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    Stan Lee 

Stan Lee / "Irving Forbush" / "The Watcher Informant"

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/stan_lee_iron_man.png
"Excelsior!"

Species: Unknown / Various

Citizenship: Various

Portrayed By: Stan Lee

Voiced By: Jesse Conde (Latin-American Spanish dub); Salvador Moreno [main films], Eduardo Muntada [Captain America: The First Avenger], Santiago Cortés [Captain America: The Winter Soldier], Fernando Hernández [Guardians of the Galaxy, Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.] (European Spanish dub)

Appearances: Iron Man | The Incredible Hulk | Iron Man 2 | Thor | Captain America: The First Avenger | The Avengers | Iron Man 3 | Thor: The Dark World | Captain America: The Winter Soldier | Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. (Episode: "T.R.A.C.K.S.") | Guardians of the Galaxy | Agent Carter (Episode: "The Blitzkrieg Button") | Daredevil note  | Avengers: Age of Ultron | Ant-Man | Jessica Jones note  | Captain America: Civil War | Luke Cage note  | Doctor Strange | Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.: Slingshot | Iron Fist note  | Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 | Spider-Man: Homecoming | The Defenders note  | Thor: Ragnarok | The Punisher note  | Runaways (Episode: "Metamorphosis") | Black Panther | Avengers: Infinity War | Ant-Man and the Wasp | Cloak and Dagger note  | Captain Marvel | Avengers: Endgame | Loki note 

"Superheroes? In New York? Give me a break!"

A pioneer of the comic industry, and the creator or co-creator of most of the characters so far featured in not only the Marvel Cinematic Universe, but also the X-Men, Spider-Man and other non-Disney film and franchises. Much like Alfred Hitchcock, it became a tradition for Stan Lee to make cameo appearances in most movies or TV series based on Marvel Comics, MCU and otherwise—up until his death.


  • Accidental Misnaming: The FedEx deliveryman whom he plays in Captain America: Civil War reads off "Tony Stank". While laughing, Rhodey says he got it right, "Yes, this... this is Tony Stank. Thank you for that."
  • Armchair Military: He is a high-ranked officer in The First Avenger that does not see combat.
  • Ambiguous Situation:
    • Stan Lee's character in the Netflix TV shows is actually named Irving Forbush, a Joke Character from Marvel Comics, and in said shows he only appears via his picture being on NYPD recruitment posters. Whether Forbush is just another disguise for the Watcher Informant or not is ambiguous.
    • Given that Spider-Man: No Way Home establishes all non-MCU Marvel movies are part of the same multiverse as the MCU, it's unknown if all of Stan's cameos in those films, whether his characters were named or not, are each an Alternate Self or retroactively meant to be this same character.
  • Ambiguously Human: Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 indicates that Stan Lee's characters in all other movies are actually the same person, and that he has been the informant for the Watchers for quite some time. He also remains looking the same in the 1940's and the modern days, which implies that maybe he's not really a human. Or that there's time travel involved.
  • Artificial Limbs: In Thor: Ragnarok, his right-hand has been replaced with a saw/bladed claw used to cut Thor's hair.
  • As Himself: Except perhaps in Iron Man and Iron Man 2, where he may or may not have been Hugh Hefner and Larry King. Definitely not himself in Captain America: The First Avenger and Agent Carter, since he would been about 60 years younger at that point in time. Also not himself in Guardians of the Galaxy unless he's mastered interstellar space travel. However, Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 suggests that he may actually be himself in all those cameos, as he's seen in space talking to the Watchers about previous cameos he's donenote . Played a bit straighter in Captain Marvel, where he appears reading over the screenplay of Mallrats in which he famously cameoed. He was also credited as himself for Thor: The Dark World.
  • Butt-Monkey: Mistakes a Senator's aide for Captain America, Tony Stark can never get his name right, gets sick from a gamma radiation laced soft drink, has the back of his truck ripped off, and misses all of The Avengers' action in New York. By Thor: The Dark World, he's in an asylum. In Captain America: The Winter Soldier, he's a Smithsonian guard who believes that he's going to lose his job after Steve breaks in and takes his WWII uniform to wear in the climax of the film, and in Avengers: Age of Ultron he gets drunk off of his ass. In a deleted cut of Guardians of the Galaxy, he somehow ends up becoming part of The Collector's collection. In Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2, the Watchers eventually get bored of his stories and walk off, leaving him stranded in space. Less severely, his peace and quiet was disrupted by Spider-Man in his movie. In the climax of Ant-Man and the Wasp, his car is hit by a stray Pym Particle and seemingly shrinks down to nothing.
  • Catchphrase: Stan Lee's real life catchphrase is "Excelsior!" He finally gets to use it in Age of Ultron after he takes a shot of Asgardian alcohol, aged for a thousand years, getting him so drunk that he has to be assisted when walking.
  • Celebrity Paradox: While his status As Himself is pretty ambiguous in most of the movies, his cameo in Captain Marvel raises a whole slew of questions, since the presence of his copy of the Mallrats screenplay confirms that his character (at the very least in this one movie) is indeed Stan Lee, co-creator of many characters that have appeared in the MCU. Mallrats is especially meta due to his cameo in that film being extensively about the creation behind some of his iconic characters.
  • Chatty Hairdresser: In Thor: Ragnarok, he is one of those in the Sakaar gladiatorial ring. And Thor is frightened at having his hair cut by him!
  • Chuck Cunningham Syndrome: He disappears from the film series after his cameo in The '70s during Avengers: Endgame. Canonically, the last time we see him is driving a schoolbus during the events of Avengers: Infinity War. Invoked as a result of Stan Lee's real life death, which means that we'll never see any cameos of him ever again.
  • Commissar Cap: Wears one as a general in Captain America: The First Avenger.
  • Cool Old Guy: Some are less cool than others; A Lady on Each Arm at a party? Cool. Drinking soda tainted by Hulk blood and collapsing? Not cool.
  • Cool Shades: They add to his Cool Old Guy image.
  • Creator Cameo:
    • With the exception of his appearance in Captain America. He did not create that character but was responsible for bringing him into the Silver Age, as well as creating Cap's now-iconic shield throwing. He also appears in Guardians of the Galaxy despite only having a hand in creating Groot. Even then, Stan's original characterization of Groot was incredibly different from what is seen in the modern comics and the film.
    • In addition to all of Stan's cameos, a digital recreation of his wife — Joan Lee — appears alongside him in Avengers: Endgame, de-aged to match her appearance in 1970. While Joan died before filming of Endgame began, this posthumous appearance makes for her second Marvel movie cameo after Fox's X-Men: Apocalypse (where she appeared alongside her husband), and her only Marvel Cinematic Universe appearance.
  • Dirty Old Man: In Iron Man 3, when he gave a Christmas beauty pageant competitor in a skimpy bikini a perfect ten, is flirting with a much younger woman in Guardians of the Galaxy with Rocket calling him a "Class-A pervert" and wondering where his wife is, and in Ant-Man agrees with Luis that the woman talking to him looks "stupid fine".
  • The Ditz: In his appearances from Thor onward he's not bright. In Captain America: Civil War he even appears only to read a character's name wrong.
  • Elderly Immortal: He remains looking the same in the 1940's and the modern days. Maybe because he's not really a human? Which is more than can be said for the real Stan Lee, whose latest possible appearance is in Avengers: Endgame following his passing in November 2018.
  • Evil Laugh: He lets out a sinister chuckle as he prepares to cut Thor's hair.
  • Expecting Someone Taller: In Captain America: The First Avenger — "I thought he'd be taller."
  • Flat-Earth Atheist: In The Avengers: "Superheroes? In New York?" However, considering what he may actually be, it may be a case of Obfuscating Stupidity.
  • Identical Grandson: It's more than likely that the Stan Lee who appeared in 1940s is the grandfather of Modern Day Stan Lee. Or, given the Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 cameo, is not.
  • Inexplicably Identical Individuals: His characters' appearances range from the 1940s to post-2000; he's even seen on another planet. Unless, as his Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 cameo suggests, they're all the same person.
  • A Lady on Each Arm: Appears with two women in Iron Man during a party, and Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. in a train.
  • New Job as the Plot Demands: There is no way of telling what his actual job is. Himself on Larry King, varied retirees, a general, pageant judge, Smithsonian security guard, an NYPD officer, a bartender, delivery man, limo driver, hairstylist, bus driver, among others. However, it appears that all his jobs are extensions of 'interstellar informant', and the various places he's employed as are covers to get information to the Watchers.
  • Noodle Incident:
    • How exactly he finds himself in one absurd situation after the next is never explained.
    • A more specific example happens in Ant-Man and the Wasp, where he believes a stray Pym Particle shrinking his car is somehow connected to some unspecified (possibly drug-related) event half a century ago.
      Stan Lee: Well, The '60s were fun, but now I'm paying for it.
  • The Pornomancer: When he appeared in Iron Man, where he was mistaken for Hugh Hefner.
  • Recurring Extra: He's the Where's Waldo of MCU, having cameo appearances in the first 22 movies of the setting.
  • Retired Badass: In his cameo for Avengers: Age of Ultron, he is a World War II veteran.
  • Riddle for the Ages: Why was he talking to the Watchers? How did he keep appearing across the entirety of the Marvel Cinematic Universe over different time periods? What information was he even relaying to them!? We'll never know.
  • Running Gagged: Due to Lee's real life passing, the Running Gag of having him appear in MCU films ends when his character doesn't appear at all and isn't even alluded to in Spider-Man: Far From Home, though the credits do give a memoriam to him and Steve Ditko. Word of God is that they have retired using his likeness in a physical sense. That said, pictures or subtle nods to him aren't off the table, considering he appears on a mural in the TVA courtroom in Loki.
  • Seen It All: In Avengers: Infinity War, he appears as a school bus driver. All of a sudden, the students rush out of their seats in surprise and horror at the sight of Thanos's Q-Ship hovering over the city. He just groans and rolls his eyes about all the ruckus.
    Stan Lee: What's the matter with you kids? You never seen a spaceship before?
  • Shipper on Deck: In a deleted scene for The Avengers, after hearing Steve Rogers' exchange with a waitress, he tells him, "Ask for her number, you moron."
  • Unexplained Recovery: He was poisoned by gamma-radiated soft drink and possibly died in The Incredible Hulk, but he keeps appearing in the future movies without any explanation how he got recovered. Maybe he's an identical relative. Or maybe because he's not really a human. Or maybe this is how he was able to turn into the Hulk that one time.
  • The Watcher: He just appears in places, not really adding much to them. Appropriately, in Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2, he's having conversations with the Watchers.
  • Weirdness Magnet: If he's around, chances are a superhero isn't far away.
  • What the Hell, Hero?: Delivers one to a disguised Agent Coulson in Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. regarding his parenting skills.
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    K.E.V.I.N. (Major Spoilers!) 

Knowledge Enhanced Visual Interconnectivity Nexus

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/cf5a0e40_eb64_4908_8880_e078dba79fa2.jpeg
"I possess the most advanced entertainment algorithm in the world, and it produces near-perfect products."

Species: Artificial Intelligence

Citizenship: None

Affiliation(s): Marvel Studios, The Walt Disney Company

Portrayed by: N/A

Voiced by: TBA

Appearances: She-Hulk: Attorney at Law

K.E.V.I.N.: Were you expecting a man?
Jen: Yeah. Why would I expect a giant AI brain and not a man?

The true mastermind behind the Marvel Cinematic Universe, an AI capable of creating "near-perfect" stories.


  • Above Good and Evil: As the creator of the MCU's stories whose entire purpose is for entertainment, the actions of both heroes and villains alike are his doing. Questions of good and evil are irrelevant because his purpose is the creation of their stories.
  • Author Avatar: Well, he's explicitly the head of Marvel Studios and his name spells out "Kevin", that's pretty on-the-nose.
  • Author Powers: Jen convinces him to rewrite the big dumb finale that was planned for her show's first season, removing Todd's dumb Hulk powers, not letting her cousin steal her thunder in the climax and letting her win in court instead.
  • Biting-the-Hand Humour:
    • He makes Jennifer transform back into her normal form, since She-Hulk is too expensive to animate. But only offscreen, since the CGI artists are working on something else now.
    • He describes his creations as "near-perfect", and lets the internet decide which ones are less perfect than others.
  • Fun with Acronyms: Any resemblance to Kevin Feige is purely coincidental. It stands for "Knowledge Enhanced Visual Interconnectivity Nexus", though that's obviously a mouthful.
  • Interface Spoiler: If you watch the episode with subtitles, everyone except Jen who says K.E.V.I.N. does so with his name written as an acronym, spoiling that they're not really talking about Kevin Feige.
  • Machine Monotone: He speaks in a flat synthetic voice.
  • The Man Behind the Man: As the creator of the MCU, he serves as this to every hero and villain that has appearednote  in it.
  • No One Sees the Boss: Nobody is allowed to see K.E.V.I.N. When Jen tries, she gets attacked by Disney's security guards (who are completely ineffective against her).
  • Ominous Multiple Screens: K.E.V.I.N.'s room is filled with screens that all play significant scenes from the MCU. When Jen walks into the chamber, it's playing every significant appearance of the Hulk.
  • Robotic Reveal: Jen is surprised to find that the "Kevin" that's behind everything is actually an AI.
  • Signature Headgear: The housing above his camera-eyes resembles a baseball cap, just like Kevin Feige almost always wears.
  • Silicon Snarker: After dismissing Jen, he says "See you on the big screen." Her face lights up and she says "Really?", to which he flatly replies "No."

LMDs

    In General 

Life-Model Decoys

An old S.H.I.E.L.D. program intended to create robotic duplicates to serve as assassination targets. Though scuttled before the re-emergence of HYDRA, Dr. Holden Radcliffe was able to restart the program thanks to technological advancements by Agents Leo Fitz and Jemma Simmons.


    Aida 

    May LMD 
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    Radcliffe LMD 

Holden Radcliffe LMD

Species: Life-Model Decoy

Portrayed By: John Hannah

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

An android duplicate of Holden Radcliffe, created to act as a decoy to avoid capture.


  • I Take Offense to That Last One: he objects to being made to sing like a canary. Why not singing like Mick Jagger?
  • Kill It with Fire: Destroyed in S.H.I.E.L.D.'s on-base incinerator along with the original Aida's remains.
  • Nothing Personal: He doesn't bear Fitz any grudge for shooting him, saying "What's a bullet in the head between friends?"
  • Revealing Injury: Fitz proved he was an LMD by shooting him in the head and thus revealing circuits.
  • Troll: He has a quantum brain and thus no programming, but somehow he's able to mimic the actions of a man being possessed when Fitz and Simmons are screwing with his programming in order to screw with them and Mack, and at one point literally sings like a canary during an interrogation session.

    Coulson LMD 

    Fitz LMD 

    Mack LMD 

Alphonso Mackenzie LMD

Species: Life-Model Decoy

Portrayed By: Henry Simmons

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

An android duplicate of Agent Alphonso Mackenzie, created to infiltrate S.H.I.E.L.D. as part of Radcliffe's plans to replace the entire organization with LMD duplicates.


  • Ludicrous Gibs: Due to Daisy's quake powers, he is reduced to scrap. LMD Fitz remarks that it will take a while to fix him.

    Mace LMD 

Jeffrey Mace LMD

Species: Life-Model Decoy

Portrayed By: Jason O'Mara

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

An android duplicate of Director Jeffrey Mace, created to infiltrate S.H.I.E.L.D. as part of Radcliffe's plans to replace the entire organization with LMD duplicates.


  • The Brute: Unlike the other LMDs, the real Mace was known to possess Super Strength. As such, the Mace LMD had no reason to hide its own strength and acted as the brute of the group while the others played up the illusion by continuing to use firearms.
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    Daisy Johnson LMDs 

    Simmons LMD 

    Ivanov LMDs 

Anton Ivanov LMDs

    Phil Coulson Chronicom LMD 

The Framework

Framework's HYDRA

    In General 

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. (first appears in Episode 82: "What If...")

A virtual recreation of the real-world organization of the same name inside the Framework simulation. The history of the virtual HYDRA followed the history of the real-world HYDRA up until S.H.I.E.L.D.'s mission in Bahrain, where Melinda May saved Katya Belyakov instead of killing her. As a result of May's actions, S.H.I.E.L.D. brought Katya back to the United States, where her abilities of sensory manipulation caused a massacre at a school in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The massacre and the subsequent shutdown of S.H.I.E.L.D. led to HYDRA revealing itself to the world before conquering the entire planet, creating a fascist new world order.


  • Adaptational Villainy: In-universe. While the real world's HYDRA is an organisation that runs under Equal-Opportunity Evil, not caring about the nationality, ethnicity or even whether their operatives are human or not, the Framework's version of HYDRA lives up to their Nazi reputation by brutally rounding up Inhumans and experimenting on them.
  • Equal-Opportunity Evil: Averted and mixed with Fantastic Racism. This version of HYDRA uses racism against Inhumans to justify their fascist regime. One would assume that factually false propaganda about HYDRA's history is used to draw attention away from the fact that HYDRA was founded to worship an Inhuman.
  • For Want of a Nail: The 'nail' in this case is Aida's hamfisted attempt at fixing May's greatest regret. Because Agent May didn't kill the Inhuman child Katya, she continued being an Enfante Terrible and caused a massacre. Because an Inhuman had caused an atrocity, Fantastic Racism against Inhumans skyrocketed. This allowed Hydra to use Hitler's political tactics and take over by focusing everyone on the supposed Inhuman threat.

    Madame Hydra 

    Dr. Leopold Fitz / The Doctor 
See his folder here.

    Alistair Fitz 

Alistair Fitz

Species: Artificial Intelligence

Portrayed By: David O Hara

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

The Framework counterpart to the real Alistair Fitz; a high level member of HYDRA. For tropes related to the latter go to the Citizens page.


  • Character Death: Simmons kills him in self-defense while trying to kidnap him.
  • Coattail-Riding Relative: Radcliffe hits a nerve with him when he points out that he only has so high of a position in HYDRA because of his genius son, implying that he only got as far as he did by mooching off of Fitz.
  • The Dragon: Becomes one to Fitz's Dragon Ascendant after Aida/Ophelia is incapacitated.
  • Evil Brit: Well, Scottish. And he's a fascist.
  • Had to Be Sharp: Instilled this mentality on Fitz to make him into what he believes a true man should be.
  • Politically Incorrect Villain: He's a chauvinist and a fascist.
  • Shipper on Deck: For his son and Madame Hydra, to the point of telling him to his face that she's the only woman right for him. There's a possibility that Aida may have programmed him this way on purpose.
  • Tranquil Fury: The personification of it. In fact, he thinks non-tranquil fury is something to be ashamed of.
  • Virtue Is Weakness: He considers doubt, sentiment and compassion to be "womanly".
  • Would Hit a Girl: Slams and nearly chokes Simmons to death when she tries to kidnap him.

    Melinda May 
See her folder here.

    Skye 
See her folder here.

    Kenneth Turgeon 

Kenneth Turgeon

Species: Artificial Intelligence

Portrayed By: Adam Kulbersh

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

The Framework recreation of the real HYDRA scientist and supervisor.


  • Adaptational Badass: Scientifically speaking, he seems more productive and successful than his real counterpart.
  • The Evil Genius: His job for HYDRA. He even creates the Framework's version of Calvin Zabo's super-strength so Melinda May can defeat the Patriot.

    John Garrett 

John Garrett

Species: Artificial Intelligence

Portrayed By: Bill Paxton

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

The Framework recreation of the real HYDRA agent, already deceased in this virtual reality and posthumously hailed as a hero.


  • Posthumous Character: Killed through unknown circumstances, his picture only briefly appears at The Bakshi Report.
  • Villain with Good Publicity: Naturally, since HYDRA is in charge of everything, he gets praised as a hero after his death.

    Sunil Bakshi 

Sunil Bakshi

Species: Artificial Intelligence

Portrayed By: Simon Kassianides

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

The Framework recreation of the real HYDRA agent. Here, he is in charge of the organization's propaganda program The Bakshi Report.


  • Dirty Coward: Talks a big deal, but after just a small demonstration of Daisy's powers, he is willing to speak out against HYDRA to save his own ass.
  • Propaganda Piece: In charge of it.
  • Rabble Rouser: Spends most of his time on air ranting against the enemies of the regime.

    Daniel Whitehall 

Werner Reinhardt / Daniel Whitehall

Species: Artificial Intelligence

Portrayed By: Reed Diamond

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

The Framework recreation of the real HYDRA leader, here a public figure celebrated for discovering the polio vaccine.


  • Mad Scientist: Its implied he's involved in the Inhuman experimentation to eradicate the so-called "Inhuman Plague".
  • Villain with Good Publicity: He's credited with the discovery of the polio vaccine and is the subject of school textbooks. His involvement in the Inhuman Experimentation is also spun.

    Felix Blake 

Felix Blake

Species: Artificial Intelligence

Portrayed By: Titus Welliver note 

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

The Framework recreation of the real S.H.I.E.L.D. agent turned Watchdogs leader, here a public figure celebrated as a HYDRA hero for founding the Humans First Movement .


  • Composite Character: In-Framework, as he takes on the role of Senator Ellen Nadeer as the founder of the Humans First Movement.
  • The Ghost: Unlike Whitehall or Garrett, his image isn't shown in any way, though he was obviously recreated with the same appearance of his real world counterpart.
  • Villain with Good Publicity: His creation of the racist Humans First Movement is positively spun by the HYDRA controlled media and he's even honored with a parade.

    Pinsky 

Pinsky

Species: Artificial Intelligence

Portrayed By: Brandon Morales

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

A colleague of the Framework's versions of Skye and Ward.


  • The Generic Guy: Doesn't show much personality, other than being a loyal agent.

Framework's S.H.I.E.L.D.

    In General 

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. (first appears in Episode 82: "What If...")

A virtual recreation of the real-world organization of the same name inside the Framework simulation. Much like its counterpart, it collapsed due to long-term infiltration by HYDRA but reformed into an underground Resistance aimed at taking down HYDRA.


  • Hero with Bad Publicity: HYDRA's Propaganda Machine refers to them as terrorists to turn public opinion against them.
  • The Remnant: A heroic example. The Framework version of S.H.I.E.L.D. is formed by whatever survived the HYDRA uprising.
  • La Résistance: They carry out a resistance against the HYDRA regime with the meager resources at their disposal. HYDRA even refers to them as "the resistance".

    Jeffrey Mace / The Patriot 

    Grant Ward 
See his folder here.

    Antoine Triplett 

Antoine Triplett

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/framework_trip.jpg
"Trip? Haven't heard that nickname since high school."

Species: Artificial Intelligence

Portrayed By: B.J. Britt

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. (first appears in Episode 84: "No regrets")

A virtual recreation of the real-world person of the same name inside the Framework. He fought for S.H.I.E.L.D. under the leadership of the Patriot, and was tasked with working undercover in HYDRA to gain intel.


  • Appeal to Audacity: Trip actually believes Jemma's story about the real world, claiming nobody would ever be able to make up something so crazy.
  • Casanova Wannabe: When Trip talks with Daisy about the real world, he asks if he was involved with any of the women on her team. When she says no, he asks why she'd want to go back to such a bleak world. She finds it funny, but he's still striking out.
  • Distressed Dude: Was discovered spying on Project Looking Glass for S.H.I.E.L.D. and got jailed by HYDRA. He gets rescued in his debut episode.
  • Killed Offscreen:The audience doesn't see him getting deleted along with the rest of the Framework.
  • Taking Up the Mantle: Becomes the new Patriot after Mace's death. Too bad the Framework gets deleted shortly afterwards.

    Jemma Simmons 
See Jemma Simmons page

Civilians

    Alphonso "Mack" Mackenzie 
See the Team Coulson page

    Hope Mackenzie 

Hope Mackenzie

Species: Artificial Intelligence

Portrayed By: Jordan Rivera

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

A virtual recreation of the deceased daughter of Alphonso "Mack" Mackenzie.


    Phil Coulson 
See the Phil Coulson page

    Burnell 

Burnell

Species: Artificial Intelligence

Portrayed By: Taj Speights

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

A student of Coulson's class.


  • Good Bad Bugs: In-universe he is one by Jemma's judgement; he's not a real person and is technically a few lines of code within the simulation of the Framework. However, he's willing to help her precisely because she's rebelling against the system.
  • Rebellious Spirit: Believes Hydra are a bunch of nazis, vandalises cars and generally questions the regime.

    Chris Adler 

Chris Adler

Species: Artificial Intelligence

Portrayed By: Skyler James

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

A student of Coulson's class.


Others

    The Quantum Virus 

The Quantum Virus

Appearances: What If...?

A virus contracted by a Variant of Janet van Dyne in the Quantum Realm, which quickly decimated her Earth.


  • Adaptational Nonsapience: Played with. The Marvel Zombies virus distinguished itself by creating fully sapient zombies whose villainy is driven by an uncontrollable Horror Hunger. Here, the zombies are your bog-standard mindless flesh-eaters, although they still know how to use their weapons, gear and powers, much like the zombies in the comic books did. There are however a few exceptions of some zombies still possibly possessing sentience.
    • There's a brief moment where the zombified Scarlet Witch stops chasing the heroes to cradle Vision's corpse, implying that there may be something left of Wanda Maximoff.
    • Zombie Happy still says "Blam!" when using his repulsor, showing they can at least speak simple phrases.
    • Zombie Thanos is shown grinning after collecting six of the Infinity Stones, suggesting he still has enough sentience to complete the gauntlet and with every intention of using it.
    • This is also a double example, in that the Marvel Zombies comics actually depicted the virus itself as sentient, which isn't alluded to here.
  • Arc Villain: The zombies as a whole are the main antagonists of "What If... Zombies?!"
  • Expy: Of the Hunger Gospel from Marvel Zombies.
  • Karma Houdini Warranty: As much as a virus can get. It seems untouchable in its debut episode. Fast-forward to "What If...The Watcher Broke His Oath?" and some of, if not all its infectees are wiped out by Infinity Ultron. If they truly are all gone, the virus may have very well ended with it.
  • Logical Weakness: As powerful as the virus is, it is still restricted to infect organic beings. Therefore, Vision, an android, and the Cloak of Levitation, a sentient piece of cloth, are immune to its influence.
  • No Name Given: The virus is never given a proper name, save for Uatu identifying it as "a quantum virus" for having originated in the Quantum Realm.
  • Our Zombies Are Different: Typical feral zombies, save for the inclusion of Elite Zombies formed from fallen superheroes, who retain their unique powers and combat skills.
  • Outside-Context Problem: It shows up shortly before its timeline's equivalent of Infinity War and promptly derails everything.
  • Zombie Apocalypse: It quickly spreads to cover the entire world and turning the entire population into zombies.

Alternative Title(s): MCULMD, MCU The Framework

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