible. Furthermore, Rick's joke causes her to doubt on whether she is the real Beth or not, which pushes her back to Jerry, who she genuinely falls in love with.
  • Creepy Child: Back when she was a child, she often asked her father to make weapons and gadgets and disturbed her father enough that he found it better off to create an Sugar Bowl world to sequester her in.
  • Daddy's Girl: Deconstructed. She adores her father for the most part and is willing to put up with a lot of his crap, though even she has her limits. Word of God even notes that her adoration of Rick (who, ignoring the mad scientist aspect, is still an alcoholic absentee parent who was away for much of her life) is what truly makes her a messed up person. In "The Wedding Squanchers", she admits that the reason she puts up with her father and is willing to be a galactic fugitive is because she's afraid of Rick running out on her again.
    • Another extreme variation. All she ever wanted, every action she ever took, was on some level to make her dad come back and love her again. Getting knocked up and pregnant in high school, becoming a horse surgeon, this has caused her to glorify Rick into something he's not. To Beth, if her father's gone, there's no happiness for her. She'll do anything to keep him around, even if it meant divorcing her husband, ditching him, and compromising the well-being of her kids to extreme lengths.
  • Daddy's Little Villain: Claims that she only asked her father to make weapons and dangerous toys for her when she was a kid because she wanted to show that she was just like him. Rick doesn't buy it.
  • Dating What Daddy Hates: Jerry is both flattered and insulted that Beth ultimately fell for him because he wasn't dismissive or cryptic like her father.
  • Deadpan Snarker: It seems to be a learned trait from her father, though it tends to come off more as complaining when she does it.
  • Disappeared Dad: Rick was gone for a large portion of her life. She said that she used to draw him into family pictures with crayon. Once he returned, she was willing to do anything she could to keep him in her life.
  • Drowning My Sorrows: After she shoots Mr. Poopybutthole, and after Rick gets arrested again.
  • Electra Complex: Word of God has it that she grew up resenting her mother and idolizing Rick as she came to blame her for Rick running out on them. The bloom's probably off the rose at this point, though she's still more lenient than she ought to be, partly because she'd rather have Morty end up like Rick than Jerry.
  • Enfant Terrible: Was this as a child and such Troubling Unchildlike Behavior is apparently a multiversal constant when it comes to Beth.
  • Everyone Has Standards: She's normally always siding with her father, but Rick will still do things she clearly doesn't approve of, like attempting to shoot Morty Jr. or hold a baby-eating alien hostage under the house.
  • Fatal Flaw: Her insecurity of feeling abandoned. She is willing to let her son go on dangerous adventures and go through a divorce with Jerry, hurting the rest of her family, so Rick wouldn't leave her.
    • She overcomes this at the end of season three.
  • Freaky Is Cool: It's stated by the creators that Beth fetishes the abnormal and this is one of the reasons she likes having Rick around.
  • Freudian Slip: When Rick shows all of the toy-themed murder tools from her childhood to prove that Tommy was telling the truth about her attempted murder of him, she briefly stops denying her hidden sociopathic tendencies and says that it maybe possible that she asked Rick to make all of her stuff just to get his attention. And that she may have tried to kill Tommy because she was jealous of his family. When she travels to Froopyland in a failed attempt to bring back Tommy to his family, she starts denying her murder attempt all over again.
  • Gasshole: She can burp just as well as her father to some extent, particularly when drunk. The Ricks are all quite proud of her for this.
  • Hate Sink: She starts to become one in season 3, blaming her own shortcomings on her kids in "Pickle Rick", and becoming arrogant and irresponsible to the point that Morty has to call her out on her attitude after Summer accidentally turns herself into a giant reverse-skin monster in "The Whirly Dirly Conspiracy". It becomes even more apparent in "Morty Mind Blowers" that she has little regard for Morty's life, choosing Summer over him with no hesitation when given a Sadistic Choice. Played with at the end of "The ABC's of Beth" whether or not if she is the real Beth, in the season 3 finale "The Rickchurian Mortydate" she finally reconciles with Jerry at the end even inviting him back into the family.
  • Hospital Hottie: Her job as a heart surgeon for horses. It's shown that had she not given birth to Summer and married Jerry, she would have gone on to become a Nobel Prize-winning surgeon.
  • Hidden Disdain Reveal: In the stinger of Rick Potion #9, Beth tells Jerry she doesn't care about what might have happened to Rick and Morty and now that they have gone, she feels finally happy. "Morty's Mind Blowers" shows that our current Beth shares this, having almost no regard for Morty's life, as she immediately chose Summer over him when given a Sadistic Choice.
  • I Coulda Been a Contender!:
    • In "Meeseeks and Destroy", she tells her Mr. Meeseeks that she often wonders what happened to that wide-eyed girl from Muskeegon whose hopes and career plans got short-changed after her Teen Pregnancy and shotgun wedding. She notes that she is successful as a veterinarian but obviously it's not fulfilling intellectually. Indeed, Jerry is often taunted by his family and by Rick for essentially ruining her career and her aspirations, noting that "she had options".
    • This is made more complicated in "The ABCs of Beth" where Rick told Beth that she was apparently a teen sociopath, and that she is smart and just like her Dad, but because of that, she will never really be satisfied with what the universe throws in her way. Rick eventually gives her an option of cloning and replacing her while the real Beth can have adventures, but it's left ambiguous if she did take that offer or not.
    • Furthermore, as an earlier episode showed, Beth and Jerry have a severe toxic co-dependncy on one another. Jerry's spineless devotion to her matches her aggressive yet fragile ego and both of them are incredibly insecure, going to extreme lengths to prove themselves in fulfillment. Combine this with Beth's massive issues with Rick and ultimately, it seems that while Beth had potential to make something of herself, she was pretty doomed from the start... thanks to Rick's crap parenting and her own issues.
  • I Just Want to Be Loved: Deconstructed. She craves affection and respect and married Jerry because, for all his flaws, he practically worshipped her. After divorcing him in Season 3, she steadily becomes nastier and more unstable due to Rick's coldness and she lashes out at her kids in trying to defend him while Morty is forced to do damage control
  • Informed Ability: Season 3 really has Rick piling on that she's incredibly smart like he is. "Ricksty Minutes" shows that she would have become a capable human heart surgeon, but as of the end of the season there's no indication that she has anything near Rick's intellect.
  • Ink-Suit Actor: Like Jerry, she strongly resembles her own VA.
  • It's All About Me: Remarkably so. A standout moment was in "Wedding Squanchers" when Birdperson tells her about him and Rick being galactic fugitives wanted for terrorism who have committed numerous atrocities together, and she doesn't even acknowledge what he's saying, preferring instead to talk about herself and her problems.
    • A recurring source of conflict between her and Jerry is the latter's belief she'd gladly let Rick's antics mess with the lives of the rest of the family so long as she was happy to have her father back. In said episode, she bluntly confirms that theory. It's a pretty normal reaction for someone in her situation though.
  • In the Blood: She has inherited her father's intelligence, ego, alcoholism, and sociopathy.
  • Jerkass: The status quo of the show is that Jerry and Beth's marriage is always on the brink of collapse; as such, she is particularly venomous towards Jerry, even above everyone else and almost as much as Rick. The original Beth became indifferent to the fate of Morty after the events of Rick Potion #9.
  • Jerk with a Heart of Gold: Beth, or at least the current Beth, at least earnestly loves and attempts to make her dysfunctional family and marriage work, and given how selfish and egocentric Jerry himself is, it's a two-way endurance. Unfortunately in Season 3 she just goes straight into a full-blown jerkass right after divorcing Jerry, now in "Pickle Rick" she just curses at the kids and therapist when she's fresh out of excuses after calling her out. While it's left ambiguous to the audience if she did or didn't take the clone, she becomes far more nicer then before; even refusing to look up to rick anymore in the Season 3 finale.
  • Latino Is Brown: Averted, if her family background really is Latino (and not, say, Iberian Spanish). Beth has the most fair complexion out of her whole family. If the version of her mother in The Rickshank Redemption is accurate, then she strongly takes after her in appearance rather than Rick.
  • Like Father, Like Son: Well, daughter, but eventually Beth does realize she's exactly like Rick. To the point where Rick offers to make a clone of her so that she can run off and have her own adventures while still letting Summer and Morty have a mother. The end of the episode leaves it ambiguous whether she took Rick up on his offer and abandoned her kids like Rick did to her.
  • Lonely at the Top: Turns out, she does not take loneliness well, especially when she has no one to look down to. It's been revealed in "Rixty Minutes" that, despite her fame and fortune as an experienced human surgeon, she surrounds herself with only birds in cages while Drowning Her Sorrows with pints of wine to deal with her loneliness.
    • This ties in with her I Coulda Been a Contender! attitude. Despite her supposed resentment of her status as marriage, she very much needs Jerry to function. And of course, there's her devotion to her father.
  • Mad Scientist's Beautiful Daughter: Adult variation. She is the hot, only child of her Mad Scientist father, and she's a Daddy's Girl.
  • Mama Bear: In "The Wedding Squanchers" Beth defends Summer against a robot that tried to harm her.
  • Masculine Girl, Feminine Boy: The masculine girl to Jerry's feminine boy.
  • Maternally Challenged: It seems that Beth does love her kids (for the most part). But that doesn't mean she's been a good mother.
  • Medium Awareness: At the end of Season three, she casually breaks the fourth wall by mentioning that now that she and Jerry got back together it'll be just like Season One.
  • Missing Mom: Rick states in the pilot that Beth's mother is no longer alive, and it's mentioned in "Rick Potion #9" that Rick left her mom. In "Auto Erotic Assimilation", Beth mentions that her mom had an issue with Rick putting his experiments before the safety of his family, resulting in him leaving. Whether or not she is dead or simply not around is unknown.
  • Morality Pet: In at least some sense, Beth seems to function as one for Rick. He tends to genuinely compliment and flatter Beth. He never swears at her like he does with the rest of the family and even calls her "sweetie".
  • Never My Fault: She seems to always blame Jerry for their strained marriage yet never admits her cold and distant attitude towards him could be a factor. This gets Lampshaded by a family therapist when she and the children go to a session and Beth puts all her problems on her kids. Near the end of Season 3, she tanks her own attempt to save a childhood friend of hers that she attempted to murder by refusing to apologize.
  • Not So Above It All:
    • One of the comic books reveals that Beth regularly uses Rick's portal gun to meet up with alternate versions of herself. They even have their own rock band.
    • In "Big Trouble in Little Sanchez" Jerry manipulates the device she is strapped into to present a mental image of what she idealistically wants him to view her as. That being a literal goddess!
  • Open-Minded Parent: She is typically ok with her father taking her children on potentially dangerous adventures across the universe, mostly because she would rather her children be more like her father than their father. She also didn't want to intervene with Morty loudly using a sex robot in "Raising Gazorpazorp" because she thought it would affect him negatively. However, she did intervene when she thought Rick was using it too.
  • Parental Abandonment: Beth has a lot of issues from Rick abandoning her during her childhood, resulting in her attempts to get him to stick around even though his presence damages the family. In "The ABC's of Beth", the ending leaves it ambiguous whether or not she followed Rick's example and abandoned her children, leaving behind a clone of herself to take care of them.
  • Parental Neglect: Her interactions with Morty are few and far between and a few episodes have shown that there's an unpleasant reason why. In "Rick Potion #9" Beth openly admitted that not having Morty in her life didn't bother her. "Morty's Mind Blowers" also has a very cruel moment where Beth is forced to choose which of her children gets to live and she chose Summer with no hesitation whatsoever.
  • Parental Substitute: Played with. As previously mentioned, the end of Season 3 suggested (though not confirmed) that Beth had abandoned her family to travel the multiverse while Rick created a clone to replace her role in the family. When the (alleged) Clone Beth begins to realize the possibility that she was a clone, she still decided to play the part. Rick and Summer were fine with it as well as Clone Beth proved to be a much less selfish and more nurturing maternal figure than the real Beth was.
  • Parents as People: She has moments where she genuinely seems to care for her children but she idolizes Rick so much that she is blind to the negative impact he is having on them. Add her occasional bouts of selfishness and her toxic co-dependent relationship with Jerry and it is easy to see how Morty and Summer turned out the way they did. After she divorces Jerry in Season 3, she notices the impact it is having on the kids and starts to reach out to them. In "The Whirly Dirly Conspiracy" she expresses how confused she feels as a parent but she ultimately manages to get through to Summer.
  • Reasonable Authority Figure: As much of a Daddy's Girl as she is, Beth is fully willing to call out Rick when his antics lead to real trouble.
  • Small Name, Big Ego: Beth is quite a narcissist. In the "Pilot" Rick is able to get her to stop being angry with him for taking Morty on his adventure by complimenting her breakfast. She tends to put her own needs ahead of others, such as insisting Rick stay in their lives despite his antics. In "Big Trouble in Little Sanchez" Jerry knows that she wants him to view her as a goddess. Rick also later reveals she was a petty sociopath as a child, bugging Rick for deadly gadgetry to use on any other kid that made her feel insecure, one of the sanest being a ray gun that forces people to like her.
  • The Sociopath: After her true Heel Realization at the end of season 3, she calls herself Rick's "sociopathic, crazy bitch of a daughter."
  • Teen Pregnancy: She went to her senior prom with Jerry (possibly out of pity, as Rick believes) and had sex with him, getting pregnant at seventeen as a result. While she and Jerry decided to get married and ostensibly made the best of things, Reality Ensues and their relationship suffers greatly over the years due to both of them not being mature and settled enough to properly raise their children. For what it's worth though, at least one alternate reality shows that while both of them would've been rich had Jerry not knocked her up, they would've deeply regretted not being together.
  • Took a Level in Jerkass: In Season 3 her current state may be a result of her father's actions after the divorce, but in one episode "Pickle Rick." she has absolutely no self-control when she blame her shortcomings and personal problems on her children even going as so far as openly insulting her kids and pushes the blame on them during therapy session, all while knowingly allowing her father to put her kid's lives at risk.
  • Took a Level in Kindness: In "The ABC's of Beth". If there's a chance that she isn't a clone, then choosing to stay made her feel more complete and happy with her life which also hints that the whole point of the clone was to get her shit together and get over her daddy issues. After suffering an existential complex in the following episode wondering over this, she starts taking more responsibility for herself and her family.
  • Toxic Friend Influence: More like Toxic Spouse Infuence, but Beth and Jerry both need one another because they balance the worst in one another. Jerry is so needy for love and affection while being utterly insecure so he's drawn to the aggressive Beth, even if she is very mean and vindictive. On the other hand, Beth is so needy for love and affection while being utterly insecure that Jerry's willingness to give it to her along with him going along with what she mostly does makes her feel like she has control in her life and that she is wanted. They do love one another, but they're also bad for another. On the other hand, when they divorce, Jerry has even worse luck and Beth lashes at her kids to vent.
  • Weakness Turns Her On: Played With. On the one hand, she can annoyed or disgusted by Jerry's passiveness. On the other hand, it's that passiveness she needs him for since his adoration for her however unhealthy for both, makes her feel good about herself. Heck, this is one thing that Rick seems not take into account as to why Beth puts up with Jerry. It's also why she starts descending into crappier attitudes when they divorce.
  • Turn Out Like His Father: While she's not particularly an active parent when it comes to Morty, one thing she does try to make sure of is that he doesn't turn out like Jerry; hence the reason why she allows Morty to spend so much time with Rick.
  • Troubling Unchildlike Behavior: According to Rick. He said child Beth used to ask for some disturbing inventions from him, such as a switchblade that could talk, a ray gun, false fingerprints, etc. Rick also said he built Beth her own world not because he wanted to get rid of Beth, but because he wanted to protect the neighborhood from Beth (for his own selfish reasons).
  • Ugly Guy, Hot Wife: With Jerry, who is implied to have married out of his league, but downplayed, as Jerry is more average-looking than truly ugly.
  • The Ugly Guy's Hot Daughter: Beth is beautiful while Rick isn't very attractive.
  • "Well Done, Daughter!" Girl: Deconstructed. Rick does love her but his abandonment of her as a child creates an overriding desire to earn her father's approval and she tries to do everything she can so he won't leave her again — often resulting in her ignoring his negative influences on her family or being okay with him taking her kids on life-threatening adventures to other dimensions.
  • Women Are Wiser: Downplayed. She obviously seems a more stable and intelligent being than Jerry, but even he is perfectly able to call her out on her flaws and arrogance many times over. Eventually subverted in season 3, where it is revealed that her relative intelligence in regards to Jerry is the same sort of sociopathic arrogance as her father's, and is a very unstable person herself.

    Summer Smith 
https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/summerandmorty_1293.png
"Bitch, my generation gets traumatised for breakfast."
Voiced by: Spencer Grammer

Summer: It's called "carpe diem" Morty. Look it up.
Morty: You look it up, you don't-you don't even know what it means.
Summer: That's because losers look stuff up while the rest of us are carp'en all them 'diems.

The daughter of Jerry and Beth, the granddaughter of Rick, and the sister of Morty. Summer behaves the way a typical teenage daughter living in a house with a psychotic grandfather would.


  • Action Girl:
    • In the comic book B-plot (Summer Spectacular), she imagines herself as this. Issue 1 has her saving a man from a hostage situation, while Issue 2 portrays her as the commander of an army of anthropomorphic food. Gradually starts to grow into the role as the series goes on. Going so far as to be proactive at times given how morally compromised her grandfather is and how spineless or apathetic Morty tends to be. Culminates in the spin-off comic Little Poopy Superstar, where she gets to team up with Mr. Poopybutthole.
    • She gradually becomes this in the show proper after she starts going on adventures with Rick to avoid dealing with the stress caused by her parents' divorce. This is taken to the extreme when she joins a tribe of cannibalistic marauders and easily adapts to their dangerous lifestyle.
  • A-Cup Angst: The Rushed Licensed Adventure game reveals that she wears double D bras despite her size being much smaller, claiming she'll grow into them because "Mom's got big boobs."
    • Turns up in the show proper in a big way when said angst ends up driving the B-plot of "The Whirly Dirly Conspiracy"
  • Adorkable: Like Morty, she sometimes acts cute and dorky and has anxious moments in the series.
  • All Girls Want Bad Boys:
    • In the pilot, she has a crush on Frank Palicky. Too bad he got frozen to death by Rick.
    • She enters into a brief relationship with the Devil.
    • Later, she starts a relationship with the leader of a tribe of cannibalistic marauders. It doesn't last.
  • Alliterative Name: Summer Smith.
  • Aloof Big Sister: Zigzagged. Summer goes back and forth on this. Earlier on, she was much closer to being actually aloof and uncaring about Morty. But as the show went on, she's become closer to Morty and cares about him, even if she doesn't always show it.
  • Appeal to Popularity: Summer has a tendency to follow the crowd if only so she can get more attention. In "Ricksy Business" she encourages Morty as well as one of her geeky school mates, Nancy to traverse a dangerous dimension because she thinks they'll ruin her house party. In "Get Schwifty" she becomes a religious fanatic when the rest of the town starts worshiping the giant heads in the sky. It also might be why she is so disturbed with Unity, one mind controlling the minds of many.
  • Ascended Extra: While she was always part of the main crew, Summer gets a major bump in screen time after "Rick Potion No. 9", and another one during season two, to the point where entire subplots were centered around her. Summer also appears quite often in the comics and is even getting a spin-off comic of her own: Lil' Poopy Superstar.
  • Attack of the 50-Foot Whatever: Winds up a skinless giant in The Whirly-Dhirly Conspiracy as a result of messing around with one of Ricks inventions in an attempt to enlarge her boobs.
  • Barbarian Longhair: Evoked in The Rickshank Redemption and Rickmancing the Stone when the audience actually sees Summer with her hair down.
  • Big Sister Bully: Zigzagged. Summer doesn't actively pick on Morty, mostly because neither one speaks to each other. At one point she groin kicks him for what at first seems like a very flippant reason— but it turns out she thought he went in her room. It still appears to be an overreaction ... until it is revealed a minute later in the episode that Morty masturbates in EVERY room in the house. Even so, they do care for each other.
  • Big Sister Instinct: To her brother Morty. Summer and Morty developed very protective instincts towards each other as they faced threats, their parents' complicated relationships and Rick's antics. Morty tries to protect Summer in anyway he can, even from her own adoration of Rick. She is just as protective of him and even attempts to get Morty to go free when they face the Council of Ricks together to protect him.
  • Brain Bleach: When returning to her house after forgetting concert tickets, Summer accidentally walked in on Morty masturbating in the kitchen. This bad memory convinces her that Morty isn't a parasite.
  • Bratty Teenage Daughter: Though mostly in the pilot. She has shown improvement in later episodes, but still generally carries this trope around with her. She also has much more of a backbone than her brother and thus a lot less tolerance for Rick's bullshit.
  • Breast Expansion: Gives herself a dose of this in Season 3. Unfortunately, she goes in for a second dose, winds up unbalanced, and causes a big mess.
  • Brilliant, but Lazy: Implied. Summer mentioned at one point she intentionally gets C grades and it's shown that Summer possesses superior intelligence.
  • Brother-Sister Team: She and Morty are seen working together when the need calls for it, mostly against something caused by their grandfather.
  • Character Development: Goes from being just a bratty stereotypical teenage girl into a lot more of an action girl and becoming more and more equipped to deal with the strange situations her grandpa puts the family in and becomes indifferent to her mother's Never My Fault attitude.
  • Combat Stilettos: Her Blooddome outfit in Rickmancing the Stone comes with a pair of gray heels.
  • A Date with Rosie Palms: In chapter 3 of the game, one of the items is Summer's "relaxing massager," and it's made very clear what she does with it. Rick sees the item and doesn't think it's a big deal.
  • A Day in the Limelight: "Raising Gazorpazorp" has her being involved in Rick's misadventure and future episodes have put a bigger focus on her such as Rixty Minutes and Something Ricked This Way Comes. As of season 2, Rick has much less of a problem including her on his and Morty's intergalactic escapades.
  • Everyone Has Standards: Despite being a bitch to Morty a lot of the time, she's horrified in one memory of "Morty's Mind Blowers" where their mother chooses to save Summer's life over Morty's without any hesitation.
  • Extreme Mêlée Revenge: After the events of "Something Ricked This Way Comes", Summer is scammed out of her business venture with Lucius Needful (aka the actual devil). The answer? Get jacked up on steroids with your grandfather and beat the living shit out of him in front of thousands of onlookers in Seattle.
  • Fiery Redhead: Obviously, especially in episodes like "Something Ricked This Way Comes" and "Auto-Erotic Assimilation".
  • Generation Xerox: Summer has inherited Rick's creativity and love of adventure, as well as Beth's hero-worship of Rick. Taken a step further in "Rickmancing The Stone" when Summer's relationship with her cannibal boyfriend turns out exactly like Beth and Jerry's marriage after a few weeks of living together. Justified because, as Rick points out, both relationships were based on running away from their problems.
  • The Generic Girl: While Rick is a mad scientist, Morty is his long-suffering sidekick and Beth and Jerry are a dysfunctional couple, Summer is completely devoid of any drama. Keep in mind she was born when Beth and Jerry were teenagers.
  • Green-Eyed Monster: It is shown that Summer can be jealous of Rick and Morty's close relationship, and she can sometimes feel ignored by her grandfather. While Rick does his best to keep her at a distance, the two of them have gone on their own adventures, including on the planet Gazorpazorp. Her complex of being ignored by Rick manifests into a connection with the Devil in "Something Ricked This Way Comes".
  • Groin Attack: She once kicked Morty in the nuts because he once went into her room, even though he tries to tell her he didn't.
  • Hair Color Dissonance: Summer is a strawberry blonde.
  • Hero-Worshipper: Much like her mother, Summer begins to hero worship Rick and overlook his flaws to gain his approval. This is a problem since, as Morty says, Rick may not be the villain, but he's definitely not a hero.
  • Hidden Depths:
    • Although Summer is not as scientifically-minded as Rick, she does possess superior intelligence. Summer is shown to be very whip-smart and nimble-witted, at least compared to rest of her family.
    • Summer seems to communicate with Rick better than Morty does, at least as long as neither party is being belligerent. Near the end of "Ricksy Business", Summer understands Rick's vague descriptions of a device much faster than Morty does even though the latter had spent much more time with Rick by that point.
    • She demonstrates an impressive knowledge of vehicles in "Rickmancing The Stone", using Rick's flask as an impromptu nitro booster and causing an enemy dune buggy to flip over and explode with one well-placed shot.
  • I Just Want to Be Special: Summer gets frustrated that when Rick won't allow her to go on adventures with him and is annoyed to find all her alternate reality selves to be rather boring. Or non-existent.
    • Outright says it in Rick and Morty Comics #16 when she runs off with another space traveler. Rick, rather uncharacteristically, agrees and lets her go.
      Summer: "I want to be special, Grandpa Rick! I deserve to be special!"
      Rick: "Yeah, Summer. Yeah. You do."
      • She later gets her wish when she becomes more part of Rick and Morty's adventures in the 2nd and 3rd seasons.
  • Jerk with a Heart of Gold: Despite her outward bratty and aloof attitude, Summer does have a moral compass (which especially stands out when she goes on adventures with Rick and Morty) and does love her family.
  • Morality Pet: While Rick can be a huge jerk to Summer, it's obvious that he does love her.
  • Ms. Fanservice:
    • Only in Mr. Goldenfold's dreams. Although it's not as sexy as it looks.
    • She is made to wear a very Barbarella-style outfit in the comics after she teams up with Peacock Jones.
  • Obfuscating Stupidity: In "Lawnmower Dog" she says she gets C's intentionally. It might just be an excuse for her bad grades.
  • Only Sane Woman: Along with Morty, Summer is by far the most grounded and "normal" person in her family, as she is the one that calls out Rick the most and is the one that has the least "zany" adventures opposite from her family. This causes Rick not to take her to his adventures with Morty, considering that she would protest more easily than her pushover brother.
  • Potty Failure: Seems to have this problem.
    • In "A Rickle in Time", when Morty knocks out Rick, he mentions that all the Mortys knocked out all the Ricks and all the Summers peed their pants.
    • In "Total Rickall", during the flashback to when everyone got stuck in an elevator, she tells Morty "Just pee your pants. I did it the moment we got stuck."
    • In "Look Who's Purging Now" she fondly remembers Jerry pushing her on the swings until she peed herself.
    • A promotional commercial for season 2 also seems to lampshade this problem as Summer, Rick, and Morty search the multiverse for a bathroom that Summer can use. Morty mentions in passing that Rick solved this same problem with by simply putting a catheter in him.
  • It Runs in the Family: Summer huffing pottery glaze in the art room could be a sign she has inherited an addictive personality like her mother and grandfather.
  • Seen It All: In "Morty's Mind Blowers", she doesn't even blink upon finding Rick and Morty with none of their memories. Instead she simply comments on it being a "Scenario 4" and breaks out a notecard on what to do.
  • Shut Up, Hannibal!: Having grown sufficiently calloused to them, Summer counters Rick's attempt to bully the family into shame and subservience with a nihilistic rant family during the season 3 finale by farting.
  • Strange Minds Think Alike: In the first episode of Season Three, Summer is the only one in the family who doesn't take Rick turning himself in as abandonment. When she is looking frantically in the garage for a way to rescue Rick, she finds six dead flies on a work table and guesses that if they are arranged in a certain pattern they might unlock a secret lab full of weapons. She only gives up that attempt because Morty mentions the dead Rick buried in the backyard, realizing they could his portal gun. When Rick later enters the garage, he complains about Jerry moving his things around, and then re-arranges those same dead flies in such a way that they unlock a secret lab exactly like the one Summer described.
  • Straw Nihilist: Becomes one due to the trauma from Beth and Jerry's divorce and joins a tribe of cannibals in a desert wasteland dimension. This is played for laughs when Rick gives the tribe the technology to live comfortably and Summer is the only one still committed to their nihilistic philosophy. By the end of the episode she makes her peace with Jerry and starts to show shades of The Anti-Nihilist.
  • Strong Family Resemblance: She has Jerry's facial features and head shape.
  • Took a Level in Badass: Summer's adventures with Rick and Morty allows her to go from the teenager who get easily scared from horrors to the warrior-like Action Girl who doesn't even blink when about to kill those who try to kill her.
  • Trademark Favorite Food: The comic portrays her eating pizza a lot. In Issue 1, she accidentally burns herself because she's simultaneously daydreaming, straightening her hair, and eating a slice of pizza. In Issue 2, she holds the hand of an anthropomorphic piece of pizza as he dies on the battlefield.
  • The Unfavorite:
    • In the second universe it's shown that Jerry and Beth are very resentful of the sacrifices they had to make because Summer was born. It takes Morty's twisted consolation to make her stay. It's not long until where an alternate universe closely similar to theirs regret the abortion and has caused both parents terrible lives as the current universe watches it unfold. One of Morty's Mind-Blowers shows that she's at least Beth's favorite, since when a villain forces her to choose whether Summer or Morty will be spared, Beth doesn't even take a second to think it over before choosing to save Summer.
    • While Rick does love her deep down, it's pretty clear he favors Morty over her although this might be because Morty is easier to manipulate. As Summer begins to hero worship Rick more-and-more, she tries to compete with Morty for Rick's attention and prove herself as an adventurer.
  • "Well Done, Daughter!" Gal: Notably, she doesn't have this relationship with Jerry, but with her grandfather, Rick, whose approval she tries to win. Especially noteworthy in the season three premiere.

Extended Family Members

    Morty Jr. 
See his folder here for tropes regarding Morty Jr.

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