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Characters / Mischief Theatre
aka: A Christmas Carol Goes Wrong

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Recurring characters from Mischief's ...Goes Wrong series of shows.


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Debuted in The Play That Goes Wrong

    Chris Bean 

Chris Bean

Originated by: Henry Shields

Cornley Polytechnic Drama Society's director and leading actor.

  • Acting for Two: invoked
    • Portrays both Mr. Darling and Captain Hook in "Peter Pan". Unlike the other examples in the production, it's common practice for an actor to take on both roles.
    • Additionally, there's one moment where he and Dennis briefly switch parts when Chris speaks Smee's lines to prompt Dennis, which causes Dennis to speak Hook's lines. Chris stops this before it goes too far.
  • Ambiguously Christian: In the early Mischief production Nativity Goes Wrong, Chris is the founder of a Christian theatre company performing a Nativity play, although no further references to his religion have been made since.
  • Badass Baritone: Chris has a pretty smooth sounding, deep voice, which often compliments his roles rather nicely. That is until hijinks ruin all of his scenes.
  • Bad Boss: He often loses his temper with his cast and crew, but considering the people he's working with, you can't really blame him.
    • He also played Scrooge, a man who certainly qualifies.
  • Basement-Dweller: Apparently still lives at home with his Amazingly Embarrassing Parents. His Dad turns up mid-filming to play Commander Wickham in "The Pilot" and his mother misplaces the envelope containing the winner for "Best Performance in a Sequel" (after making him loudly admit that he has "photography magazines" in his drawer.)
  • Berserk Button: While Chris is pissed off about quite a few things throughout the series, he really doesn't like it when the audience gives him lip.
  • Big "SHUT UP!": He throws this out there when he's having trouble with the audience during Peter Pan.
  • Breaking the Fourth Wall: With the exception of some nasty behind-the-scenes business during A Christmas Carol Goes Wrong, Chris is one of the most professional members of the group, but when the audience talks to or teases him, he'll be quite quick to talk back.
  • The Comically Serious: Chris takes himself and his art incredibly seriously, despite the many shortcomings of both. This leads to a lot of humour as things go increasingly, disastrously wrong. This particularly becomes apparent in Peter Pan Goes Wrong, in which he alone of everyone, cast or audience, seems to believe that he's appearing in a serious production of Peter Pan and not a pantomime, and keeps getting into arguments with the audience when they try and participate.
  • Copiously Credited Creator: invoked He is Murder at Haversham Manor's lead actor, director, set designer, costume designer, prop maker, box office manager, press & PR person, dramaturgy, voice coach, dialect coach, and fight choreographer. He also filled in for the role of Mr. Fitzroy during rehearsals.
  • Delusions of Eloquence: Occasionally slips into this, as he’s by far the most insistent on the company’s productions being serious epics, even when it’s a classic pantomime like Peter Pan. It also takes a certain type of arrogance to select some of his company’s scripts (like the Pilot (Not The Pilot) episode.)
  • The Determinator: Everyone in the cast has this attitude after dealing with all the mishaps, but Chris stands out due to powering through mistakes continuously, rather than pausing for thought like the others.
  • Everyone Has Standards:
    • He doesn't seem pleased with how the group has been forced to sell out with blatant product placement, but he also notes that they need the money.
    • He also isn’t amused by Robert putting down his own niece’s acting ability.
  • Evil Laugh: He performs one as Captain Hook. It's not exactly subtle.
  • Heel–Face Turn: Simultaneously during Scrooge's, he realizes how bad he's been to his crew lately, resulting in a sincere apology and allowing for Robert to play Scrooge like he wanted to.
  • Heroic BSoD: At the end of Peter Pan Goes Wrong, he is sat on the stage practically weeping following the crash of the Jolly Roger.
  • Hidden Depths: It's implied that Chris can actually be a genuinely good actor when he's not plagued by a series of nonstop errors, with him being accepted by an agent in A Christmas Carol Goes Wrong. It could be that he gets to show his genuine talent more when he's not busy handling so many aspects of his own group.
    • He is also shown to be a talented pianist in The Goes Wrong Show.
  • Insistent Terminology: He insists that his production of Peter Pan is a "traditional Christmas vignette'' rather than a pantomime.
  • Jerk with a Heart of Gold: He treats his actors like crap, particularly Robert and Dennis, but when push comes to shove he deeply cares about his friends, and their welfare and safety.
  • Kick the Dog: He's pretty awful to Robert during A Christmas Carol, calling him the troupe's worst actor, and falsely claiming that everyone else would've walked if he was cast as Scrooge, when in actuality, they supported him. And when Jonathan mentions that Robert would be great for the part, Chris says that the role is "Ebenezer Scrooge. Not Ebenezer Huge". All this is made even worse since Chris was planning to completely abandon all his friends all this time. Luckily, he realizes the error of his way and decides to right his wrongs.
  • Kick the Son of a Bitch: After Robert spends the first two thirds of “Summer Once Again” treating him poorly, Chris arranges for him to fail miserably in the last third, before having all of his dialogue removed in the next episode.
  • Large Ham: He patterns himself off of old-school theatrical actors, so his acting is quite broad and loud. Worth noting, though, that it's still a far more realistic example compared to his peers.
  • Mr. Fanservice: Unintentionally so, as his snowman costume winds up being removed during "The Spirit of Christmas", forcing Chris to continue to play the rest of the scene in his underwear, showing off a fairly good build in doing so.
  • Not So Above It All: As an actor, Chris tends to be one of the most straight-laced and professional members of the cast… but has on several occasions acted in a hilariously similar manner to Robert; getting into arguments with the audience and engaging in Ham-to-Ham Combat.
  • Only Sane Man: Relatively, at least; while not without an ego, he's comparatively down-to-earth compared to most of his fellow dramatists, simply wants to put on a good show, and tries vainly to keep things from going too far off the rails. He starts to lose this crown whenever he's provoked into arguing with the audience, however.
  • Out of Focus:
    • "90 Degrees" is the only time he doesn't portray one of the main characters, with his part being an important role, but only onstage for a single scene outside of his pre-show intro. Additionally, we also get to hear him during Robert's backstage drama throughout.
    • Subverted with the Nativity play, which is the only time Chris doesn't play a character within the piece, but still has an active role as the narrator and piano player throughout the proceedings.
  • Pet the Dog: After acting like an ass towards Robert during A Christmas Carol, Chris tries to make amends with him by giving him his role of Scrooge.
  • Rant-Inducing Slight: While looking for a prop during The Play That Goes Wrong, he finally snaps at the audience for laughing at him and his exasperation with the other performers.
  • Sitcom Arch-Nemesis: He's gotten into fights with the audience several times. He also takes his bickering and spotlight hogging with Robert on-stage multiple times.
  • Small Name, Big Ego: Chris actually isn't really a narcissist, but he clearly thinks he's far better than the awful shows that he's involved in. And while he is one of the more competent people involved, he's still got his own fair share of shortcomings.
  • Too Clever by Half: As a director, he often showcases way too much ambition for his otherwise decent amount of ingenuity and skills, approving grandiose set designs his crew can’t pull off, using casts too large to avoid his company’s eccentricities and flaws, and barreling ahead with productions so far outside of their expertise that they’re Giftedly Bad.
  • Unsympathetic Comedy Protagonist: As the director and lead actor he is arguably the main character, and consistently shares the role of Jerkass with Robert. This helps to make his failings all the more entertaining to watch.
  • Vitriolic Best Buds: With Robert, the Society's co-founder.
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    Robert Grove 

Robert Grove

Originated by: Henry Lewis

Cornley's wannabe leading actor. Unfortunately, his ambitions far outstrip his abilities.

  • Acrofatic: Robert's clearly the largest member of the cast, his involvement in the slapstick shows him to be more flexible and in better shape than you'd expect.
  • Acting for Two: invoked
    • Plays Nana the dog, Peter Pan's shadow, and Starkey the pirate in "Peter Pan". He also briefly plays Peter for two lines when he as the shadow accidentally pops up in front of Jonathan as Peter, and he takes advantage of the situation.
    • Plays a mortician, an employee of Scrooge, the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come, Tiny Tim, and Scrooge in "A Christmas Carol".
      • The latter two were not planned. Robert repeatedly tries to incapacitate Chris to play Scrooge until the latter has a Heel–Face Turn and gives Robert the role, which he only gets to properly portray for a brief amount of time before Derek Jacobi comes back to reclaim the production and role. And during his attempts to steal the role of Scrooge, he knocks out Lucy who was playing Tiny Tim, forcing the not so tiny Robert to take over the role.
    • Plays Gabriel the Angel and later assumes the previously nonexistent role of "the manager" in "The Nativity".
  • Adaptational Heroism: While his Stage Mom and Evil Uncle tendencies are still on full display in the BBC version of Peter Pan Goes Wrong, Robert is no longer responsible for crushing a child during a production of Oliver!, parking his car in the ambulance parking spot, preventing paramedics from saving his life, and still to this day parking in the ambulance spot. Instead, this is given to David Suchet. Additionally, the original version has Robert rather unprofessionally start the "Oh, yes it is" chant against Chris, while the BBC version has an audience member start it instead (though he clearly finds it hilarious).
  • Alcohol-Induced Idiocy: Accidentally winds up getting plastered during "The Spirit of Christmas", which causes him to frequently break character and engage in all sorts of shenanigans ad libbing.
  • Ambiguously Christian: In Nativity Goes Wrong, Robert is part of Christian theatre company C. H. R. I. S. T. along with Chris.
  • Badass Baritone: Robert has a deep, booming voice that he's quick to put to use in his Large Ham performances, which occasionally works, although it's often interrupted by Robert going too over the top, or other circumstances beyond his control.
  • Big Beautiful Man: Definitely on the heavy side, but he's still a decent looking guy in his own right, and more than willing to play a Mr. Fanservice when given the opportunity. Unfortunately, the opportunity was in the role of Peter Pan's shadow, and involved a skin tight lycra bodysuit...
  • Big Eater: Gets arrested in The Goes Wrong Show for stealing a giant packet of fruit gums all for himself.
  • Break the Haughty: When he usurps Chris as director to stage "Summer Once Again", he gives himself a big entrance with confetti...and then proceeds to ruin the performance with his perfectionism and restarting scenes to get them right. It leaves the cast with no time to actually finish the play, and he's left looking very foolish after having to hastily summarize it.
  • Camp Straight: He can be fairly flamboyant and dramatic, and his outfits can match this demeanor, especially when we see his flashy sparkling hat. However, he was stated to have been married to a woman.
  • Comedic Sociopathy: He goes above and beyond in trying to incapacitate Chris during A Christmas Carol Goes Wrong because that's the only way he'll get to play the lead role.
  • Dawson Casting: invoked After completely incapacitating Lucy, he takes over her part of Tiny Tim.
  • Demoted to Extra: In Universe. After Robert's brief (and tyrannical) stint as director of "Summer Once Again", the reinstated Chris punishes him by casting him only as non-speaking characters in "The Most Lamentable...". This does not stop Robert from giving himself lines.
  • Drowning My Sorrows: Overdoes it on Santa's sherry in "The Spirit of Christmas", and reveals his wife has left him and he's living in his car.
  • Dull Surprise: Whenever he gets a role he doesn't want or isn't enthusiastic about, he tends to read his lines in a dull monotone.
  • Everyone Has Standards:
  • Evil Uncle: Robert isn't evil, but he fulfils the role by being a horrific Stage Mom towards his niece.
  • Fat Bastard: Robert's not a villain, but he has his nasty moments and he's a fairly large fellow. Any time he plays a villain, this trope applies, particularly when he portrays Adolf Hitler.
  • Hollywood Tone-Deaf: When he steals the mic from his dubber during "The Spirit of Christmas", his singing is more akin to just screaming the lyrics. This is due to him getting absolutely wasted beforehand, with his other instances of singing averting this trope.
  • Irony as She Is Cast: invoked While he only plays the role after accidentally incapacitating Lucy, he applies here for his portrayal of Tiny Tim, given he's the largest and tallest member of the troupe. The fact that he accidentally beats the shit out of Dennis and Sandra while playing this sickly child only emphasizes it.
  • It's All About Me: As other tropes state, he usually wants to be the center of attention, and when he once played Santa, his presents for the children were all copies of his book on acting.
  • Jerkass Has a Point: While Max has his moments of competency, and Robert's criticisms of his skill are quite harsh, Max's complete disregard for character would cause most other theatre groups to not touch him with a thirty nine and a half foot pole. Not that many troupes would be clamoring for Robert either, but his biggest issues aren't exactly uncommon, and can be worked with.
  • Jerk with a Heart of Gold: Sure, his diva nature often causes trouble, but he's horrified and will try to help when the other actors are injured.
  • Kick the Dog:
  • Kick the Son of a Bitch: His attempts to take Chris out of commission continually grow in danger, but considering Chris is acting like far more of a Jerkass than normal, we can sympathize with him.
  • Large Ham: When he gets a role he does like, he hams things up like nobody's business. His book is called Anything You Can Act, I Can Act Louder.
  • Laser-Guided Karma: After he usurps control of the company, he goes out of his way to demean Chris, rewriting his character as the shit-eating manure boy. However Chris gets the last laugh, when Robert's direction proves to be even worst than his, Robert trips and literally ends up with a shit-eating grin and the bricks within his bag, that he placed to humiliate Chris all the more, fall upon his feet. By the end the company becomes so tired of Robert's tyranny, Chris is almost immediately reinstated as the director.
  • Laughing Mad: Tries to exit doing an Evil Laugh during "The Lodge", but he goes through quite a few obstacles in doing so, causing him to continue laughing until he can exit, with each failed attempt causing him increase in volume and intensity.
  • Milking the Giant Cow: He wrote a book teaching this acting style, as seen in The Goes Wrong Show.
  • Mr. Fanservice: He plays up the sex factor quite a bit as Peter Pan's shadow, all while wearing a very tight outfit. Given Robert's overweight and, as stated, playing Peter Pan's shadow, this can go into Fan Disservice, but not if you find him to be a Big Beautiful Man. The shadow thing, however...
  • My God, What Have I Done?:
    • He's clearly mortified and guilt ridden over horribly injuring Lucy during Peter Pan Goes Wrong.
    • Subverted in Peter Pan Goes Wrong. He clearly looks to regret his rather harsh words towards Sandra, Jonathan, and especially Max, when they're played for everyone to hear; however, in The Goes Wrong Show he's revealed to have learned nothing, and is utterly remorseless in trashing his fellow actors in his segment of "The Cornley Drama Festival".
  • My Sister Is Off-Limits!: In A Christmas Carol Goes Wrong, he is less than pleased to find out the girl that Chris was making out with in the video of the Company's holiday party wasn't Sandra but his sister.
  • Non-Singing Voice: invoked He's quite obviously lip syncing during his song in "The Spirit of Christmas", even before the actual singer pops up on camera.
  • Oh, Crap!: When his Hazmat suit gets compromised in "A Romantic Dinner."
  • Pet the Dog:
    • While he and Jonathan are trying to lift a knocked out Sandra out of the window in The Play That Goes Wrong, Robert moves Sandra's dress to stop it from showing off her underwear, clearly trying to lessen her humiliation, even though she's too unconscious to know.
    • After Lucy's been through enough Amusing Injuries to wind up in a wheelchair Robert seemingly tries to dissuade Chris from making her character walk the plank, realizing it's Tempting Fate. Unfortunately, Chris sticks to the script.
    • He asks actors to force out some tears during his masterclass and when Max fills a whole jug, he is genuinely concerned for his well-being, before urging viewers to stay emotionally safe.
  • The Prima Donna: Robert is quite dramatic both in and out of character.
  • Pushed in Front of the Audience:
    • In "A Christmas Carol", while originally only supposed to play the two ensemble roles and The Voiceless Ghost of Christmas Past, but after knocking out Lucy, he has to take over as Tiny Tim, and once Chris has a Heel–Face Turn, Robert briefly gets his wish and takes over as Scrooge.
    • In "The Nativity", in addition to playing Gabriel, he takes it upon himself to play "the manager" after Dennis mixes up the term with "the manger".
  • Sad Clown: Behind his over the top nature, it's revealed that Robert's gone through a divorce that he's still not over yet and is currently sleeping in his car.
  • Sex Sells: His dancing as Peter Pan's shadow is fairly suggestive, at one point emulating an orgasm on stage.
  • Sitcom Arch-Nemesis: He and Chris frequently bicker or try to monopolise creative control and screen time from each other, a turbulence that often more than shrewdly seeps into several plays. Taken up to eleven in Christmas Carol Gone Wrong where Robert tries to injure Chris via method acting so he can usurp star role from him, with Chris retaliating in kind.
  • Small Name, Big Ego: Robert is actually capable of giving good performances, but he's still far too confident in his own abilities.
  • Stage Mom: He takes this role with Lucy, his niece. She clearly doesn't want to be a part of CPDS but he forces her to take the stage. When she finally decides she enjoys performing, he constantly criticizes her even during the performance.
  • The Starscream: The more shows that the cast puts on, the less Robert tries to hide how much he wants to usurp Chris as director. Like the Trope Namer, when he gets his chance in the second series premiere, he quickly loses his newfound leadership role due to his own arrogance and ego, to the point that cast decide they prefer Chris.
  • Took a Level in Jerkass: Robert is arguably even more of a jerkass in the second series compared to the first. He forces the actors to perform "Summer Once Again" three times because it isn't "perfect", he treats Chris horribly in his small role as the "manure boy", he constantly insults the acting abilities of his fellow cast members, and attempts to steal the show with every scene he's in. And in "The Cornley Drama Festivsl" he shoots him.
  • Vitriolic Best Buds: With Chris, the Society's co-founder. They may not get on, but when ranking the actors, he still places Chris third after himself and Sandra.

    Dennis Tyde 

Dennis Tyde

Originated by: Jonathan Sayer

A diminutive supporting player who struggles with remembering his lines.

  • Acting for Two: invoked
    • Plays both John and Smee during "Peter Pan". He mixes up the costumes during the climax. The original version has him portray both characters battling each other.
      • He also winds up speaking Hook's lines when Chris prompts him with Smee's, but Chris puts an end to it before it goes on for long.
    • Plays a mortician, Bob Cratchit, and a future citizen during "A Christmas Carol".
    • Plays one of the wise men, one of the shepherds, all three innkeepers, and a dust bunny (or tumbleweed) in "The Nativity".
  • Accent On The Wrong Syllable: He has trouble pronouncing words like "philanthropist" and "facade".
  • Ambiguous Disorder: At one point, Robert refers to Dennis as "medically fascinating" for his truly catastrophic levels of stupidity.
  • Bad "Bad Acting": While not without his occasional moments of competency, Dennis stands out as by far the worst actor of the troupe. This reaches its zenith when he repeatedly fails at Playing a Tree.
    • In The Goes Wrong Show episode "The Cornley Drama Festival Part 1," he is ranked by Robert as the worst actor of the group (though placed just before Trevor, ranked lower for his role as stage manager rather than actor).
  • Big Fancy House: The "See It Safely" short shows that he lives in one of these with Robert (who has presumably moved in after living in his car following his breakup with Denise.)
  • Cloudcuckoolander: According to Jonathan Sayer, Dennis has trouble sometimes distinguishing between the plays and reality.
  • Dawson Casting: invoked Plays the young John in "Peter Pan".
  • The Ditz: He struggles to pronounce multi-syllabic words, cannot remember even simple lines, and seems cheerfully oblivious to the audience being there or the requirements of acting.
  • Demoted to Extra: In-Universe, after playing large, significant roles in the previous productions, he's constantly cast as animals and props in The Goes Wrong Show. However, Dennis being Dennis, he frequently finds ways to mess up, giving him more lines than he's supposed to have.
  • Everyone Has Standards: Even someone as ignorant as Dennis can tell when he's being humiliated.
    • He looks noticeably upset over having to play a horse in "Harper's Locket". Perhaps he doesn't enjoy being ridden by Max, or maybe, given the chronological order of how the show was supposed to air, it's that he's upset about being demoted to animals after the previous two episodes allowed him to play humans after his stint as props.
    • His butchered pronunciation of "cyanide" upsets him enough that he has to turn away from the audience to hide his emotion.
  • Flanderization: He's never been the sharpest tool in the shed, but he's gotten progressively stupider as the shows go on, initially being quite upset when he noticed his mistakes, but has now become completely ignorant of this.
  • Hidden Depths: As noted below, he can remember everyone else's lines perfectly well, and his larger performance in "90 Degrees" is only faulted by circumstances beyond his control. Except for forgetting he is disabled. In the Children in Need special "A Romantic Dinner", he seems to be get along fine, until he says he can’t taste anything (meant as a pickup line, but misinterpreted as him having COVID) and is quarantined.
    • In "The Most Lamentable...", he loses the words to his bawdy song but manages to improvise a new one fairly quickly.
    • Peter Pan Goes Wrong shows he has quite a good singing voice. Truth in Television as Jonathan Sayer was a chorister in his youth.
  • Irony: He cannot remember any of his lines; however, he seems to remember every one else's lines, leading to the cast some times accidentally and briefly switching roles. One such case is when he & Chris exposit on Hook and the Crocodile in Peter Pan Goes Wrong.
  • Kindhearted Simpleton: He's easily the dumbest member of the Company, but is also one of the nicest.
  • Literal-Minded: When a fire breaks out on the set of Play of the Week, he runs in with a lit blowtorch thinking "fight fire with fire" applies to the situation at hand. In "There Is No Escape" he takes all of his bird cues as literal, such as "flies down" being interpreted as pulling his fly down and "sweeps in" as coming in with a broom.
  • Manchild: As seen in Peter Pan Goes Wrong, he apparently still uses water wings while at the community pool.
  • Nice Guy: Quite affable, and doesn't hold the others getting pissed at his horrible acting against them.
  • Performance Anxiety: Suffers from stage fright. When Chris tries to give a backstage tour for "Whats On Stage.com" for promotional purposes, he catches Dennis trying to jump out of his dressing room window, to escape having to perform that night. Apparently this is a common occurrence; if his line at the beginning of A Christmas Carol Goes Wrong is anything to go by, a lot of the reason why he has trouble remembering his lines is because of nerves.
  • Playing a Tree: In The Goes Wrong Show he tends to be cast as an animal, inanimate object, or similar so that he won't have to remember any lines or directions. It doesn't help.
  • Playing Gertrude: He portrays the the older butler Perkins in "The Murder at Haversham Manor" with his hair greyed up. Unfortunately, the grey doesn't cover the back of his head.
  • Reading the Stage Directions Out Loud: He reads his lines exactly as they're fed to him. This means awkward pauses as cue cards get shuffled, lines being read backwards because he's looking through glass, or repeating random lines that get broadcast to his radio headset.
  • Took a Level in Dumbass: While he blatantly reads his lines off of his hand, and horrifically mispronounces them during The Play That Goes Wrong, his performance there is still much more competent than the embarrassingly poor and downright stupid actor who can't remember any of his lines and screws up playing inanimate objects of later productions.

    Sandra Wilkinson 

Sandra Wilkinson

Originated by: Charlie Russell

Cornley's female lead.

    Jonathan Harris 

Jonathan Harris

Originated by: Greg Tannahill

A supporting player who mainly juggles multiple walk-on roles.

  • Acting for Two: invoked
    • Plays Jacob Marley, both present and future citizens, and a guest of Francis (possibly the same present citizen) in "A Christmas Carol".
    • Plays the lead juror and a reporter in "A Trial to Watch". Though the former role is rendered pretty much nonexistent when there's no room for him to fit in the set, and the latter one is all chopped up by the poor video.
    • Plays the doctor, the lead character's son and a wise priest in "Summer, Once Again", but due to having to run the role at speed, Robert shoots him away before he can deliver any lines.
  • All There in the Manual: One of the backstage videos for The Play That Goes Wrong states that he is both an actor and a model, (though this most likely is an embellishment on his part). It also shows him being caught in the act with Sandra.
  • Amicable Exes: While their fallout was noticeably nasty, there's been no apparent bad blood between him and Sandra since, so it appears that they've worked things out.
  • Ascended Extra: After playing a corpse in The Murder at Haversham Manor, he is given the lead role in Peter Pan Goes Wrong to Max's chagrin, before being Demoted to Extra, probably for his scummy behavior during Peter Pan, for A Christmas Carol Goes Wrong and The Goes Wrong Show (though he still has a pivotal role as Marley in the former).
    • In-universe he did have the larger roles of the Jury Foreman in "A Trial to Watch", the fake Churchill in "The Pilot" and Nostle in "The Spirit of Christmas", but set and makeup difficulties respectively kept him from participating each time. In fact he does generally have reasonably large parts in the "goes right" versions, but events always conspire to keep him offstage.
    • Also worth noting, this applies to his performance in "The Murder at Haversham Manor" as well. On paper the role is rather small, primarily acting as a dead body. But unfortunately, things go wrong, meaning he gets to be involved in plenty of antics despite all that.
  • Amusing Injuries: He portrays Peter Pan, a role that requires being lifted up with a harness to perform flying tricks, in Peter Pan Goes Wrong. You do the math.
  • Becoming the Mask: He seemingly portrays Winston Churchill in "The Pilot", but then, the end his character declares himself to not be the real Churchill. Unfortunately, he's unable to get the facial prosthetic off, so he settles for ending the play saying "I'm Winston Churchill".
  • Butt-Monkey:
    • He gets jerked around, pantsed, and eventually knocked-out with a concussion during the flying sequences in Peter Pan Goes Wrong. This is even worse in the television version, which reveals that he is Going Commando following a Wardrobe Malfunction.
    • He's also had two wardrobe malfunctions, the first revealing his (censored) junk as noted above, and the second rendering him completely nude, though he's able to cover himself up before his family jewels go on TV again.
    • Not only is he often the smallest role in The Goes Wrong Show, but those parts often wind up being Demoted to Extra due to unwanted hijinks. He finally gets his due in the second season finale, forced to perform an entire ensemble number on his own.
  • Chick Magnet: Attracts both Sandra and Annie.
  • Dawson Casting: invoked Jonathan is clearly middle-aged and there are more youthful members of the troupe, but he was the one cast as Peter Pan.
  • A Day In The Lime Light: Always a supporting player, often playing the smallest part in the cast, he got to play the leading role of Peter Pan.
  • Jerk with a Heart of Gold: He's at his worst during Peter Pan, but he tries to help and reassure Annie after she goes through a near death experience. And the jerk can be dropped for all other productions, as he actually comes across as one of the most professional members of the group in his other appearances.
  • Jerkass Ball: His stint as Peter Pan is really the only time that Jonathan's ever really come across as a Jerkass. Otherwise he conducts himself in a friendly and professional manner.
  • Kick the Dog: Upon taking role back from Max, who he's learned is in love with his girlfriend, he refers to Max's part as the "crocodile, that nobody likes" while shooting him a brief Death Glare.
  • Mr. Fanservice: He winds up getting all of his clothing stripped off during the nativity play, though he blocks audiences from getting a view of his privates, though it doesn't hide that he's in fairly decent shape. His pants were also accidentally removed during Peter Pan, which he's not able to cover up, though it's censored.
  • Out of Focus: Currently the only actor to not perform a lead role in The Goes Wrong Show, often being the smallest part, which is made worse by outside factors taking making his roles even smaller.
  • Pet the Dog:
    • He warns Robert when he sees he's been set on fire and tries to guard Sandra from it.
    • He also looks after Annie when she's had a brush with death. Unfortunately, this leads to him cheating o Sandra with her.
    • In A Christmas Carol Goes Wrong he mentions that he feels Robert would make a great Scrooge, and seems rather put out when Chris insults Robert.
  • Romance on the Set: invoked He's in a relationship with Sandra during Peter Pan Goes Wrong and falls for Annie while on-stage during the same production.
  • Running Gag:
  • Took a Level in Jerkass: Despite being on pretty good behavior during The Play That Goes Wrong, he comes across as a Jerkass during Peter Pan Goes Wrong, being cruel to Max and cheating on Sandra with Annie. Perhaps getting the lead role went to his head. However...
  • Took a Level in Kindness: After acting like a bit of an ass during Peter Pan, he's back to normal in the following shows, with his only act that's rather mean spirited being a snarky comment directed at Chris in A Christmas Carol Goes Wrong, but considering Chris had been acting much worse than before, it's deserved.
  • Whatever Happened to the Mouse?: He and Annie seem to fall for each other during Peter Pan Goes Wrong, passionately kissing before being caught by Sandra. Despite this, we never see any follow up on whether or not they became a couple, and if they did, are if they're still together. Given that Annie had found out he was cheating on Sandra, and that she felt terrible for it, even though Sandra had forgiven her, she probably chose to dump him.

    Annie Twilloil 

Annie Twilloil

Originated by: Nancy Zamit

Initially Cornley's stage manager, and in later productions the supporting female player.

  • Acting for Two: invoked
    • Plays Mrs. Darling, Lisa the maid, Tinkerbell, Cecco the pirate, and Tiger Lily during "Peter Pan". The first two directly contradicts the script which claims they're different in every way, she has noticeable difficulty making the costume changes in time, and for the latter two, she has to make her costume change onstage, something she's a little too slow on.
      • Worth noting, she only plays Cecco in the BBC version, as the original play has the part portrayed by Francis who was also the narrator. But his role was Adapted Out in favor of David Suchet playing the narrator, and rather than having him just play the rather small role Cecco, it was added to Annie's list of characters.
    • Plays a mortician, Francis; a Gender Flip of Fred, the Ghost of Christmas Past, and a future citizen in "A Christmas Carol".
    • Plays one of the wise men, one of the shepherds, along with the front and backside of a donkey in "The Nativity".
  • Beware the Nice Ones: She's one of the kinder members of the Company, but when pushed, she strikes back hard. In one case she accidentally holds up a convenience store during "A Christmas Carol Goes Wrong", and even then can't help but show off her sweet side.
    Annie: (everyone else has run off, while still holding up the glued gun) Give us a Snickers...
    Cashier: What?
    Annie: A Snickers!
    (Cashier does so)
    Annie: TAKE ONE FOR YOURSELF!
    (Cashier grabs one for himself)
    Annie: (motions to the woman behind her) Her purchase is free!
    Cashier: (Shakes his head) Alright!
    Annie: (Sweetly) Merry Christmas...
    (Runs off to join the others)
  • Butt-Monkey: She's nearly killed in Peter Pan Goes Wrong and gets herself stuck on props and scenery due to Trevor haphazardly spreading adhesive everywhere during A Christmas Carol Goes Wrong.
  • Character Development: In The Play That Goes Wrong, Annie is just a stagehand who's forced into appearing onstage when Sandra gets knocked out and can't play her part. At first she's uncomfortable with it, but she grows to enjoy acting enough to the point where she battles a newly conscious Sandra to keep her part. From that point on, Annie has remained an actress.
  • Cross-Cast Role:
    • Portrays a man in "The Pilot". This wasn't actually planned, as Chris' father was going to play the part. Considering her small stature and the body double needed for her Shirtless Scene, it's not very convincing.
    • She also plays two different men in "A Christmas Carol".
    • Portrays both a wise man and shepherd in "The Nativity".
  • Dawson Casting: invoked Plays a four year girl in "The Lodge". It's not very convincing.
  • Hidden Depths: Though she started out as a stagehand who got thrown into acting by chance, she's actually one of the better actors in the Cornley Polytechnic Drama Society. She's a decent character actor, probably the most adept at juggling different roles within the same show and making them distinct from one another, and her Large Ham performances tend to be reserved for when it's appropriate for the character she's playing. She also turns out to be a very talented singer, but unfortunately her big solo in "Peter Pan" gets drowned out by Robert being saved from the doggy door, which forces her to yell most of the song.
    • Continues in the Drama Festival, where it’s notable that even though things still go wrong, she had the foresight to actually choose a farce, and largely cast everyone else in appropriate roles, so that most of the greatest problems with the performance were caused by others’ mistakes spilling over into her show. This makes her arguably a better director than both Chris and Robert!
  • Kick the Dog: Refusing to back down when Sandra comes back to reclaim her part, and resorting to physical violence to keep a role that was never supposed to be hers. While Sandra does initiate the physical drama, Annie's the one who truly ups the level of violence. Given she's otherwise a Nice Girl, this can be explained as her catching the acting bug after performing for the first time.
  • Large Ham: She has her moments, especially when she portrays Tinkerbell.
  • Ms. Fanservice: Not quite to the level of Sandra, but she's definitely not afraid to play up the sexiness in a scene. She's also had her underwear exposed during productions several times.
  • Nice Girl: With the exception of holding the Jerkass Ball during The Play That Goes Wrong, Annie is one of the most genuinely actors in the troupe. No moment makes this more clear than when she accidentally robs a store, and decides to make her victim steal something for himself to keep.
  • Pet the Dog: When Dennis admits he has forgotten his lines in "A Christmas Carol", she tries to help by strategically placing them around the set. Hilarity Ensues, but it was a nice gesture.
  • Pushed in Front of the Audience: She got her acting break in The Murder at Haversham Manornote  when Sandra was knocked unconscious and she had to work as an emergency stand-in.
  • The Rival: She and Sandra get into an onstage scuffle over who plays the leading lady in The Murder at Haversham Manor.
  • Romance on the Set: invoked She and Jonathan publicly fall for one another on-stage during Peter Pan Goes Wrong.
  • Took a Level in Kindness: She's arguably the biggest Jerkass in The Play That Goes Wrong, as she's not only unwilling to let Sandra reclaim the role that's rightfully hers, she repeatedly assaults her in attempts to keep the part. In all the following shows however, Annie is one of the nicest members of the cast. It's worth noting that her unlikable traits only popped up when she was going to lose her role, so it's likely that her new status as a full time actress whose part is no longer in question has kept any violent and diva nature at bay.
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    Max Bennett 

Max Bennett

Originated by: Dave Hearn

A supporting player who keeps getting distracted by the audience. He's actually the best actor of the bunch (when he's not too busy mugging for the audience) but is relegated to bit roles.

  • Acting for Two: invoked
    • Plays both Cecil and Arthur in "The Murder at Haversham Manor" as well as Michael and the Crocodile in "Peter Pan". He also plays Peter at one point, before Jonathan comes back in to take the reclaim the role.
    • Plays the head mortician, a Good Samaritan, young Scrooge, the Ghost of Christmas Present, and a future citizen in "A Christmas Carol".
  • Ambiguously Bi: During the "The Murder at Haversham Manor", he seems to be physically uncomfortable with the love scenes with Sandra's character, but actually excited when Trevor's playing the role of Florence. However, he later publicly declares his love for Sandra during "Peter Pan", and the two end up engaged by the end of "A Christmas Carol". It's possible he was awkward playing across the object of his affections.
  • Ascended Extra: The end of Peter Pan has the characters coming to the conclusion that his role of the crocodile is the show's true hero.
  • Aside Glance: He's constantly looking away towards the audience.
  • Bad "Bad Acting": Max can actually be a decent actor at times, but any talent of his goes out the window as soon as he starts mugging for the audience.
    • In The Goes Wrong Show episode "The Cornley Drama Festival Part 1," Robert ranks the 8 Cornley members in terms of acting ability. He places Max at 5, just before those he considers "sub-actors."
  • Brainless Beauty: Max is a good looking man and all too happy to play Mr. Fanservice, but if his onstage antics are of any evidence, he's not too bright.
  • Breaking the Fourth Wall: He's very much aware of the audience and often mugs to get attention.
  • British Teeth: Courtesy of his portrayer, Dave Hearn. He had noticeably crooked teeth in earlier productions, but got braces by the time of Peter Pan Goes Wrong which came off before A Christmas Carol Goes Wrong.
  • Cloudcuckoolander: Not to the same extent, but like Dennis, Max sometimes has trouble drawing the line between the play and reality.
  • Dawson Casting: invoked Portrays the four year old Michael in "Peter Pan".
  • Flanderization: The Goes Wrong Show (except for 90 Degrees) plays up his immaturity, which wasn't as prominent in The Play That Goes Wrong or Peter Pan Goes Wrong before being significantly downplayed in A Christmas Carol Goes Wrong (largely due to his depressed emotional state at the time)
  • Hidden Depths: When he stops being such a shameless ham, he's actually shown to be a good actor, with the text for Peter Pan Goes Wrong noting that his brief turn as the title character is actually good.
  • I'm Crying, but I Don't Know Why: In "The Cornley Drama Festival", he manages to produce a whole jug of tears compared to the other actors who can manage only a few drops. When Robert sincerely asks if he is ok, Max responds with a wobbly: "I don't know."
  • Informed Flaw: He's mocked for being a bad actor but he repeatedly demonstrates that he knows his scripts and can put on good performances and improvizations. His main flaw as an actor is that he has a very unprofessional tendency to break character and mug for the audience in the most goofy way, even when he really shouldn't be. While the other actors have their own problems, for the most part they're all far more willing to commit to their role and stay in character.
  • Kindhearted Simpleton: He's probably the kindest member of the Company, and yet still comes off rather dim, though this is more likely due to his childlike naivety, given he is able to competently play most of his roles, rather than out and out stupidity like say Dennis.
  • Literal-Minded: In The Goes Wrong Show he produces a "Kitchen Sink Drama" consisting of himself and the others dressed up as crockery and a dish sponge in an actual kitchen sink.
  • Manchild: He has a tendency of mugging to the audience, as well as goofing about during the Show. The program for "Peter Pan Goes Wrong" states that even his own father thinks he has the mental capacity of a Four Year Old.
  • Nepotism: Unintentionally on his part, but his aunt runs the BBC, and thus he was only hired on to get the group onto the BBC, which he only finds out after hearing a recording, in the middle of the show no less, of Chris and Robert mocking him and his performance.
    • Based on the group not being brought back for the next year's Christmas show (not that it stops them from performing) shows that his aunt has her limits, though it can be assumed that she's responsible for "Play of the Week" being broadcast on the network.
    • The original version that was not broadcast on BBC makes it so that his uncle gave a huge donation to the group.
  • Mr. Fanservice: Max, Dennis, and Sandra all get accidentally stripped down during Peter Pan, and while the other two are quite uncomfortable with it, Max is happy to show off his fairly toned body. He's all too happy to do so again when he plays a corpse in his underwear on The Goes Wrong Show.
  • Nice Guy: He's probably the nicest member of the Cornley troupe, being rather sweet-natured and mild-mannered in contrast to the many preening egos he's surrounded by.
  • Pet the Dog:
    • Comforts a humiliated Dennis after he gets upset over one of his many pronunciations.
    • Saves Sandra from getting hit Captain Hook's out of control ship.
  • Romance on the Set: invoked He begins a relationship with Sandra in Peter Pan Goes Wrong and this progresses to the two getting engaged in A Christmas Carol Goes Wrong.
  • Unskilled, but Strong: For both bad and good:
    • Max shows almost no interest in improving his acting skills for the purposes of the company’s usual (Giftedly Bad) “serious” fare, and in fact his immaturity and lack of dedication to the intended direction (however badly it is selected) makes him one of the few cast members to intentionally mess things up when he finds it funny.
    • At the same time, his natural intuition for acting means that Max has excellent comedic timing and an ability to be sincere when he actually wants to be, and is thus also one of the only cast members to get the reaction he wants out of the audience
    • This means he’s a horrible choice for any dramatic role he’ll get bored with or start adding comedic bits to when things go wrong… but a strong choice for any intentionally comedic role or one that requires interacting with the audience.

    Trevor Watson 

Trevor Watson

Originated by: Rob Falconer
Currently played by: Chris Leask

Cornley's technical director. He loves Duran Duran.

  • Ascended Extra: In-Universe example, as the technical director of a production should obviously remain unseen throughout the show, but because everything goes wrong, he's constantly popping up to deal with issues, or accidentally appearing and causing them.
    • The biggest examples are when an actor gets taken out of commission, forcing Trevor to play the part, particularly in Peter Pan Goes Wrong, where he briefly takes on the lead role.
    • For the first time, he's shown playing a role without being Pushed in Front of the Audience during "The Nativity", though it has no lines. Later, after he gets stuck in the set, he's offhandedly referred to as John the Baptist, though he never acts the part.
    • Trevor finally gets a line as an english soldier in "The Most Lamentable...", though he overly stresses the iambic pentameter to comedic effect.
  • Butt-Monkey: He's been knocked unconscious more times than anyone else onstage, though Sandra's only one behind. Additionally, he's constantly being spotted by the audience, even though his role as the technical director very clearly requires him to be an offstage presence.
  • Cross-Cast Role: The Play That Goes Wrong sees him briefly portraying Florence after both Sandra and Annie have been knocked out.
  • Dawson Casting: invoked Briefly plays Peter Pan.
  • Jurisdiction Friction: In the BBC version of Peter Pan Goes Wrong, he gets into bitter arguments with the BBC stage manager over who's in charge of the production.
  • Out of Focus: Unlike everyone else, he's not an actor, so while his handling and involvement in the many mishaps give him stage time and lines, he'll almost always have less than the other characters since unlike them, he's never meant to be seen or heard, with most of his appearances being quick pop ups and one liners.
  • Rouge Angles of Satin: He struggles to spell "A Christmas Carol" correctly on-screen. Eventually giving up and settling on "Scrooge".
  • Small Name, Big Ego: In the Peter Pan and A Christmas Carol BBC productions, he argues vociferously with the BBC technical people over who's in charge... even though he's one of the primary reasons for the Goes Wrong tag.
  • Special Effect Failure: invoked He's responsible for all the dodgy special effects seen in Cornley productions.

Debuted in Peter Pan Goes Wrong

    Lucy Grove 

Lucy Grove

Originated by: Ellie Morris

Robert's niece, the extremely nervous member of the CPDS.

  • Butt-Monkey: She's bullied into appearing in Peter Pan despite her clear discomfort and is forced to continue performing despite constantly getting injured on-stage and being in clear pain. Likewise in A Christmas Carol, her stint as Tiny Tim, which she actually seems rather excited to perform, gets cut short when Robert drops an object on top of her head, knocking her unconscious. He was aiming for Chris.
  • Character Development: After finally conquering her fear of acting at the end of Peter Pan Goes Wrong, she is much more chipper in A Christmas Carol Goes Wrong (despite her Amusing Injuries) and her appearance on The Goes Wrong Show displays that she no longer suffers from stage fright (though Robert still considers her performance to be dreadful.)
  • Demoted to Extra: Following her debut in Peter Pan Goes Wrong, she makes only a very brief appearance in A Christmas Carol Goes Wrong before appearing as an unacknowledged extra in an episode of The Goes Wrong Shownote . She makes a return appearance, this time in character, in the season two episode "There Is No Escape."
  • Nepotism: Was cast in Peter Pan Goes Wrong because she is Robert's niece. Unusually for this trope, she has no desire to appear on stage in the first place.
  • Performance Anxiety: She is so completely uncomfortable on stage, she can barely get through her lines without hyperventilating.
    • Her appearance on The Goes Wrong Show shows she's much more capable, but is flummoxed by Robert's attempts to perfect her performance.
  • Vague Age: There isn't a huge age gap between Ellie Morris and Henry Lewis (Robert), yet she plays his niece. We also see Robert's sister briefly in A Christmas Carol Goes Wrong and she is a similar age. Evidently she is the daughter of a third, older sibling.
    • Then again, the in-universe program for Peter Pan Goes Wrong says that she's a member of Cornley Youth Theatre, an organization headed by Robert that works with "talented, enthusiastic, and/or available children from Upper Cornley Primary School", so she could just be an example of Dawson Casting.

    Francis Beaumont 

Francis Beaumont

Originated by: Harry Kershaw

Was a temporary member of the CPDS during their production of Peter Pan.

  • Adapted Out: Replaced as the Narrator in the TV version of Peter Pan Goes Wrong by David Suchet.
  • Stage Magician: According to the in-universe program for Peter Pan Goes Wrong, he was one of these before he joined the drama society. His last accomplishment as a magician was when his "Diamonds are Forever" trick won the 2011 Best New Trick award, which had to be rescinded, along with his license to perform, when it was discovered that the diamond tattoo he imprinted on his volunteer couldn't be removed.
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Debuted in The Goes Wrong Show

    Vanessa Wilcock-Wynn-Carraway 

Vanessa Wilcock-Wynn-Carraway

Originated by: Bryony Corrigan

A new addition to the Cornley Polytechnic Drama Society.

  • Ascended Extra: Like Annie, she used to be a stagehand for the CPDS; you can see her helping out behind the scenes in the BBC production of Peter Pan Goes Wrong and as the BBC receptionist in A Christmas Carol Goes Wrong.
  • Butt-Monkey: In the second episode of The Goes Wrong Show she's repeatedly smashed in the face and forced to ad lib in languages she doesn't speak.
    • In the "See It Safely" short, she is catapulted through a trapdoor into the the Piccadilly line.
  • Dawson Casting: invoked Portrays the leading little girl in "The Spirit of Christmas" even though she's taller than Annie, who plays her mother. When she's desperately trying to keep the show on track and protests "Santa's" offer of a sherry because she's just a little girl, Robert replies "You're twenty-six!"
  • Flat Character: Given that she's the newest character added to the cast, she hasn't had much time to establish a personality like the rest of the characters (largely because the half hour timeslot means the series is unable to show much of the behind the scenes action), and is mainly just known as the third female actress. "The Nativity" starts to show a little more of her personality, making a bit of a dorky improv, being unable to understand Robert's cry for his halo, and having a little rivalry with Annie.
    • The second season plays up her nervousness and inability to properly handle the various mistakes that go on. "The Cornley Drama Festival Part 1" shows that working with the Cornley Drama Society has left her deathly afraid of the unexpected and her attempts to adapt to improvisation make things worse.
  • Hidden Depths: She's actually a legitimately good singer, but her this is overshadowed by her having to sing far too high for her big solo in "The Spirit of Christmas".
    • "The Cornley Drama Festival Part 1" shows she's a fairly good dancer as well, provided her partner doesn't drop her or things get in the way of her feet.
  • Naïve Newcomer: Downplayed, but as the newest cast member she's also less used to the company's usual mishaps and reacts with a lot more visible horror and embarrassment. While also one of the more competent actors, she's also completely unable to improvise her way out of difficult situations, resulting in her reading whatever telegram is put in front of her in "The Pilot," drinking from a bear statue in "90 Degrees," and even killing her daughter in "The Lodge" when Jonathan fails to enter in time to stop her.
  • Not So Above It All: Despite being The Straight Man, she joins Dennis in confusing Robert asking for his "halo" as him wanting them to say "hello". In the same episode, she starts to feud a bit with Annie.
  • Sixth Ranger: She joins the cast for the first time in The Goes Wrong Show, making the gender balance of the main cast more equal.
  • Straight Man: She is the most normal, capable cast member and often tries to help the others when disaster strikes, with little success.
  • Vocal Range Exceeded: While she does have a lovely voice, her song in "The Miracle of Christmas" continually ups the Key, with her seeming to be in physical pain due to the song being far too high for her to sing. Fun fact, Bryony Corrigan actually has an amazing Soprano range, and the cast had to constantly make the song higher to finally get it out of her range, and even then they admit that a lot of her voice cracks were just acting because she could still reach a lot of the notes naturally.
  • Womanchild: During "Zoom Goes Wrong" when her husband accidentally answers Chris' call, she is seen walking around in monkey pajamas.
    Husband: Ness, are you supposed to be on a Zoom?
    Vanessa: (walks in in monkey pajamas, with her mouth full of chips/crisps) What?
    Husband: Yeah a Zoom Call.
    Vanessa: (looks down at her outfit and rushes to the computer) OH NO, NO, NO, FOR FU-!!!
    (Chris disconnects her)
  • Word of God: Her surname was never used onscreen or in publicity materials but Henry Shields stated on Twitter that it is Wilcock Wynn-Carraway, purely because it sounds funny.

Alternative Title(s): The Goes Wrong Show, The Play That Goes Wrong, Peter Pan Goes Wrong, A Christmas Carol Goes Wrong

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