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Spoilers for all works set prior to Avengers: Infinity War and Avengers: Endgame are unmarked.

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United States of America

White House

    President Matthew Ellis 

President Matthew Ellis

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/matthew_ellis_im3_4433.png
"You elected me on a single platform: I will defend this country at all cost."

Species: Human

Portrayed By: William Sadler

Voiced By: Jorge Badillo (Latin-American Spanish dub)

Appearances: Iron Man 3 | Captain America: The Winter Soldier | Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

The President of the United States. As part of his personal vow of protecting America from all threats, President Ellis decides to take a proactive approach in dealing with the Mandarin and the Ten Rings organization, particularly by rechristening Lt. Col. James Rhodes as the Iron Patriot. During the emergence of Inhumans, he allies with Phil Coulson's underground S.H.I.E.L.D., providing them secret support.


  • Alternate History: As if the superheroes weren't enough, his presence further confirms the divergence of the MCU from real history, since Barack Obama was the real-life US President when Iron Man 3 was released.
  • Celebrity Paradox: The Die Hard films exists in the MCU, due to being referenced by Ant-Man in Avengers: Endgame, yet Ellis' actor Sadler had played the Big Bad Colonel Stuart in Die Hard 2.
  • Defiant to the End: Even when threatened by Savin wearing the Iron Patriot armor, Ellis doesn't cower and instead tries to pull a gun in the face of his situation.
  • Distressed Dude: In Iron Man 3, he is abducted by Aldrich Killian.
  • The Ghost: Although he is seen on video for the Captain America exhibit in the Smithsonian Institution, he is still unseen in Captain America: The Winter Soldier when HYDRA targets him and others during Project Insight.
  • Hoist by His Own Petard: What Killian tries to invoke by having the President die in the suit of armor that the President commissioned for Rhodes while set on fire by oil.
  • Horrible Judge of Character: The man he chose as his Vice-Presidential running mate joined a conspiracy to assassinate him, and he made "Thunderbolt" Ross, of all people, Secretary of State.
  • The Leader: He's the leader of the USA. Based on what we see of him, he cuts a Charismatic type figure.
  • Our Presidents Are Different:
    • He's President Personable, who later becomes President Target by Killian. Likely would have become President Action given he was wearing the Iron Patriot armor, but never got a chance to use it.
    • Becomes President Target again when HYDRA starts Project Insight.
  • Puppet King: Subverted. Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. at first implies that he is this to Rosalind Price, but it turns out they were simply friends.
  • Reasonable Authority Figure: President Ellis allows Coulson to continue his work with the Inhumans even though he can't officially support him. In fact, he's a reasonable enough leader that he was seen as a threat to HYDRA, who listed him as a target for Project Insight.
  • Tuckerization: His name is a Shout-Out to Warren Ellis, who wrote the Extremis arc that Iron Man 3 takes inspiration from.

    Vice President Rodriguez 

Vice President Rodriguez

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/rodriguez_im3_3938.png

Species: Human

Portrayed By: Miguel Ferrer

Voiced By: Guillermo Coria (Latin-American Spanish dub)

Appearances: Iron Man 3

The Vice President of the United States. Rhodey and Stark hear him mentioned in Killian's evil plan, and call Rodriguez to warn him that he's a target. However, it turns out Rodriguez is actually not just in on the plot, but Killian has bankrolled him into providing assistance.


  • Bald of Evil: Once his true colors are revealed, that bald dome marks a contrast.
  • The Dragon: Once he becomes President he'll still technically answer to Killian, making him the real leader.
  • Even Evil Has Loved Ones: Working to use Extremis to have his daughter's leg regenerated.
  • Number Two: He's the second in command of the United States.
  • President Evil: He's working with Killian to kill the president, in order to have his daughter's leg regenerated.
  • The Starscream: The plan is for President Ellis to be killed and Vice President Rodriguez to take his place.
  • Traitor Shot: Once he was finished talking with Rhodes and Stark, another man asked if something was wrong, leading to the above tropes.
  • Twenty-Fifth Amendment: He was to ascend to the office of president once Killian had killed Ellis.
  • Walking Spoiler: There's really no way to talk about him without spoiling his morality, since he only made one brief appearance before that particular reveal.

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Department of State

    Secretary Thaddeus "Thunderbolt" Ross 

Secretary Thaddeus "Thunderbolt" Ross

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/ross_thunderbolt.jpg
"In the past four years, you've operated with unlimited power and no supervision. That's an arrangement the governments of the world can no longer tolerate."

Species: Human

Portrayed By: William Hurt

Voiced By: Juan Carlos Tinoco [The Incredible Hulk], Óscar Gómez [Captain America: Civil War onwards] (Latin-American Spanish dub)

Appearances: The Incredible Hulk | The Consultantnote  | Captain America: Civil War | Avengers: Infinity War | Avengers: Endgame

"Tell me, Captain, do you know where Thor and Banner are right now? 'Cause you can bet if I misplaced a couple of 30 megaton warheads, there'd be consequences."

A General who hunts down Bruce Banner claiming him to be a threat — in truth, he's after Banner's blood in order to perfect a new Super Soldier serum. Following a heart attack and retirement from the army, he has become the United States Secretary of State.


  • 0% Approval Rating: Absolutely no-one in the MCU seems to like this guy. From heroes like Captain America, to villains like the Abomination, and even his own daughter have voiced their hatred of him. That being said, his actions against Bruce Banner in The Incredible Hulk, and the Avengers in both Civil War and Infinity War make this trope one hundred percent justified. Special mention goes to how in Civil War, Rhodey, as a fellow military man, was respectful of Ross for his military achievements, and supportive of the Sokovia Accords. By Infinity War, two years of working with the man has deeply soured Rhodey's outlook of both Ross personally and the Accords in general.
  • Adaptational Villainy: In the comics, Ross considers the Hulk a threat, and hunts him in order to stop him. In The Incredible Hulk, he is indirectly responsible for Bruce turning into the Hulk by lying about what the experiment was about, and afterwards knows perfectly well that Banner would prefer not to fight, but wants the Hulk to make more Super Soldier serum. However, Civil War seems to rerail him to his comic book incarnation, who believes that super-powered beings are threats and he's doing all he can to protect the world from them.
  • Antagonist in Mourning: By Avengers Endgame, even he is grief-stricken over Tony Stark's Heroic Sacrifice.
  • Bait the Dog: In Civil War, he pretended to Took a Level in Kindness towards the Avengers to get them to sign the Sokovia Accords for his own selfish ends.
  • Big Bad: All the conflict of The Incredible Hulk is because he wants to dissect Bruce and all the soldiers attacking Bruce answer to him. However, he is then upstaged by Emil Blonsky.
  • Bitch in Sheep's Clothing: When we see him once again in Civil War he seems to be sincere in his admission to the Avengers that the world owes them a debt and that they have done some good, and presents the Sokovia Accords as a compromise that'll allow them to continue to operate; suggesting he's soften somewhat since The Incredible Hulk. However, it becomes clear that his initial genial attitude was just a front, as he later focuses more on imprisoning those Avengers that defy him than going after the real threats like Zemo, or even an alien invasion in Infinity War, and threatens even those that signed the Accords with the same should they fail or step out of line.
  • The Bus Came Back: While he was never really put on a bus to begin with due to The Incredible Hulk never receiving a sequel (one could say the whole franchise was Put on a Bus), his return in Captain America: Civil War marks one of the longest gaps between appearances by a character in the MCU, at 8 years.
  • Composite Character:
    • His desire to capture and dissect the Hulk echoes that of General John Ryker, another Hulk villain.
    • In Captain America: Civil War, he essentially gets Maria Hill's role as the government representative trying to force the Avengers into registration (though Maria Hill still exists as a separate character).
  • Determinator: For better or worse, he does not know when to give up.
  • Drowning My Sorrows: In The Stinger of The Incredible Hulk after he had a really rough day: his star soldier Blonsky went psycho and became the Abomination, his daughter severed her ties with him, and he was forced to release Banner to defeat Blonsky. As The Consultant reveals, his day will only get worse.
  • Enemy Mine: He temporarily releases Banner from custody and allows him to become the Hulk in order to fight off the Abomination and save the city.
  • Even Evil Has Loved Ones: For all his shortsightedness and disrespect towards other people, especially towards heroes, he does genuinely love his daughter Betty. However, it’s the same love for her that drove her away from him. Eventually, his overprotectiveness and irresponsibility leads to Betty disowning him. It's telling that him not talking to her for years shows that he respects her wishes.
  • Evil Is Petty: In Civil War, if the encounter between him and Stark on "The Raft" is any indication, Ross gets an opportunity to get the last laugh on Stark following their last encounter in The Stinger for The Incredible Hulk with the turning point in the trust between the Avengers and the public being at a low point in Ross's favor. Then it's implied he intends to have Rhodey court-martialed for disobeying Ross's orders to arrest Steve, Natasha and Sam in Infinity War.
  • Evil Old Folks: When he makes his return to the MCU, Ross clearly has aged during those eight years prior to Civil War as he has gray hair in contrast to his blond hair in The Incredible Hulk and is noticeably slender than his past burly physique. However, his weight loss might have something to do with his recovery from his heart attack that required him to drop some pounds for the sake of his health. He doesn't truly become Older and Wiser until after Tony's Heroic Sacrifice.
  • Evil Sounds Deep: With William Hurt, who has a deep, husky voice, this is a given.
  • Evilutionary Biologist: Of a sort. While he claims to be hunting down the Hulk just for the public's safety, he's more interested in dissecting Banner in order to discover the Captain America formula.
  • Expy: Word of Godinvoked has directly compared Thunderbolt Ross's role in Civil War to Colin Powell, being a military general turned Secretary of State. His Fantastic Racism, abuse of his official position, and even had tried to dissect a superhero however makes him the closest to the MCU's depiction of William Stryker from X-Men. In The Incredible Hulk, Hurt based Ross on Captain Ahab from Moby-Dick due to their obsessions during their hunts.
  • Fallen Hero: Was a decorated Vietnam War veteran before becoming The Neidermeyer General Ripper then an Obstructive Bureaucrat. For this moral degradation, he is viewed as a disgrace to the uniform by fellow military servicemen Steve, Sam and eventually Rhodey, who initially respected Ross for his distinguished military career until realizing his true colors. Despite this, he had enough respect for Tony Stark that he showed up at his funeral.
  • Fantastic Racism: He sees superheroes less as people and more as weapons who happen to be alive.
  • General Ripper: His obsession with capturing Banner leads him to create violent and unnecessary situations, such as bringing helicopters to a college that, until that point, was not experiencing Hulk problems. When he becomes Secretary of State he also doesn't cares about doing what is right or reasonable for the sake of doing his sworn duty to protect the country (and the world) but wastes very necessary time trying to get rid of perceived threats.
  • Glory Hound: It's implied the reason he was in charge of the Super Soldier project following the origins of Captain America in The Incredible Hulk and tried to enforce the Sokovia Accords onto the Avengers in Civil War and Infinity War was to selfishly take credit for the superheroes' heroic actions, while also discrediting them to make himself look good.
  • Godzilla Threshold: He's willing to use an uncompleted serum on his star soldier in order to take down the Hulk. When that goes wrong, he sets Banner free to become the Hulk in order to save Harlem from the Abomination.
  • Hate Sink: In all his appearances, he's made to be thoroughly unlikeable and despicable as possible. The fact that he is a General Ripper, The Neidermeyer, Obstructive Bureaucrat and Inspector Javert all rolled into one is already bad enough, but the fact that he's supposed to be on the side of the heroes makes this even worse. He repeatedly calls the Avengers out for their inability to mitigate damage control, while refusing to take accountability for his own faults. He also obstructs the heroes from doing their job; as best seen when Stark tries to deal with Zemo, and orders Rhodey to arrest the fugitive Avengers despite them being the only hope of stopping Thanos. While Zemo and Thanos are the main threat, they at least have sympathetic qualities that make it hard for audiences to root against. Thus, Ross is made the perfect punching bag for audiences to jeer at.
  • Heel–Face Turn: Given he doesn't arrest the anti-Accords Avengers present at Stark's funeral, he may have given up completely on that out of respect for Stark and them.
  • Hero Antagonist: Subverted. In Civil War, it seems that he's aware of the potential danger the Avengers are to society and lays out the Sokovia Accords to keep them in check. However, it becomes clear that he just wants to be in control of them and will not hesitate to arrest them for any reason and imprison them in "The Raft."
  • Hypocrite: He chastises the Avengers for all the collateral damage that happens in their fights while showing them footage of it, and wants them to be held accountable for their actions. Yet conveniently (or perhaps deliberately) never brings up the the battle in Harlem, New York between the Hulk and Abomination, which he was responsible for and refuses to be held accountable for it. He also criticizes Bruce's actions when the only reason Bruce was infected was because HE lied to Bruce about what they were doing.
  • Inspector Javert: An outside observer would see a general tracking a defector/monster in order to bring him in to custody. Also in Civil War, he believes that super-powered beings are threats that should be keep an eye on to protect the world. By Infinity War he showcases all of the absolute worst parts of this trope by ordering Rhodes to arrest Steve Rogers and the other fugitive Avengers when they arrive to HQ looking to see what they can do to help stop Thanos, bluntly telling Rogers that it doesn't matters that the sky is literally on fire, he is still a fugitive and will not be forgiven for his crimes no matter what. Rhodes declines to do the arrest and Rogers tells Ross to take a hike.
  • It's All About Me: In the end, there’s no one Ross cares more about than himself. Even if he sincerely loves his daughter and is a patriot to his country, it is actually selfish love towards either of them due to his shortsightedness.
  • Jerkass: He treats Banner like property and disrespects others. He gets better somewhat in Civil War, but still disrespect others like the Avengers, only this time he has a very good reason unlike his first appearance.
  • Jerkass Has a Point: During Civil War he rhetorically asks Captain America where Hulk and Thor are now and brings up that if he lost two nuclear warheads, he would surely not get away without consequences. Subverted in that he himself lost track of Banner for five years and lost control of Blonsky and was never reprimanded.
  • Jerk with a Heart of Gold: Despite the below, Ross clearly held a degree of respect of Tony Stark despite their animosity, given that he attends Stark's funeral.
  • Jerk with a Heart of Jerk:
    • When Ross makes his reappearance in Civil War, he initially interacts with the Avengers by casually telling them a story of his heart attack during a round of golf and undergoing a triple bypass, seemingly appearing to have Took a Level in Kindness in contrast to the last time we saw him in The Incredible Hulk. He also appears to be more rational as when he lays out the Accords, he brings up good reasons behind them like the damage the Avengers caused during their missions. However, notably during his briefing, he dosn't bring up his own mistake back in Harlem. Also, when he assigns Tony to arrest Captain America and Bucky, he gives out a short deadline, otherwise he would have Stark prosecuted for his failure, and promises to send a kill squad after Cap. Even after Bucky is proven innocent for the bombing, Ross refuses to listen to Stark to release the anti-Accords Avengers due to Stark's failure to arrest Steve and Bucky. Despite have better manners and being more subtle in attitude, Ross has not changed his mindset one bit. Even though Ross sincerely loves his country and daughter, it is actually out of selfish love.
    • Infinity War shows that not even an alien attack and impending universal doom will make him see eye-to-eye with Steve Rogers. He instead orders Team Cap's (and everyone with him) arrest, causing Rhodey — his last remaining supporter who was still present on Earth — to turn on Ross and the Accords for the sake of the planet.
  • Karma Houdini: Despite being behind the experiment that turned Bruce into Hulk and being responsible for Harlem being torn apart it doesn't hamper his career and he eventually ends up as Secretary of State. Of course, his relationship with his beloved daughter has been extinguished. However considering Leonard Samson commented that Ross cared more for capturing the Hulk then his own daughter, something that Ross did not even bother to deny, Ross may have viewed the loss of that relationship as acceptable collateral damage.
  • The Knights Who Say "Squee!": Downplayed with Ross, but he's very genial in his conversation with Cap (likely to due him being a fellow military combat vet and the fact Cap's origins is what inspired Ross to start his own Super Soldier program in The Incredible Hulk). However, possibly due to what Bruce off-screen told Cap about Ross' program that unwillingly turned him into the Hulk which ruined his life and therefore made Ross one of those who tainted the legacies of both Cap and Dr. Abraham Erskine's research with their own corrupted experiments that followed, the feeling isn't mutual.
  • Knight Templar: Ross is unwavering in his beliefs, despite claiming at one point to have gained "perspective". As noted by Samson, despite what Ross himself thinks, he's a bigger threat to Betty's safety than the Hulk.
  • Manipulative Bastard: In The Incredible Hulk, he tries to get his daughter to side with him with lies until she discovers the truth.
  • The Neidermeyer: As a General Ripper Jerkass in The Incredible Hulk who deliberately turned Banner into the Hulk just to dissect to start his own Super Soldier program to further his own military career. Even fellow American military servicemen Steve, Sam and eventually Rhodey saw him as a disgrace to the uniform for his despicable arrogance and incompetent decision making.
  • Never My Fault:
    • The experiment that turned Bruce into the Hulk was headed by him, but refuses to take responsibility for what happened to him or his daughter. He didn't even tell them what they were actually doing, creating a new Super Soldier instead of radiation resistance. Betty calls him out on it.
    Betty: I will never forgive you for what you've done to him.
    General Ross: He's a fugitive...
    Betty: You made him a fugitive, to cover your failures and to protect your career. Don't ever speak to me as your daughter again.
    • In Civil War, he claims Tony Stark's behavior at Leipzig proves he can't be objective about Steve Rogers, managing to completely overlook the part where Tony's actions were because Ross wanted to send a killsquad after his friend and co-worker.
    • Also in the same movie, he blames Steve, Sam and Natasha for HYDRA rebuilding itself inside S.H.I.E.L.D, despite the fact that he's part of the government that funded S.H.I.E.L.D when HYDRA was under the radar. Granted, neither of them knew that HYDRA was hiding all this time, but it makes it seem like he just wants to blame the Avengers while making himself look good. However, this is subverted as at the time of HYDRA's corruption of S.H.I.E.L.D, Ross was still at the time temporarily retired to recover from his heart surgery and wasn't promoted to State Secretary and actively working fo the government again until after HYDRA's deception was revealed, so Ross for that was technically innocent despite misblaming the Avengers for it.
  • Nice Job Breaking It, Hero!: By giving Blonsky the prototype remade Super Soldier serum, he essentially created the Abomination by proxy. He's essentially responsible for creating the kind of violent, rampaging beast he considers Bruce to be. The only reason Bruce was transformed in the first place was because he lied to Bruce about what they were doing. Had he been more honest Bruce probably would never have become the Hulk.
  • Nice Job Fixing It, Villain!: His rude and disrespectful personality eventually leads to all Pro-Accords heroes to stop allying with him and supporting the Sokovia Accords, with some even defecting to the Anti-Accords team.
  • Obstructive Bureaucrat: In Civil War, when he is promoted to Secretary of State and lays out the Accords to place a strict eye on the superheroes. This grows even worse in Infinity War where even the planet being at risk along with the universe does not have him ease up on the superheroes, even as they are trying to save everyone. However, by the end of Endgame, he decided to attend Tony's funeral, showing he had some degree of respect for Iron Man.
  • O.O.C. Is Serious Business: In Endgame, he is seen at Tony Stark's funeral, and instead of ordering Captain America and everyone who disobeyed him arrested and being disgusted by his presence, he's just about as withdrawn as everyone in attendance over the loss of Tony Stark.
  • Outliving One's Offspring: His daughter was one of the victims of Thanos' Badass Fingersnap. It is unknown if he had fallen victim too, if not, he would have to live with the fact his daughter is dead. Thankfully gets undone later, which may be part of the reason why he attends Tony Stark's funeral and no longer seeks to take action against the Avengers that refused to comply with the Sokovia Accords.
  • Overprotective Dad: One of his other reasons for tracking Banner; Betty was injured during Bruce's first ever Hulk Out.
  • Parents as People: He focuses so much of his time on getting the Hulk/Bruce Banner that it damages his relationship with his daughter.
  • Pet the Dog:
    • He assists the Hulk in his fight against the Abomination and actually lets him go after he has beaten and subdued Blonsky.
    • He was willing to make a deal with Hawkeye and Ant-Man to allow them to still be with their families, on the condition that they would also be under house arrest.
    • In Endgame, he attends the funeral of Tony Stark out of respect, and is seemingly willing to overlook the renegade Avengers in attendance. However, it's also likely out of personal gratitude for bringing his daughter Betty back to life (especially since it was his former Arch-Enemy Bruce who did the job) after falling victim off-screen to to Thanos' Badass Fingersnap in the last film.
  • Reasonable Authority Figure: At first, in The Incredible Hulk he was willing to put his hatred aside in stopping the Abomination. But Subverted in Civil War where he seems to have softened up since his heart attack, but when the chips are down it's clear his beliefs haven't shifted much. Even though it's eventually proven that Zemo bombed the UN building and framed Bucky for it in order to tear the Avengers apart, he still keeps those heroes who hampered Bucky's arrest locked up in the Raft. By Infinity War it's become averted — he's more concerned about being a Head-in-the-Sand Management or ordering the fugitive Avengers arrested than the fact the situation is a textbook example of the Godzilla Threshold. However, it's played straight in Endgame when he attends Stark's funeral and choose not to arrest the Avengers present.
  • Red Baron: He's primarily known as "Thunderbolt" to the extent that his real first name is rarely used.
  • Skewed Priorities: Even an alien invasion isn’t enough for him to get along with Team Cap. He even orders Rhodes to arrest them, even though they’re the best chance the Earth's got right now. That clearly makes everyone wanna punch the guy in the face many times. However, he clearly had enough respect for Tony that he came to the latter's funeral.
  • Smug Snake: In The Incredible Hulk, he believes that his Super Soldier program would further his military career, ignoring the consequences that could happen and then leads the manhunt of the Hulk out of desire to be hailed a hero (which he seemingly succeeded at in the Viral Marketing for Civil War, which announces his promotion to a job at the White House dues to his experience in Harlem) and earning Betty's love (which he failed to do). Then in Civil War, when meeting with Stark at "The Raft," he gloats at not having to listen to the latter and intimidating him with the Accords due to Stark's failure to arrest Rogers and Barnes.
  • Took a Level in Kindness: Downplayed and subverted. When he comes back in Civil War, he's mellowed out since his last appearance, but it’s later revealed that his beliefs never truly changed. In Infinity War, his polite façade is gone and he’s back to being the Jerkass he was 10 years ago. Conversely, showing up at Tony's funeral after his Heroic Sacrifice possibly proves that he has indeed become a better person, unlike before.
  • The Vietnam Vet: He's a decorated combat vet of the Battle of Khe Sanh.
  • Villain with Good Publicity: He is portrayed as this in Viral Marketing for Civil War when news reports of President Ellis' announcement to promote him as Secretary of State and mentioning his experience with the Hulk in Harlem in a positive portrayal as a solution to such incidents rather than being the cause of this one that led to his new diplomatic position. While not specified, it was also implied he'd taken all credit of stopping the Abomination's rampage rather than Bruce.
  • What the Hell, Hero?: He's been on both ends of this. When he receives them, he never listens.
  • Written-In Absence: He's first shown on-screen in Civil War relating an anecdote about the heart attack and triple bypass he had "five years ago" during a round of golf, keeping him out of active service while he recuperated and later relegating him to a larger role behind the front lines.

    Miriam Sharpe 

Miriam Sharpe

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/miriam_sharpe.png

Species: Human

Portrayed By: Alfre Woodard

Voiced By: Rebeca Patiño (Latin-American Spanish dub)

Appearances: Captain America: Civil War

"You think you fight for us? You just fight for yourself. Who's going to avenge my son, Stark? He's dead. And I blame you."

A woman who works in human resources at the State Department and the mother of Charlie Spencer, who was killed in the Battle of Sokovia.


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Congress

Senate

    Senator Stern 

Senator Stern

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/stern_ws_9347.png
"Ooh, sorry... funny how annoying a little prick can be, isn't it?"

Species: Human

Portrayed By: Garry Shandling

Voiced By: Humberto Vélez (Latin-American Spanish dub)

Appearances: Iron Man 2 | Captain America: The Winter Soldier

"My priority is to get the Iron Man weapon turned over to the people of the United States of America."

A United States Senator who tries unsuccessfully to get Tony Stark to provide Iron Man suits for the military. He makes a cameo appearance in Captain America: The Winter Soldier.


  • Canon Foreigner: Was created specifically for Iron Man 2, and thus has no comic book equivalent.
  • Cerebus Callback: His appearance in Iron Man 2 becomes one after the events of Captain America: The Winter Soldier. It is entirely possible that the reason why the government wanted Tony's Iron Man armor was because of Stern's allegiance to HYDRA.
  • Corrupt Politician: He's an undercover HYDRA member.
  • Dirty Old Man: When speaking to Sitwell in The Winter Soldier, he mentions a constituent he works with, describing her as "really hot, wants to be a reporter, but who listens by that point?"
  • Expy: He bears a lot of similarity to Senator Harrington Byrd, a character from the early Iron Man books who would constantly be calling for Stark Enterprises to hand the Iron Man tech over to the US Gov't and was generally obnoxious to Tony Stark. That being said, Byrd was ultimately harmless and uninvolved with any evil organizations like HYDRA.
  • Insistent Terminology: Always refers to Stark's armor as a "weapon".
  • Jerkass Has a Point: While he's a jerk about it, it's hard to argue that he's wrong to be worried about leaving technology as sophisticated and dangerous as the Iron Man suits in the hands of a Manchild like Tony Stark. Granted, he probably wanted to hand it over to HYDRA for their goals, but that doesn't actually disprove his point. Though his point is a little harder to accept considering said Manchild is literally the inventor of said tech, and basically the only one who really understands it.
  • Kick the Son of a Bitch: When he's roped into giving Tony and Rhodey medals for stopping Ivan Vanko, he deliberately messes up pinning Tony's medal so that it jabs him at the same time. Pretty mean but, as he puts it, Tony had been "a little prick" to him, so it's getting even.
  • The Mole: He's one for HYDRA within the United States Congress, until he gets discovered and arrested.
  • No Party Given: We never learn if he's Republican, Democrat, or an independent. His real allegiance turns out to be HYDRA.
  • Obstructive Bureaucrat: He's a Senator who tries forcing Tony Stark back into weapons contracting.
  • Properly Paranoid: Stern feels the suits should be granted to the US so they can defend against enemy ones, but Tony assures him that there's no danger of rival armor suits to counter his, and that all attempts are decades behind. However, Ivan Vanko soon arrives to provide some doubts about that. Downplayed since, as a member of HYDRA, Stern is an enemy himself all along.
  • Shout-Out: His name is a reference to Howard Stern, who heavily promoted the first Iron Man film on his radio show, even interviewing director and casual friend Jon Favreau.
  • Stealth Insult: To Tony: "Funny how annoying a little prick can be."

    Senator Boynton 

Senator Boynton

Species: Human

Portrayed By: James Eckhouse

Voiced By: Germán Fabregat (Latin-American Spanish dub)

Appearances: The Avengers

A United States Senator at the time of the Chitauri attack on New York.


  • Adaptation Dye-Job: His comic book counterpart has long, white, curly hair. MCU Boynton is balding and has graying hair.
  • Adaptational Heroism: A minor example. The comic books counterpart of Boynton was part of a plot to destroy Iron Man. In the MCU he simply calls for the registration of superpowered individuals.
  • Jerkass: Even though the Avengers save New York, Boynton calls them "so-called heroes".
  • Super Registration Act: He argues for one in the wake of the destruction left behind following the fight between the Avengers and the Chitauri.

    Senator Christian Ward 

Senator Christian Ward

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/christian_ward_aos_3987.jpg
"When evil sits to one's own heart, that is when the surest hand must cut it out."

Species: Human

Portrayed By: Tim DeKay, Alex Neustaedter (young)

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. (first appears in Episode 8: "The Well" (young), Episode 28: "A Fractured House" (adult))

Grant Ward's abusive older brother, who has become a U.S. Senator.


  • Ambiguously Evil: According to Christian, Grant's stories about him being abusive are all lies, and that Grant himself is the insane one who abused their youngest brother under the delusion that Christian was forcing him to do so. Flashbacks have been shown to Christian's abuse but only from Ward's perspective, possibly indicating a dose of Unreliable Narrator; however, it was mentioned that Christian campaigned to have Ward tried as an adult when Ward nearly killed him as a teenager. Despite Christian seemingly expressing concern for Grant when he heard Coulson held him prisoner, his plan is to execute him so that he can win public support for his political campaign and it's ambiguous how much his crusade against S.H.I.E.L.D. was done out of a sincere belief that they're terrorists or whether their downfall would be good PR for him. Overall, the simultaneous discussions shown between Grant and Skye and Christian and Coulson are shot in such way that's meant to cast doubt on which brother is telling the truth, and which is the truly evil one (assuming they're not both evil). Turns out they were both telling the truth. Both of them are right about the other one. In Season 3, Thomas confirms that while Christian really did all this, Grant became much worse than both him and their parents afterwards.
  • Asshole Victim
  • At Least I Admit It: The key difference between him and Grant. He admits he did horrible things, unlike Grant who blames everyone else for his problems.
  • Be Careful What You Wish For: He wanted Grant and he got him, all right. Except it's not how Christian imagined it would turn out.
  • Being Tortured Makes You Evil: Turns out, Thomas was the only child their mother didn't torture, and both Christian and Grant were so much The Unfavorite that Christian plotted Thomas's murder just to get back at their mother.
  • Big Brother Bully: To Grant and their younger brother, Thomas. He's first seen forbidding Grant from throwing a rope down to Thomas at the bottom of a well. He also forced Grant to beat up Thomas, or at least Grant claims so, but chances are he was more willing to follow Christian's lead than he remembers. Turns out it was true, but Thomas still believes that he and their parents didn't deserve to be killed by Grant.
  • Bitch in Sheep's Clothing: According to Ward, he'll smile and "bare his soul" when he's suckering you into believing his lies.
  • Character Death: Killed along with his mother and father in an act of arson in "The Things We Bury".
  • Consummate Liar: Ward, a liar himself, calls him this and says Christian is better at it.
  • Create Your Own Villain: His tormenting Grant has been hinted to be a factor in his murder-by-arson attempt, which led directly to his recruitment by Garrett. In fact, learning that Grant was more willing to follow him despite the abuse than Grant had let on would make Christian essentially a proto-Garrett.
  • Dirty Coward: He turns into a simpering coward when Grant abducts him. He also admits he didn't have the personal courage to hurt and kill Thomas himself and needed to bully Grant into doing it.
  • Even Evil Has Standards: When he makes a promise, he'll do his utmost to follow through with it, as demonstrated when he concedes to the world that there's a difference between S.H.I.E.L.D. and HYDRA in exchange for Grant. He also considers HYDRA to be a genuine enemy. He's also appalled at Grant's Never My Fault mentality.
  • Evil Counterpart: He's set up to be this to fellow Inspector Javert Talbot, who at least seems to have been a bit more reasonable and amicable towards Coulson by the present point in the series; plus, whereas Talbot genuinely cares about his family, so far we've only seen Senator Ward's nasty side towards his siblings. However, judging from what we see in the present day (even if he does cheat on his wife), he's clearly mellowed with age, with no memories of his past sins until Grant takes him back to the well.
  • Inspector Javert: Like Talbot, he believes S.H.I.E.L.D. to be a terrorist organization.
  • It's All About Me: Christian's pursuit of S.H.I.E.L.D. appears to be less about mistakenly thinking they're as evil as HYDRA, and more because he could suffer political embarrassment if it came out that his brother was an agent of HYDRA.
  • Kill It with Fire: Grant tried this. It didn't work. At least, not the first time around.
  • No Party Given: Averted. He's shown to be a Republican by an (R) after his name during a TV appearance in "A Fractured House".
  • Not So Different: Coulson tells his brother at the tail end of a harsh talkdown in "A Fractured House" that the two may have too much in common.
    Coulson: Your brother saw the same angles. Maybe you are more alike than you think.
  • Sudden Name Change: He was originally credited as "Maynard Ward" in "The Well".
  • The Unfavorite: In "The Things We Bury", he admits that the reason he made Grant torment their brother was because Thomas was the only Ward sibling their mother didn't abuse, and this was his way of making her suffer.
  • Unreliable Narrator: He claims all of Grant's stories about making him torture their brother are false, and that Grant did it of his own free will. It's not clear which brother is lying, but the only evidence that clearly supports either one of them favors Grant's version of events. Grant eventually manages to get him to admit the truth.
  • Up to Eleven: Ward describes him as "like me, but worse". Thomas, however, believes that Grant is more horrible than Christian.
  • Your Cheating Heart: He has a wife, but blows her off to make arrangements with his mistress at the Ward family cabin, just so we don't feel too sorry for him when Grant gives him what he deserves.

    Senator Randolph Cherryh 

Senator Randolph Cherryh

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/fa95dc2a643c7750758f0cdb295474dc.png

Species: Human

Portrayed By: Jonathan Walker

Appearances: Daredevil (2015)

A United States Senator involved in Wilson Fisk's plot to seize and gentrify Hell's Kitchen.


  • Adaptational Attractiveness: He's more handsome and better dressed than his comic book counterpart.
  • Corrupt Politician: Cherryh is on Fisk's payroll. His role is to alter zoning regulations so Fisk can complete his goal of turning Hell's Kitchen into residences for the rich.

    Senator Ellen Nadeer 

Senator Ellen Nadeer

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/rota_nadeer.png

Species: Human

Portrayed By: Parminder Nagra

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. (first appears in Episode 69: "Uprising")

"It was only a matter of time before this happened. We can no longer pretend like the Inhuman threat doesn't exist. Each and every one of them is a lethal weapon and now those weapons are aimed directly at us. Make no mistake; this is an act of war. Unless we take a stand and fight back now while we can, we will be complicit in our own extinction."

A United States Senator from New York who is highly vocal about the Inhuman "threat" in the wake of Hive's rampage and Quake becoming a fugitive. She's the leader of the Humans First Movement and a secret collaborator of the Watchdogs


  • Asshole Victim: After her screen time was spent being blatantly racist toward Inhumans, annoyingly smug toward the Team Coulson, killing her own brother for being a Inhuman, and generally getting away at every turn, it's really hard not to cheer when she gets blown up. Daisy even lampshades this.
    Daisy: Well, we can't be too sad. She did try to have you killed.
  • Bitch in Sheep's Clothing: Presents a law-abiding if strident voice to the American people, while she is secretly aiding and abetting the Watchdogs' campaign against Inhumans.
  • Black and White Insanity: She sees herself as the one protecting the people and S.H.I.E.L.D. as the problem, ignoring the fact that they are the ones usually saving the day while she's the one working with a terrorist group. Her brother accuses her of "painting with a broad brush again," suggesting she has a habit of such thinking.
  • Curse Cut Short: Comes close to calling a Watchdog that had been infected by the Terrigen mist a "son of a bitch" as she goes up in a successful and explosive assassination attempt.
  • Even Evil Has Loved Ones:
    • Played with. She almost has her own brother killed by the Watchdogs for becoming an Inhuman, but after he begs for his life, she decides not to go through with it. She finally follows through with it personally at the end, but if they were in each other's shoes he would've done the same to her—after all, they had made a promise to each other.
    • She genuinely loved her mother and was devastated by her death.
  • Expy: Her anti-Inhuman demagoguery and extremist attitude make her a very close Distaff Counterpart for Senator Robert Kelly from the X-Men film series (although Kelly was much more sympathetic than her and eventually changed his views about superpowered people).
  • Fantastic Racism: She appears to be outspokenly anti-Inhuman, even enough that midway through "Broken Promises" she's an eyelash away from having her brother killed by the Watchdogs as he's begging her to call off the ambush.
  • Freudian Excuse: Her views on the Inhumans seem to be motivated by the fact that her brother was seemingly killed or incapacitated by Terrigenesis. It's more of a general hatred of all "aliens", sparked by the loss of her mother in the battle with the Chitauri.
  • Hate Sink: This woman has ZERO redeeming or likable qualities. Even her supposed Morality Pet, her brother, she ends up ultimately shooting out of hatred for Inhumans. Even a vehement racist like Tucker Shockley seems to despise her while Ivanov doesn't remotely give a shit. If anything, he's more upset at Shockley for making noise rather than killing a US senator.
  • Killed Mid-Sentence: She's blown up in her own office while goading to the Watchdogs that she doesn't have the Inhuman gene.
  • Manipulative Bastard: She blackmails S.H.I.E.L.D. director Jeffrey Mace with incriminating footage of Coulson and May with Daisy and Ghost Rider to get his cooperation.
  • Meaningful Name: Her surname is pronounced the same as "nadir", meaning a lowest point — mirroring the public hatred towards Inhumans and other powered persons, along with how her Fantastic Racism stems from losing her own brother to Terrigenesis and their mother in the Chitauri attack on New York.
  • The Mole: Apart from her views, she is coordinating with the Watchdogs to stoke anti-Inhuman hatred.
  • No Celebrities Were Harmed:
    • Her demagoguery and deeply racist views about "aliens", coupled with her status as a prominent politician, are more than a little reminiscent of the positions held by Donald Trump and his inner circle (though in Nadeer's case, taken to much greater extremes).
    • Her nature as a right-wing Indian woman politician also calls to mind Nikki Haley, former governor of South Carolina and US Ambassador to the United Nations
  • Ooh, Me Accent's Slipping: Parminder Nagra's natural British accent occasionally slips through.
  • Sudden Name Change: She was originally credited as "Rota Nadeer" in "Uprising".
  • Villain with Good Publicity: Is a prominent U.S. Senator while she seeks to use the Watchdogs to wage a campaign of fear and discrimination against Inhumans.
  • Well-Intentioned Extremist: In "Broken Promises", she claims to do what she does to protect "her people".
  • You Are What You Hate: Shockley teases that because her brother is an Inhuman, she may or may not carry the gene in her DNA too. This is surprisingly subverted when Shockley sets off a Terrigen crystal in her office, only for him to undergo Terrigenesis instead while Nadeer remains unaffected.

    Senator Stan Ori 

Senator Stanley "Stan" Ori

Species: Human

Portrayed by: Rick Holmes

Appearances: The Punisher (2017)

A United States Senator who has developed a reputation for his pro-gun control views.


  • Adaptational Heroism: As unlikeable as he is, his comic book counterpart was incredibly corrupt, with links to organized crime and dirty cops.
  • Dirty Coward: When Lewis Wilson comes to assassinate him, he weeps openly and begs for his life. While that's understandable, his cowardice becomes disgusting when he throws Karen to the assassin so he could escape, in spite of the fact that she begged for his life seconds earlier.
  • Hypocrite: Karen points out how despite his advocacy for gun control, Stan is hiring Billy Russo's company to provide him security. He actually declines Russo's offer at first for this very reason, but Russo correctly points out he is not the kind of person to die for his conviction.
  • Pompous Political Pundit: He uses the shock and anger of Wilson's bombings to rile up patriotic fervor, labeling the government and police as cowardly and useless (because, after all, they can't stop Frank) and himself as the "only solution".
  • Sleazy Politician: It's made pretty obvious that he's only using his gun control platform and the social outrage of Wilson's bombings as a reason to get more money and increase the chances of getting votes.
  • Unreliable Narrator: Ori's account of the attempt on his life paints him in a positive light, saying he fired a few shots at his would-be assassin before running to get help. Karen says it's all bullshit, he cried and begged for his life, then threw Karen to the assassin to save himself. He also says Frank Castle tried to kill him, even though Castle was not only there to save him, but Frank actually took a bullet meant for him.

    Senator David Schultz 

Senator David Schultz

Species: Human

Portrayed by: Todd Alan Crain

Appearances: The Punisher (2017)

A United States Senator, presidential prospect, and heir of the powerful Schultz family. Also a closeted gay man.


Department of Homeland Security

    Dinah Madani 

Special Agent Dinah Madani

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mcu_dinah_madani.png
"The people he's up against, he's going to get himself killed, Billy. Neither of us want that, right?"

Species: Human

Portrayed by: Amber Rose Revah

Appearances: The Punisher (2017)

A Department of Homeland Security agent whose investigations abroad lead her to cross paths with Frank Castle.


  • Canon Foreigner: Like Sam Stein, Madani has no comics counterpart.
  • Dating Catwoman: Madani is quickly seduced by Billy Russo and begins an affair with him. She weans herself off him once she learns he's dirty and also killed Stein.
  • Determinator: Dinah will let nothing stop her from exposing the Government Conspiracy and avenging the murder of her former partner, Ahmed Zubair, and later that of Sam Stein.
  • Deuteragonist: Of The Punisher (2017) Season 1.
  • Expy: Jeph Loeb has likened her to Samuel Gerard.
  • Fair Cop: Not a policeman, but still a very attractive enforcement officer.
  • Foil: She and Sam are essentially like Matt and Foggy, with Madani as the determined lead of the two.
  • Heroic BSoD: She takes to her bed for a week after Sam's death. On the plus side, this convinces Frank she's on the level.
  • Hurting Hero: Ahmed Zubair, her first partner, was killed in Afghanistan.
  • Immigrant Patriotism: Her parents immigrated from Iran and Dinah herself is now in the service of the US government.
  • I Owe You My Life: Frank saved her life after Micro rammed her car, and she later repays the favor, saving Frank's life by bringing him to her father, who's a doctor. She later makes a deal with her superiors to let Frank go free.
  • It's Personal: Her interest in Frank Castle is because he's one of the soldiers involved with the unit that tortured and killed Ahmed Zubair. Things get even moreso when Billy kills Stein and several other DHS agents in the midst of a shootout. In Season 2, she is obsessive about keeping an eye on Billy through his recovery, and takes on a personal quest to bring him down when he escapes.
  • Jerk with a Heart of Gold: She's kind of abrasive and doesn't always keep Sam in the loop, but she does indeed care about him and is fundamentally on the side of good.
  • Made of Iron: Not quite to the same level as Frank, but he's quite impressed that she survived getting shot in the head.
  • Screw This, I'm Outta Here!: By the end of Season 2 she quits Homeland Security to join the CIA
  • 'Tis Only a Bullet in the Brain: Russo shoots her in the head but she survives, which impresses Frank.
  • The War on Terror: She's part of the DHS and recently has returned home from service in the Middle East
  • You Are in Command Now: She takes over as SAC after Wolf gets killed by Frank.

    Sam Stein 

Special Agent Samuel "Sam" Stein

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/samstein.jpg

Species: Human

Portrayed by: Michael Nathanson

Appearances: The Punisher (2017)

Madani's partner.


  • Canon Foreigner: Just like Dinah.
  • Failed a Spot Check: You should have patted down Billy for weapons when you got the drop on him, Stein.
  • Idiot Ball: The failed spot check above is due to a gross neglect of proper police procedure. More details on the What An Idiot page.
  • The Mentor: Puts Madani through the ropes on her transfer in to New York City.
  • Number Two: He's Madani's second-in-command after she takes command.
  • Sarcastic Devotee: He's ultimately loyal to Madani, but not afraid to let her know when he disagrees with her.

    Carson Wolf 

    Rafael Hernandez 

Operations Director Rafael "Rafi" Hernandez

Species: Human

Portrayed by: Tony Plana

Appearances: The Punisher (2017)

Operations Director of the Department of Homeland Security and mentor of Dinah Madani.


  • Affectionate Nickname: Dinah calls him "Rafi".
  • Cool Old Guy: Unlike Wolf, Hernandez has a pretty fatherly relationship with Madani
  • The Mentor: He's the one who brought Dinah into Homeland Security and mentored her.
  • Obstructive Bureaucrat: Only to a degree, as he doesn't understand Madani's actions because he's Locked Out of the Loop and he wants her to succeed in her career
  • Reasonable Authority Figure: He wants to help Madani succeed in her career and only antagonizes hen he feels her actions threaten this or the Department. Once he learns of the bug planted in her office he grows more supportive. In the end he also agrees to give Frank a clean slate as a reparation for his losses and the service he's provided.

Advanced Threat Containment Unit (ATCU)

    Rosalind Price 

Rosalind Price

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/rosalind_price_aos.jpg
"The laws of nature have changed. And until the laws of man change to reflect that, we can only do what we feel is right."

Species: Human

Portrayed By: Constance Zimmer

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. (first appears in Episode 45: "Laws of Nature")

Head of the Advanced Threat Containment Unit (ATCU).


  • Almighty Janitor: She's a shady intelligence officer who happens to have considerable influence over the President.
  • Ambiguously Evil: It seems she just wants to protect humanity... but her "relationship" with the President makes her motives suspect to say the least. It turns out she's in league with Gideon Malick. However she's completely unaware that he's HYDRA until she and Coulson put the pieces together.
  • Badass Boast: When Coulson asks who she answers to, she simply replies "People answer to me." As in, the freaking President.
  • Cynicism Catalyst: Her husband died of cancer, which is why she puts the captured Inhumans in stasis. As far as she's concerned, they're victims of a disease that makes them a danger to themselves and others, so it's no different than putting someone in a medically induced coma until a cure is found.
    Rosalind: I would have given anything to be able to do this for him. Just... put him to sleep for a while.
  • Deadpan Snarker: She gives as good as she gets from Coulson.
  • Distaff Counterpart: To Coulson. Both heads of intelligence agencies, similar taste in cars, and similar banter.
  • Everyone Has Standards: Though she's willing to authorize lethal force, she clearly wants to capture most of the Inhumans alive. She's quite aghast at the trail of bodies left by Lash, though she spends most of her first episode believing Coulson is responsible.
  • Explain, Explain... Oh, Crap!: "I get my weekly reports... From Malick..."
  • Fantastic Racism: Towards superpowered individuals, though not overly so. She is annoyed that they're being murdered before she can capture them, and lethal force is only considered an option, not a first resort.
  • I Have Many Names: She has used a number of aliases within various agencies. Even "Rosalind Price" is an alias.
  • Knowledge Broker: She's able to dig into S.H.I.E.L.D.'s secrets... including T.A.H.I.T.I., which wasn't part of the public data dump in Winter Soldier.
  • Manipulative Bastard: Is hinted to have the President of the United States wrapped around her finger.
  • My God, What Have I Done?: Upon realizing that Gideon Malick is with HYDRA.
  • Mysterious Past: Coulson's background check on her revealed she worked for multiple government agencies under an alias.
  • Not So Above It All: She can't resist making a Hurricane of Puns about Coulson's hand. She also hints that, like Coulson, she treats her own classic car as a Companion Cube.
  • Only Known by Their Nickname: The show strongly implies that "Rosalind Price" is simply another alias.
  • Poor Communication Kills: Believed that Coulson was behind a rash of dead Inhumans, not suspecting a third party was involved.
  • Romantic False Lead: For Coulson, until her death.
  • Skilled, but Naïve: "A Wanted Inhuman" proves that she is able to match Coulson in the world of espionage but she makes the critical error of publicizing her organization and its goals, something that S.H.I.E.L.D. and HYDRA knew to avoid because of the problems that doing so would cause.
  • Stuffed into the Fridge: Ward snipes her in the neck as she dines with Coulson, specifically because he wants to hurt him.
  • Unwitting Pawn: She had been unknowingly collaborating with HYDRA through her correspondence with Gideon Malick.
  • Well-Intentioned Extremist: Wants to eliminate the threat posed by the newly-emergent Inhumans by any means necessary.
  • World Half Empty: She points out for every Daisy there's a Lash, which is why they have to contain them until they can be sorted out.

    Luther Banks 

Luther Banks

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/luther_banks_aos.jpg

Species: Human

Portrayed by: Andrew Howard

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. (first appears in Episode 45: "Laws of Nature")

An agent of the Advanced Threat Containment Unit and the right-hand man of Rosalind Price. He leads the unit's operations.


  • Dropped a Bridge on Him: His own gun is turned on him not long after Rosalind is killed.
  • Guttural Growler: His voice has a rather notable rasp to it.
  • Hero with Bad Publicity: Actually for real a good person, but positively looks like a HYDRA Mook. Which may or may not have been deliberate casting. It doesn't help that his backstory makes him seem way more suspicious.
  • Noodle Incident: Was discharged from the USMC "with cause", but we never learn what exactly.
  • Number Two: To Rosalind. He leads the ATCU's operations to capture (or eliminate) Inhumans. Daisy even says this trope's name word for word in "Among Us Hide".
  • Red Herring:
    • Despite what Hunter thinks, Banks isn't actually Lash - or even Inhuman - after all.
    • During the ambush at the Distant Star facility, it initially looks like he's The Mole. Instead, Giyera took control of his gun.

Central Intelligence Agency

    Marion James 

Marion James

Species: Human

Portrayed by: Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio

Appearances: The Punisher (2017)

Deputy Director of the CIA, due to move up to the Director's chair.


  • CIA Evil, FBI Good: Zig-zagged with her. Even if she's the most honorable member of the Agency to appear on-screen and is horrified about Rawlins' "shit-show" (her own words), she still does everything possible to keep the whole mess from becoming public, including allying herself with Rawlins (and then again, she makes it perfectly clear to him, when he points out that this alliance could be used as leverage over her when she tells him he'll be forced to retire after getting rid of the loose ends, that she will have him arrested by Homeland Security if he tries, her own career be damned).
  • Karma Houdini: While she has morals she'll likely keeps her career despite giving a mass murderer a new identity so he doesn't expose the dealings of Agent Orange and won't get any comeuppance for allying with him solely because she and the Agency will look bad if they didn't pay attention to their agent doing war crime (it's only when she sees the full picture she stops covering Agent Orange and even then she was willing to let him walk scott-free and put everything on Russo).
  • Number Two: She's the second in command of the CIA, though she's about to become the new Director.
  • Reasonable Authority Figure: When she's in a position to eliminate the last loose ends of Rawlins' conspiracy, Frank, she opts to set him up with a new life and cut him loose.

    Agent Orange (Bill Rawlins) 

    Everett K. Ross 

Deputy Task Force Commander Everett Kenneth Ross

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mcu_everett_ross.png
"You step out of line, you're dealing with me. Please, step out of line."

Species: Human

Portrayed By: Martin Freeman

Voiced By: Juan Antonio Edwards (Latin-American Spanish dub), Jesús Maniega (European Spanish dub), Toshiyuki Morikawa (Japanese dub), Julien Sibre (French dub), François Sasseville (Canadian French dub)

Appearances: Captain America: Civil War | Black Panther

A CIA agent in a command position in the Joint Counter Terrorist Center.


  • Absentee Actor: He is no where to be seen in Avengers: Infinity War, though his absence from that film is justified as the CIA has no business being involved when Thanos and the Black Order invade Earth. He also doesn't appear in Avengers: Endgame either.
  • Ace Pilot: Was a former Air Force member before joining the CIA. He single-handedly fights off the air force of the Wakandan weapons exporters in a remote-controlled ship. Shuri flat-out says he has one of the greatest track records known to the US military.
  • Adaptational Badass: He's a much better bureaucrat than his comic alter ego, with much more power than Ross properly earned in the comics.note  This version is also a CIA operative and former Air Force ace pilot with some combat skills, rather than just a State Dep. aide.
  • Adaptational Nice Guy: Ross in the comics is a bit of Politically Incorrect Hero, which is an aspect largely excised from the films.
  • Ascended Extra: Everett doesn't have a particularly large role in Civil War, but plays a bigger part in Black Panther, and likely future MCU movies.
  • Audience Surrogate: Largely fulfills this role in Black Panther once he's brought to Wakanda, as the Westerner who discovers a world that was totally unknown to him, and marveling at the technological wonders there.
  • Badass Bureaucrat: When he's introduced in Civil War, he appears as someone who would be more comfortable behind a desk than in the field. When he's introduced in Black Panther, however, he has no problem being in the middle of gunfight and is revealed to have a distinguished military record.
  • Butt-Monkey: Even though he is significantly more competent than his comics counterpart, Ross always draws the short straw in Black Panther when crossing paths with T'Challa again. In Korea, T'Challa's intervention screws up his original plan to apprehend Ulysses Klaue. Later, Ross gets shot taking a bullet for Nakia and would've died had it not been for T'Challa bringing him to Wakanda to be healed by Shuri. He also gets trolled repeatedly with several Wakandans deriding him as a colonizer and M'Baku joking about feeding him to his children.
  • Celebrity Paradox:
    • In the UK version of The Winter Soldier, Steve Rogers' list includes the BBC series Sherlock, in which Martin Freeman plays Watson.
    • The Avengers implies that The Lord of the Rings exists. If The Hobbit also exists, Martin Freeman plays Bilbo.note 
  • Composite Character: His role as the government attaché assigned to oversee the Avengers is similar to that of Henry Peter Gyrich, who traditionally serves as the team's government liaison in the comics, but who cannot be used in the MCU because of rights issues.
  • Determinator: During the final battle of the film, despite knowing that the force field window is almost broken by a flying drone machine gun, he continues, not caring whether he’d die any second. All so he could prevent the ships from escaping Wakanda. That takes a lot of mental strength to do.
  • Fire-Forged Friends: The events of Black Panther have made Ross a close ally to the Wakanda royal family.
  • Fish out of Water: Becomes this during the second act of Black Panther, having been brought to Wakanda for life-saving medical treatment.
  • Friend on the Force: Of a sort. Ross is T'Challa's biggest political ally outside of Wakanda and lets him in on the going ons with the international political climate.
  • Give Me a Reason: As his image caption indicates, he dares his prisoners to do something that will provoke him into tormenting them.
  • Heroic Sacrifice:
    • Zigzagged in Black Panther. During the climatic battle, one of Killmonger's ships drops down into the Mound and starts blasting at the remote control chamber that Ross is using to go after the transport ships loaded with vibranium weapons for black supremacist cells. Despite Shuri's admonitions to escape, Ross reengages the controls and continues trying to take down the transport ships, knowing he could be killed at any moment if the ship's fire breaches the defensive walls. Subverted in that Ross manages to complete his mission and escape seconds before the ship can kill him.
    • Also from Black Panther, his Taking the Bullet for Nakia, without a moments hesitation.
  • Hidden Depths: Black Panther reveals that he formerly served in the US Air Force and was one of the best fighter pilots they ever had.
  • Jerk with a Heart of Gold: While he makes it clear that he thinks all superhumans should be locked up and enjoys taunting his prisoners, he closely works with and helps out T'Challa when in need - a dynamic which gets deepened in Black Panther, where he actively supports the Wakandan royal family and their allies, even Taking the Bullet for T'Challa's beloved, Nakia.
  • Obstructive Bureaucrat: Spends most of Civil War yelling at everyone else for violating the Accords. Subverted in Black Panther where he's much more of a Reasonable Authority Figure.
  • Oh, Crap!:
    • Has this look on his face when trying to apprehend Ulysses Klaue in a sting operation, only to immediately recognize T'Challa when he shows up, realizing things are about to get complicated.
    • Has another one when he tries to speak up in M'Baku's court and the latter threatens to feed him to his children.]] Luckily for him, M'Baku was only yanking his chain.
  • One Steve Limit: He shares a surname with General Ross, and both of them appeared in Civil War together. No relation.
  • Pay Evil unto Evil: It's pretty bad form to taunt a helpless and suicidal prisoner, but considering what Zemo had done, it's hard to condemn Ross too much.
  • Shut Up, Kirk!: On the receiving end of one of these from Zemo that effectively takes the wind out of his sails.
    Ross: Smug So how does it feel? To spend all that time, all that effort, and to see it fail so spectacularly?
    Helmut Zemo: Did it? [Ross's smile falters]
  • Suspiciously Similar Substitute: He seems to have replaced Coulson as the normal guy who is the link between the authorities and superheroes. Ironically, Coulson is a creation for the MCU while Ross had existed in the comics for decades.
  • Taking the Bullet: In Black Panther, [takes one for Nakia during Killmonger's breakout of Ulysses Klaue and the reason why he is brought to Wakanda for life-saving medical treatment.
  • Token White: The only named white guy on the good guys' side in Black Panther (Bucky Barnes sits out most of the movie and just shows up for The Stinger).
  • Took a Level in Kindness: In Civil War, Ross mainly comes across as an obstructive Jerkass. In Black Panther, he is much more reasonable and helpful. Justified, as in Civil War, he is dealing with a terrible terrorist attack on the UN that has killed several people with the main suspect being a deadly super soldier assassin and the threat of rogue superheroes, thereby making him a Properly Paranoid Jerkass Has a Point at the time. In Black Panther he was originally occupied with a simple black market arms seller and murderer wanting to peddle a dangerous artifact. Everyday assignment, most likely which is why he is shown to have cool down the next time he is seen in a MCU film.
  • Uncertain Doom: His fate after Thanos's snap is left unknown. Although may be a moot point, considering the snap was later undone.
  • Universal Driver's License: Justified. When he is given control of a Wakandan drone fighter, Shuri makes the interface resemble an American fighter jet so that it will be familiar to him. Before this is made clear, he raises it as a concern himself.

    Sharon Carter 

Agent Sharon Carter / Agent 13

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mcu_sharon_carter.png
"With all due respect, If S.H.I.E.L.D. is conducting a manhunt for Captain America, we deserve to know why."

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed by: Emily VanCamp

Voiced By: Vanessa Acosta (Latin-American Spanish dub), Pilar Martín (European Spanish dub), Yuko Mikutsu (Japanese dub), Chantal Macé (European French dub), Bianca Gervais (Canadian French dub)

Appearances: Captain America: The Winter Soldier | Captain America: Civil War | Falcon & Winter Soldier

"Compromise where you can. Where you can't, don't. Even if everyone is telling you that something wrong is something right. Even if the whole world is telling you to move, it is your duty to plant yourself like a tree, look them in the eye, and say, 'No, you move.'"

A former S.H.I.E.L.D. operative, who pretended to be a nurse living next door to Steve but was secretly assigned by Nick Fury to protect him. Later she is a reluctant part of Pierce's surveillance team, tracking the whereabouts of Captain America.

After S.H.I.E.L.D. collapsed, she becomes CIA agent.


  • Action Girl: She's a S.H.I.E.L.D. agent and a highly proficient shooter. Though she doesn't do very well against Rumlow in The Winter Soldier, it was because she was standing far too close. Played much straighter in Civil War, where she goes up against the Winter Soldier.
  • Advertised Extra: A specific example with Civil War. Her role is bigger than in the last movie, but it's not nearly as big as the marketing and merchandising images would have you believe. There are a ton of group shots showing her fighting as part of Team Cap, which she never does at any point in the movie.
  • Badass Family: Sharon is the niece of Peggy Carter, former Director and co-founder of S.H.I.E.L.D.
  • Badass in a Nice Suit: In her appearances at the Triskelion in The Winter Soldier, she is wearing a S.H.I.E.L.D. style suit.
  • The Big Damn Kiss: Finally shares one with Steve in Civil War with Falcon and Bucky giving them the thumbs up for it.
  • Bodyguarding a Badass: Chosen by Nick Fury to protect Steve, called history's greatest soldier by Fury himself.
  • Bus Crash: A Freeze-Frame Bonus in Avengers: Endgame reveals that Sharon is among who were turned to dust by Thanos.
  • Chuck Cunningham Syndrome: Quietly disappears from the MCU after Civil War, and her relationship with Steve hasn't been brought up since.
  • Comic-Book Movies Don't Use Codenames: Inverted, she's referred to as Agent 13 most of the time. We don't even learn her first name until the final scene of The Winter Soldier, and even then her last name and relation to Peggy Carter isn't mentioned until Civil War.
  • Demoted to Extra: Compared to her role in the comics, she's mostly a tertiary character in The Winter Soldier. She has a slightly larger role in Civil War, but it still pales in comparison to the comics. Then she vanishes altogether, literally as a Thanos victim and no mention is made of her even after everyone has been revived.
  • Did Not Get The Guy: Sadly, Cap seems to have completely forgotten about her by the time of Endgame and goes to an alternate version of the past to live with her aunt instead.
  • Friend on the Force: She provides help to Cap and the anti-Accords Avengers despite being on the pro-Accords Joint Counter Terrorism Center at numerous points in Civil War. First, she provides intel that leads Cap and Sam to Bucky's safehouse. Next, she allows Cap and Sam to listen in on Bucky's interrogation after they are arrested, alerting them to Zemo's infiltration. Finally, she delivers Cap's shield and Sam's Falcon suit to them shortly before the fight at the Berlin airport.
  • Generation Xerox: Downplayed; she physically resembles Peggy but has blond hair instead of brown. It's more noticeable in terms of personality and abilities: she's an excellent markswoman and very serious at her job as an agent, just like Peggy. Civil War reveals that it was her aunt Peggy who motivated her to become an agent. However, she opted to not disclose their familial ties to avoid being cast in her shadow.
  • Girl Next Door: She initially poses as Kate, a nurse who lives next door to Steve.
  • Hair of Gold, Heart of Gold: Blonde, and a loyal agent of S.H.I.E.L.D., which is further emphasized in The Winter Soldier, when she stops Rumlow from killing a tech who refuses to bow to HYDRA's orders by holding him at gunpoint. She then saves the tech from getting shot by kicking out his chair from under him even after Rumlow injures her.
  • Love Interest: She becomes Steve's Second Love in the aftermath of the death of Peggy in Civil War, but this doesn't go anywhere since she doesn't appear in Infinity War and Endgame, and Steve time-travels to be with Peggy as the resolution to his character arc.
  • Loving a Shadow: Sharon is perhaps the only person who resembles Peggy in terms of appearance, personality and skills (not to mention being her blood relative). And thus, Steve pursues a romance with Sharon in the hopes of filling the hole that Peggy left behind after her death until the invention of Time Travel in Endgame, which gives Steve the chance to be with Peggy for real.
  • Reverse Mole: In Civil War, she uses her employment with Everett Ross' counter terrorist force to aid Steve, Sam and Bucky even after they go on the run.
  • Secret Identity: Kate, a nurse and Steve Rogers's neighbor, is actually S.H.I.E.L.D. agent Sharon Carter, with the mission of keeping an eye on him and protecting him if needed.
  • What Happened to the Mouse?: After she gives Steve and Sam their gear in Civil War, she and Steve agree that the theft will be easily traced back to her. She's not mentioned for the remainder of the film, then goes unmentioned in Infinity War. A Freeze-Frame Bonus in Endgame reveals that she was snapped out of existence by Thanos, but she's still unmentioned even after the Mass Resurrection, and Steve consistently refers to Peggy as the love of his life.
  • "Where Are They Now?" Epilogue: The Winter Soldier gives one, and for her, she's seen getting a job at the CIA.
  • You Are Number 6: Referred to in press material for The Winter Soldier as Agent 13.

Federal Bureau of Investigation

    Agent Winn 

Agent Winn

Species: Human

Portrayed by: Andrew Sensenig

Appearances: Daredevil (2015)

An agent with the New York FBI office's Office of Professional Responsibility.


  • Boom, Headshot!: Hattley kills him with Ray's gun, then Felix Manning bags the gun (with Ray's prints) and an audio recording to blackmail Ray into working for Fisk.
  • Internal Affairs: As an agent of OPR, it's his duty to investigate cases of misconduct.

    Jimmy Woo 

James "Jimmy" Woo

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mcu_jimmy_woo.png

Species: Human

Portrayed By: Randall Park

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. note  | Ant-Man and the Wasp | WandaVision

An FBI agent (formerly of S.H.I.E.L.D.) assigned to Scott Lang's house arrest as his parole officer.


  • Adaptational Wimp: In the comics, Jimmy was classified as a Level 8 agent sometime before the Secret War. Here, he's a useless, almost bumbling, FBI agent. And sort of a goofball.
  • Ambiguously Gay: Jimmy legitimately wonders if Scott was asking him out to dinner at the end in their talk about "seeing each other" once Scott's parole is done.
  • Anti-Villain: While he does seem like a jerk to Scott, he is simply doing his job watching a potentially dangerous Wild Card who broke international law. Furthermore, he is fairly friendly with Scott when he visits, and sincerely congratulates him on seemingly making it to the end of his house arrest during the second visit to Scott's house. Even at the end, when he could arrest Scott for somehow getting out of the house with the suit, he doesn't, because he can't prove Scott got out of the house. All in all, he isn't all that hateable despite his rougher attitude.
  • Bunny-Ears Lawyer: Despite his attempts to act like a professional agent, he's kind of... odd.
  • The Comically Serious: Jimmy Woo's comedy comes from reacting in FBI seriousness to the size-shifting silliness around him, but he's not nearly as unflappable as he'd like to think.
  • Curse of the Ancients: He lets out a "What the dickens?" when the situation of Ant-Man and the Wasp gets to be too much for him.
  • Everyone Has Standards: He won't arrest Scott on the suspicion that he broke his house arrest, because there isn't any proof. Agent Woo does promise that if he catches Scott breaking the law, he will arrest him, but for now Scott is off the hook.
  • Friendly Enemy: Even though he is just doing his job, he speaks in a rather polite way to Scott, apologizing to him when he thought that Scott had broken from house arrest. In fact, he actually takes a liking towards Scott and invites him for dinner after his parole has ended.
  • Gosh Dang It to Heck!: Not explicitly touched upon, but Jimmy doesn't swear much and once says the rather unusual "What the dickens?" in the place of a more profane word. This may have to do with his alleged side gig as a youth pastor. He does however use "damn" a couple of times towards the end when Scott evidently escaped but ultimately couldn't prove it.
  • Hero Antagonist: An honest, hardworking FBI agent who puts Scott, Hope, and Hank at risk during the events of Ant-Man and the Wasp, but he's neither evil nor particularly heroic. He's just doing his job.
  • Nice Guy: He's very civil to Scott and tries to calmly explain to Cassie why her dad's in trouble. Woo's not very good at the explanation, but he tries, and he mentions he's a youth pastor. When he briefly cheers on hearing Hank and Hope got arrested, he then apologizes to Scott since it was an insensitive thing to do. It also says something that he follows the letter of the law and won't arrest Scott on the suspicion of him becoming Ant-Man again.
  • Not Now, Kiddo: Zigzagged and played for laughs. When Cassie calls him out, he tells her that he's sure this all has to sound like a bunch of confusing adult stuff to her, and proceeds to explain it... Using legal jargon.
  • Not So Above It All: Tries to be a professional, but it's not too hard to get him to crack. Just look at his utter fascination with Scott's magic trick.
  • Obstructive Bureaucrat: As Scott's parole officer. It's his responsibility to make sure Scott doesn't break house arrest.
  • Police are Useless: Much like Paxton and SFPD in Scott's last movie, he and the FBI are very incompetent at their job and acts as only detrimental obstacles for Scott and his friends. Downplayed in that they do manage to temporarily capture Hank and Hope, though it still makes them an obstacle when they refused to listen to Hank and Hope about what is actually going on after detaining them.
  • Production Foreshadowing: Prior to his film debut, he was mentioned in an episode of Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. four years earlier.
  • Race Lift: Of the "Minority to Minority" kind, being changed from Chinese-American to Korean-American. It helps that "Woo" is applicable on both sides.
  • Sarcasm-Blind: As a crowner to how he's seemingly not good with people, after he Info Dumps the whole terms of Scott's sentence to his 11 year old daughter:
    Scott: Wow. You're really great with kids!
    Woo: Thanks. I'm also a youth pastor.
  • Schrödinger's Canon: In the tradition of MCU films never addressing details from the MCU TV shows, his status as a former S.H.I.E.L.D. agent is not even hinted at.
  • We Will Meet Again: By the time he lets Scott off house arrest, it's pretty clear he knows that Scott violated his agreement and went out as Ant-Man, but since there's nothing to officially prove that, he has no choice but to let him go. That said, he thinks it's only a matter of time before Scott gets caught again, given how often this happens, and says he'll be the one who catches him.

    Stoltz 

Agent Stoltz

Species: Human

Portrayed By: Sean Thompson Kleier

Appearances: Ant-Man and the Wasp

A corrupt FBI agent .


  • Asshole Victim: He is the only person Ghost actually kills in the entire movie, but he's a dirty FBI agent who works for Sonny Burch, not exactly what you'd call a tragic loss.
  • Dirty Cop: He's in league with Sonny Burch, selling him information.
  • Tele-Frag: Ghost phases her hand into his heart to kill him.
  • Sudden Name Change: Originally, Kleier was listed as Geoffrey Ballard, a.k.a. Centurion, an obscure Bronze-Age character that debuted in Black Goliath #4 in 1976 and went on to appear in a few Ms. Marvel issues.

Wilson Fisk's protection detail

    Tammy Hattley 

Tamara "Tammy" Hattley

Species: Human

Portrayed by: Kate Udall

Appearances: Daredevil (2015)

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/vlcsnap_2019_04_27_21h19m51s680.jpg
"I got a boss too, and he's got a hard-on for agents in financial holes."
Nadeem's superior at the New York FBI office.
  • Da Chief: Nadeem and Dex's boss.
  • Cruel to Be Kind: She divorced her husband to ensure that Fisk can't hunt him down.
  • A Darker Shade of Gray: Callously murders a colleague unlike Ray and probably most of the other blackmailed Feds.
  • Dirty Cop: Fisk manipulates her into turning the rest of her agents into his glorified muscle.
  • Even Evil Has Loved Ones: She got a divorce from her husband to keep him off Fisk's radar, and encourages Nadeem to do everything he can to keep his family safe from Fisk as well.
  • Even Evil Has Standards: Despite nonchalantly murdering Winn, her conversation with Nadeem when they're preparing to escort Fisk to a summit of rounded-up gangsters makes clear she's not too happy with doing Fisk's dirty work, and the only thing keeping her from ratting is Fisk's threats of harm to her daughter. After Nadeem's posthumous confession video goes viral and implicates her, she's quick to give up everything she knows.
  • Evil Red Head: Red-headed and works for Fisk.
  • Forced into Evil: Fisk killed one of her children in an arranged "hit and run", and used this to blackmail her.
  • Mole in Charge: Fisk's at the FBI.
  • Pet the Dog: She makes efforts early on to try and keep Ray out of Fisk's machinations. Unfortunately, Ray's pride keep him from failing to see the trap Fisk has lured him into.
  • Reasonable Authority Figure: She's a stern but fair-minded boss who's honest with her employees. Except she isn't. She shockingly kills Winn in front of Nadeem and blackmails him into working for Fisk just like she and Dex - and several others - already are doing.
  • Trapped in Villainy: Fisk has threatened to kill her daughter if she does try to leave.

    Rahul "Ray" Nadeem 

Rahul "Ray" Nadeem

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/raynadeem.png
"Because of you, my wife still has her husband and my son still has his father."

Species: Human

Portrayed By: Jay Ali

Appearances: Daredevil (2015)

"You know, you remind me of someone I knew growing up. Jack Kem. Yeah, but everyone knew him as Jiggy. You know, Jiggy lived in a two-family house all by himself. It was practically a mansion to me. But Jiggy was a helper, too. He was always helping out folks on the block. Annie the single mom needs a new car? Jiggy's got it. The Hoffmans are desperate for rent? No problem. Ten-year-old me thought this guy was a hero. But it turned out Jiggy had hidden ten kilos of heroin in the trunk of Annie's sedan. Another five in the Hoffman baby's room. Guess who the cops arrested when they tracked down that powder? I've seen your kind of "help" before."

An FBI agent who becomes Wilson Fisk's handler upon his release from prison.


  • An Offer You Can't Refuse: Fisk suggests that he's making one of these when he first summons Nadeem to propose an offer to become an informant, only to clarify he's actually offering to provide information to Nadeem in exchange for Vanessa's protection, and realizes that as a married man, Nadeem is likely to take sympathy on him for that. Then of course, it turns out that the offer was always an unrefusable one even before Nadeem got sent, as Fisk had spent three years slowly bankrupting him without him even meeting the man, to make him desperate enough to take Fisk's deal without looking closely enough.
  • Boom, Headshot!: His fate at the hands of Dex.
  • Canon Foreigner: Nadeem and all of his colleagues except for Dex are all-new characters created just for the show.
  • Deal with the Devil: He makes one with Fisk that, at the outset, looks pretty good: Fisk offers information on a major Albanian crime syndicate, which will boost Ray up the career ladder whereas he'd previously stalled. However, by pinning his career advancement on Fisk, he puts himself into a position of vulnerability which Fisk swiftly exploits. It spirals out of control and Fisk gains complete control over Ray and turns him into a Dirty Cop.
  • Deathbed Confession: He records a final message to his family, before being killed by Dex. But the video also includes his confession and full testimony against Fisk, detailing everything he did and knows about the Kingpin's activities. His wife smuggles the video to Foggy, who quickly realizes this is a Dying Declaration — the evidence they need to bring Fisk to justice. Once it's released to the public, Fisk is quickly arrested for his crimes.
  • Decomposite Character: He is an original character, but his financial troubles being orchestrated by Fisk are reminiscent of what happened to Matt in the original Born Again story. That it has to do with his sister-in-law's cancer treatments is borrowed from Nick Manolis, the dirty cop in Born Again that Fisk paid to discredit Matt (whose son Fisk offered to pay full treatment for if Manolis perjured himself).
  • Deuteragonist: Of Daredevil Season 3. He has almost as much screentime and character development as Matt himself.
  • Dirty Cop: Downplayed. Fisk uses emotional manipulation and actual blackmail to turn Ray into a very reluctant accomplice. Ray eventually turns against Fisk, valuing his moral compass and the example he'll set for his son over his own survival.
  • Determinator: He's willing to go to any length for his family. Fisk even uses this to manipulate him into being desperate enough to cut the deal with Fisk to begin with.
  • Entertainingly Wrong: When questioning Foggy, he correctly suspects that Matt is leading a double life and Foggy knows about it, but he guesses that Matt is a criminal instead of a vigilante.
  • Face Death with Dignity: When Dex catches up to him in his house, he says he's glad that Dex will be the one to kill him, and urges him to just kill him there and then to get things over with. He ultimately has to draw his gun to get Dex to go through with shooting him.
  • Fan Disservice: He's a good-looking, well-built guy who gets a shirtless scene in "Revelations", but it's a Shower of Angst and he's wounded from getting shot by Dex, making it this.
  • Foil: To Matt. Both have similar "I can fix this" attitudes that mirror one another. Nadeem is pretty isolated as he tries to fix all the problems he caused by himself: he never draws in Seema, he never lets her help, he barely leans on her emotionally. He doesn't depend on friends. He views co-workers as competition. He only gives in and goes for help when it’s already too late and he’s in too deep to get out. Matt, meanwhile, is constantly trying to get everyone else to stay out of his fight and insisting that it is his fight and his alone, that he must be the one that fixes it. The only difference is that Matt realizes he needs the help of other people sooner than Nadeem does, soon enough to actually make use of a multi-pronged attack. (It probably helps that the people Matt cares about who are being threatened are also grown, capable adults. It’s not fair to threaten someone’s kid.)
  • Forced into Evil: Fisk runs a masterful manipulation game on him, and the subsequent Frame-Up forces him into becoming a Dirty Cop working alongside the man who shot him.
  • Guilt-Ridden Accomplice: He's only a Dirty Cop for a short time, but he's tormented by guilt the entire time until he pulls a Heel–Face Turn.
  • Happily Married: He's a family man, and has a very loving relationship with his wife Seema despite financial worries from paying for her sister's treatments. The sorts of things that Wilson Fisk likes to exploit.
  • Heel Realization: After spending a fair portion of Season 3 protecting Fisk, he's told by Matt, by Karen and by others in no uncertain terms that Fisk has been using him to regain power. When confronted with evidence in the wake of Jasper Evans' death, he goes to Fisk's penthouse and sees the full extent of the luxury Fisk is living in. He's horrified to realized that however inadvertently, he's allowed the most dangerous crime lord in New York (maybe America) to ascend the throne yet again.
  • A Lighter Shade of Gray: Much more sympathetic and moral thanthe other agents blackmailed by Fisk
  • Nice Job Breaking It, Hero!: While it's logical to assume from how he's responded to earlier matters like Union Allied and Detective Blake that Fisk had a spare in reserve for if he couldn't exploit Nadeem's desperation, Nadeem ultimately was exploited. Ultimately the entire plot and conflict of the third season happened because he agreed to Fisk's deal.
  • Pride: His Fatal Flaw. Aside from his financial worries, Nadeem wants his family to think well of him. He wants to be a good man and hero in their eyes, and this leads to him making some careless decisions.
  • Redemption Equals Death: He eventually defies Fisk, and goes before the Grand Jury with the support of Matt, Foggy, and Karen. Fisk manages to blackmail the grand jury, leaving Ray to accept his fate and sacrifice himself to save his family.
  • Secret Keeper: Matt unmasks himself to Nadeem after rescuing him and his family from Fisk's assassins.
  • Unwitting Pawn: Fisk lures him in with promises of career advancement. In fact, he's been Fisk's pawn since long before he even spoke to the man. Fisk targeted Nadeem by cutting off his sister-in-law's medical insurance, forcing Nadeem to pay her medical bills and go into crippling debt, ruining his FICO score and delaying hopes of career advancement, so that when Fisk offers him information, Nadeem won't look too closely at the possible repercussions.
  • We Used to Be Friends: While he and Dex start the season as close friends and colleagues, they grow distant until Dex snaps from Fisk's influence and goes on a killing spree.
  • You Remind Me of X: Says Fisk reminds him of a neighbor of his named Jiggy who ostensibly painted himself as a man of his community who helped others out, only to then turn those he "helped" into fall guys when his secret drug dealing operations got busted.

    Benjamin "Dex" Poindexter 

Benjamin "Dex" Poindexter / Bullseye

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/poindexter_benjamin.jpg
"If I was wearing a mask, the press would be calling me a hero. Instead I'm sitting in here trying to justify defending myself."
Click here to see his phony Daredevil costume 

Species: Human

Portrayed By: Wilson Bethel

Appearances: Daredevil (2015)

"FBI and the army before that, they helped keep me on the straight and narrow path. But now... without that it's all... I'm drowning in deep water and I don't know whether I'm swimming through the surface or the bottom."

A SWAT sniper on the detail protecting Wilson Fisk.


  • Adaptational Heroism: In the comics, Bullseye was a Psycho for Hire from the off, never had any sort of career in law enforcement (though he potentially worked for the NSA) and showed zero inner conflict. Here, Dex is an FBI agent (albeit a Cowboy Cop) and while he's most certainly still psychotic, he has a desire to fix it and takes steps to deal with his disorder, which causes him no shortage of pain.
  • Adapted Out: Unlike his comics counterpart, his skeleton is not laced with Adamantium due to those rights being with Fox's X-Men Film Series at the time that Daredevil Season 3 was filmed.
  • Adaptation Name Change: Comics Bullseye has no known real name; the closest we ever get is "Lester". Here, one of his comic book counterparts frequent aliases, "Benjamin Poindexter," becomes his legal name.
  • And I Must Scream: By the end of Season Three, he's had his spine broken and he's been left in the care of an unknown party that performs a surgical experiment on him. While he's conscious.
  • Arch-Enemy: Dex becomes this for Matt when Dex murders Father Lantom in front of him.
  • Ax-Crazy: Not only does he have severe mental issues, he doesn't need much incentive to kill.
  • Badass Normal: He doesn't have any explicit superpowers, yet is able to overpower Daredevil (who admittedly is still recovering from all the abuse he went through in The Defenders) using his skills and fighting prowess alone.
  • Big-Bad Ensemble: With Fisk under house arrest and unable to take direct action, Dex acts as The Heavy for most of season three. When Manning has Julie murdered, Dex completely snaps and turns on Fisk, becoming an independent threat for the finale.
  • The Brute: Fisk corrupted him into his personal attack dog, which came back to bite Fisk in the ass in the season finale.
  • The Bully: As a sadist, Dex gets his kicks where he can get them, and that means lording whatever power he has over whoever has less.
  • Catchphrase: "That's hard. Really hard" is his response whenever he's told about someone suffering, simply because, as The Sociopath he genuinely doesn't understand how he should react, but on the advice of his therapist has found a phrase that will let him (just about) function in society.
  • Charles Atlas Superpower: His throwing power comes from an obsessive amount of practice since he was young. He thought that if he could throw perfectly at baseball his parents would come back.
  • Clothes Make the Superman: The fact that Dex wears an armored Daredevil suit when acting as Fisk's assassin, while Matt has gone back to his original off-the-shelf ski mask and black sweater, significantly helps level the playing field between the two of them.
  • Cowboy Cop: Dex is a bloodthirsty and sadistic man, and his badge gives him license to indulge in his violent tendencies. His appointed FBI therapist remarks that he's used lethal force before, but Dex is agitated that cops like him get condemned by the press for doing what's necessary whereas vigilantes like Daredevil get cheered on for doing the same.
    Dex: If I was wearing a mask, the press would be calling me a hero. Instead I'm sitting in here with you having to justify defending myself!
  • Cold Sniper: His talents as a sniper make him an optimal candidate for Fisk to turn into an attack dog.
  • Composite Character: He takes the role of the imposter Daredevil and Nuke from the 'Born Again' storyline in the comics.
  • Comic Book Movies Dont Use Code Names: Dex never goes by his alias name "Bullseye", and the closest we ever see to him being called that is the bullseye on his baseball coach's hat.
  • The Corruptible: Wilson Fisk exploits his need for recognition and a North Star, to turn him into his crazed assassin.
  • Creepy Child: He was a very unsettling little boy. He ultimately kills the one adult in his life who encouraged and mentored him, for essentially no reason... and subsequently showed zero remorse.
  • Crippling Overspecialization: Dex's marksman skills are superb, as he can make any object, regardless of how harmless it is, into a lethal—or at the very least, painful—thrown weapon. However, while his close range skills aren't horrible and is impressive enough to take hits from Matt and later Fisk, his actual moveset is limited and he has to resort to either finding a surrounding object he can use or block the barrage of blows thrown his way.
  • Dark and Troubled Past: His parents died at a young age, and according to him, they were "always mad" before they died. He was then sent to an orphanage, spending much of his time entirely alone.
  • Disproportionate Retribution: He killed his baseball coach for benching him, along with telling him a harsh truth that no amount of skill at the game would bring his parents back. He also wanted to kill his therapist for dying of cancer, as he saw it as her abandonning him.
  • The Dragon: Fisk crafts him into his personal enforcer and hitman for season 3, and he spends most of the season posing as Daredevil to tarnish his reputation.
  • Driven to Suicide: He's on the verge of doing this after he is made a scapegoat by the FBI when their investigation into his conduct in killing the Albanian hit squad after Fisk is leaked to the press (by Fisk) and he is put on administrative leave. Feeling betrayed, he is going to shoot himself on his kitchen table before getting a phone call from Fisk, who had orchestrated Dex's suspension and has Felix Manning waiting outside Dex's apartment to take him to the tailor to be outfitted for a Daredevil costume.
  • Dude, Where's My Respect?: Fisk is able to get inside Dex's head because he's the first person who's actually shown admiration for Dex's talents, as he's been driven to be a very bitter and jaded person by the various mentors, institutions, and other figures that he has trusted who have all abandoned him for one reason or another.
  • Early-Bird Cameo: He made an unnamed appearance in Season 1 of Daredevil, where he can be identified as a SWAT sniper with some the Ace of Spades.
  • Establishing Character Moment: When Fisk's armored convoy transporting him to a safehouse is ambushed by an Albanian hit squad that incapacitates and/or kills the rest of the FBI agents in the transport, Dex manages to singlehandedly dispatch every assassin with quick and meticulous accuracy, which is what ultimately leads Fisk to take interest in his skills. He also murders a couple of surrendering gunmen, purely because he didn't see any reason to spare them after trying to kill him.
  • Even Evil Has Loved Ones:
    • He was genuinely deeply attached to his therapist and was utterly heartbroken by her death. While he expressed this in violent ways (saying he wanted to kill her to punish her for leaving him, even when he intellectually knew it wasn't her fault) his pain was genuine.
    • He tries this again with Julie, and even though he proves completely incapable of a personal relationship with her, he truly recognised and respected her goodness, and however messed-up his feelings for her were, they were certainly genuine, to the point that he is devastated when he finds out from Matt that Fisk had her killed.
  • Even Evil Has Standards: Subverted, and in direct contrast to Fisk. Fisk clearly won’t take a painting from a family affected by the Holocaust. Dex has no problems killing the remaining family members for it. This is done without Fisk’s knowledge, and Fisk is understandably disturbed to find the painting in his living room. This pretty much draws a line of separation between Fisk’s ambitions, and Dex’s complete lack of morals.
  • Evil Counterpart: To Matt Murdock — All the way. Both lost their parents at a young age albeit through different circumstances, both of them work for law enforcement, and they constantly suffer life crisis'. However, Matt found other parental figures in Father Lantom and Stick, whom while none of them were perfect, did care for Matt in their own ways. Whereas Dex lost both his parents, killed his own mentor in a fit of rage, and everyone else he cared about died off, none of whom were nearly as sketchy as Matt's famial ties. Matt is also a respected lawyer and despite defending a few questionable clients, stays true to his morals, is mostly well liked by the authorities, and does the right thing for the most part. Dex however is an FBI agent who is constantly looked down upon by his superiors for his brutality until they are all either killed off or turned dirty by Fisk and expresses fierce jealousy towards vigilantes, which ultimately turns him dirty and corrupts him into Fisk's personal hitman. However, their fighting styles are completely different: Matt focuses on his fists, specializing in close quarters combat and uses boxing just like his late father, and even though he does show he have some long-range skills, it's more of an improvised backup and even then, it's limited and he's only decent at it. Dex meanwhile is more of a marksman and unlike Matt, can use pretty much anything he grabs his hands on as a weapon, and while he is more than capable of holding his own during a brawl, he is at a significant disadvantage and has to resort to more defensive measures via constant blocking or find something he can throw. In many ways, Dex is what Matt Murdock would have become if he wasn't able to control his bloodlust and became a sociopathic killer instead of a fighter for justice.
  • Evil Is Petty: Dex takes a lot of pleasure in bullying others, including Fisk. He takes a bite out of the big man's burger before sending it in.
  • False Flag Operation: Fisk directs him to commit crimes in a replica of the Daredevil armor to turn public opinion against Matt.
  • Final Boss: He's one of the final enemies Matt must defeat in the final showdown, along with Wilson Fisk.
  • The Heavy: For season 3. Both of the major character deaths (Father Lantom and Ray Nadeem), as well as a large number of minor character killings or hospitalizations (Ellison, Jasper Evans, etc), are committed by Dex.
  • Inexplicably Awesome: While the series does a good job of setting up his impressive accuracy, his general fantastic combat ability is left more in the air. Matt was trained by the Chaste since he was a child and, by the time he faces Dex, has already been proven as a match for any of the Five Fingers of the Hand, the Iron Fist or the Black Sky; all of whom have superhuman abilities, as does Matt himself. Dex still defeats him twice over the course of the season and, during the three way fight in the finale, it's pretty clear that he would have been able to kill both Matt and Fisk if he hadn't been distracted by his obsession with killing Vanessa as revenge for Julie. All this despite nothing stating that he has any combat training beyond the standard for a soldier and an FBI agent, nor any superhuman ability.
    Matt: He didn't just find someone to wear my suit. He found someone as fast and skilled as I've ever seen, and I couldn't take him. He found someone to kill me!
  • The Insomniac: He tends to have trouble sleeping due to the voices in his head.
  • Improbable Aiming Skills: Dex is a very skilled sharpshooter, and is downright uncanny with thrown weapons, two very different skills. He can hurl pencils with such force that they impact with the strength of thrown daggers, and is able to bounce bullets and other objects off of items that deflect them into their intended targets. His first fight with Matt at the Bulletin sees him also turn practically anything that isn't tied down to the floor into a weapon. When going after Karen and Matt at the church, he turns rosary beads into projectiles and collection plates into deadly frisbees.
  • Improbable Weapon User: Pencils, scissors, snow globes, light ornaments, and rosary beads to name a few. If it's not tied to the floor, and can be thrown, he will use it with lethal accuracy.
  • Improvised Weapon: If it can be thrown, anything is a deadly weapon in his hands.
  • In Love with Love: He makes it clear he has no real physical attraction to Julie, he just wants her as a Morality Pet. He can fake the idea that they are a couple but the truth is that he just wants a good person to praise him when tries doing good.
  • It's All About Me: Much of his instability seems to stem from being so narcissistic, even as a child, that he becomes violent to the point of homicidal if the world cannot live up to his self-entered expectations of it.
  • Kick the Dog: As a kid he used to torture animals, it required a lot of therapy sessions for him to stop.
  • Kick the Son of a Bitch: He shoots a couple of surrendering gunmen...who had just gunned down five of his fellow agents in cold blood. Hard to feel bad for them.
  • Lack of Empathy: He has so little empathy for others that he has to be taught how to fake it.
  • Lean and Mean: He has a slender (but muscular) build, and is as dangerous as they come.
  • Long-Range Fighter: Dex is a damn good fighter, but even when not in top shape Matt still has the edge over him in hand-to-hand. However, Dex absolutely dominates at long range, whether with firearms or improvised weaponry.
  • Meaningful Name: His last name Poindexter is telling of his abilities.
  • Morality Chain: A very dark example. His childhood therapist told him that he needed a constant north star to keep him morally on-balance and guide him. After her death, he spends much of his adulthood fixating on finding another north star, which leads to him stalking an old work acquaintance.
  • Mundane Made Awesome: One of his common attacks is picking up everyday objects and throwing them at people. Its in his first fight with Matt, he finally uses random objects, and with terrifying effectiveness. Matt is both knocked out of the air, and painfully hit in the face multiple times, even behind cover.
  • Mythology Gag: His assumption of the Daredevil identity (and Matt's renewed use of the Bullseye-like plain black costume) calls back to a brief era at the end of the Ann Nocenti run where he impersonated Daredevil of his own accord and Matt had to snap him out of it by dressing as Bullseye.
    • As a kid, his ball cap had a target similar to Bullseye's insignia stitched onto it.
  • Never My Fault: Refuses to say he did anything wrong during the convoy ambush, even though there are two corpses with their hands behind their heads he'll rather blame the vigilantes for getting away with what he can't.
  • Not Wearing Tights: He never wears his iconic comics costume, only wearing civilian clothes throughout the show and only donning a costume when Fisk has him impersonate Daredevil.
  • One-Man Army: Dex takes down a dozen well-armed Albanian gangsters with advanced weaponry and body armour, entirely by himself. This is after the Albanians just murdered most of the FBI envoy transporting Fisk.
  • The Paranoiac: He has several symptoms, such as refusing to accept blame for the murders he committed and even reframing his supportive coach as a jerk to justify his killing of him, a penchant for murderous revenge over even minor slights, controlling tendencies manifesting in needing everything in his home to be in perfect order, a suspicious outlook and self-fulfilling belief that others are out to get him, a tendency to see himself in a self-important light (such as preferring to see his actions as heroic, or not caring as a child if other kids didn't get to pitch at baseball to the point of murdering over it), and an irritable temperament and general Jerkass attitude overall. He also has stalking tendencies and a habit of growing dangerously attached to particular people for fear of abandonment, to the point he would rather kill them than allow them to abandon him in any way.
  • Pet the Dog:
    • Even while obviously threatening Nadeem upon turning up at his house, he acts very polite and cordial in the presence of Nadeem's wife and kids.
    • He worked for a time at a suicide prevention hotline. Unfortunately, this just led to him stalking Julie and didn't solve his mental issues at all.
    • Even though his Roaring Rampage of Revenge involves Revenge by Proxy, he does not use lethal force against the honest FBI agents, and we know at least Hattley survives when he could have very easily killed her. It seems like trying to make the frozen corpse of Julie, the "north star" to his moral compass, has had at least some positive effect on him.
  • Psycho for Hire: He's diagnosed as having borderline personality disorder with psychopathic tendencies and is hired by Fisk to impersonate Daredevil.
  • Roaring Rampage of Revenge: When Matt tips him off that Fisk had Julie murdered, he dons the Daredevil armor and makes a one man assault on Fisk's heavily defended hotel, with the intent to kill him and Vanessa at their wedding.
  • Sadist: He takes pleasure in hurting others, and sees little difference between innocent civilians and armed combatants.
  • Sanity Slippage: Over the course of Season 3, he becomes more and more unhinged as Fisk's influence corrupts him. By the Season 3 finale, he seems to have completely gone off the deep end, talking to the corpse of Julie, bent on making his enemies suffer as much as him, and engaging in Revenge by Proxy regardless of the cost.
  • Shadow Archetype: To Matt Murdock. See Evil Counterpart for more details.
  • The Sociopath: One of the most comprehensive clinical examples on the show. He's diagnosed at an early age with borderline personality disorder with psychopathic tendencies, which is the textbook definition of a sociopath. He needs to fake empathy when confronted with the feelings of others, repeatedly falling back on "It's hard, real hard" as a mundane platitude because he doesn't know what else to say. He shows no remorse for killing people, always finding a way to shift the blame to them for angering him, or getting in his way, or simply inconveniencing him. Once Fisk corrupts him and he embraces his role as Fisk's executioner, he relishes any chance to flaunt his power over others with impunity, killing and maiming almost at will, and with no regrets.
  • Stalker with a Crush: He tells his FBI therapist that he has a girlfriend called Julie. He doesn't, but Julie is indeed real. He worked with her at a suicide hotline for a year, and has been stalking her ever since. When he finally gets the chance for a real date with it, he's far too excited, easily insulted and unhinged to keep things together. He winds up ruining any actual chance with her, falling deeper into his insanity as a result. Although he is able later to win her over a bit, convince her to try to help him with his issues. Before she can, Fisk has her killed and pretends that she has rejected him again in order to make Dex reliant upon him. When Matt reveals the truth to him, he goes on the warpath against Fisk.
  • Start of Darkness: It all began when he killed his baseball coach for benching him.
  • The Pen Is Mightier: He uses office supplies during his fight with Matt in the Bulletin, and uses a pencil to wound Mitchell Ellison.
  • Throwing Your Gun at the Enemy: Naturally he can get away with it. He can even kill people by throwing the magazine of the gun.
  • Tragic Villain: He knows he's an apathetic killer, which breeds an intense self-loathing. He later became an FBI agent to only target bad people, but Wilson Fisk's influence causes him to snap, transforming him into a fully insane killer willing to target innocent and guilty alike.
  • We Can Rebuild Him: After his spine is broken during a three way battle with Matt and Fisk, he undergoes an experimental surgery to upgrade his body.
  • Wham Shot: (turns to the passenger seat) “Don’t worry Julie. He’s one of the good ones.” By this point Julie is a corpse that’s been sitting in one of Fisk’s freezers for most of the season. Now, Dex is driving around NYC with her thawing corpse in the passenger’s seat. Also, Dex is in his Daredevil costume. Even Matt, who is aware of Dex’s crazy, has to do a double-take on that one.
  • Woobie, Destroyer of Worlds: After losing his parents and psychiatrist and killing his coach in a fit of rage, it's easy to understand why he snapped.

    Pryor Arinori 

Pryor Arinori

Species: Human

Portrayed by: Don Castro

Appearances: Daredevil (2015)

A colleague of Dex and Nadeem's.


  • Bald of Evil: He's got a shaved head, although he's not really "evil" so much as "blackmailed into working for Wilson Fisk".
  • Forced into Evil: Fisk has some sort of dirt which is how he got blackmailed into working for him.
  • Noodle Incident: He refuses to say what exactly it is that Fisk has on him.
    Arinori: Better we don't talk about it, and in here we don't even say his name.

    Agent Lim 

Agent J. Lim

Species: Human

Portrayed by: Scotty Crowe

Appearances: Daredevil (2015)

A colleague of Dex and Nadeem's.


  • Oh, Crap!: His reaction when Dex turns up at Fisk and Vanessa's wedding in his fake Daredevil costume and carrying Julie's frozen corpse.

    Agent Alvarez 

Agent Alvarez

Species: Human

Portrayed by: Kimberli Alexis Flores

Appearances: Daredevil (2015)

A colleague of Dex and Nadeem's.

    Agent Wellers 

Agent Wellers

Species: Human

Portrayed by: Matthew McCurdy

Appearances: Daredevil (2015)

A colleague of Dex and Nadeem's.


  • Bald of Evil: That and he's a much more consenting dirty cop in working for Fisk.
  • Shoot the Messenger: Fisk brutally beats him to death for telling him that Nadeem has gone rogue and helped Karen Page escape from Dex.

Department of Damage Control

    Anne-Marie Hoag 

Anne-Marie Hoag

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mcu_hoag_4.png

Species: Human

Portrayed By: Tyne Daly

Appearances: Spider-Man: Homecoming

The director of Damage Control, a U.S. government department operated by Stark Industries that's tasked with cleaning up collateral wreckage caused by superhuman activity.


  • Clean Up Crew: A non-villainous example. Their goal is to clean up and repair the damage left behind by superhero activities and salvage materials and weapons from the battles.
  • Obstructive Bureaucrat: As the head of Damage Control, she oversees the logistics of cleaning up sites affected by superhuman battles, which makes Adrian Toomes' business redundant.
  • Power Hair: She wears her hair at a medium length, reflecting her position of power.
  • Small Role, Big Impact: Only appears briefly in Spider-Man: Homecoming, but her actions in the prologue inadvertently turn Toomes towards villainy. She is also breifly visible in the background during the aftermath of the bodega incident, presumably to help the local police co-ordinate the clean-up of the alien tech involved.

Alternative Title(s): MCU United States Government Military

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