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Spoilers for all works set prior to Avengers: Infinity War and Avengers: Endgame are unmarked.

Tony Stark / Iron Man

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"Truth is... I am Iron Man."

Birth Name: Anthony Edward Stark

Known Alias: Iron Man

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

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Affiliation(s): Stark Industries, Avengers, S.H.I.E.L.D., MIT, Damage Control

Portrayed By: Robert Downey Jr., Davin Ransom (young)

Voiced By: Idzi Dutkiewicz (Latin-American Spanish dub), Juan Antonio Bernal (European Spanish dub), Keiji Fujiwara (Japanese dub), Bernard Gabay (European French dub since Phase 1 + Canadian French dub since Phase 2), Daniel Picard [Phase 1] (Canadian French dub), Marco Ribeiro (Brazilian Portuguese dub)

Appearances: Iron Man | The Incredible Hulk | Iron Man 2 | The Avengers | The Consultant | Iron Man 3 | Avengers: Age of Ultron | Captain America: Civil War | Spider-Man: Homecoming | Avengers: Infinity War | Avengers: Endgame | Spider-Man: Far From Home note 

"You want my property? You can't have it. But I did you a big favor: I have successfully privatized world peace."
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Anthony Edward "Tony" Stark was born on May 29th, 1970 in Long Island, New York. He is an era-defining genius and the CEO of Stark Industries who uses his own self-designed Powered Armors. After being held hostage by terrorists and escaping only with the help of Yinsen, his worldview and philosophy changes, leading to him shutting down the weapons manufacturing division of his company and becoming the superhero Iron Man.

Despite various interpersonal clashes, Tony finds himself called in to join the Avengers and proves a vital asset to them as The Team Benefactor, particularly during the conflict with Ultron. However, Tony's increasing desire to protect the world and his friends, culminating from the Survivor's Guilt accumulated through each successive film he's made an appearance in, inspires him to make some catastrophic decisions that begin to cause a rift between him and his friends — particularly Steve Rogers.

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    Tropes # to F 
  • 10-Minute Retirement:
  • Accidental Misnaming: When he reveals to Peter he knows his identity.
    Tony: So you're the Spider...ling? Crime-Fighting Spider? Spider-Boy?
    Peter: ...S-Spider-Man.
  • Ace Custom: The Iron Man armors are always a step or two higher in terms of technology and gear compared every other armor user. This is most notable when Tony upgrades to nanotech in Infinity War and Endgame, but he never upgrades the others to nanotech level. Justified in both cases:
    • Upon seeing that the War Machine armor turned out to be a good way to get the government off his back about sharing his tech, since they now had an armor of their own, Tony allowed them to share his advanced armor tech, but never does with his most advanced tech, be it the Detachment Combat nature of Mark 42 to 44, or the nanotech of Mark 50 and 85. Given that he mistrusted the government in the first place, especially in light of the events of The Winter Soldier, it's pretty clear he certainly doesn't trust them with even more extremely advanced technology that they may abuse or might fall into the wrong hands.
    • With the third notable armor user, Pepper, the Rescue armor is simply Mark 49, as shown by the numerical marking on the suit, meaning it was the last armor Tony made before completely switching to nanotech, or at least worked on it while making his own nanotech upgrade. Oddly enough, he never upgrades it to nanotech in the five years since the Snap, though that's likely due to the fact that he was pretty sure that Pepper wouldn't appreciate the armor, given her dislike of violence and general lack of active experience with using armors, though she does prove his assumptions wrong by taking it into battle alongside the assembled Avenger army.
    • As said by Tony himself:
    Tony: While I'm happy to make the world a better place with my technology and all, there are times when you gotta save the best gadgets for yourself.
  • Action Dad: In Endgame, Tony gets a daughter with Pepper, the little Morgan Stark. Although he's officially retired, he participates in a last Avengers mission, but with the higher stakes in that he now has Morgan to return to.
  • Action Hero: Over the course of his career, he's squared off against terrorists, alien invaders, rogue A.I.'s, gods, monsters, super soldiers, and even Thanos himself in order to keep people and the planet at large safe.
  • Adaptational Heroism: Captain America: Civil War portrays him much more sympathetically than the comics do, where he made several morally gray and sometimes outright villainous decisions, alienating much of his fanbase. In the film, he goes along with the Accords out of guilt over the deaths he believes he caused in order to make amends. His conflict with the Anti-Reg side also isn't simply because they won't sign, but because Cap is breaking the law to protect Bucky (a wanted criminal), and Tony sees himself as the responsible one trying to ease tensions, whereas Cap's actions, however noble, only further inflame them. Ross's threats of lethal force against Cap's team didn't help either, nor did Steve covering the truth about the death of his parents from him.
  • Adaptational Intelligence: Downplayed. Tony Stark is a genius in all versions of his character, but his original comic rendition has him only specializing in engineering and physics. The MCU version, on the other hand, is a master engineer, physicist, chemist, hacker and computer scientist, a skilled biologist, knowledgeable in neuroscience, and a master businessman. Justified in that MCU Tony Stark is a Composite Character, with Reed Richards's intelligence being a major part of his combined character.
  • Adaptation Relationship Overhaul: The MCU takes several liberties regarding his relationship to other characters, compared to the comics.
    • Howard and Maria Stark are his biological parents in the MCU. In the comics, he is actually their adopted son. His real parents were two S.H.I.E.L.D agents where one of them was a mole for HYDRA until the mole was killed and Nick Fury (the white one) was asked by the traumatised survivor to ensure that the upcoming baby is safe. After being tossed into an orphanage as per S.H.I.E.L.D protocol regarding unwanted pregnancies, Howard Stark learned of the baby due to being an associate of Nick Fury and in response to the events surrounding their firstborn son Arno Stark, Howard and Maria decided to adopt him and the rest is history...
    • Him and Bruce Banner become friends in The Avengers. Not only are they both experts in science, Tony recognizes something of himself in Bruce, in that they're both men Cursed with Awesome that could use their terrible powers for good. In the comics the two aren't friends, and Stark was even one of the men that exiled Bruce from Earth in the prelude to Planet Hulk.
    • He becomes a stern father figure to the young Peter Parker and is essential to his growth as Spider-Man. In the comics, Spidey didn't have such a relationship with Stark, and if anything was closer to the Fantastic Four (who haven't yet appeared in the MCU due to film rights previously being tied to 20th Century Fox). He, however, had such a relationship with Peter in the Ultimate imprint, and were friends in the lead-up to the 616 Civil War (they had a falling-out during when Peter defected to Cap’s side).
    • Scott Lang, the second Ant-Man, spent much of his comics time as a supporting character for Stark, being sort of like his sidekick. Iron Man's most famous comic book story, Armor Wars, had Scott play a pivotal role. It's rather funny then that the Civil War had them meet on opposing sides, with Stark being completely unaware of who Scott was.
  • Adult Fear:
    • Tony spends most of Spider-Man: Homecoming terrified that Peter will end up seriously injured or killed by taking on bad guys without proper training and, quite simply, being too young to be putting himself in harm's way. When Thanos uses the Infinity Gauntlet and disintegrates half the universe's population, Tony can only look with an expression of devastation and utter heartbreak as Peter turns into cosmic dust right in front of him. He also worries that he's being a remote and distant mentor, much like his own father was, and tries to develop a healthier relationship with Spider-Man.
    • As revealed in Age of Ultron while he is under Wanda's spell, Tony's greatest fear is being a sole survivor. Becoming an Avenger gave Tony his first real friends in a long time. He would sacrifice himself for the greater good without a second thought but is deeply afraid of losing them. When Thanos uses the Infinity Gauntlet in Infinity War, Tony helplessly watches the others including the boy who saw him as a father disintegrate one by one until only Nebula — whom he barely knows — is left. He is completely broken.
  • The Alcoholic: Since this is a universe where the Demon in a Bottle comic arc never happened, many scenes involve alcohol. In Iron Man 2, he gets plastered while wearing the suit.
  • Always Second Best:
    • Fears he'll never be as brilliant as his father or as goodhearted as Steve. Is literally second-best in Captain America: Civil War when Steve chooses Bucky over him.
    Stark, regarding his father: Been dead for 20 years... still taking me to school.
    • Subverted in terms of his father, thoughinvoked. Word of God notes that he's even more brilliant than his late father Howard Stark.
  • Always Someone Better: Played with and is a case ofinvoked Flip-Flop of God. Producer Nate Moore claims that Black Panther's younger sister Shuri has the highest I.Q. in the MCU, which would put Tony in a tie for second place with Bruce Banner. Russo brothers also said she is the smartest person in the MCU. However, both director Ryan Coogler and Shuri's actor, Letitia Wright, have stated on two separate occasions that Tony and Shuri are equals in terms of natural I.Q. As shown in the films, both are gifted engineers, but Shuri is more concerned with neuroscience and medical science as secondary practices, while Tony is more invested in physics, chemistry, and computer science.
  • Ambiguous Disorder:
    • After The Avengers, Tony is depicted as having some form of anxiety disorder (most likely PTSD). He has panic attacks during Iron Man 3 coupled with nightmares. In Avengers: Age of Ultron, while the panic part is under control, he does show signs of obsessive worrying. In Captain America: Civil War, he displays excess guilt over the destruction Ultron caused. All of this carries over into Avengers: Infinity War, where Tony's mental state takes a turn for the worse — if the last scene of him sitting with his knees drawn up to his chest and practically catatonic is anything to go by. Heck, Tony almost looks like he's going to have another panic attack when Banner tells Tony that Thanos was behind the New York atack.
    • Anxiety and anxiety-linked issues aside, Tony also qualifies as a Cloudcuckoolander, is prone to random and eccentric behaviors, and has little social ability beyond formal talks or Snark-to-Snark Combat. Natasha Romanoff sums it up adequately in her report of him: "Mr. Stark displays compulsive behaviour, is prone to self-destructive tendencies, and demonstrates textbook narcissism."
  • AM/FM Characterization:
    • Iron Man: Tony's Establishing Character Moment involves rolling in a Humvee as part of a military convoy, listening to "Back in Black" by AC/DC.
    • Iron Man:
      • After his birthday party is ruined by an Iron Man suit-wearing James Rhodes, Tony requests for the DJ to play Queen's "Another One Bites the Dust" as a way to show he doesn't take Rhodes' threat even remotely seriously.
      Tony: Give me a phat beat to beat my buddy's ass to.
      • Earlier in the film he dives into the Stark Expo playing "Shoot to Thrill" by AC/DC, which will be repeated in...
    • The Avengers, when he hacks the Quinjet's PA System before flying in to confront Loki in Germany. No matter where he goes, he has to create a spectacle. He also wears a Black Sabbath T-shirt after that.
  • Anger Born of Worry: After coming to Peter's rescue during the ferry incident, Tony very angrily scolds Peter afterward for not just overstepping his boundaries and disobeying him, but for needlessly risking his life and accidentally putting everyone on the ferry in danger.
    Tony: What if somebody had died tonight? Different story, right? 'Cause that's on you! And if you died... I feel like that's on me. I don't need that on my conscience.
  • Anti-Hero: He's one of the good guys, but he has a lot of character flaws. It's lampshaded by Tony and everyone around him at least once per film.
    Tony: Apparently, I'm volatile, self-obsessed, and don't play well with others.
    Pepper: That I did know.
  • Anti-Role Model: In Spider-Man: Homecoming, he wants Spider-Man to be better than him and not do what he would do.
  • Apocalyptic Log: The trailer for Avengers: Endgame has Tony recording one to Pepper, telling her that he's lost in space, adrift, with food and oxygen running low.
    Tony Stark: "Hey, Miss Potts. If you find this recording, don't feel bad about this. Part of the journey is the end. Just for the record, being adrift in space with zero promise of rescue is more fun than it sounds. Food and water ran out four days ago... oxygen will run out tomorrow morning. That'll be it. (beat) When I drift off... I will dream about you. It's always you."
  • Appropriated Appellation: The press comes up with "Iron Man", and he decides to go with it. In the Novelization, Tony even imitates Ozzy Osbourne's "I AM IRON MAN!" when reading the news.
  • Archenemy:
    • In a reversal of Rogues-Gallery Transplant, Tony's archenemy in the MCU is Thanos. He's indirectly responsible for the PTSD and trauma that plagued Tony in phase 2 and 3, which led Tony to alienate himself from Pepper and the other Avengers. Tony's actions are centered around preparing for his inevitable invasion. On Thanos' part Tony foiled his first invasion, is one of the few enemies he respects. In the end, Tony kills him but dies in the process.
    • To the Mandarin, the mysterious being who was responsible for Tony becoming Iron Man to begin with. The Ten Rings were responsible for the kidnapping of Tony in his very first film which in turn led to him becoming a superhero. When the Mandarin allegedly made a return in Iron Man 3, it's quite clear Tony bitterly hates him and challenges the terrorist on public television. While this Mandarin was revealed to be a fraud, the real Mandarin is still at large and plotting his next move. Though he wasn't in time to make a move on Iron Man before the hero perished.
  • Arc Words: "I am Iron Man" becomes this throughout his movies. "Legacy" is also a very important one, driving all of his initial characterization and leading him to create Ultron.
  • The Atoner: As described by Wanda Maximoff:
    He will do anything to make things right.
    • Initially, he really didn't give much of a crap about who was blowing up what with his toys, but after being held hostage by terrorists armed with weapons of his design, he vowed to undo his destructive legacy.
    • The later films partially revisit and correct this, with Tony Stark still being plagued and haunted by his past even after he has tried to atone for it, bringing home the fact that his actions still have consequences which he has to live with. Examples include Auldrich Killian, Adrian Toomes, and the Maximoff twins for whom his actions are not Easily Forgiven in the slightest. It strays a little into Contrived Coincidence at times.
    • It's also criticized in that Tony's desire to atone becomes something of a Fatal Flaw in that it leads him to over-correct to make up for it in a grand gesture. It leads him to work on Ultron with Bruce, and then it leads him to support the Sokovian Accords simply because of his need to make up for his guilt.
  • Attention Deficit... Ooh, Shiny!: Tony's eccentric nature and constantly active brain makes him prone to non-sequitars and zoning out of what he's supposed to be doing.
  • Awesomeness by Analysis:
    • In conjunction with his various SherlockScans. In Iron Man 3, Tony deduces the plan behind the Extremis project just by watching security footage of a failed Extremis experiment. He also deduces that Harley is being bullied simply by interacting with him, and in Iron Man 2, he sees through Natasha's disguise as an assistant when no one else does. In The Avengers he's the first one out of the Avengers to figure out that Fury and S.H.I.E.L.D. have ulterior motives for the Tesseract, and in Avengers: Age of Ultron, he finds the secret hallway where the Scepter is being held based on J.A.R.V.I.S.'s descriptions of air currents.
    • In a more negative take on this trope, this is also why Tony's verbal digs tend to pack more of a substantial punch than most of the other characters'; he has the ability to see what gets under their skin and use it.
  • Babies Ever After: He and Pepper have a daughter, Morgan, after the five year Time Skip in Endgame.
  • Badass Beard: This is a distinctive trait of Tony's, being a superhero who has not once (save in a computer-generated flashback in "Civil War") been clean-shaven while onscreen. When time travelling back in the 1970's his facial hair style is even commented upon as resembling that of a Beatnick, befitting his rebellious "bad attitude" persona.
  • Badass Boast: His response to Steve in The Avengers when called out on his seemingly egotistical exterior.
    Steve: Big man in a suit of armor. Take that off, what are you?
    Tony: Genius, billionaire, playboy, philanthropist.
  • Badass Bookworm: Incredibly intelligent and ingeniously knowledgeable in anything STEM, and a badass with or without the "Iron Man" armor.
  • Badass in Distress: In Endgame, he is heading back to Earth with Nebula in the Guardians' spaceship when they run out of food and water, and get close to running out of oxygen, and need external help to survive. Captain Marvel ends up saving them both.
  • Badass Mustache: He's notably one of the few mainstream heroes in comics or movies that regularly sports a mustache.
  • Badass Normal: Whenever he's out of his suit, he's like James Bond, but making his own gadgets.
    • Tony does well against Iron Monger during the end of Iron Man while stuck in an offline armor.
    • In Iron Man 2 he is able to do well against Vanko without his armor during the raceway attack, fending off Whiplash using a combination of Deadly Dodging and Car Fu.
    • When without a suit in Iron Man 3, he shows he's been practicing martial arts, and even manages to kill the super-powered Ellen Brandt with some improvised explosives. He also storms the Mandarin's hideout with a few improvised weapons he cobbled together from materials he bought at a hardware store.
    • He even tries his luck with some success against the Winter Soldier in Captain America: Civil War with an incapacitating device he deploys on his hand.
    • In Avengers: Infinity War, there are only two people who manage to make Thanos bleed. One is the God of Thunder who possesses an enchanted battleaxe built with the express purpose of slaying the Mad Titan, the other is Tony Stark.
  • Bad Dreams: By Iron Man 3, his experiences during The Avengers have shaken him up and given him these, resulting in a hard time sleeping in general. He eventually gets better.
  • Battle Couple: With Pepper in Endgame after she suits up for the final battle. They even get a mid-air Back-to-Back Badasses moment.
  • Beware the Silly Ones: If he's not acting like an immature jerk, quipping at friends and enemies alike, or being a Cloudcuckoolander in general, then he's making revolutionary (and often deadly) scientific discoveries and inventions and verbally and/or physically destroying his opponents.
  • Big Damn Heroes: He did not become one of the leaders of the Avengers for nothing:
    • Iron Man: Just as the head thug is about to execute an innocent villager in Afghanistan as his wife and children scream for them to stop, he falls out the sky and proceeds to lay the smackdown on all the terrorists in short order.
    • The Avengers: Multiple times. He intervenes to aid Captain America against Loki in Stuttgart, Germany. And then again saved a (shieldless) Cap from Loki's mook who had him pinned with gunfire. He also takes out a Chitauri footsoldier trying to attack Hawkeye and then a Chitauri carrier chasing Black Widow in the final battle. Then at the end of the film he sacrifices himself by carrying a nuke into the Chitauri spaceship.
    • Iron Man 3: When the "House Party Protocol" is invoked, an entire legion of Iron Man armors come in to assist against the Extremis soldiers.
    • Age of Ultron: Swoops in to save a family trapped in a building, and then stops a hovercraft carrying civilians into the helicarrier from crashing when an Ultron drone shoots out one of its boosters.
    • Spider-Man: Homecoming: An Iron Man drone piloted by Tony saves Spider-Man from drowning when a parachute malfunctions. Later, Spider-Man webs up the ferry to keep it together, and Iron Man arrives to give Peter the support he needs.
  • Big Ego, Hidden Depths: A brash-but-brilliant engineer who shows off his colossal wealth with luxury, world-class accommodations and specialized expos, is the in-universe poster child for playboys, talks a big game to everyone he meets, and always has a swagger to his stride... also has a two-sided Dark and Troubled Past, suffers from PTSD, carries around an Inferiority Superiority Complex and a guilt complex, cares deeply for his friends and teammates, is a father figure to his protege Spider-Man, would sacrifice himself for the greater good, and is terrified of not doing enough to keep the world safe. He's just very good at hiding it.
  • Big Entrance:
    • Iron Man 2: He lands stylishly at the site of his Stark Expo in his Iron Man suit to the cheers of many admirers after skydiving out of his personal carrier. For added effect, he's surrounded by a group of women in garb meant to resemble his armor who are performing the Can-Can.
    • The Avengers: Tony hacks the Quinjet's PA system to blast out AC/DC's "Shoot to Thrill", blasts Loki, and then makes his Three-Point Landing.
      Iron Man: Make your move, Reindeer Games.
  • Bigger Stick: He claims to be America's Big Stick in Iron Man 2, and stopping others from abusing his "sticks" is a recurring problem for him.
  • Bond One-Liner: In Iron Man 3. The Extremis-enhanced soldier Tony was fighting tanked a direct blast to the face in their first engagement. The second time they come to blows, Tony puts a hole through his chest.
    Tony: Walk away from that, you son of a bitch.
  • Brainy Brunette: He has his trademark, jet-black hair and is a scientific genius.
  • Breakout Character: Perhaps the character most helped by the MCU.
    • Before the movies came out, Tony Stark was the Lesser Star of Marvel comics: not as smart as Reed Richards, not as popular or beloved as Spider-Man, not as socially relevant as X-Men, and boasting the least interesting supporting cast and Rogues Gallery of major heroes. Then the movies came out, and suddenly Iron Man is one of the biggest things ever — to the point that he rivals Spider-Man in popularity as a brand these days, and thanks to the rights issues of Fantastic Four, has taken over Reed Richards' role as the main genius with Dr. Doom and Norman Osborn transplanted to his storylines and titles.
    • Iron Man wasn't well-known globally among Marvel titles compared to Spider-Man, the X-Men, or the Fantastic Four (the fact that those three titles were first sold to rival studios by Marvel to bail themselves out of bankruptcy, and made into movies is a major clue as to what were their most valuable properties). He didn't benefit from Pop-Cultural Osmosis, either, and wasn't known to people who don't read Marvel comics or know who the Avengers are. But thanks to the movies, and especially Robert Downey Jr., Iron Man is an A-Lister now.
  • Break the Haughty: Zig-zagged. Tony starts off as arrogant and selfish and is constantly placed in situations where he's proven wrong or his ego gets him into trouble. However, the lesson often doesn't stick necessitating more rounds of Break the Haughty. It doesn't help that he's right as often as he's wrong which doesn't help his ego or that his reaction to trauma is to act more arrogant and controlling.
  • Brilliant, but Lazy: Implied to be this pre-Character Development in the first film. Along with Shuri and Bruce Banner, he's the MCU's foremost genius, and can build, invent, revolutionize, and improve almost anything mechanical or scientific like that — but only when he wants to, or absolutely has to. He sure built that arc reactor pretty quickly once he needed it, and found the solution for Extremis overnight when he needed a cure for Pepper. He's more hardworking, but quite hedonistic.
  • Broken Ace: World-renowned genius and Avenger of the first hour, also a womanizer and an inspiration to many, like Peter Parker. But beneath his self-confident and sometimes arrogant exterior lies a man haunted by his past mistakes and inability to save everyone.
  • Brought Down to Badass: Partway through the third movie, he loses a lot of his technology. Then he proves he doesn't need it. He is Iron Man.
  • Bunny-Ears Lawyer: With his own Ambiguous Disorder, multiple personality quirks, and a long list of character flaws, Tony Stark is by far the most eccentric character in the MCU. He's also arguably the most brilliant and scientifically knowledgeable, and as such is a world-renowned billionaire and genius, an essential part of the Avengers, and operates as S.H.I.E.L.D.'s business consultant. Granted, the majority of the people he works with spend 90% of the time wanting to punch him in the face, but they still put up with him because he's just that good.
  • But for Me, It Was Tuesday:
    • Played for Drama. He's utterly horrified to find out that Killian was some random guy whom he played a cruel joke on years ago.
    • Also Played for Laughs: Apparently, the formula for Extremis (i.e. the MacGuffin powering his opponents in Iron Man 3, and what many people in the cast were trying to reverse-engineer) was something he scribbled out on scrap paper while blind-drunk.
  • Byronic Hero: Every single characteristic save for the brooding—unless you catch him in a downbeat moment.
  • The Cameo: Has one at the end of The Incredible Hulk.
  • The Casanova: Is known as such in Iron Man and Iron Man 2. By the time of The Avengers however, he's in a monogamous relationship with Pepper and while, probably from habit, still a little flirtatious in his interactions with women (especially May Parker), he's not one by the later movies.
    Soldier: Is it true that you went twelve-for-twelve with last year's Maxim cover models?
    Tony Stark: That is an excellent question. Yes and no. March and I had a scheduling conflict, but fortunately the Christmas cover was twins.
  • The Cassandra: All of Tony's motivations post-The Avengers is about preparing for the day aliens come back and attack earth once more. None of the Avengers take Tony's fear seriously and Natasha even rolls her eyes. Bruce Banner when hearing about his plan for Ultron notes that it doesn't take into account human threats from Earth, which later films and Ultron itself prove would not truly go away.
  • Cassandra Truth: The whole point of Tony building Ultron and Vision was to prepare for the day when a greater extraterrestrial threat came back to Earth to finish what the Chitauri started. Everyone besides Bruce Banner initially thought this sentiment was far-fetched and ridiculous — until Thanos and the Black Order came to Earth and did exactly what Tony had predicted years ago.
  • Character Death: Tony Stark used the Infinity Gauntlet to kill Thanos and his entire army, fully aware that being exposed to the Infinity Stones' collective power is fatal for a human. Pepper, Peter Parker, and Rhodes were by his side when he passed on and a funeral for Tony was held.
  • Character Development:
    • Aside from the obvious "becoming less of a dick" aspects, in the first movie he's helpless to manage his affairs without Pepper, but by the third he's apparently secreted caches of money he can access while still remaining off the grid. And may have been carrying quarters, just in case he came across a payphone.
    • After going into the wormhole at the end of The Avengers and being off-planet and possibly facing death in the abyss of space, while battling a cosmic-level threat, he becomes more serious, responsible, and paranoid.
    • In Spider-Man: Homecoming, he takes up the role of a Parental Substitute for Peter Parker. He scolds Peter like a father would, after the younger hero acts recklessly with his technology and endangers civilian lives, and ends with him confiscating the suit which he later says was an act of Tough Love. At the end of the film, after seeing Peter being more responsible on his end and how much Peter has matured, he even has a So Proud of You moment with the boy.
  • Character Narrator: In Iron Man 3, Tony narrates bits of the story. The Stinger reveals that he's talking to Bruce Banner, a.k.a. the Hulk.
  • Character Tics: Tony is sometimes massaging/holding his left arm, since it has a tendency to get repeatedly injured over the movies, ever since the first Iron Man. He usually does this when stressed and it can occasionally be seen trembling, making it likely that it's a nervous tic and probably linked to PTSD.
  • Character Title: Of his own films.
  • Chekhov's Gun: Fan theories were circulated around the internet about him snapping with the Infinity gauntlet, involving his left arm suffering injuries.
  • Chekhov's Skill: In terms of his hand-to-hand abilities. Initially, Tony had no skill whatsoever in unarmed combat (which is ironic, considering that his actor is one of the few Marvel actors who actually does know legitimate martial arts), but after he found himself in more and more situations when he was without his suit, he began to train in basic self-defense. Iron Man 2 has Tony practicing boxing with Happy, and in Iron Man 3, Tony's lab is notably equipped with punching bags and a wooden Wing Chun dummy, which he uses briefly while testing the Mark XLII. This all pays off later in Captain America: Civil War, when Tony engages the Winter Soldier and almost manages to bludgeon him with his own gun before he's put down.
  • Chick Magnet: Tony's wealth, fame and roguish charm have earned him the attention of many, many women. This is most clearly demonstrated in the original Iron Man, which includes references to several past one-night-stands Tony had with famous models, a scene where he hooks up with a reporter, and a line from a gorgeous woman eagerly asking Tony if he remembers her (he doesn't). He stops responding to the ladies' affections once he starts dating Pepper, but we get no indication the attention stops.
  • Child Prodigy: A former one. He built his first circuit board when he was four, his first engine when he was six, and at some point in his childhood he designed and constructed his mechanical lab assistants DUM-E and U. It's also mentioned he built his first A.I. at the age of seven, and, given that he graduated from MIT at the top of his class when he was seventeen, he likely would've gotten into MIT at around ten or twelve years old.
  • Children Raise You:
    • Spider-Man: Homecoming is just as much about Peter learning responsibility as a superhero as it is Tony learning responsibility as a Parental Substitute; one of the key scenes is Peter gaining self-actualization and Tony working out his Daddy Issues in the same conversation. By the time Avengers: Infinity War rolls around, several movies' worth of Character Development, along with the recent mentoring of a young teenager, have notably matured Tony and made him far easier to work with and fight beside.
    • Tony's experience in raising Morgan finally allows him to understand and empathize with his father, accepting Howard's missteps as a parent. Notably when he meets Howard in the past, the two are able to have a sincere and open heart-to-heart with no resentment or anger on Tony's part.
  • Chronic Hero Syndrome: He really has a hard time giving up being Iron Man. At the end of Iron Man 3, he initiates a self-destruct sequence on all of his suits, has surgery to remove the shrapnel in his chest so he no longer needs the arc reactor, and tells Pepper that he no longer needs the suit, as he considers it a cocoon from which he's emerged, a new man. Yet by Age of Ultron he's back in the fight, flying the suit for the opening action sequence. In Captain America: Civil War, he admits to himself that he doesn't want to stop.
  • Cloudcuckoolander: He certainly has some rather... eccentric behaviors, including threatening his mechanical lab assistants and AI systems, purposefully poking Bruce Banner in order to evoke the Hulk (and expressing excitement over the idea of the Hulk running rampant), dropping dissonant remarks both inside and outside of combat (such as when he was rediscovers a new element in Iron Man 2; he destroys a good portion of his lab in the process, and gives a gleeful "Oops!" as the laser is cutting things in half.). He also gives nicknames to everyone and everything.
  • Combat Pragmatist: Very much so, and it's especially prevalent when he's without his technology:
    • Iron Man 3 has Tony relying on a combination of James Bond-style tricks, homemade weapons, and basic but effective physical maneuvers that outclass the greater martial prowess of the Extremis super soldiers, and in Avengers: Age of Ultron, he uses his technological know-how to disable one of the Ultron-controlled suits with chopsticks.
    • Tony has also displayed ingenious use of his suit and his environment. In The Avengers, when Thor has him pinned down, instead of trying to get back to his feet and risk more blows, Tony simply guns his repulsors forward, knocking Thor off his feet and positioning himself for another attack. In Captain America: Civil War, he uses his various weapons to control his surroundings by collapsing parts of the ceilings and walls in order to trap Bucky and impede Captain America. And in his one-on-one fight with Thanos in Avengers: Infinity War, it is because of his cunning and sheer variety of attacks that Tony is one of the only characters to (albeit briefly) give the Mad Titan a good fight.
  • Comes Great Responsibility: After his switch to The Atoner, Tony is perfectly willing to wield the power of his money, fame, and genius for the greater good. Naturally, given the trope's association with Spider-Man, this justifies why the MCU version of web-slinger is so closely tied to the story and world of Tony Stark, even after the latter's Heroic Sacrifice, including Spidey's Rogues Gallery for the MCU, and why Tony serves as Peter's mentor and benefactor.
  • Comically Missing the Point: A few times, though he does this mostly on purpose. For instance, his thoughts on being called "the Da Vinci of our time"...
    Tony: Absolutely ridiculous, I don't paint.
  • Comic-Book Movies Don't Use Codenames: The ending of the first Iron Man is one of the few instances when he is referred to as "Iron Man". Everybody just calls him Tony Stark.
  • Composite Character:
    • This version of Tony Stark blends the serious demeanor of his 616 counterpart with the more playful billionaire personality of his Ultimate universe counterpart.
    • He also takes aspects of Hank Pym being a Science Hero and an Omnidisciplinary Scientist that serves as The Smart Guy of the Avengers, right up to replacing him as being the one who builds Ultron and having to suffer that as his greatest failure.
    • More generally, he takes the role of Reed Richards in being the great representative genius of the MCU, whereas before Tony Stark was seen as a skilled inventor and engineer but not as good a theoretical physicist as Reed. This is Lampshaded in The Avengers where Tony has to learn thermonuclear astrophysics overnight and proves a very quick study. Stark's comparability to Richards is also noted where Spider-Man is concerned, as the comic book version of Parker idolized Richards at a similar point in his crime-fighting career.
    • His mentoring of Peter Parker, being his backer and handler is analogous to Ultimate Fury in Ultimate Spider-Man. Samuel L. Jackson was originally supposed to reprise that mentor role in Homecoming but MCU decided to go with Tony instead.
    • He is also given the role of Peter’s Comes Great Responsibility teacher, which is normally done Peter’s Uncle Ben, who has yet to be directly mentioned in the MCU.
  • Consummate Liar: As shown in the prologue of Iron Man 3, back in 1999 he lied to Aldrich Killian at the New Year party to get rid of him, making the latter uselessly wait for him on the roof all night while Tony was exploring a female scientist's.. research. He thus made Killian his future enemy.
  • Control Freak: This becomes part of his characterization from Iron Man 3 onwards. His exposure to the wormhole and trauma of surviving a cosmic threat in The Avengers has definitely unbalanced him, to the point that he starts overtinkering with his suits and then in Avengers: Age of Ultron, he and Bruce Banner decide to build an A.I. that can supplant and replace the Avengers to put a "suit of armor around the world" and in Captain America : Civil War, his controlling behavior bristles with the rest, whether it's putting Wanda under house arrest for her own good (and without telling her or explaining to her), then drafting Spider-Man to fight on his team, and in Homecoming tethering Peter to serve with a disinterested handler and then brushing him off when he does something stupid.
    Hawkeye: The futurist, gentleman! The futurist is here! He sees all. He knows what's best for you, whether you like it or not.
  • Cool Garage: His workshop houses a Saleen S7, a Tesla Roadster, an Audi R8, an AC Cobra and a hot rod. He smashes one of them and sprays debris on another during his tests of the Iron Man suit.
  • Cool Plane: Tony's custom quinjet. It can fly anywhere in the world and has stealth technology so advanced that even people who know what to look for can't find it.
  • Crazy-Prepared:
    • Played with. It's demonstrated that Tony builds his suits with contingencies in mind, and newer versions improve on the flaws of the last model; The Mk 42 would've been a Lightning Bruiser if it worked right. Yet, Tony is unable to have spares of important equipment when he needs it.note  The only exception is The Avengers where not only has the Mk 6 been upgraded to have more weapons, but he has the Mk 7 to replace the Mk 6.
    • By the third film, he's hidden stashes of money he can get to while remaining off the grid, and memorized how to access them, as well as learning the basics of how to shoot and hand-to-hand combat.
    • The Hulkbuster system in Age of Ultron includes lots of spare parts up to full on limbs, correctly anticipating the Hulk tearing them off. On the other hand, he doesn't anticipate that Hulk would start tearing up the delivery system.
    • Pays off loads in Endgame: Being one of the designers of the new Infinity Gauntlet used in the film, he basically anticipated the possibility of it blowing up or someone else stealing it and using it for the wrong reasons. Thus he made sure that the stones can be easily removed AND that his Mark LXXXV can form a replica Infinity Gauntlet to fit the stones to when the need arises, such as when Thanos got a hold of the gauntlet in the film's climax.
  • Create Your Own Villain: The fact that he keeps ending up having a hand in the villains he fights begins to wear on him over time, burdening him with guilt that drives his character arc:
    • Tony admits to doing this in the opening narration of Iron Man 3. Specifically, it's his cruel joke back in 1999 that sets Killian on his Face–Heel Turn.
    • He's also Ultron's main creator. Likewise, the initial reason why Pietro and Wanda worked for HYDRA was that they blamed him for the death of their parents and the destruction of their home when his missiles were used by enemy combatants over Sokovia.
    • Helmut Zemo also blames Ultron's destruction of Sokovia as his Freudian Excuse in Civil War, though he blames all the Avengers rather than Tony in particular, even if Tony created Ultron.
    • He even does this for other heroes' villains. Spider-Man: Homecoming shows that his continuing efforts to atone for his days as a weapons manufacturer drove Adrian Toomes out of business and led him to become The Vulture.
    • This even happens posthumously. He was the one who fired Quentin Beck after he made the B.A.R.F. device, yet Stark still personally used it himself. When Stark died, Beck took the opportunity to engineer himself as a superhero known as Mysterio. What's worse, Beck ins't working alone, he has a team of over a dozen disgruntled current and former Stark Industries employees working with him, all of whom hate the late Tony's guts and feel underappreciated by him.
  • Crime Fighting With Cash: He combines his colossal wealth with his phenomenal intellect to create the most sophisticated Powered Armor on the planet — and then puts it to good use by shutting down threats ranging from pirates to aliens.
  • Cruel and Unusual Death: The radiation from wielding the Infinity Gauntlet burns most of his right arm and the right side of his body, and he's left looking like death and being too weak to even speak. He dies within the minute, presumably in incredible pain.
  • Cunning Linguist: According to Tony's S.H.I.E.L.D. file, he speaks fluent English, Spanish, Italian, and Dari, and even demonstrates some basic knowledge of French in Iron Man 2. It's downplayed in regards to his comic book counterpart, who spoke a grand total of at least eight different languages.
  • Cursed with Awesome:
    • By The Avengers, this is how Tony Stark has come to view the electromagnet and the miniature arc reactor that are plugged into his chest 24/7 and are the only things keeping him alive. He spends a good deal of the film trying to convince Bruce Banner that the Hulk is a similarly awesome curse.
      Tony: It's a terrible... privilege.
    • This is proven true later in The Avengers when it's shown that the reactor makes Tony the only person unable to be controlled by Loki's scepter because it cuts direct access to his heart.
  • Cutting the Knot: When challenged by Steve Rogers in The Avengers over his worldview and his unwillingness to make the sacrifice play when the chips are down, he defends himself thusly.
  • Cyborg: First, we have his Arc Reactor pacemaker. Following The Avengers, Tony's PTSD leads him to build subdermal implants in his arm allowing him to control his suit remotely piece-by-piece to pull them to him or put them on another user. While he has surgery to remove the "walking death" shrapnel from his chest, throws his reactor into the ocean and blows up the entire Iron Legion of his remaining armors (which could be controlled by J.A.R.V.I.S.) at the end of Iron Man 3, Age of Ultron shows that he didn't get rid of the implants.
  • The Cynic: His main front he puts in the public, to hid how emotionally affected he really is, such as his reaction to Natasha's assessment of him regarding the Avengers Initiative, finding Steve Rogers's "outdated and irrelevant idealism" annoying, or feebly trying to dismiss Coulson as an idiot for taking on a god and getting killed for his efforts. The mask falls apart in the finale of Civil War when he finds out that Winter Soldier killed his parents while brainwashed, resulting in him lashing out furiously and painfully at Captain America.
  • Daddy Issues: Where to begin? Between Howard Stark's constant idolizing of Captain America and berating Tony for not doing more with his gifts, plus the abuse makes Tony much more fond of his mother.
  • Dance of Romance: He first seems to notice Pepper romantically when he gets her out onto the dance floor for a nice slow waltz. They have an awkward and comedic conversation about it afterwards.
  • Dark and Troubled Past: Between his abusive father and his oft-distant mother, Tony's less-than-caring upbringing is a major part of this, though the true darkness that influences his character is when he was abducted, tortured, and enslaved for three months in Afghanistan.
  • Deadpan Snarker: The biggest one in the MCU. His sarcastic streak is legendary.
    • In Iron Man 3, when he's battling Extremis-enhanced super soldiers:
      Brandt: That all you got? A cheap trick and a cheesy one-liner?
      Tony: Sweetheart, that could be the title of my autobiography.
    • In The Avengers, after Thor kidnaps Loki:
      Steve: Wait, Stark! We need a plan of attack!
      Tony: I do have a plan. Attack.
    • In Avengers: Age of Ultron, after the team tries to stop Tony and Bruce from creating Vision:
      Steve: I'm only gonna say this once.
      Tony: How about nonce?
    • In Captain America: Civil War, after he's crushed by a garage-full of cars and his suit is punctured:
      F.R.I.D.A.Y.: [red alarms flashing] Multiple contusions detected!
      Tony: Yeah, I detected that, too.
  • Death by Irony: Tony Stark, "the Futurist who sees all and knows all" who acted in the name of the greater good ultimately is manipulated by Dr. Strange, who really can see the future and know all, into performing a Heroic Sacrifice in the name of the greater good of stopping Thanos and saving the universe. The great Control Freak of the MCU who anticipated and prepared for every possibility and eventuality ends up becoming a victim of fate.
  • Deconstructed Character Archetype: Of the Randian Objectivist hero. He is an Eccentric Millionaire who is also physically fit and handsome enough to successfully seduce a reporter that was trying to slander him for his shady practices, the kind of Übermensch that Rand always wrote as the ideal. When he discovers that his work is being used in a manner that conflicts with his interests (his tech falling into the hands of terrorists) he creates a revolutionary new product (his iconic suit) and fights them off himself. Much like in the case of Hank Reardon in Atlas Shrugged, the government sees this amazing new tech and tries taking it for themselves under the guise of a Utilitarian agenda and they are portrayed bad for doing so (in later movies revealing the same judge that tried to rule against him being a member of HYDRA). Every villain he has faced has either tried to kill him out of jealousy for his success or tries to take what belongs to him for themselves. He buts-heads with Captain America because their philosophies (Steve Rogers believing in Nationalism, altruism and self-sacrifice) are in direct conflict with one another. In the belief that he alone knows what is best for the world, he ends up creating Ultron, and rather than admitting that what he did was wrong, he doubles down and finishes creating Vision with complete certainty that what he is doing is right. The Deconstruction part comes later in Phase 3, when he sees where his Enlightened Self-Interest gets him after Sokovia's destruction at the hands of his creation Ultron and the lives lost afterwards cause him crippling guilt, eventually turning in-favor of government oversight.
  • Decoy Protagonist: In Civil War, Tony starts out as a Tritagonist overlapping with Hero Antagonist and Sympathetic Inspector Antagonist, however, when Zemo plays the tape that shows the death of his parents at Bucky's mind-controlled hand, Tony, while still counting as the film's Hero Antagonist, becomes a vengeful Inspector Javert Final Boss who battles Bucky (and indirectly, Steve) to the death to avenge the deaths of Howard and Maria Stark.
  • Despair Event Horizon:
    • Downplayed in Iron Man 2, where Tony's response to his looming demise is to give up all pretense and make a scene of himself at his own birthday party. Even Rhodey fighting him and stealing the War Machine suit isn't enough to snap him out of it. Ultimately subverted when Nick Fury clues him in to the fact that all hope is not lost, according to Howard Stark.
    • Comes reeeeaaaally close to it in Iron Man 3, after Pepper apparently dies. He can't even emote properly. Thankfully, she lives.
    • Invoked in Age of Ultron where Scarlet Witch uses a vision of Tony's greatest fears to drive him into self-destructive mania and, ultimately, to creating Ultron.
    • All but crosses it in Infinity War, when everyone he fought alongside, aside from Nebula, is dusted. In Endgame, he's initially alright with the idea dying while drifting in space after sending a message to Pepper... Although Captain Marvel has other ideas.
  • Deuteragonist:
    • Of the general MCU. While he initially was the protagonist of Phase 1; starting with The Avengers, the focus slowly shifted towards Captain America. He remains the character with the most face-time taking in account all movies, but given that the storylines involving him (notably all of his movies, save minor sections of the first two) tend to be self-contained while Cap's have a greater impact in the general universe, he could either be considered this in general, a supporting protagonist at best, or a hero antagonist (such as in Civil War) at worst.
    • There's precedent for this in the comics too, at least in regards to The Avengers roster, with Tony starting out as The Hero and The Leader of the team during the book's first few issues, until Captain America is thawed out and takes on both these roles, and Tony becomes more of a deuteragonist.
    • However in the end he is the one who figures out how to make Scott's time travel idea a viable means reversing the snap and the one who ultimately defeats Thanos which suggests that he is a Subversion being the true protagonist who simply appears to be this to Cap's Decoy Protagonist.
  • Didn't Think This Through: Tony's "run before you can walk" philosophy has mixed results. His first flight test nearly kills him, though confronting the icing problem helps against Iron Monger's untested suit. Telling the Mandarin "here's my home address, come and have a go" was a bit much even for him. It reaches its ultimate endpoint when his desire to protect the world and save everyone causes him to jump without any real plan or even talking things out with his teammates besides Bruce, leading to the creation of Ultron.
  • Did You Just Flip Off Cthulhu?:
  • Disability Superpower: The arc reactor that powers Tony's Powered Armor is installed in Tony's chest in the first place as (to oversimplify) a very fancy pacemaker. Remove the arc reactor and Tony's heart will very quickly give out. He finally gets the shrapnel removed in Iron Man 3.
  • Disappeared Dad: Downplayed. Tony is nothing but an attentive, caring father to his and Pepper's daughter, Morgan, but unfortunately becomes this to Morgan after pulling a Heroic Sacrifice in "Endgame".
  • Disproportionate Retribution: While captured in Iron Man 3, he taunts a guard with this after the guard breaks his borrowed "deluxe Dora the Explorer" watch. "Just for that, I'm going to kill you first."
  • Drink Order: Tony is seen drinking all sorts of beverages, but being worldly and manly, he appears to prefer Scotch whisky or hot sake. His second drink of choice is champagne.
  • Don't Do Anything I Wouldn't Do: His word of advice to Peter Parker in Spider-Man: Homecoming:
    Tony: Don't do anything I would do. And definitely don't do anything I wouldn't do. There's a little grey area in there, and that's where you operate.
  • Dying Moment of Awesome: In Avengers: Endgame, he uses his own Badass Fingersnap to wipe out Thanos and his forces. However, Tony's body is too weak to handle the strain of using the Gauntlet, killing him.
  • Early Installment Weirdness: The Iron Man 1 novelization implied that Tony had a healthy relationship with his father. Subsequent films establish that Tony's relationship with Howard was strained at best and abusive at worst.
  • Easily Forgiven: Some feel Steve's letter at the end of "Civil War" was an example of this, while others do not. Really best to leave it at that.
  • Eccentric Millionaire: He buys million-dollar paintings just because they're overpriced, but dislikes being handed anything. He flies to Monaco to watch an F1 race, but decides at the last minute to instead actually compete. Getting the picture?
  • Embarrassing Nickname: As of Civil War, as far as Rhodey is concerned, his name is now "Tony Stank".
  • The Engineer: This is Tony Stark's superpower (and what makes him a super hero), and building suits of Powered Armor is just one aspect. In Iron Man 3, he engineers himself out of most of the film's dilemmas, usually without the armor. In Endgame, he creates a functional time travel system that builds on Hank Pym's Quantum Tunnel (which was crude and unstable and could only be walked in and out to recover Janet at a specific time) and his Pym Particles, by making it something the Avengers can drop-in-and drop-back at their convenience and preferred timestamp. He also collaborates with Rocket Raccoon and Professor Hulk to build a second Infinity Gauntlet based on his Iron Man nanotech.
  • Everyone Has Standards: In a bit of Adaptational Heroism from the comic which Captain America: Civil War is loosely based on, he's unsettled by the prison conditions that the anti-accords Avengers are placed under.
  • Evil Parents Want Good Kids: Tony is one of the good guys, but has a Dark and Troubled Past as an arms dealer and has made a few questionable decisions since then (e.g., the creation of Ultron). However, he wants Peter to surpass him and use his gifts for good before he ever gets the chance to screw up like Tony did.
    Peter: I just wanted to be like you!
    Tony: And I wanted you to be better.
  • The Extremist Was Right: Creating Vision in Age of Ultron is a move of desperation that almost everyone thinks is a terrible idea, but Stark is ultimately proven correct that the Avengers aren't beating Ultron by themselves and Vision is critical to victory and that his hopes about an A.I. Superhero protector were ultimately vindicated.
    Thor: Stark is right.
    Bruce Banner: Oh, it's definitely the end times!
    • In Avengers: Endgame, when he gets back to Earth half-dead, he points out to the others just how Properly Paranoid he was when he made Ultron. A threat from space did come, they were completely unprepared for it and now half of the universe is nothing but ash in the wind.
  • Face Death with Dignity: He's extremely composed in the face of his attempted Heroic Sacrifice in The Avengers (2012) and his real one in Endgame.
  • Famed In-Story: Unsurprisingly, given that he appeals to almost all demographics. His billionaire playboy status made him something of a celebrity to men and women alike, his genius and business success made him renowned around the world for being the lead in technology, and his philanthropist tendencies made him popular with the public in general. It's taken Up to Eleven once he dons the Iron Man armor; Tony can't go anywhere in public without drawing a crowd or Happy having to chase off the paparazzi.
    • Up to Eleven in Spider-Man: Far From Home, where his heroic sacrifice has made him a martyr in the eyes of the public. There is a proliferation of art in tribute to Iron Man and people are constantly comparing other heros to Tony.
  • Family Man: Played with. Tony is fiercely protective of the few people he loves and considers his close family, but at the same time still allows his workaholic tendencies and Chronic Hero Syndrome to drive wedges between himself and those he cares for.
  • Famous Last Words:
    • To Thanos, just before Tony uses the Infinity Gauntlet to wipe him out: "And I am Iron Man."
    • After performing his Badass Fingersnap and dying from the radiation in aftermath, Tony is barely able to speak but manages to mutter out "Hey, Pep..." to Pepper Potts when he sees her for the last time.
  • Fanboy: To Bruce Banner as seen in their first meet in The Avengers. He's a fan of Bruce Banner's scientific work and also the way he loses control and turns into enormous green rage monster.
    Bruce Banner: ...Thanks.
  • Fatal Flaw: Carelessness, a flip side of his tendency to be Taught by Experience. Sometimes Played for Laughs:
    • Iron Man: When he was testing the flight suit he pushed the altitude beyond its tested limits with no back-ups. He could have died.
    • Iron Man 2: Tony's fight against Whiplash would be much easier if he packed spare laser cartridges.
    • Iron Man 3: Many of his problems could have been avoided if he bothered to store some of his extra suits in Stark Tower.
    • Age of Ultron:
      • Instead of sealing off Loki's scepter he screwed around with the unknown highly unpredictable alien technology, leading to the creation of Ultron. Thor, a Sufficiently Advanced Alien, told him how dangerous it was and was mad at him when he found out.
      • If Tony conducted his AI experiments on an isolated network that isn't connected to his weapons systems or the Internet, Ultron would never get the chance to do anything. Instead, the Killer Robot took control of his drones and later digitally transferred itself to another country.
    • His suits initially don't have a parachute, an auxiliary power source or any kind of safety system that saves the user's life if the important parts of the suit stop working, which serves as a major aspect of his own escape from the F-22 Raptors in Iron Man and leads to Rhodes breaking his spine from falling down in Civil War.
  • A Father to His Men: As one of the co-leaders of the Avengers, especially towards Peter Parker in Civil War when he sends him off early in the middle of battle to make sure he does not get hurt. Then in Spider-Man: Homecoming, he continues to look out for Peter while acting as a Parental Substitute.
  • The Fettered: Tony Stark before his kidnapping by the ten rings was The Unfettered. After returning from his experiences a changed man he realizes he has been "comfortable with a system of zero accountability" and creates a new legacy of responsibility, which becomes a major theme for Iron Man throughout the franchise.
  • Fiction 500:
    • Forget the private jet that turns into a nightclub with flight attendants who double as exotic dancers. He has the personal resources and completely automated production facility to build a fully functional Iron Man suit in five hours in his garage.
    • As of Iron Man 2, said garage now contains a miniature, personal Hadron Collider.
    • The Avengers has him kicking it up a notch, having bought the MetLife building and given it some drastic upgrades: he completely cut it off from the city's electrical grid, equipped it with 10 stories of R&D, gave it the capability to both manufacture the Iron Man armor and remove it from Tony while he enters his apartment, and chopped the top off to rebuild it as what can only be described as a fantastic display of ego.
    • In 2013, Mr. Tony Stark ranks #4 on Forbes' Fictional 15, with a net worth of $12.4 billion.
    • His "Binarily Augmented Retro Framing" device (or "B.A.R.F.") cost him over six-hundred million to bring to life, something he admits could only be self-funded since no research firm would ever throw that kind of green at him on flight-of-fancy tech. He then says that everyone in attendance of the demonstration (which he is conducting at MIT) will have their research projects fully funded by his grant.
  • Final Boss: Steve's final opponent in Civil War is not Baron Zemo, nor the other Winter Soldiers that are in hibernation. It's Tony because Tony tries to kill Bucky to avenge his mother.
  • Final First Hug:
    • Defied in Spider-Man: Homecoming; he tries to keep himself emotionally distant in is mentoring of Peter Parker, rebuffing a hug from him.
    • Played straight in Avengers: Infinity War. When Thanos's Badass Fingersnap culls half the universe's population, and Peter is one of the victims, all Tony does is hug the terrified, crying boy as he disintegrates.
    • Also played straight in Avengers: Endgame. When taking a brief break from the final battle, Tony Stark runs into a recently-resurrected Peter Parker and does not hesitate to give him a hug. Tony dies not that long afterward, with Peter standing by him as he passes on.
  • Flaw Exploitation: In Civil War, his emotionally volatile responses to negative situations do pretty much all of Zemo's work breaking up the Avengers. All Zemo has to do is show Tony and Steve the recording of Bucky killing the Starks, and Tony flips, any thought of stopping or capturing Zemo forgotten in favour of just plain killing Bucky. Just as Zemo was banking on.
  • Foil:
    • To Steve Rogers, playing the seemingly selfish cynic to Steve's old-fashioned idealist. For example, when both are shown to be darlings of the public (featured at big show events complete with dancing girls), Steve is made visibly uncomfortable with the spotlight while Tony relishes in it.
    • To Doctor Stephen Strange: they both start out as being self-centered, reckless men who care about pleasure and success until a life-changing accident brings them down a few pegs. The difference is Tony (as Iron Man) uses technology while Strange uses Magic. Additionally, Stark gets the chance to stroke his own ego for good by becoming a beloved superhero, while Strange learns humility by fighting battles kept away from the public eye. It is in these similarities that lead to them butting-heads so often.
  • Forgiven, but Not Forgotten: After the Time Skip in Avengers: Endgame, he finally forgives Steve for his part in their falling out, represented by giving back Captain America's shield. However, judging by how he refuses to mention his parents death by name and is uncomfortable referring to it even obliquely, he's not fully forgotten it.
  • Formerly Fit: Not as much as Thor but 5 years of retirement and simple aging means that Tony is notably out of shape and weaker in Endgame than he was in Infinity War.
  • Four Is Death: Prior to Endgame, he has said the iconic "I am Iron Man." Catchphrase thrice, and all of them in his own movie trilogy.Note  In Endgame, he then utters the same line one last time as a Pre-Mortem One-Liner to the time-displaced 2014 Thanos, prior to using the Infinity Gauntlet, then later dying as a result.
  • The Friend Nobody Likes: He's not very popular among the superhero community due to three reasons: his status as a Bunny-Ears Lawyer and a reputation for hedonism; his past as a Jerkass weapons manufacturer and a son of Howard Stark (especially important to Scarlet Witch, Hank Pym and Scott Lang to whom Hank passed the prejudice); his role in the creation of Ultron and the Sokovia Accords. Zig-zagged: most of the original team in The Avengers and his new allies in Infinity War get an initial impression of him being selfish, arrogant and annoying. But after fighting alongside him and seeing how he is willing to sacrifices himself to save others, they are more open and relaxed toward him. And then his own actions or past truths (such as Bucky's involvement in the deaths of Howard and Maria Stark) create a rift between him and some heroes, while the others still like him or are indifferent towards him.
  • Friend to All Children: Tony has an affinity for kids, and is a lot more patient and understanding (yet no less snarky) when talking to them. Three of the closest bonds he shares are with kids, in fact: Harley, Spider-Man and his own daughter Morgan hold their own with regards to witty banter and adore the man greatly.
  • Fun with Acronyms: Tony likes giving his tech and AI acronyms. J.A.R.V.I.S. is Just a Very Intelligent System, B.A.R.F. is Binary Augmented Retroframing etc.
    E.D.I.T.H.: Mr. Stark loved his acronyms.

    Tropes G to L 
  • The Gadfly: Depends on what mood you catch him in.
    • Tony has an unfortunate habit of using sarcastic humor as an icebreaker in interpersonal relationships, most tellingly in his tendency to give everybody goofy nicknames and being absolutely fine about openly and lightly discussing personal trauma, such as with Captain America's 70-year freeze and how he's a fan of the way Bruce Banner "turns into an enormous green rage-monster."
    • In The Avengers, he pokes Bruce with a cattle prod, but Bruce finds it funny. They're both scientists; little lab pranks like that happen all the time.
    • In Civil War he teases Peter Parker over his initial improvised costume and gadgets.
  • Gadgeteer Genius: When pushed, he can revolutionize Arc Reactor technology and design advanced prostheses IN A CAVE! WITH A BOX OF SCRAPS!, as well as build his own personal Hadron Collider by nothing more than rewiring his own home.He is also masterful in multiple fields of science and has accomplishments ranging from being the first to crack nanotechnology without the use of vibranium to finding a cure to the Extremis method.
  • Generation Xerox: Of his father, Howard Stark. Genius inventor in the arms industry that gets involved in a war and becomes cynical and aloof as a result. Probably the real reason for their estranged relationship was that they were too similar to each other.
  • Genius Bruiser: He's a genius no matter what he wears and easily qualifies as one of the most powerful Avengers when he's in his suit. Case in point, he's the only character besides Thor, Wanda, and Dr. Strange to (albeit briefly) match Thanos in Avengers: Infinity War.
  • Giver of Lame Names: Despite being the MCU's resident Nicknamer, he has had some off moments:
    • He called two of his early robotic arm assistants "DUM-E", and "U".
    • In the Novelization of Iron Man 2 and one of the tie-in comics, it's explained that he tried to get his new element patented as "badassium". Predictably, the IUAPC shot it down.
    • In Endgame, his Paper-Thin Disguise when confronted with his father Howard Stark when they met in the SHIELD facility in the 1970's? "Howard Potts."
  • Go Out with a Smile: A dying Tony still manages to give Pepper a weak smile in his last moments.
  • Good Is Not Nice: Yes, he's willing to work hard to keep the world safe, and his heart is in the right place, but he's also abrasive and not good at endearing himself to his teammates.
  • Good Parents: Tony becomes a caring and devoted father to his and Pepper's daughter, Morgan.
  • Good with Numbers: Since he's a genius in anything STEM (particularly engineering and physics), this is a given. It's lampshaded by Tony himself in Iron Man:
    Tony: [to Yinsen] If my math is right — and it always is — then three gigajoules per second.
  • Grade Skipper: He graduated top of his class from MIT when he was 17 with two masters. Given that masters generally take anywhere from 5-7 years to earn (including the time it takes to earn a bachelor), Tony would've been attending college since he was around 10.
  • Guile Hero: Doubles up with Science Hero. Tony Stark, of the original Avengers, is the most likely to Take a Third Option. It often works; his crazy and half-improvisational plans often leave his enemies without a clue what he's going to do next.
  • Guilt Complex: In Civil War, he gives his complete support to the Sokovia Accords because of his overwhelming guilt over the events of Age of Ultron. He strives to submit to a higher authority that would prevent him from doing any more wrong, and attempts to appease the government by any means necessary. He also tries to convince the other Avengers to do the same regardless of their concerns. Of known events in support of the Accords (New York, Washington D.C., Sokovia, and Lagos), only one (Sokovia) can be blamed on the Avengers — the rest were caused by enemy forces, and the Avengers tried to stop them and minimize the collateral damage. Tony's inability to see that because of guilt eventually results in fracturing the team, the very thing that he was trying to prevent.
  • Hands-Off Parenting: Initially, Tony tried this approach with Peter, fearing that if he was any more involved he'd be overbearing like his father. After this proves to not be the most effective way of mentoring Peter, though, Tony keeps closer tabs on the kid.
  • Has a Type: We've seen three women he slept with; Christine Everhart, Maya Hansen, and Pepper Potts. All of them are smart, capable, professional women who are willing to challenge him. Black Widow used the archetype as her cover identity. Tony also hires Maria Hill to help run the Avengers.
  • He Who Fights Monsters: Even though he's just doing his duty to support the Accords, Captain America: Civil War depicts Tony going down this route as he increasingly becomes real enemies with Steve, allowing Revenge Before Reason to be in the front wheel of his morale during his battle against Steve, especially after his friend Rhodes gets injured in a skirmish. Once he finds out HYDRA used Bucky to kill his parents, Tony goes ballistic and doesn't even attempt to capture the former anymore and instead actively tries to hurt him.
  • Heartbroken Badass: Hand in hand with his unresolved issues concerning his father's lack of love towards him, Tony's single greatest fear is to fail a child who admires and looks up to him; hence his continued (and futile) refusal to return Peter Parker's friendship and affection lest he begins to love him like a son. You can therefore witness the exact moment that Stark's heart shatters in Avengers: Infinity War when he helplessly watched a crying Peter Parker crumble into ash in his arms, as he collapses and inconsolably weeps for the boy who saw him as a second father.
  • Hero Antagonist: In Captain America: Civil War, he is in direct opposition to Cap even though he isn't evil. While Helmut Zemo is the true Big Bad and the one responsible for the events of the movie, Tony and his group are actively trying to capture Steve and Bucky while ignoring Zemo's plan to unleash five HYDRA Super Soldiers from suspended animation. He officially takes this spot in the film's final act once he finds out HYDRA used Bucky to kill his parents, by watching a video of it with Bucky right next to him, and snaps.
  • The Hero Dies: One of the principal heroes of the entire MCU, and the one to start the MCU in the first place, and he gives his life to stop Thanos and his forces during the climax of Endgame. The Infinity Stone Saga begins and ends with him. Spider-Man: Far From Home has Tony's death as a major plot point, since Peter Parker saw Tony as a father figure; now that Tony's dead, Peter spends a good portion of the film rather upset.
  • Heroes Want Redheads: His first girlfriend, as opposed to one-night-stand, is redheaded Pepper.
  • Heroic Sacrifice:
    • The Avengers: He attempts to make "the sacrifice play" by directing a nuclear warhead away from Manhattan and into the wormhole towards the mother-ship. He has no expectation or hope of surviving in the deep vacuum of space, in another part of the universe. He survives by falling back into the wormhole just in time and having his fall stopped by the Hulk.
    • Endgame: He uses the Infinity Gauntlet to wipe out Thanos and all of his army, knowing that his body is too weak to use it. note  He takes a second to realize what he is about to do and still go through his fingersnap. It also counts as a Dying Moment of Awesome.
  • Heroic Self-Deprecation:
    • As of Iron Man 3, he's very aware of how flawed he is. Hilariously so.
      Pepper: Well now I see why you work with the suits so much... God, what am I going to complain about now?
      Tony: It's me, there's always something to complain about.
    • And:
      Pepper: I am gonna be okay?
      Tony: You're in a relationship with me, everything will never be okay.
    • This theme continues in Spider-Man: Homecoming where he makes it clear that he doesn't consider himself a superhero role model. He tells Peter "don't do anything I would do" and later, when Peter says he was trying to be a hero like him, he replies, "I wanted you to be better."
  • Hero with Bad Publicity: In the beginning of the Age of Ultron, one of Tony's droids is met with hatred by the locals of Sokovia, and the camera pans to some anti-Iron Man graffiti. After Age of Ultron, for co-creating Ultron, he has more than a few haters in-universe (although he's still popular among young people as seen in Homecoming). This bad publicity is part of what leads him to support the Accords and become more responsible.
  • Heterosexual Life-Partners: With Rhodey; he's one of two people that he trusts.
  • Hidden Heart of Gold: Uses sarcasm, obnoxious humour, and narcissism to hide any insecurity or fear — which there turns out to be a lot of, given his Inferiority Superiority Complex, Daddy Issues, Survivor Guilt, Guilt Complex, and Cassandra status.
  • Honest Corporate Executive: After he returned from Afghanistan and refused to allow his product to fall into evil hands.
  • Horrible Judge of Character:
    • Tony Stark met with Ulysses Klaue — a gangster -– prior to repurposing his company, but he waves it away as just a meeting and that he never actually did business with Klaue.
    • Tony assumes that if Banner was around, he'd be on the pro-registration side. Considering that the man in charge of the Accords is Secretary Ross, the man who is responsible for causing Banner to get his powers and ruined his life, Natasha questions Tony's judgment on this.
    • Later on, Tony assumes that with the new evidence that exonerates Barnes and proves Zemo was responsible for the attack, Ross will help him out. Not so much.
  • Hot Scientist: There's a reason there are several scenes of him in tank tops, such as during his lab work.
  • Hypocrite:
    • He believes that superheroes need to be put in check, but has absolutely no problem enlisting an unregistered up-and-coming underage superhero (Spider-Man) to further his goals.
    • Tony accuses Steve of letting his emotions cloud his reasoning regarding his opposition of the Sokovia Accords, even though Tony's own reasons for supporting them is largely due to his own guilt. Tony then throws reason out the window in the final act as he tries to kill Bucky over something Bucky had no control over.
    • Admonishes Peter for being “nothing without the suit” by saying he shouldn’t have it if that’s how he feels yet he has tied almost all of his identity into being Iron Man (despite making many attempts to distance himself). At least in this instance it comes with an air of “do as I say, not as I do.” Plus Iron Man 3 made a point of demonstrating that with or without the suit Tony is Iron Man.
  • Hypocritical Humor:
    • Part of his Explain, Explain... Oh, Crap! in the first Avengers is in part due to him realizing his description of Loki also fits himself.
    • He tells Peter to shut up with the pop culture references in Infinity War after Peter makes a second reference to the Alien franchise — a thing Tony himself is often guilty of, including earlier in the same film when he called Ebony Maw "Squidward". Minutes later, he's calling Quill "Flash Gordon" and Drax "Mr. Clean".
  • I Am Not Left-Handed:
  • I Am Not My Father: Much of his motivation prior to the Sokovian Accords is undoing Sins of Our Fathers by taking Stark Industries out of the weapons trade, which is how Howard Stark built the fortune that Tony inherited. The fact that civilians continue to be killed by bombs made by Stark Industries haunts him through Iron Man 3 and Civil War. His father's actions such as deporting Vanko, and having a bad relationship with Hank Pym (though in that case, Hank was hardly all that nice a guy himself) also haunts him. It also reflects on his anxiety about settling with Pepper and starting a family, since he's worried if he'll be good with kids, and his interactions with Harley and later Peter stem from him trying to be a good Dad to see if he can make it.
  • I Hate Past Me: He rather nonchalantly tells Scott Lang to go ahead and give his 2012 self the equivalent of a heart attack so they can grab the Tesseract.
  • I Just Want to Be Normal: A downplayed example as he does like being a hero and a billionaire but Tony's greatest wish is to retire to a humble life with Pepper.
  • Improvised Weapon User: Tony dismantles Bucky's gun and uses the slide to bludgeon him when armorless in Civil War.
  • Incoming Ham: His arrival at the Stark Expo in the second movie, and appearing in Germany with guns blazing and hijacking S.H.I.E.L.D.'s audio systems to play AC/DC in The Avengers.
  • Insecure Love Interest: Tony agrees with Killian that he doesn't deserve someone like Pepper, which is in complete compliance with his self-loathing nature.
  • In-Series Nickname: Almost always referred to as just "Tony".
  • Insistent Terminology: During a senate hearing, he states that he doesn't see the Iron Man armor as a weapon, but a hi-tech prosthesis.
  • Instant Humiliation: Just Add YouTube!: Near the beginning of Iron Man 2, he is Hauled Before A Senate Sub Committee because he refuses to share his signature Powered Armor with the US government. He proceeds to make a mockery of it. By the time he gets home, his antics are already on YouTube with 1,890,873 views, much to his amusement.
  • Insufferable Genius:
    • Snubs an award ceremony for technological brilliance and then gives away the award like it's junk. This also colors a lot of his interpersonal interactions, but it's hilarious.
    • He kept the Ultron project a secret from the other Avengers (sans Bruce) because he didn't want to be given the whole "man must not meddle" lecture. When called on it afterward, he just angrily bites back that everyone else "doesn't get" what he was trying to do.
    • In general, when Tony's at his worst (or lowest), this becomes a serious issue for him, as he'll absolutely refuse to accept the possibility he might be wrong about something, or refuse to budge on an issue. For example, throughout Iron Man 2, he believes that since he's looked for every possible means of curing palladium poisoning, there isn't one at all, and needs encouragement from Fury to find one (and never mind the problem was caused by having a chunk of palladium in his chest in the first place, something that 3 demonstrates could have been solved by Tony just hiring a bunch of doctors to get the shrapnel out of his chest). Hawkeye calls him on it during Civil War.
  • Intergenerational Friendship:
    • He befriends a boy named Harley in Iron Man 3 who proves to be quite a useful Kid Sidekick.
    • He becomes something of a mentor to Peter Parker from Captain America: Civil War onwards.
  • Irony:
    • As pointed out by Obadiah Stane in the first Iron Man:
      Stane: How ironic, Tony! Trying to rid the world of weapons, you gave it its best one ever!
    • In Civil War, Peter Parker is hesitant about flying to Germany, but Tony charismatically pressures him into going. Whereas in Spider-Man: Homecoming, Peter is eager to join the Avengers, but Tony is hesitant about it.
  • Irrational Hatred:
    • Played with. Tony's murderous reaction toward Bucky after finding out that the latter brutally slaughtered his parents was the realistic, human response in such a situation. However, given that Bucky was brainwashed when he killed the Starks and seemingly had no control over his actions, it wasn't logical for Tony to place the blame entirely on him, and it was more than a little overkill when Tony decided to kill him for it. At the same time, though, knowing that Bucky wasn't himself when he killed Tony's parents did nothing to change the fact that he did kill them, whether he wanted to or not, and it certainly didn't soften the blow for Tony, who had actually planned on helping Bucky after finding out about Zemo. The Russos say this is why the reveal didn't happen until the movie's third act; Otherwise, he would have had time to think it through and would have responded differently, rather than being confronted with the truth in such a visceral way.
    • In Infinity War, he has come to acknowledge being irrational when he attempts to reason with Star-Lord from making the same mistake by attacking Thanos for killing Gamora before they can remove the Infinity Gauntlet.
  • It's All About Me:
    • Self-centeredness has long been a character trait of Tony Stark, but initially it was portrayed more an endearing/annoying factor than a true flaw. Such as when he bought a giant tower in order to put his name on it in big letters. As he says, "It's like Christmas, but with more... me."
    • While Tony does think supporting the Accords is the right thing, he's perfectly willing to ignore his teammates' feelings on the matter and go behind their backs to do it. Eventually, Black Widow and Hawkeye call out Tony on making the issue all about himself and his personal guilt.
      Black Widow: Are you incapable of letting your ego go for one goddamn second?
    • In Spider-Man: Homecoming, when he rips Peter a new one after the ferry disaster, he seems to care more about how Peter's actions could affect him, though this ends up being subverted in Avengers: Infinity War.
      Tony: If you died, that's on me. I don't need that on my conscience.
    • In Avengers: Endgame, he initially refuses to help Scott Lang and his remaining Avengers teammates try to figure out a way to bring back their loved ones who were Snapped because all of his loved ones are still around or, in his daughter's case, arrived after the event. He does eventually change his mind, but only once he's assured that they won't do anything that may jeopardize his daughter's existence.
  • It's All My Fault: Deconstructed. He's a textbook case of how fine a line there is between this and It's All About Me, and how they can be equally destructive; he constantly attempts to assuage his guilt and self-loathing with superheroism, only for his altruism to be scorned as his self-gratification, and his efforts to assuage his guilt. As of Civil War, Pepper has left him because being Iron Man has consumed his life to the point of leaving no room left for self-indulgent romance. This continues in Spiderman: Homecoming where he tries to be a responsible mentor for Peter Parker so the kid stays out of trouble that he can't handle and grows into a better superhero than he himself, but at times it sounds like he is trying to vicariously fix his own troubled relationship with his deceased father.
  • Jerkass Has a Point: Tony is a selfish, hypocritical, narcissistic Manchild with a complex Never My Fault attitude. But, he's still correct on some things.
    • He proves that the Hulk isn't inherently dangerous and is a part of Banner rather than a different being.
    • His decision to go with the Accords is because that the Avengers do need to be checked with their incredible power.
    • Tony's anger at Natasha in Civil War is reasonable given how she was supposed to side with the Accord and decided to help Steve during the airport flight.
    • While visiting the superheroes in prison after the airport fight, Clint makes a sarcastic quip in regards to Tony's Knight Templar like actions but Tony points out that he and the others had a choice and knew the consequences.
    • His anger and murderous hatred towards Steve and Bucky, respectively, is hard to blame. For the former, Steve withheld information regarding the deaths of Tony's parents; as for the latter, while he was brainwashed into it, Bucky is still responsible for the murders of Tony's parents.
    • Throughout Homecoming, Tony wasn't exactly the best mentor to a young Peter, but he was right to call out the boy for being reckless in his pursuit to apprehend the Vulture.
    • Though he was ignoring his own fault in the Civil War mess, Tony's livid What the Hell, Hero? moment to Steve points out the latter's was also at fault for the mess as well.
    • While nicknaming Beck's hologram technology "BARF" was a bit of a dick move, firing Beck for being unstable was clearly the correct thing to do. And to be fair, even Tony himself openly admitted there and then to not being fond of the name, but likely couldn't come up with any other name in time, though Beck clearly ignored that part.
  • Jerk with a Heart of Gold: While Tony can be a bit of a showoff, his heart's in the right place and he works hard to make the world better. By The Avengers, he's also indulging in shockingly open and extravagant displays of compassion and thoughtfulness in between smug, self-aggrandizing quips. Age of Ultron reveals that Tony's greatest fear is the other Avengers (whom he fully considers his friends by now) dying and Earth being destroyed because Tony didn't do enough.
  • Jumped at the Call: Tony is living proof that becoming a hero can still be a lot of fun.
  • Karma Houdini: Played With. He created Ultron yet doesn't face any consequences for the property damage and deaths that his Ax-Crazy A.I. caused. That said, he is haunted by his mistakes and is willing to atone for his actions in Civil War.
  • Kidnapped Scientist: In the first film, he and Dr. Yinsen are abducted and told to build the Jericho missile by the Ten Rings or be executed. They Take a Third Option.
  • Knight In Sour Armor: Tony marinates daily in cynicism and sarcasm before setting forth to bring world peace, protect the innocent, and mock the stupid.
  • Kryptonite Factor: Although the Iron Man armors can withstand things ranging from small arms fire to Thor's lightning, they are susceptible to heat intense enough to melt through them. This is why any of the Extremis fighters can almost fight on even ground with Tony.
  • Ladykiller in Love: The first and second movies made it obvious that for all his Casanova tendencies, Tony was in love with his long-time Beleaguered Assistant Pepper Potts. Since Iron Man 2, he has been monogamous.
  • The Lancer: In The Avengers as a direct foil to The Leader and Ideal Hero Captain America, and an obnoxious Ace that always has a plan different to Steve's. He's also listed as the official Number Two (to Cap) of the team.
  • Large Ham: As a man who believes the spotlight is always trained on him, it's a required trait. His hamminess dials down after The Avengers (something about staring face to face with the void at the heart of the universe made him wise up).
    Tony Stark: I am Iron Man, the suit and I are one.
  • Laser-Guided Karma: Lampshades this in his narration of Iron Man 3, as his act of spurning Killian in 1999 bites him back in the ass.
    Tony: We create our own demons.
  • The Last Dance: In Iron Man 2 until he finds a replacement element for the palladium core of his arc reactor that was poisoning him.
  • Leaning on the Furniture: He makes a habit of it that Doctor Strange does not appreciate in Infinity War:
    Strange: Are you seriously leaning on the Cauldron of the Cosmos?
  • Leitmotif: Many of his scenes involve AC/DC songs.
  • Let's Get Dangerous!: Many people, both foes and allies, have assumed that Tony's Cloudcuckoolander irreverence and Obfuscating Stupidity mean he's an Upper-Class Twit who can't take anything seriously, let alone pose a threat. These people were very wrong.
  • Like a Son to Me: It's pretty clear that he views Peter as this and whenever he berates him, it is because he is worried sick about losing him one day.
  • Like Father, Like Son: As the MCU has expanded, we've learned that Tony is extremely similar to his father in many ways such as sense of humor and a desire to help people.
  • Like You Were Dying: In Iron Man 2. when confronted with his poisoning and seemingly imminent death, Tony asks Natasha Romanoff what she would do if she had only a brief time to live. Natasha, evaluating him for S.H.I.E.L.D., tells him that she would do whatever she wanted. As a result, he decides to have a wild party at his house in Malibu and get completely drunk in full armor, thereby endangering everyone around him.
  • Lineage Comes from the Father: Everything from Tony's personality to his looks seems to come from his dad — both are playboy tech whizzes who run the same multi-billion dollar company and have a sarcastic streak. They're also both dark-haired, dark-eyed, about the same height, and have similar facial structure and hair style. This is in contrast to Tony's mother, who was a soft-spoken blue-eyed blonde that seemed to prefer art and music over science.
  • Locking Macgyver In The Store Cupboard: How he built the Mark I Iron Man armor. It's a Invoked Trope; the Ten Rings asked him what he needed to build a Jericho Missile and Tony told them exactly what he needed.
  • Lonely Rich Kid: He had no friends growing up in his swank boarding school. Later, he grew up to be a Millionaire Playboy enjoying swank parties and seducing reporters, although it's shown that this is a very shallow existence and his only true friends are Rhodey, Pepper, Happy, and his robots.
  • Luxurious Liquor: In several films, he is seen drinking scotch to match his narcissistic rich boy persona. In the first Avengers film, he even prepares one for Loki when they're exchanging words at Stark Tower and as an excuse to go behind the bar to get his Iron Man suit attachment bracelets in preparation for needing to jump out the windows — though this could well be exploiting the theory behind the trope to prevent the trickster from questioning his movement. In the first Iron Man film, he even throws in a portable alcohol station for the troops in the Middle East who buy his weapons.
    Tony Stark: Give me a scotch, I'm starving.

    Tropes M to R 
  • MacGyvering: His main ability when he's not inside his Iron Man suit. Other than building a Powered Armor with just scraps of metal, he can come up with weapons using whatever he has access to at the time.
  • Mad Scientist: Proudly calls himself one in Age of Ultron. You gotta own up to it, you know?
  • Made of Iron: He can take an amazing pounding, even out of his suit. Routinely takes impacts and falls that should kill a human being.
  • Manchild:
    • At times Stark looks more like a child building with legos than an adult saving the world. Considering that he built his first A.I. at just seven, he really hasn't grown out of revolutionising technology by playing with toys!
    • He'll often start behaving childishly even in serious situations, like during his Senate hearing, where his antics earn him a disapproving look from Pepper. Most of Iron Man 2 involves him struggling with these tendencies.
    • Even his former employee Quentin Beck lampshades this, outright calling him a "boozy man child".
  • Married to the Job: See his Chronic Hero Syndrome entry. By Civil War, his devotion to the Iron Man role is damaging his relationship with Pepper. He's obviously realized this flaw in Homecoming, where Tony tells Peter that if he truly needs the suit to be a superhero and good person, then he doesn't deserve it.
  • The Mentor: A Parental Substitute to Spider-Man in Homecoming, by providing him with a better suit and giving him life lessons such as "if you need the suit to be a hero then you don't deserve it" while also praising him when he succeeds. He becomes a case of Mentor Occupational Hazard in Endgame.
  • Meta Casting: Given Downey Jr.'s history with partying and drugs — plus snarky characters — he was made for the role ...except for his height. The comic book version of Tony Stark is 6 inches taller than him, and Downey is shorter than everyone in the MCU aside from Scarlett Johansson (hence the visual tricks done to make him look taller). It memed.
  • Metal Head: As punny as it might seem... huge fan of both Black Sabbath (having a song eponymous to his codename helps!) and AC/DC.
  • Metaphorgotten: Towards the end of Spider-Man: Homecoming, Tony Stark tells Peter, "You screwed the pooch, but then you did the right thing; you took her to the free clinic, you raised the hybrid puppies- Okay, that's not a great analogy..."
  • Millionaire Playboy: Billionaire, in this case. And a philanthropist. Oh, and genius.
  • Momma's Boy: A Badass Bookworm Guile Hero with razor-edge technology of his own design who gravitates more toward his mom due to his abusive father. He never talks negatively about her and her death affected him more than his dad's. Note his reaction upon finding out that the Winter Soldier killed his parents: "He killed my mom."
  • Motor Mouth: The man never shuts up. Pepper has the singular ability to hold a conversation with him by talking right over him without pause and listening at the same time, otherwise she'd never get a word in edgewise.
  • My Greatest Failure:
    • His naiveté on the harm the weapons his company initially created were doing.
    • His hand in the creation of Ultron, and the ensuing destruction of Sokovia, leading to the dissolution of the Avengers come Civil War.
    • Peter Parker dying in his arms and being unable to save him is probably the worst; finding a reminder about that painful loss is what ultimately convinces him to return to the Avengers for one last mission.
  • Names to Run Away from Really Fast:
    Vulture: So that's it. You just gonna run?
    Shocker: Feds were waiting for us. Now we're on Iron Man's radar? Yeah, I'm running. You should too.
  • Narcissist: Black Widow's report in Iron Man 2 dubs him as such. However, it is a milder case of It's All About Me: Tony acts like he believes the entire world revolves around him, as demonstrated by his series of suspiciously specific denials at the Stark Expo, his performance at the Senate subcommittee hearing, and discussed by Nick Fury (who reminds Tony that he is "not the center of my universe") and Pepper, who at one point threatens to throw something at his head if he says "I" one more time. But he deeply cares about Pepper, fellow Avengers, young Peter Parker and ordinary people he protects for their own sake — something a pathological narcissist is incapable of, along with taking the blame.
    Tony Stark: "Textbook... narcissism?" [sees Fury's expression] Agreed.
  • Never My Fault:
    • Tony goes along with the Accords and does his best to repair the public image of the Avengers, ignoring that keeping Wanda under house arrest is a bit much even for PR.
    • When Clint holds Tony responsible for imprisoning most of Team Cap, Tony tries to deflect blame by telling him they're the ones who decided to break the law and he didn't write it. Of course, Tony is ignoring the fact that Ross was initially going to send a SWAT team to go after them (which Team Cap probably would've easily beaten) until Tony convinced him to let him and the other Pro-Reg heroes do it.
    • Tony rips Peter a new one after the ferry incident in Spider-Man: Homecoming, ignoring that it was his aloofness and dismissiveness towards Peter that spurred him to try to take on the Vulture himself in the first place.
    • Tony explodes at Steve in Endgame claiming that his idealism that left Earth vulnerable to Thanos and for not being there for him, when it all happened ignoring a) that none of his own solutions like Ultron or the Sokovia Accords ultimately panned out, b) his refusal to communicate or compromise with his teammates resulted in the Avengers disbanding in the first place and c) Steve had given Tony a direct line to contact him with that he never even attempted to use until Bruce implored him to put his grudge aside and call him.
  • Nice Job Breaking It, Hero!: Despite Wanda's role in mind-raping Tony to exploit all his fears, and Bruce helping him out with drafting the original plans, Tony is the one who ultimately gets blamed for creating Ultron (though this is mostly because Bruce admitted it was a bad idea and apologized while Tony kept trying to justify it). Despite them being "nowhere near an interface" and Ultron spontaneously gaining consciousness via the Mind Stone. This is the defining event that causes the UN to draft the Sokovia Accords in Civil War, which splits up the Avengers, of which both Tony and Steve are responsible for. Where as Steve is at fault for being unwilling to compromise and keeping the secret of what really happened to Tony's parents, Tony is at fault for allowing his guilt to dictate his judgement, causing him to try to compromise with the government by any means.
  • The Nicknamer: One of the indicators of his generally flippant attitude is his tendency to toss off casual and frequently pop-culture-laden nicknames for people and objects —
    • "Old Man" and "Capsicle" for Captain America,
    • "Point Break" alongside Shakespeare references for Thor, later "Lebowski" when Thor was fat and drunk.
    • "Legolas" for Hawkeye,
    • "Big Man", "Enormous Green Rage Monster" (which he's a big fan of), and "Jolly Green" for Hulk/Banner.
    • "Reindeer Games" (due to the horns on his helmet) and "Rock of Ages" for Loki,
      • Also "Glowstick of Destiny" and "Joystick" for Loki's scepter,
    • Plus many more for people whose names he either doesn't know or doesn't care about (such as calling a random henchman "Ponytail Express" in Iron Man 3 or "Forrest" for the first airman he addresses in Iron Man).
    • In Civil War,
    • In Infinity War,
      • He dubs Ebony Maw as "Squidward".
      • And Drax "Mr. Clean" and Star-Lord "Flash Gordon".
      • He even refers to Thanos's Q-Ships as exactly what they looked like, Donuts.
      • He does call Dr. Strange "Wizard", but isn't the first to do so as Thor had done so in Thor: Ragnarok.
    • In Endgame:
      • He cheekily refers to Nebula as a “Blue Meanie” from The Beatles Animated Movie Yellow Submarine in his recorded will to Pepper; kind of a cheap shot considering she *did* help him patch up and *disinfect* the nasty stab wound her father Thanos gave him through his midsection.
      • He refers to Strange as the "Bleecker Street Magician" doing his "Reason You Suck" Speech to Rogers after his return to Earth.
      • He initially thought Rocket was a "build-a-bear." Rocket quipped back that he may be one. Later on Stark calls him "Ratchet".
      • He has plenty for Lang including Thumbelina, Stuart Little, and "Piss-ant".
  • Despite all of the above, this is ZigZagged for himself as he can't think of a meaningful alias.
    Howard: Do I know you?
    Tony:[[fumbles with his visitor badge]] No sir; I'm a visitor from MIT
    Howard: Got a name?
    Tony: Howard
    Howard: Well that will be easy to remember.
    Tony: Howard [[pauses to figure out a last name]] Potts

  • Ninja Pirate Zombie Robot: He is, in his own words, a "genius billionaire playboy philanthropist" with a suit of Powered Armor.
  • No Kill Like Overkill: He favors this for his combat tactics. Also the case with the arc reactor in his chest. Three Gigajoules per second is a power output roughly on par with a nuclear power plant, and he essentially made it to power a pacemaker. Keep in mind that's the prototype, and he has upgraded it at least twice.
  • No-Sell: Thanks to the reactor cutting off direct access to his heart, Loki cannot mind-control him.
  • Not Me This Time: A variation. While he did fire Quentin Beck in the past, unlike the other "demons" he created, it's established that Beck was always an unstable and shifty person before losing his position, and used this event as an excuse to run a Monster Protection Racket.
  • Not So Different:
    • From Loki in The Avengers, much to his chagrin.
    Tony: ...And Loki, he's a full-tilt diva! He wants flowers, he wants parades, he wants a monument built to the skies with his name plastered—
    [realises he's describing Stark Tower and in turn, himself]
    Tony: Sonofabitch.
    • From Vulture in Spider-Man: Homecoming. When Peter Parker confronts Toomes and accuses him of being an illegal arms dealer selling high tech weaponry to the highest bidder, Toomes points out that Tony started off as an arms dealer who sold high tech weaponry to the highest bidder as well.
  • Not Staying for Breakfast: Young Tony may be The Pornomancer, but he fears the morning after something fierce. In the first film, he dispatches Pepper to get rid of Christine Everhart while hiding in his basement garage. He also does it in a flashback from the third film.
    Tony: How'd she take it?
    Pepper: Like a champ.
  • Obfuscating Stupidity: He often acts absentminded, easily-distracted, and excessively self-obsessed and arrogant, but is shown to be incredibly brilliant socially and technically, delivering sarcastic putdowns to people who irritate him and building incredible machines out of whatever he has on hand. After one night of study, he becomes enough of an expert in thermonuclear astrophysics to discuss the specifics of the Tesseract with Bruce Banner.
  • Odd Friendship:
    • With Bruce Banner in The Avengers, due to them being the resident science geeks.
    Tony: Finally, somebody who speaks English!
    • With Nebula in Avengers: Endgame. Despite their contrasting attitudes, the two bond while being stranded together in space.
  • Offscreen Breakup: With Pepper after Iron Man 3. They get back together by the end of Homecoming.
  • Off to Boarding School: Tony bitterly describes Howard Stark's happiest moment as the day he shipped Tony off to boarding school. Subverted with the reveal that HYDRA had infiltrated S.H.I.E.L.D., and that Howard was a target. Howard sending Tony off was in order to get him away to safety.
  • Oh, Crap!: Despite being a superhero, Tony is a civilian and the only one of the original Avengers without any formal combat training and the psychological training associated with it, so he gets this a lot:
    • In Iron Man:
      • When an armed missile lands right in front of him, which causes the injury which leaves him with the shrapnel in his chest.
      • More subdued one, but he has one when he realises his terrorist captors are using guns manufactured by his company.
      • Again when he gets the proof that his company was actually selling them the weapons.
      • When he fails to escape the F-22s sent after him.
      • When Obadiah takes his arc reactor.
      • When Iron Monger was not taken out by a fall from the skies.
    • In Iron Man 2:
      • When Vanko attacks him at the racetrack.
      • When he realises the Hammer drones and War Machine armor had been hacked by Vanko.
      • When Vanko activates a self destruct sequence.
    • The Avengers (2012):
      • When he gets news that the Tesseract was missing.
      • When he gets trapped between the helicarrier rotors.
      • When he realises Loki was headed for Stark Tower.
      • When Loki attacks him.
      • When the Chitauri start pouring in.
    • Iron Man 3: Most of the movie.
  • Omnidisciplinary Scientist: Word of God defines Tony as a master engineer, master physicist, master chemist, master computer scientist, skilled in neuroscience, and knowledgeable in biology. His main skill is the franchise's greatest engineer and he can build impossible inventions by having a practical grasp of different subfields in science and how to create tools that tap into the different kinds of knowledge. Originally he used this ability to build weapons, later he uses that to build his Iron Man technology and its various upgrades and sub-systems.
    • He is an expert at high-energy physics, materials science, and aerospace engineering all at the same time. His in-universe nickname was "the Da Vinci of our time" but Tony doesn't think so because he doesn't paint.
    • He's a quick study. After spending a night reading S.H.I.E.L.D.'s briefing packet, he can converse fluently with Bruce Banner about the technical details of the Tesseract.
    • He also glances at Maya Hansen's life's work, immediately understands it, invents the breakthrough equation that makes Extremis work, and scribbles most of it on the back of his name-tag, while too drunk to remember doing it.
    • It's implied in Iron Man that Tony might even possess some level of expertise in genetics; when he's being grilled by some reporters over his company's war profiteering, he deflects the blame by pointing out breakthroughs in genetically engineered "intelli-crops" and advancements in medical technology, presumably both invented/designed by him.
    • Subverted briefly in Age of Ultron where he defers to Banner in Vision's creation due to Banner knowing bio-organics better than he does (although he runs point on several of the AI issues of their projects, both for Vision and their previous attempt at bringing Ultron to life).
    • He designs a pair of glasses (that come with an astounding price tag of over six-hundred million dollars) that allow him to project memories directly from his brain in Civil War, which is his neuroscience skill in action.
  • Once per Episode: Tony's introductory scenes are accompanied by an AC/DC song: "Back in Black" in the first film, "Shoot to Thrill" in Iron Man 2 as well as The Avengers, and "Let There Be Rock" in the Fury's Big Week comic.
  • O.O.C. Is Serious Business: Whenever Stark stops being a Deadpan Snarker, you know shit is gonna get serious. For example when he chews out Peter for being careless and most notably when he learns Bucky killed his parents.
  • Opposites Attract: With Pepper. In particular, Pepper is good at covering for his weaknesses and shortcomings being reliable, focused and organized to counter Tony's Absent-Minded Professor and Workaholic tendencies.
  • Papa Wolf: Is very protective of his teammates, especially Peter Parker. Bringing Peter back is one of his major motivations for rejoining the fight in Endgame.
  • Parental Neglect: Tony complains that his dad was cold, never around for him, and he seriously doubted that his father even loved him at all. This is eventually shown not to be the case in regards to whether he loved him.
  • Parental Substitute: Tony acts as this for Peter Parker from Civil War onwards, being the father he never had. He becomes his mentor for all things superhero, giving him his supersuit and saving him when he gets in trouble. Even though Tony is emotionally stunted, he attempts to give Peter encouragement and "break the cycle of shame" that he had to endure with his own father. When Peter gets disintegrated by Thanos, Tony does not take it well. The first thing he does when they reunite in Endgame is hug him.
  • Parents as People: In Spiderman Homecoming, Tony isn't Peter's father but he does serve as a Parental Substitute. He's incredibly flawed in that role, prone to both not listening and not clearly communicating. There's also an undercurrent of Tony trying (unsuccessfully) to not get emotionally attached which comes across as neglecting Peter. They work out the kinks by the end of the movie and by Infinity War, the two share a close relationship.
  • Parent-Child Team:
  • Parents for a Day: More like parent for a few hours. In Iron Man 3, Tony briefly bonds with Kid Sidekick Harley in order to defeat the Mandarin.
  • Parent ex Machina: Subverted. If it wasn't for Tony, Peter would've drowned and/or split himself in half trying to hold a ferry together — not to mention his suit, which was provided by Tony, has bailed him out multiple times. However, Tony ended up playing a much larger role to Peter than just being a convenient save here and there, and helped Peter become a more responsible, self-actualizied hero by the end of Spider-Man: Homecoming.
  • Parents in Distress: Tony would've been bludgeoned by one of the Thanos's minions during the battle of New York had Peter not appeared out of nowhere and pulled a Punch Catch on it in Avengers: Infinity War.
  • Parting Words Regret: When he's demonstrating his new technology to reframe old memories, he expresses a wish that the happy memory of his last moments with his parents was how it had really happened.
  • Passing the Torch: E.D.I.T.H. from Spider-Man: Far From Home is Tony's way of handing control of Stark Industries' weapons and information gathering technology to Peter after his death.
    Tony's Note: To the next Tony Stark. I trust you.
  • Paying for the Action Scene: In Age of Ultron during the fight in Johannesburg he piledrives the Hulk into a skyscraper that is under construction, but makes sure to buy the building before he commits to the act.
  • Perspective Reversal: Early in the films, Tony is an egotist who has little use for authority, while Steve Rogers just wants to join the Army and do his part for his country. By the time of Civil War, the fallout from his reckless actions have made Tony believe that the Avengers need to be subject to oversight while Steve, having witnessed how corrupted and obstructive governing bodies have become in the modern day, distrusts the idea, to the point where the two end up leading opposing factions of the team.
  • Phlebotinum Dependence: He needs to keep his electromagnet powered by palladium on so that shrapnel in his chest won't migrate to his heart. In Iron Man 2, he creates a new element to replace the palladium, and at the end of Iron Man 3 he has the pieces of shrapnel removed so that he no longer needs the arc reactor to survive.
  • Playful Hacker: Among other things, he enjoys hacking other people's sound systems to play appropriate music for his dramatic entrances. In 2 he gleefully hacks a live senate broadcast and several military satellites just to prove a point. He reminisces cracking the Pentagon security net in high school on a dare, in Age of Ultron.
  • Poor Communication Kills:
    • Tony's not very good at talking to other people about his problems, which leaves everyone around him confused and irritated by his strange behavior while he does things like build a suit of Powered Armor in his basement or slowly die of palladium poisoning. However, by the time of the third film he's getting much better, coming right out and telling Pepper that he's got problems when they start to affect her directly. He's also open to Harley about anxiety attacks.
    • He's back at it twice in Age of Ultron, the first time played straight after Scarlet Witch uses a vision of Earth being destroyed and the Avengers dying because Tony didn't do enough to save them to drive him to self-destructive isolation and a rabid need to do something, anything to protect the world.
    • Spider-Man: Homecoming: The damage to the ferry would be prevented if Tony called Peter earlier to tell that he received the warning about the weapons deal and tipped off the FBI, if Peter didn't hang up on Tony, or if Peter hadn't removed the suit's tracker so Tony would know where Peter was heading. FBI agents also would be better prepared to tangle with Toomes and his men, if Tony had done a better job at listening to Peter to know what they were facing.
    • Spider-Man: Far From Home: Tony leaves E.D.I.T.H. to Peter with a rather short and cryptic note. Peter would never have given it to someone else if Tony had written a more explicit message to prevent Peter from misinterpreting his intent.
  • The Pornomancer: He's the page image for a reason (12 for 13 on a yearly cover model list) but he stops becoming this by the time he's in a committed relationship with Pepper Potts.
  • Posthumous Character: In Far From Home, Tony is dead but his legacy still weights on many of the characters. Left without a superhero like Iron Man, many people place their expectations on Spider-Man who is reluctant to become a successor of such an icon, while Quentin Beck is revealed to be a former employee of Stark Industries with a grudge on Tony. Tony has also left Peter his glasses, which contain an advanced AI giving Peter control over a swarm of killer drones.
  • Post-Victory Collapse: In The Avengers after helping save New York from an alien invasion and a tactical nuke, he is found lying on the street, nearly comatose. After he regains consciousness, he doesn't have any particular desire to sit up again right away:
    Tony: All right. Hey. All right. Good job, guys. Let's just not come in tomorrow. Let's just take a day. Have you ever tried shawarma? There's a shawarma joint about two blocks from here. I don't know what it is, but I wanna try it.
  • Primary-Color Champion: His main Iron Man suit is one with both red and yellow colored armor.
  • Properly Paranoid: He's possibly the only person on the planet who believes that the Chitauri and their mysterious master will return one day, and kick the Avengers' asses. He's not wrong. Some of his behavior like building endless suits and upgrades in Iron Man 3, then Ultron, supporting the Sokovia Accords to Knight Templar levels and then in Spider-Man: Homecoming giving Peter a suit with endless upgrades and an Insta-Kill mode suggests someone becoming a Crazy Survivalist, and his paranoia has made things worse, since there isn't a fully formed Avengers unit on standby after Civil War, and if he wants Spider-Man to be a future Avenger in time to defend Earth against upcoming threats, he's not taking an active enough role in training him either.
    Tony: A hostile alien army came charging through a hole in space — we're standing 300 feet below it. We're the Avengers. We can bust arms dealers all the livelong day, but that up there? That's the endgame. How were you guys planning on beating that?
  • Pre-Mortem One-Liner: The climax of the Final Battle in Endgame has him uttering his Catchphrase prior to finger-snapping away the time-dispaced Thanos and his entire army.
  • The Protagonist: Of his own series of films, but one of two main contenders for this for the Marvel Cinematic Universe as a whole, the other being Captain America. His film was the one that kick-started the MCU, and he continues to have a major role and Character Development through The Avengers, Avengers: Age of Ultron, Captain America: Civil War and Spider-Man: Homecoming as well as cameos and mentions in the others. Even when he's not personally present, his family's influence is felt through the different films (i.e. Howard Stark in The First Avenger, the Insight Repulsors or Hank Pym hating Howard Stark), and finally on top of all that in the end he's the one who ultimately kills Thanos.
  • Pungeon Master: He doesn't force the puns, but he never shies away from an opportunity for innuendo. For example, Iron Man 3 he claims his autobiography could be titled A Cheap Trick and a Cheesy One-Liner.
    James Rhodes: Think I can't hold my own?
    Tony Stark: We get through this, I'll hold your own.
    James Rhodes: You had to make it weird.
  • Really Gets Around: There's Maya Hansen, Christine Everhart, and Pepper, plus the offscreen twelve models, that we know of... Thankfully, he cools it down a lot after the first film and even more after joining the Avengers. He's in a committed relationship with Pepper, after all.
  • "The Reason You Suck" Speech:
    • Tony gives one to Loki in The Avengers, telling him that there's no way there's any scenario that ends with him victorious, because he pissed off a bunch of people who'll fight until the end to beat him.
    • Tony gives one of these to Maya in Iron Man 3, calling her out on compromising her moral integrity for progress.
    • Tony gives a big one to Steve in Avengers: Endgame while still recovering from his near-death experience in space. He rips his IV drip out after yelling at Steve about how his naive attitude in Age of Ultron and Civil War led to Earth being unprepared for Thanos's invasion. He rages at Steve for holding him back and not being present for the fight on Titan, all before passing out.
  • Red Is Heroic: Red is his signature colour because he specifically included "hotrod red" into the Mark 3 armor which is the one he uses to start his superhero career.
  • Red Oni, Blue Oni:
    • The Red Oni To Steve Rogers's Blue Oni. Boy, does it show between these two. Heck, the colors of their suits can be a good literal/visual example of this. He's also the Red Oni to Doctor Strange's Blue Oni. For the two of them, it is science vs. magic.
    • Tony plays the role of Blue Oni to Peter Quill's Red Oni on Titan trying to browbeat him into a plan and to take Thanos seriously. It's implied that Tony's greater experience has matured him, experience that Quill lacks.
  • Relationship Upgrade:
    • To Official Couple with Pepper as of the end of Iron Man 2. Broke up with each other sometime between Iron Man 3 and Civil War, due to Tony breaking his promise to retire as Iron Man, but are back together by the events of Spider-Man: Homecoming and are engaged with wedding plans during Infinity War.
    • They have another Relationship Upgrade at the end of Homecoming. When Peter backs out of the press conference they had planned at the last minute, Pepper pressures Tony as to what they are going to tell the 50 reporters they had gathered in the next room, to which Tony and Happy produce an engagement ring they had been carrying since 2008. Come the beginning of Infinity War, Tony and Pepper are discussing having children.
    • Following up on the above Endgame features the ultimate example of this, by 2023 five years after Infinity War Tony and Pepper have not only gotten married but are also raising an adorable four-year old little girl named Morgan.
  • Relative Button: Tony has two main ones:
    • Anything involving his parents especially Howard. This is mostly due to his troubled childhood and his parents' untimely death
    • Losing the people he loves is another. Tony cares deeply for his friends and family and fears their death above all else. Threatening or hurting the people he cares about is a great way for him to lose all reason and rationality.
  • Renaissance Man: So much so that his nickname to much of the world is "The Da Vinci of Our Time". Not only is Tony an accomplished Omnidisciplinary Scientist with breakthroughs in engineering, physics, chemistry, neuroscience, computer science, and genetics, but he's also business savvy, politically apt, multi-lingual, and a competent tactician.
  • Retired Badass:
    • By the end of Iron Man 3, Tony decides that being with Pepper is more important than being Iron Man, going so far as to blow up his entire arsenal of armored suits.
    • In Age of Ultron, Tony leaves the Avengers at the end, deciding that he's done enough damage.
    • In Endgame, Tony fully retires for 5 years and gets to build a family with Pepper. Now living in a more humble house by a lake and having a daughter he adores in Morgan, Tony is actually reluctant to accept the Avengers' call for his help.
  • Retirony: In Endgame, a retired Tony is the one who is most adamant that they only bring back those killed by Thanos' snap and change nothing else, having gained a family in the intervening years that he doesn't want to lose and fully wishing to go back into retirement with them afterwards. He ends up making a Heroic Sacrifice to save the universe.
  • Revenge Before Reason: During the climax of Captain America: Civil War, Tony lets Zemo escape after the latter reveals that Bucky was responsible for killing Tony's parents. Despite knowing that Zemo was the manipulator of all the events in the film, Tony instead focuses on trying to kill Bucky. Additionally, he knew that Bucky was brainwashed while under HYDRA and wasn't in control of his actions.
  • Rich Idiot with No Day Job: In his case it's more of Rich Idiot with a day job, but he still flaunts and abuses his rich boy status to have as much fun as he can. By the end of his first film he reveals his secret identity to the world, and his "real" day job becomes clear.
  • Roaring Rampage of Revenge: Is uncharacteristically quiet when pursuing Bucky at the end of Civil War, and refuses to quit his hunt even as his armor's functions are reduced one by one. It takes Steve needing to shut down his armor completely to have him halt.
  • Robo Family: Tony builds a number of AIs that join the "family business" so to speak, composed of the robotic arms DUM-E and U (seriously, those are their names), J.A.R.V.I.S., F.R.I.D.A.Y., and partially (as in, partial credit for creation), the Vision. Age of Ultron plays out like a teenager rebelling against his father and Tony even jokes that Ultron is "breaking your old man's heart".
  • Robot Master: Tony was always an engineering whiz in the comics, but this version makes him a genius at the programming side as well.
  • Running Gag:
    • Does not like being handed things. Works literally and as a Stealth Pun about his character, as well: his father's success could have left him phenomenally rich and spoiled, but he nevertheless proved himself to be a prodigy and went on to earn a rightful place among the greatest minds of the planet.
    • He's technically not an Avenger. He's a consultant.

    Tropes S to Z 
  • Sacrificed Basic Skill for Awesome Training: Stark may be smart enough to build the world's first functioning suit of Powered Armor, but he's simultaneously too dumb to know his own social security number and too dense to buy remotely acceptable Christmas presents for his own girlfriend (as another example, when trying to apologise to her he brought her strawberries, which she was deathly allergic to, and attempted to atone for this gaffe by noting that at least he remembered strawberries were 'important' in some way). In general, the films play up his total lack of normal human skills a lot more than the comics do, where he's brilliant but just an asshole.
  • Sad Clown: At the end of Avengers, he laughs off his near death experience and starts babbling about the Kiss of Life and shawarma. By 3, the adrenaline's worn off and he's suffering from PTSD due to the events of Avengers. By the time that Civil War has rolled around a combination of his guilt over Ultron's actions the pressures of trying to keep the Avengers together from the Sokovia Accords, his Offscreen Breakup with Pepper, and the Trauma Conga Line he suffers throughout said movie leave Tony a shell of his former self who barely jokes or snarks at all.
  • The Scapegoat:
    • In the case of Iron Man 2, Vanko blames Tony for the actions of his father Howard Stark for the impoverishment and downfall of himself and his father. Howard Stark saw to deport Ivan's dad when the latter sought to use the Arc Reactor technology for weapons. Likewise, Aldrich Killian in Iron Man 3 chose to use AIM to weaponize and exploit veterans on his own, all to get back at Tony for insulting him at a party.
    • In the case of Scarlet Witch and Quicksilver, the latter blame Tony personally for the weapons used in a Sokovian Civil War, when the full responsibility belongs to one of the factions of the Civil War that actually used the weapons, and while Tony should shoulder some of the blame (if only in the sense of the company-man insisting that "the buck stops here") it's not like he himself personally bombed and targeted their home.
    • Likewise, while Ultron was a concept that he and Bruce Banner had planned before the HYDRA raid when Tony came in contact with the Scepter, it's a fact that the Scarlet Witch bewitched him with traumatic visions, and it's not clear that he was acting in his right mind when he and Banner worked on the AI. Ultron's actions and rampage, are as much Wanda and Pietro's responsibility, as Wanda herself admits to Hawkeye during the attack at Sokovia.
    • In the case of Spider-Man: Homecoming, Adrian Toomes has every right to be upset that Damage Control canceled his contract without compensation for his massive investment. Damage Control is a joint venture created by both Stark Industries and the Federal Government, and the agency was operating under an Executive Order which would imply the government was directing its actions regarding Toomes' worksite. However, Toomes fixates on Stark because of his high public image.
  • Science Hero: He makes powered armor and then he kicks evil ass wearing it. It's particularly prevalent in Iron Man 3, where even without his suit he can hold his own using improvised weapons he made from materials brought from a hardware store.
  • Secretly Dying: In Iron Man 2, he realizes that the Arc Reactor in his chest, which was supposed to keep him alive, is slowly poisoning him. He prepares for his death by handing control of his company to Pepper, and undergoes a public, alcohol-fueled breakdown.
  • Seen It All: By Infinity War, he just takes crazy things in stride. He is more surprised by seeing Banner again than he is by Doctor Strange's sudden introduction via a magic portal. He also doesn't bother questioning how he's meeting another human being from Earth on a distant planet, accompanied by a blue alien and a yellow-ish alien with antennae.
  • Self-Made Man: He's the son of a rich man and had access to the best education and resources but his turn to superheroism happened when he was a hostage held in a cave with nothing but a box of scraps and shrapnel moving into his chest. This experience radically changed his life and belief system of who he is and what he could do. As he affirms in Iron Man 3, take away his house, all his tricks and toys, and you still can't take away the fact that he's Iron Man.
  • Shadow Archetype: All three of the major Avengers villains serve as Foils to Tony.
    • Loki has the worst of Tony's Drama Queen and Attention Whore tendencies. He also has Daddy Issues with Odin like Tony has with Howard. Lampshaded by Tony himself in a hilarious Not So Different moment
    • Ultron is directly this due to being Tony's creation based on his own personality. He has Tony's snark (he occasionally steals Tony's lines), narcissism and drama queen tendencies as well has his affinity for machines and science. However, instead of channeling his ego and brilliance into being a superhero like Tony does, Ultron becomes a genocidal maniac. Also lampshaded by various characters.
    • By Avengers: Endgame, Tony has become a foil to Thanos. Both are great men of power, wealth, intellect and scientific-mastery driven by ironclad ideals and haunted by obsessions and self-perceived obligations to a greater purpose which they are willing to give their lives to accomplish. Both were fathers to daughters and adopted children whom they loved dearly, and both walked down the path of tyranny in the name of defending the safety of their perceived reality. To emphasize the point, their leitmotifs are the same melody, only Thanos's "Porch" is played in a Minor key, and Tony's "The Real Hero" is played in a Major key.
  • Sharp-Dressed Man: When he's not in his armor or his lab, Tony can almost always be found in a top-of-the-line suit and tie. Justified as a businessman, social worker and public figure, he has to maintain appearances. It's lampshaded by Thaddeus Ross in The Consultant:
    Ross: Stark. You always wear such nice suits.
  • Shell-Shocked Veteran: His near-death experience at the end of The Avengers has caused him nightmares, anxiety attacks, and a case of PTSD in Iron Man 3. Wanda playing to his fears of this event and what hinged on it is what sets in motion the events of Age of Ultron. Peter Parker's death in Infinity War pushes him over the edge and he is an emotional wreck when he returns to Earth.
  • Shipper on Deck: After his Relationship Upgrade with Pepper he apparently wants to see everyone else happily paired off as well; in The Avengers, when he offers Agent Coulson the use of his private jet to go and visit his girlfriend, who's just moved to a new city. "You gotta keep the love alive."
  • Signature Move: The double palm repulsor blast, followed by the arm missile.
  • Sink-or-Swim Fatherhood: Tony unexpectedly becomes a Parental Substitute to Peter after Civil War, forcing him to learn how to parent on the fly. It doesn't work out so much at first, but after a few near-disasters and an attempted heist, Tony and Peter share a close bond and a working relationship by the end of Spider-Man: Homecoming and throughout Avengers: Infinity War.
  • Sink-or-Swim Mentor: His "mentoring" of Spider-Man consists of just giving Peter a high tech suit and letting him patrol the streets of New York with no supervision or training. The only regular contact between them is Peter sending Happy reports of his activities which are then given to Tony and the only times Tony ever personally gets involved are to chew Peter out and punish him when he screws up, or save his bacon. He did try and turn it into something constructive, but circumstances interrupted him.
  • Sins of Our Fathers:
    • In Iron Man 2, Vanko (A.K.A. Whiplash) was Howard's fault, not Tony's, but Tony was the one who had to deal with him.
    • In Ant-Man, Hank Pym outright refuses to call the Avengers for aid on the grounds that he'd spent too long trying to keep the Pym particle from Howard to just hand it over to Tony despite there having been no indication that Tony and Pym have ever met or that Tony even knows Hank exists.
    • Unfortunately, he ultimately becomes the "father" in this trend. Spiderman's first two Big Bads, The Vulture and Mysterio, start their respective evil plans because of Tony's actions; the former lost a substantial salvage contract because of Damage Control and the latter was offended that Tony named his illusion technology "B.A.R.F." and fired him for being "unstable".
  • Sitting on the Roof: He often ends up on the roofs, enjoying the view, fighting enemies or making out with Pepper (which earns him a "Get a roof" comment from Rhodey). Thus in Iron Man 2, he is chilling out on the rooftop sign:
    Nick Fury: Sir, I'm gonna have to ask you to exit the donut.
  • Skewed Priorities: Played for laughs quite often. He waves off Pepper's request that Happy Hogan drive Tony to the hospital after his captivity in Iron Man despite Tony's injuries. Instead he wants to hold an admittedly serious press conference — but only after he gets a cheeseburger.
  • The Smart Guy: Zig-zagged, as he shares this role with Bruce Banner the majority of the time. While Tony is the world's premier mechanic and engineer, Bruce specializes more in biology and radiation, with both possessing a general knowledge of each other's fields. In The Avengers the two finally meet and hold an intelligent, scientific conversation with each other, cracking physics jokes and the like.
  • Smart People Build Robots: He's created the world's most advanced A.I., J.A.R.V.I.S, and at least one other robot — DUM—E — who makes up in loyalty and charm what it may lack in sophistication. All of Tony's bots have personality.
  • The Snack Is More Interesting: He is often seen eating, be it a burger just before a press-conference or pizza during a heated conversation with Obadiah in Iron Man; donuts before talking to Nick Fury or strawberries after an unsuccessful attempt to explain himself to Pepper in Iron Man 2; or dried blueberries while arguing with Captain America in The Avengers. It has become such a defining trait of the character that they used it in the teaser for Captain America: Civil War, where Robert Downey Jr. is quarreling with Chris Evans over a donut.
  • So Proud of You: Tony has a moment of this toward Peter at the end of Spider-Man: Homecoming, after Peter catches the guy selling and distributing alien weapons. He has his arm around his shoulder and everything, and even offers Peter a new suit and a place on the Avengers.
  • Stating the Simple Solution: In Avengers: Infinity War, in response learning about Thanos' going after the Infinity Stones and needs all six for the Snap, he immediately suggests to the Sorcerers to put the Time Stone "down the garbage disposal". The latter refuse as protecting it was their job and actually destroying it might not even be possible as unlike the Mind Stone with Wanda, there are no known individuals that are directly powered by the Time Stone for a similar case to happen.
  • Strong and Skilled: Tony Stark/Iron Man started off as Unskilled, but Strong, relying on the raw physical power of his Powered Armor, but he started receiving Boxing Lessons for Superman so he wouldn't be defenseless outside of the suit. Later films show even outside of the suit he's a Badass Normal capable of putting up a fight against Winter Soldier using his fighting skills and a few gadgets he had on him. Combined with his most advanced suit, he proved to be one of the few Avengers that could stand up to Thanos in Avengers Infinity War, even making the Mad Titan bleed.
  • Super Intelligence: True to his comic book original, Tony is one of the rare examples of this trope that was born with this ability, rather than receiving it later on from an outside source. Along with Shuri, Bruce Banner, and a handful of other geniuses, he's the smartest human on the planet.
  • Sympathetic Inspector Antagonist: In Captain America: Civil War, Tony is committed to fulfilling his role in the Pro-Accords side due to his guilt over the collateral damage caused by all of the Avengers' fights; however, he still cares about his friends and wants the Avengers to sign the Accords in order to protect them. He starts to swing into Inspector Javert mode during the second half of the movie as he refuses to listen to Steve about the possibility that Bucky may be telling the truth about Zemo trying to unleash a group of Super Soldiers and assumes that Steve is delusional, going to more extreme lengths to end the conflict, which isn't really helped by the fact that he has an extremely small deadline to bring Steve and Bucky in before the authorities take over completely. He eventually becomes a full on antagonist (though a sympathetic one) when he finds out Bucky killed his parents and snaps (due to the circumstances in which he finds out), and attacks Bucky.
  • Tainted Veins: In Iron Man 2, he suffers from palladium poisoning from the arc reactor, and the veins on his chest around it turn dark and visible.
  • Taught by Experience: He is constantly learning by trial-and-error and improving his suits by correcting old flaws:
    • Iron Man: He faces the "icing problem" early on during a test flight and nearly plummets to his death. He has solved the problem by the end of film, which gives him the edge over the Big Bad.
    • The Avengers: After the electrical discharges from Whiplash's weapons were disabled his suit in Iron Man 2, Tony has upgraded his suit further to absorb excess electrical energy, which he can then channel into his repulsors. He uses this feature against Thor.
    • A malfunctioning parachute was a major aspect of his own escape from the F-22 Raptors in Iron Man, while Rhodes breaks his spine and nearly dies from falling down when his suit's primary power source is shot out in Civil War. By Spider-Man: Homecoming, Tony has added a parachute to the Spider-Man suit he has designed.
  • The Team Benefactor: He becomes this for the Avengers; Steve is the leader, while he provides the expensive tech and a skyscraper headquarters.
    Maria Hill: All set up, boss.
    Tony Stark: Actually, [Steve]'s the boss. I just pay for everything and design everything and... make everyone look cooler.
  • Team Dad: Chris Hemsworth (Thor) describes him as "the godfather of the Avengers" because of how closely he works with S.H.I.E.L.D. to get the team together, as seen in The Stinger of The Incredible Hulk. This would explain why Tony always clashes with The Leader Captain America over how to "raise the kids," so to speak.
    • He plays this role during the Battle On Titan by bringing everyone together, playing peacemaker and coming up with the plan to take on Thanos (which Quill then modifies). At times, he seems like an exasperated parent dealing with unruly teenagers.
  • Team Prima Donna: In The Avengers, he is insufferably smug and bossy. Tony does, however, turn the stereotype on its side by being by far the most welcoming and friendly person out of everyone else toward Bruce Banner, the team's Naïve Newcomer.
  • Technological Pacifist:
    • Tony gradually becomes one through the first movie and is firmly seated in this trope by the end of it. He really does not want the government or military to get a hold of his technology by Iron Man 2, specifically because he believes far more lives will be saved if his suits are never mass-manufactured or used in wars.
    • This continues in Avengers, where he is livid that S.H.I.E.L.D. wants to create weapons based on the Tesseract, and in Iron Man 3, where Pepper's reasoning for turning down Killian is that Tony would not approve of how easily the technology could be weaponized.
  • Teen Genius: A former one, in addition to Child Prodigy. He cracked the Pentagon's firewall on a dare when he was seventeen and graduated top of his class from MIT with a prize-winning invention at the same age.
  • Teeth-Clenched Teamwork: Tony doesn't like Steve, at all, but there's nothing like a battle to forge a friendship. Black Widow even calls them out on their Ho Yay in Age of Ultron, and in Avengers: Infinity War, he gets past his initial irritation with both Dr. Strange and the Guardians of the Galaxy in order to fight side-by-side with them against Thanos.
  • Three-Point Landing: He is often depicted in his suit in this pose in promotional art, and he actually performs such landing in Iron Man 2 (on the Stark Expo main stage), The Avengers (when he makes an appearance in Germany to capture Loki), Iron Man 3 (multiple times), Age of Ultron (during the assault on Hydra's Sokovia base) and Infinity War (during the fight with Thanos).
  • Throwing Out the Script: At the end of Iron Man, Tony and S.H.I.E.L.D. come up with a cover story that Tony is supposed to give at the press conference. After a few questions from a skeptical press, Tony decides to just tell the truth: "I am Iron Man."
  • Title Drop: For what would eventually be the final Avengers movie, back in Age of Ultron.
    Stark: We're the Avengers. We can bust arms dealers all the livelong day, but that up there... that's the endgame.
  • Took a Level in Badass:
    • Between The Avengers and Iron Man 3 Tony has taken Captain America's question about what he is without his armor seriously, since he can now handle himself in a fight without the armor and pulls off a successful infiltration of the Mandarin's mansion through MacGyver'ed gadgets made out of things he found at a home supply store. Although he may have gotten a start on this in Iron Man 2, where he's at least dabbling in some informal martial-arts training with his head of security. By Captain America: Civil War, he's able to briefly hold his own against the Winter Soldier without a suit.
    • The armor showcased in Infinity War is the culmination of the technological prowess and tactical skills Tony honed throughout his entire superhero career. Taking notes from the Black Panther, it utilizes nanomachines that form the suit around him with the press of a button on the arc reactor on his chest, making it incredibly convenient to have around compared to his previous armors. It can also create virtually any weapon Tony can think of for him to utilize, boost his flying speeds in a pinch, and allow him to survive in the vacuum of space.
    • Speaking of Infinity War, Tony's absolute determination to keep fighting and his ten years of experience as Iron Man make him the only hero in the entire film, besides Thor, capable of going toe-to-toe with Thanos and wounding him, despite his vastly inferior strength.
  • Took a Level in Kindness: After his experience in Afghanistan, he realizes how important he is to the rest of the world. It should be noted that as a Jerk with a Heart of Gold, he's still obnoxious.
  • Too Much Alike: He and Stephen Strange share a strong mutual dislike of the other, primarily because they're both Insufferable Genius Deadpan Snarkers who are evenly matched in both capacities.
  • Trademark Favorite Food: Tony was noted to have a liking towards cheeseburgers and it was the first thing he wanted after he escaped captivity.
  • Tragic Keepsake: Despite his attempts to retire and move past the events of the Decimation, he has a photo of himself and Peter Parker at his home.
  • Tranquil Fury:
    • His default response when he gets angry. He doesn't shout, nor does he scream, instead keeping a calm demeanor while tripling the effort to take the target of his ire down or failing that, explosively remove his opponent's face.
    • This is averted in Iron Man 3, when he unexpectedly starts screaming at Trevor to tell him where the Mandarin is while pointing a gun at him.
    • In Civil War once Tony sees the video of Bucky murdering his parents as the Winter Soldier and hears Steve admit that he knew about it he drops his usual snarker routine and becomes single-minded in his desire to see Bucky dead.
      Tony: Don't bullshit me, Rogers, did you know?
    • Spider-Man: Homecoming: After Peter goes and gets involved with stopping Vulture – the exact opposite of what Tony told Peter to do – and the attempt culminates in a ferry almost sinking, Tony later takes Peter aside and the audience then gets to see him at his scariest; he doesn’t raise his voice or chance his expression, but you can FEEL the wave of blistering fury that comes from the suit when it opens to reveal he’s inside.
  • Trauma Conga Line: Boy, does he go through a lot each film he appears starting Phase 2note 
  • Trickster Mentor: To Bruce Banner in The Avengers. He pokes him with a cattle-prod to test how he'd react, then comments that Bruce is wrong to deny the part of him that is the Hulk, noting that the amount of gamma radiation exposure he endured would have killed anyone else. Much like Yinsen stopping the shrapnel from reaching his own heart, he believes that Bruce was kept alive for a reason.
  • Troll: Along with his status as The Gadfly:
    • Iron Man: Tony sardonically talks down to Christine Everheart after she tried to demonize him to the public. It is also a Running Gag for Rhodey to scold Tony for being irresponsible, only for Tony to find some new way to defy him just for kicks.
    • Iron Man 2:
      • At the Senate hearing, he calls Senator Stern "dear", turns everything he says into a double entendre, and ignores him for several minutes at a time. It gets Stern so upset that he launches a Precision F-Strike at Tony.... only for Tony to blow kisses to him on his way out.
      • At the same hearing, Tony delivers a Stealth Insult as Justin Hammer was first entering the courtroom and makes a huge deal of Justin being on-screen when Tony hacks into the Senate's video recordings to magnify everyone else's attempts at the Iron Man suit. Tony also announces that Iran, North Korea, and Hammer Industries are five, ten, and twenty years away from success, respectively.
      • Tony interrupts Nick Fury to ask whether he should focus on Fury's eye or eyepatch, refers to the Avengers Initiative as Fury's "super-secret boy band", and, after Fury finishes explaining the role of business consultant to Tony, Tony shakes his hand like he's accepting... and then promptly tells Fury with a smile on his face that S.H.I.E.L.D. can't afford him.
    • The Avengers: Tony purposefully avoids Phil Coulson in his first few minutes on-screen. Fast forward to his fight with Thor, and he's making fun of Thor's accent, clothes, hammer, and overall foreign presence. He is also constantly mouthing off or talking down to Steve Rogers, pokes Bruce Banner with an electric cattle prod in order to evoke the Hulk, and doesn't mind messing with Loki:
      Loki: [after the scepter fails] ...This usually works.
      Tony: [in an understanding tone] Well, performance issues. It's not uncommon. One out of five —
      [Loki grabs him by the throat and throws him out the window]
    • Iron Man 3: Tony calls Extremis-enhanced super soldier Brandt "Hot Wings", tells her he'd dated "hotter" girls than her, and has this exchange with her:
      Brandt: Is that all you got? A cheap trick and a cheesy one-liner?
      Tony: Sweetheart, that could be the title of my autobiography.
    • Avengers: Age of Ultron: Tony refers to himself as Ultron's "Old Man", calls Ultron "Junior" and tells him how disappointed he is in him.
    • Captain America: Civil War: After Thaddeus Ross threatened him with detainment, Tony tells Ross that he's welcome to call him, and that Tony would put him on hold because "he likes to watch the line blink." At the end of the movie, Tony does just that, much to Ross's chagrin.
    • Avengers: Infinity War: Tony engages in this and Snark-to-Snark Combat at every opportunity with Dr. Strange. He also has nicknames for most of the Guardians in under a minute.
  • Two-Faced: After using the Infinity Gems, getting mortally wounded in the process, the right side of his face get's horrifically burned.
  • Ultimate Blacksmith: He personally designed and makes his own armour. Even decades after he made his first, no other person on Earth has even come close to replicating it. In Endgame, he even manages to make a fully functional Infinity Gauntlet. It works and holds up to handling the power of the Stones just as well as the one made by Asgards personal smiths.
  • Uncle Pennybags: We're looking at the guy who gave $100 to a guy for a small box of strawberries in 2, and told the aforementioned strawberry salesman to keep the change. Not to mention funding the projects of ALL the students in attendance at his MIT demonstration.
  • Underestimating Badassery: He is focused on major cosmic threats such as the Chitauri and Thanos, but keeps underestimating local threats and dismissing ordinary criminals as "below the pay-grade," both his own and that of the Avengers as a team:
    • In Iron Man 2, he argues that he had privatized world peace and believes he was untouchable with no one able to match his technology or trigger a real arms race. Ivan Vanko arrives and proves him wrong, and backed by Hammer does manage to field a force that rivals his.
    • In Iron Man 3, he goads the Mandarin to attack his house and gives him his address on live TV, believing that Mandarin won't be able to touch him. He ends up with his house destroyed, a fugitive on the run, captured by Killian, the real Mandarin, and in the end is nearly killed by him.
    • In Avengers: Age of Ultron and Civil War, Ultron, Crossbones, and later Zemo prove him wrong. Collectively they undo the gains made by the Avengers, eroding their goodwill, internally dividing them, and handicapping them before they face Thanos.
    • In Spider-Man Homecoming he underestimates the Vulture, believing that feds can handle a guy who has operated Beneath Suspicion for four years evading both the Avengers and law enforcement, and whose technology easily outplays and overmatches the FBI in their only confrontation.
  • Unknown Rival:
    • Retired Ant-Man Hank Pym resents him because his father tried to replicate his Pym Particle and passed this distrust onto his protege Scott Lang, who tells Tony in Civil War that Hank always said you can never trust a Stark. Tony doesn't seem to know who Hank is and definitely doesn't know who Scott is, so he can only respond to this with a genuinely confused, "Who are you?"
    • In Homecoming Adrian Toomes practically considers Tony his Arch-Enemy, both for the fact his government-backed organisation Damage Control took over the lucrative clean-up operation he had heavily invested in, and more generally because he believes the likes of Tony don't care too much about the little people like him. Tony never even heard about Toomes until Spider-Man reported his existence to him, and even then he doesn't consider him enough of a threat to get the Avengers involved.
  • Unwitting Instigator of Doom: A major running theme of the MCU is the damage caused by Tony's actions. This continues even after he gives up arms manufacturing and becomes Iron Man, which was a deliberate attempt to avoid this.
  • Used to Be a Sweet Kid: One of the tie-in comics features a flashback of a five- or six-year-old Tony tinkering around with a screwdriver and a gaming console. Cue Howard stepping on one of his toys the next room over, cursing loudly about it, then going to Tony to slap the screwdriver and gaming console out of his hands and yell at him for wasting his time with toys. Tony runs off crying and tells the butler Jarvis that he wants to go back to school, even though it's a weekend.
  • Warts and All: In a pep talk to Peter, Happy reminds him that while the world needs the next Iron Man, Tony screwed up a lot. Even Tony himself couldn't live up to ideal of Iron Man, but he did his best. So Peter can as well.
  • Weak, but Skilled: Tony is heavily reliant on his suits and is not a trained soldier like Captain America or had enough experience with combat like Thor. Once he's out of the suit, then he's pretty vulnerable. Granted, he does have some martial arts skills but his suits are the primary force.
  • Wealthy Philanthropist: He is the rich CEO who once described himself as "a genius, billionaire, playboy philanthropist".
  • "Well Done, Son!" Guy: Tony's relationship with his father was strained at best, abusive at worst. This extends to his relationship with Captain America, whom Howard Stark talked about a lot, making Cap into the big brother Tony could never hope to live up to.
  • Well-Intentioned Extremist: He is willing to rush narrowly-focused into a plan that might be better done if he discusses it with others. This helps create Ultron and Vision.
  • What the Hell, Hero?:
    • On the receiving end of one from Steve in Civil War. Cap chews Tony out for his "confining" of Wanda to the Avengers compound, calling it internment. He gives one back when he learns the fate of his parents and questions if Steve knew.
    • In Spider-Man: Homecoming, he demands the suit he made for Peter Parker back after Peter tries to stop the Vulture on his own and nearly sinks an entire ship as a result.
  • The Wonka: CEO of Stark Industries that has rather strange behavior, such as building AIs that snark back at him. It's easy to see how Pepper and Rhodes get exasperated with him.
  • Worf Had the Flu: In the final fight of Civil War, he's trapped in an enclosed area, limiting the destructive potential of his heavier weapons such as his missiles or lasers and forcing him to rely on his fists and basic repulsors.
  • "World of Cardboard" Speech: Gives one at the end of Iron Man 3.
    Tony Stark: So if I were to wrap this up tight with a bow or whatever, I guess I'd say my armor, it was never a distraction or a hobby, it was a cocoon. And now, I'm a changed man. You can take away my house, all my tricks and toys. One thing you can't take away...I am Iron Man.
  • World's Smartest Man: For a long time it was believed Tony held this status in the MCU, however Black Panther (2018) sought to debunk that and establish T'Challa's sister, Shuri, as the true holder of that title.
  • Workaholic: If it wasn't for Pepper, Jarvis, and Rhodey, Tony would've starved, blown himself up, or overdosed on caffeine down in his workshop years ago. This goes Up to Eleven in Iron Man 3, where he spends more and more time in his lab to cope with his PTSD and Bad Dreams. He's apparently completed at least 30 different Iron Man weapons in the space of six months.
  • Worthy Opponent: To Thanos; the respect is more than earned, as Tony's bravery, cunning and absolute refusal to surrender makes him one of the only people in the universe to visibly wound him in single-combat.
  • Wowing Cthulhu: In conjunction with his Worthy Opponent status. In Avengers: Infinity War, Tony puts up such a phenomenal fight against Thanos that even the Mad Titan can't help but express his respect for him:
    Thanos: You have my respect, Stark. When I am done, half of humanity will still be alive; I hope they will remember you.
  • Yank the Dog's Chain: Avengers: Endgame give Tony a huge amount of emotional closure after the Trauma Conga Line of previous movies. Pepper survives the Snap allowing Tony his peaceful retirement, contrary to his fears he's an amazing parent to Morgan, he's matured enough to reconcile with Steve Rogers, he brings back Peter and he finally accepts that his father loved him. With the resolution of his Character Arc, his death was inevitable.
  • You Killed My Father: Tony puts aside any rational or political motivations towards the end of Captain America: Civil War once Zemo reveals that a brainwashed Bucky killed Tony's parents in 1991. The only thing Tony wants after that is Bucky's death.
  • Young and in Charge: Formerly. At twenty-one years old, he was the youngest CEO in history to own and run a Fortune 500 company. Turns out it was a good thing for Stark Industries; under Tony's reign, the company's revenue and net worth had never been higher, and currently clocks in at a whopping $20.3 billion and $12.4 billion, respectively.

Armors

    In General 
https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/iron_man_43_1021.png
Mark 43

Appearances: Iron Man | Iron Man 2 | The Avengers | Iron Man 3 | Avengers: Age of Ultron | Captain America: Civil War | Spider-Man: Homecoming | Avengers: Infinity War | Avengers: Endgame

The various mechanized combat suits used by Tony Stark.


  • Achilles' Heel: As powerful as his armor is, it becomes completely useless if something prevents the arc reactor from powering it. Steve and Bucky spend most of their fight against him in Captain America: Civil War trying to disable it, with Steve eventually succeeding by impaling his Vibranium shield into it.
  • American Robot: His "Iron Legion" fully turns into that after being redesigned from armor suits to identical robotic drones in Iron Man 3.
  • Animated Armor: He or his A.I. can control Mark 42 in Iron Man 3 and Mark 47 in Homecoming remotely.
  • Arm Cannon: Several of Iron Man's weapons are mounted on his forearms, such as the Mark III's anti-tank missile and the Mark 6's lasers.
  • Awesome, but Impractical: Many of his attempts to create Instant Armor resulted in this:
    • Mark 5 is a portable version of armor capable of automatically covering him rather quickly. However, it's also considerably weaker and less protective than his standard suit, and cannot fly.
    • Mark 42 can easily split itself apart and latch onto Tony in select pieces, but this very function makes it easy to break apart.
  • Back for the Dead: Marks 1 - 7 are on display in Tony’s lab at the beginning of Iron Man 3. They’re all blown to bits when the Mandarin sends his men to Tony’s home.
  • Blade Below the Shoulder: The Mark 23 has a retractable arm blade, which he uses to cut Killian's arm off as does the Mark 50 in Avengers: Infinity War; it's responsible for almost stabbing Thanos.
  • Chest Blaster: All models after the second show this capability. It drains more power than the palm blasters, so he mainly uses it as a backup weapon (unless he's blowing stuff up for laughs while hammered), resulting in a Once per Episode pattern:
    • Iron Man: In the climactic battle, when Iron Monger lifts a car full of innocent civilians above his head and is about to throw it Tony uses his chest RT to knock his enemy out from under the car, and catch it by the front bumper — when he used it with his Mark 1 reactor it ate about a fifth of his remaining power.
    • Iron Man 2: He casually destroys a watermelon with it while drunk.
    • The Avengers: After getting supercharged by a lightning bolt from Thor, he uses it in conjunction with a double repulsor attack to blast Thor in retaliation.
    • Iron Man 3: It comes back in full glory, when he blows a hole in Savin's chest and caps it off with a Bond One-Liner.
    • Avengers: Age of Ultron: In the climax, he uses it in conjunction with a lightning bolt soaked blow from Thor to destroy Ultron's bomb.
    • Captain America: Civil War: In the climactic fight, he blows off Bucky's metal arm with it.
    • Avengers: Endgame: Tony and Pepper use theirs in tandem during a mid-air Back-to-Back Badasses moment in the Battle of Earth.
  • Clothes Make the Superman: Played with. It's only because of his suits that he can play a role in direct combat and rival gods and monsters, but Tony considers his mind to be more important that whatever fancy laser or nanobot system he's packing. Iron Man 3 showed that Tony's Gadgeteer Genius is his greatest weapon, and Spider-Man: Homecoming had him spell it out.
    Tony Stark: If you're nothing without the suit, then you shouldn't have it.
  • Collapsible Helmet: In the first film, his face plate just slides up or down as necessary. By Iron Man 2, not only is the helmet of Mark 5 collapsible, the whole suit is. Even then, the helmet is the last part of the suit to deploy. By Civil War, his Mark 46 armor has a helmet that can fully retract into the suit. In Infinity War, the helmet is made out of nanomachines, and a new one can reform if the first one is torn off, which happens while he is fighting Thanos.
  • Divergent Character Evolution: Mark 1 also gave rise to the Iron Monger, and Mark 2 to the War Machine and Whiplash suits.
  • Energy Absorption: In The Avengers, his suit absorbs Thor's lightning bolt:
    Jarvis: Power to 400 percent capacity.
    Tony Stark: How about that? [fires a supercharged repulsion blast back at Thor]
  • Frickin' Laser Beams: A mainstay of the armor's weapon systems, starting from the Mark 6, where it's a one-off, last-ditch weapon. By the time of Avengers, he's upgraded the mechanisms so he can use it more than once with the Mark VII. Despite its power, Iron Man has mostly used it as a cutting tool rather than a straight weapon.
  • Flying Firepower: His armor lets him fly at supersonic speeds and shoot various energy blasts (from particle beams to lasers), while also making him nigh-immune to small arms fire and granting him strength sufficient to pick up a car over his head and out-muscle Captain America.
  • Heads-Up Display: With the exception of the Mark I, all of Tony's Iron Man suits and it's derivatives feature a HUD.
  • Immune to Bullets: His suits are at least immune to rifle fire. However, they have limits. In the first movie, the Mark 3 has its repulsors cut out and gets scuffing and scratches to its millimeters-thick armor from a single shot from an anti-aircraft gun (not a tank, as is commonly believed). Later, the same suit suffers damage from two 20mm cannon shots, and Tony's panic definitely implies that he'd be in critical danger if F-22s landed any more hits. In Iron Man 3, four of the suits are blown up by a single hit from an ATGM, launched by one of the Mandarin's helicopters, though it might be because they are inert. The Mark 46 armor in Civil War completely averts this, being vulnerable to Hawkeye's arrows (being the weakest overall physically and in attack power, despite several new fancy features)
  • Iconic Item: His Iron Man armor, as much as it can be considering how often he upgrades to a new model.
  • Instant Armor: Downplayed, then Played Straight. Because one of the main weaknesses of the armor is that Tony must don it, which is easier said than done due to its bulk and complexity, and that without it, Tony is unable to fight superpowered criminals and aliens, he's constantly tried to make the process of wearing it be as easy and fast as possible.
    • Iron Man 2: Tony has created a considerably weaker, portable version of the armor which can automatically assemble around the user's body in a short time.
    • The Avengers: Starting from this film, his armors can fly to him and can make and unmake themselves automatically so that he walks in and out of them. Mark 7 required a special set of bracelets to lock onto.
    • Iron Man 3: With Mark 42 he tried to push the idea up to individual autonomous limbs that can fly toward him, but the technology was so buggy he scrapped the idea, only using it for the Hulkbuster armor since it was guaranteed the monster would tear off something during the process of being neutralized.
    • Infinity War: The Mark 50 armor uses the same nanotechnology as T'challa's Black Panther suit. The suit itself is stored in his arc reactor and spreads over his body with a single touch.
  • Jack-of-All-Stats: In terms of superpowered heroes. Tony's suits aren't as strong and durable as Hulk or even Spider-man, as fast as Quicksilver or pack the sheer destructive capability of Thor or Captain Marvel. What the suits do have is a dizzying array of weapons and a huge amount of versatility which when combined with Tony's genius and skill allows him to go toe to toe with gods.
  • Jet Pack: Starting with his Mark 7 armor in The Avengers, to allow him to use both of his repulsors without having to use one to stay aloft in flight. It falls off into two engines into space at the climax of The Avengers, but he can probably just replace it. From Iron Man 3 onward, the jet pack is just two small slits on the back of his torso.
  • Lightning Bruiser: The vast majority of Tony's suits have incredibly potent offensive capabilities, the ability to reach supersonic speeds, and the resilience to withstand a shot from a tank followed by an uncontrolled fall from high enough to make a crater while taking negligible damage.
  • Macross Missile Massacre: Starting from Mark 6 onwards, other than the one in his forearm, he has extra missiles, mostly in his shoulder and rarely in his wrist. The Hulkbuster is also capable of launching a small barrage of devastating missiles during combat. It serves as Tony's last-ditch finishing move during the battle, using it as well as the suit itself to bring down an entire (empty) skyscraper on the Hulk.
  • Mana: A tech version. The Iron Man suits have a major weakness in that they consume a lot of power. Thus Tony is constantly watching his battery percentage to make sure he doesn't run out and at low power, he can't use his best attacks. The Mark 50 onwards mitigates this with backup power sources but is replaced with a similar weakness due to Tony only having so many nanomachines on him.
  • Mid-Season Upgrade: Tony often updates Iron Man suits mid-movie, either because the previous one became trashed or because it's become outdated.
  • Palette Swap:
    • While most suits are mostly red with yellow details, Mark 42 is mostly yellow with red details. In turn, the Mark 43 throws in more red against yellow.
    • The Iron Man Mark 47 suit is exactly the same as Mark 46, just painted in the Ultimates color scheme.
  • Powered Armor: Has made 50 of them by Infinity War, in addition to one or two modifications on the War Machine suit for Rhodey:
  • Power Palms: Starting from Mark 7 his armors have additional thrusters so Tony doesn't need to use his hand repulsors to stay aloft, allowing him to shoot.
  • Remote Body: Tony can directly control Mark 42 in Iron Man 3 over long distances with a special headset. Mark 47 in Homecoming no longer requires him to use an elaborate headpiece, so he can just pretend to be on the phone while attending a party.
  • Shoulder Cannon: Several of his armors have small precision shot guns inside the shoulders, and mini missiles.
  • Super Strength: Granted to him by his armor.
    • Promotional material for Iron Man 2 gives the limit of his early "regular" suits as being able to lift 3 tons, which roughly matches the climax of his first movie where lifting an SUV over his head causes him to double over and seriously stretches the suit's capabilities to their limits.
    • The Mark 7 he uses in The Avengers had enough strength to push back one of the Helicarriers engines and even trade blows with Thor for a bit (although Thor is weakened from his trip to Earth, while Iron Man's armor is supercharged).
    • The Mark 42 has a maximum lift capacity of 900 pounds per a Freeze-Frame Bonus (see 0:24), while Hulkbuster is as strong as the Hulk before the Hulk eventually overpowered him.
    • Mark 50 is capable of dolling out physical blows strong enough to briefly stagger Thanos. It's also able to take direct attacks from Thanos in rapid succession, though it does end up breaking in the end.
  • Super Speed: His reflexes are those of a normal human's, but his early suits are fast enough to reach Mach 2. By Infinity War, Mark 50 is able catch up to space ships exiting the atmosphere. The minimum speed required for that is Mach 20.
  • Tricked-Out Shoes: Iron Man's feet do not have particularly fancy gadgets, but ever since the Mark 1 they've incorporated rockets (for the Mark 1) or repulsors (for the rest) that are the primary exhausts through which the armors can fly, the palm repulsors being designed as stabilizers. The Mark 50 evolves beyond the previous repulsor system by occasionally having the feet's nanomachines combine into a powerful rocket that multiplies the flight speed of the armor.
  • Unfinished, Untested, Used Anyway:
    • Iron Man: Tony's first flight is a miserable failure that he barely survives. It does, however uncover a previously unknown flaw in the armor's design that comes into play later.
      J.A.R.V.I.S.: Sir, there are still terabytes of calculations required before an actual flight is...
      Tony Stark: Jarvis... sometimes you gotta run before you can walk.
    • The Avengers: His old Mark 6 suit is too trashed to rely on anymore, so he demands that J.A.R.V.I.S. prepare his still in testing Mark 7. The new suit arrives Just in Time to save his life and works perfectly during the whole battle. Of course, the Mark 7 being an incremental upgrade of by then well-proven technology means there is less what could go wrong.
    • Iron Man 3: Tony's become erratic from PTSD and has been rushing through prototypes without giving them the proper testing time. The results are utterly unreliable, and in a number of action scenes he doesn't use armor at all.
  • Unobtainium: What's been powering his suits since Iron Man 2. It's actually an element he created himself, with some guidance from his father, which is more potent and nontoxic to his body compared to palladium.
  • Voice of the Legion: Literally in Iron Man 3.
    Tony: Jarvis, target Extremis heat signatures, terminate with extreme prejudice.
    Jarvis: [from the remaining 34 armors] Yes, Sir.
  • Walking Armory: His armor carries a staggering amount of weaponry, including Power Palms, primarily designed as flight stabilizer and then used as Weaponized Exhaust and Chest Blaster, all three directly powered by the arc reactor. Then under the armor lie a missile powerful enough to blow up a tank (and alternatively a set of smaller missiles) under each forearm plate, needleguns or missile launchers in the shoulder area, and Frickin' Laser Beams generators under the wrists. He's also occasionally shown a cuff launcher to immobilize opponents and knee-mounted missile launchers.
  • Weaponized Exhaust: His primary weapon, the repulsor, wasn't designed to be a weapon, but rather a flight stabilizer. When he realized it worked as a weapon at full power, he incorporated it.
    Pepper: I thought you said you were done making weapons?
    Tony: This is a flight stabilizer. It's completely harmless. [boom] I didn't expect that.
  • Worf Had the Flu: In all three of his solo movies, Tony is hampered by something in the climactic battle with the Big Bad; he was using a more primitive arc reactor against Stane, he was using a new and untested power source against Vanko, and his primary armour was still damaged in the third. Civil War also counts since Tony was fighting with multiple handicaps as otherwise he could have easily defeat Steve and Bucky, super-soldier or not.

    Mark 1 

Mark 1

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mk1.png
Mark 1

Appearances: Iron Man | Iron Man 2 | Iron Man 3

The first suit of armor Tony made, cobbled together from pieces of weapons and machines in a cave to help him escape.


  • Beta Outfit: He builds Mark 1 "in a cave! With a box of scraps!", and it is big and bulky due to both being a mechanical prototype, and as a nod to the original Iron Man suit in the comics. After getting back to the city he creates the silver-colored Mark 2 before settling on Mark 3's coloration with gold-titanium alloy casing with red highlights, which becomes a standard for the majority of his suits.
  • Fire-Breathing Weapon: It had two flamethrowers built into its wrists. Played more realistically than most examples, being used to destroy equipment rather than as an anti-personnel weapon.
  • Made of Iron: Besides the obvious pun, it took a battering without breaking down, withstanding numerous gunshots despite numerous weakpoints and staying roughly intact after a hard landing from altitude in the desert.
  • Not Quite Flight: It had fuel and propulsion, but only enough to launch upward. Landing was much harder.

    Mark 2 

Mark 2

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mk2.png
Mark 2

Appearances: Iron Man | Iron Man 2 | Iron Man 3

The first suit of armor built by Tony upon his return to America, this one was far more advanced and the first capable of flight (though not too impressive on the landing front).


  • Achilles' Heel: Despite its incredible flight capabilities right out of the gate, the Mark 2 is incapable of withstanding the colder temperatures of higher altitudes, leading to its parts freezing up. Tony eventually corrects the problem. Obadiah does not.
  • Amusing Injuries: Tony takes punishment after punishment getting it up and running. At first it consists of his attempts to get the jet-boots firing, causing Tony to rocket up face-first into a concrete pillar in his lab. Even after the armor has been constructed and makes a successful flight, Tony decides to make a landing on his roof only to fall through three floors, land on one of his vintage sports cars and be sprayed with a fire extinguisher by DUM-E.
  • Beta Outfit: Though more advanced than Mark 1, Tony still has some kinks (like the aforementioned “icing problem”) to work out with the suits before he can debut the classic red and gold armor in full.
  • Chekhov's Gun: Though it’s the suit worn for the shortest amount of time in Iron Man, it comes back in a big way in Iron Man 2 when Rhodey takes it and Hammer converts it into the War Machine armor.
  • Chrome Champion: An all-silver ensemble to mark its prototype status. It will be the last suit of armor before Tony adopts his standard red and gold look.
  • Foreshadowing: The “icing problem” it sustains during its initial flight comes back when Tony fights Obadiah at the film’s climax.
  • How Do I Shot Web?: Since his time spent in the Mark 1 suit was mostly running for his life, Tony uses the second iteration to work out how to be Iron Man.

    Mark 3 

Mark 3

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mk3.png
Mark 3

Appearances: Iron Man | Iron Man 2 | Iron Man 3

Perhaps the most iconic suit of armor developed by Tony Stark, the Mark 3 was constructed after working out some of the kinks of the Mark 2 and given a red and gold color scheme that would appear prominently in most armors from thereon.


  • Break Out the Museum Piece: Tony is forced to power it with his first ARC reactor after Obadiah rips the improved one out of his chest. Built to power the relatively primitive Mark 1, Tony is basically running on fumes the entire fight with the Iron Monger in this armor.
  • Mythology Gag: Tony consider’s leaving it all gold before deciding to have JARVIS “throw in a little hot-rod red.” Tony’s second suit of armor in the comics was all gold before he progressed to the more iconic red and gold.

    Mark 5 

Mark 5

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mk5.png
Mark 5

Appearances: Iron Man 2 | Iron Man 3

A suit specialized on portability and easy access, that can be collapsed and turned into a briefcase.


  • Emergency Weapon: It is significantly less powerful than the regular armors and is only used in case of emergency.
  • Fragile Speedster: Understandably, as something to be worn on the go and in a pinch, its lighter configuration also translates to lighter armor and significantly lower firepower compared to the deployment-ready suits.
  • Flawed Prototype: Its durability limits (as a suit on-the-go) will be improved upon by Mark 7.
  • Hammer Space: Let's face it, this is where this suit really comes from. There's no way it could fold down into a suitcase-sized package that's light enough to carry in one hand.
  • Handcuffed Briefcase: The suitcase is usually carried around by Happy Hogan and locked to his wrist.
  • Impossibly Compact Folding: Somehow, a full body powered armor suit can fit in a briefcase...
  • Mythology Gag:
    • In the earliest issues of Iron Man, Tony Stark would often carry his armor around in an briefcase. In later years he made the briefcase itself into armor.
    • This armor's color scheme bears a great resemblance to the Silver Centurion armor from the comics. It's just a resemblance, ultimately, as Tony builds the actual Silver Centurion later between The Avengers and Iron Man 3 as Mark 33.
  • Transformation Trinket: The aforementioned suitcase can turn into and equips its user with the armor.

    Mark 6 

Mark 6

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mk6.png
Mark 6

Appearances: Iron Man 2 | The Avengers (2012) | Iron Man 3

Tony Stark's first suit powered by the element he invented, no longer relying on Palladium cores to charge the suit's (and thus his pacemaker) arc reactor.


  • Frickin' Laser Beams: Has a laser array installed on the gloves that shoots beams in every direction.
  • Unobtainium: The first suit designed to run off the element that his father had postulated and Tony completed, replacing the toxic Palladium core that was driving his previous models. It's also more potent than Palladium.

    Mark 7 

Mark 7

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mk7_0.png
Mark 7

Appearances: The Avengers (2012) | Iron Man 3 | Avengers: Endgame

An armor that Tony configured to seek two wrist-mounted beacons and form around the wearer. The suit has the honor of being deployed during the Chitauri invasion, as well as being the first to experience the vortex of space when Iron Man redirects a nuclear missile to the Chitauri mothership.

The origin of the technology that would later be used for the Mark 42 and "Veronica" Hulkbuster modular system.


  • Frickin' Laser Beams: The laser array of the Mark 6 was retained, with significant increase in battery lasting power.
  • Desperate Object Catch: In this case being Tony himself, as he activated the armor right before being thrown from Stark Tower, giving him a very real-world test of the armor's ability to properly align with the wrist beacons and attach itself before he went splat.

    Mark 42 

Mark 42/Autonomous Prehensile Propulsion Suit

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mark42.jpg

Appearances: Iron Man 3 | Spider-Man: Homecoming

An armor used throughout Iron Man 3 by Tony. It can split itself apart and can be controlled from afar.


  • Action Bomb: Became this during the final battle of Iron Man 3, in which Tony made the suit assemble around Killian's body before telling Jarvis to blow it up in order to kill him. Unfortunately, it didn't work.
  • The Cameo: Appears in Spider-Man: Homecoming as one of the items in the shipment Vulture tries to hijack near the end.
  • Detachment Combat: Its main design concept is to be able to separate into its own pieces and fly independently.
  • Flawed Prototype: Of the Mark 43, as seen in Age of Ultron. The Mark 43 is virtually identical to the Mark 42 (save for the paint scheme) but it works. It's hinted that the Mark 42's flaws come from Tony creating it while he was heavily sleep deprived and coping in his own manic way with his post-traumatic stress.
  • Fragile Speedster: Fast, mobile, can barely take a hit.
  • Unexplained Recovery: Even though the suit exploded at the end of Iron Man 3, it later reappears in the background inside the jet carrying all the tech from Avengers Tower during Spider-Man: Homecoming, complete with all of its battle damage from Iron Man 3.

    "Veronica" / Hulkbuster Armor 

"Veronica" / Hulkbuster Armor

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/7f6e82759c55be874fa58f5437230214.png

Appearances: Avengers: Age of Ultron | Avengers: Infinity War | Avengers: Endgame

An armor developed by Tony Stark and Bruce Banner specifically to stop the Hulk should Banner ever lose control. More properly, "Veronica" isn't Powered Armor so much as a drone containing modular components that can assemble into a Mini-Mecha capable of matching the Hulk in strength. This modular nature also means that the Hulkbuster can easily call for replacements of damaged or destroyed pieces of itself, something vital in a protracted fight against the Hulk. Originally designated as Iron Man's Mark 44 armor, an updated Mark 48 version was created some time before the Battle of Wakanda.


  • Abnormal Limb Rotation Range: Because Tony is secured in the Hulkbuster's chest cavity, the limbs are able to bend in ways that are anatomically impossible for a human. In one instance, Tony rotates one arm in its shoulder socket to land a punch on the Hulk behind his back.
  • Adaptational Badass: The Hulkbuster armor is not nearly as powerful or durable in the comics as it is in the movie, relatively speaking. Also, unlike the movie version, it never wins.
  • An Arm and a Leg: In Avengers: Age of Ultron, the armor loses its left arm during the fight against Hulk, though it gets quickly replaced. In Avengers: Infinity War, it also loses the same arm against Cull Obsidian.
  • Crazy-Prepared: It's made specifically to stop the Hulk, with input from Bruce Banner, so it's prepared for almost any eventuality. Its modular design allows damaged components to be replaced on the fly from the Veronica unit, it has customised attachments designed to restrain the Hulk and limit his mobility, multiple mini-arc reactors for power so Hulk can't just rip out one central powerplant, and has Unibeam-strength repulsors to keep the Hulk at bay.
  • Crippling Overspecialization: It's built solely to stop the Hulk, making it the Mighty Glacier to Stark's usual Lightning Bruiser armors. However, because it's built to play the same game as the Hulk, Bruce Banner uses it to imitate the Hulk's fighting style when Hulk refuses to fight in Wakanda.
  • Detachment Combat: Much like the Mark 42, the Hulkbuster comes in separate pieces that fly down from a storage satellite and assemble to make the greater armor. This design is actually needed because the Hulk can easily wreck through the limbs and they'll need regular replacement in order for the armor to stand a chance. In Infinity War, Banner even uses one of the wrists as a makeshift Rocket Punch by sticking it on Cull Obsidian hand and make it fly into Wakandan's forcefield, killing the alien when he collides with the field.
  • Fluffy the Terrible: "Veronica", while a Meaningful Name, isn't exactly the nomenclature you'll expect to be given to Tony's largest and physically strongest suit (or at least the delivery system for its components).
  • Glass Cannon: Despite being by far the biggest, most physically powerful suit Tony has ever built, in a straight-up fight, the Hulk can still tear the Hulkbuster apart with ease, hence why it has a multitude of redundancies and specialized weapons made solely for neutralizing the Hulk.
  • Godzilla Threshold: The armor was designed to neutralize a rampaging Hulk. This meant the armor was stored on a Stark satellite, ready to be called to Earth at any moment, anywhere; and used the technology of the Mk 42 armor to be able to fly out in parts. For this reason, it can do as much collateral damage as the Hulk himself, so Tony spends pretty much all of the fight against the Hulk taking extreme care not to have any civilians die in the crossfire.
  • Knockout Gas: It's a blink-and-you-miss-it moment, but the Hulkbuster possesses a sedative gas sprayer within its right arm. During the battle, Tony can be seen briefly attempting to use it to help calm the enraged Bruce down, very unsuccessfully.
  • Kryptonite Ring: It's strong enough to neutralize the Hulk because Bruce Banner planned it that way.
  • Meaningful Name: "Veronica" is an allusion to Betty and Veronica, in that Veronica is called in when the sweet, non-violent Betty method can't stop the Hulk. (As a bonus, Betty's also the name of Banner's former girlfriend.)
  • Meta Mecha: The suit forms around the existing Iron Man Armor, with the main armor being contained inside the central chest cavity. It even forms a dual-layered HUD when fully assembled. By Infinity War, it's been modified for use by unarmored pilots as well.
  • Mighty Glacier: The biggest drawback of the Hulkbuster is that while it is strong and tough enough to trade blows with the Hulk, it's not nearly as agile. Tony got in trouble a couple times because the Hulk could quickly move to exploit lapses in the massive armor's defense.
  • Mini-Mecha: This suit is closer to one than a Powered Armor, having completely mechanized limbs that can be easily replaced if they're ever torn off.
  • Punch Catch: The piston arm has a secondary function which allows it to lock on to Hulk's arm by retracting the fist and then clamping down restraints once Hulk's arm is drawn in. Amusingly, this was done right after Hulk had pulled a punch catch on the Hulkbuster.
  • Punch Parry: At one point the Hulk and the Hulkbuster's fists strike each other full force, resulting in a shockwave reverberating.
  • Rapid-Fire Fisticuffs: One of the arm attachments is a piston-powered fist which Tony uses to rapidly punch Hulk in the face.
    'Hulkbuster's fist: *BAMBAMBAMBAMBAMBAMBAM*
    Tony: Go to sleep go to sleep go to sleep...
  • Up to Eleven: The armor is powered by a minimum of 15 Miniature Arc Reactors, each repulsor has the strength of a main armor's Unibeam output, and when fully assembled it has a height advantage over the Hulk.

    Mark 46 and 47 

Mark 46 and 47

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mk46_47.png
Mark 46 (top) and Mark 47 (below)

Appearances: Captain America: Civil War (Mark 46), Spider-Man: Homecoming (Mark 47)

The armors worn during the Avengers' Civil War and Vulture's attempted theft of the Avengers Tower cargo, respectively.
  • Attack Its Weak Point: Steve does this at the end of his fight with Tony by jabbing his shield's edge into the main Arc Reactor, crippling the suit.
  • Animated Armor: Mark 47 shows that Tony still employs its technology when he has it save Peter from drowning, remote controlled all the way from India. Peter later tries to turn his absence on him later on after his disastrous attempt to snag the Vulture but that time, Tony is in the suit.
  • Bling-Bling-BANG!: Averted with the Mark 47, it is primarily a dull silver below its torso while keeping everything above it the classic red and gold, akin to Ultimate Iron Man's color scheme.
  • Collapsible Helmet: Mark 46, along with War Machine Mark 3, gives us fully collapsible helmets, as opposed to simply having the faceplate open.
  • Palette Swap: As mentioned above, hence why these two armors are in one folder, since there's no evidence Mark 47 has any significant differences beyond color scheme.
  • Power Up Let Down: The Mark 46 Iron Man armor he uses during Captain America: Civil War doesn't seem quite up to standards set by him until that point. Although still a powerful suit, it can be temporarily pinned and even damaged by people on Super Soldier tiers of power, whereas Tony had demonstrated that earlier models took the strength of demigods before it could be damaged by bare hands. Unlike the much earlier Mark VI armor, it also isn't airtight, which allows Ant-Man to sneak into the suit and sabotage its internal systems. Its flight speed is also downgraded, being unable to catch up to a quinjet or catch Rhodey before he hit the ground, when the suits had been supersonic since Mark 3.
  • Tron Lines: Sort of. Mark 46 shows smaller Arc Reactors that dot the suit as additional power sources.

    Mark 50 / Bleeding Edge 

Mark 50 / Bleeding Edge

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/ironmanmark48infinitywar.png
Mark 50

Appearances: Avengers: Infinity War | Avengers: Endgame

Tony's first suit that eschews the solid metal of his other armors in favor of being comprised entirely of nanobots.
  • Achilles' Heel: The Mark 50 has one major weakness - there's a finite amount of nanites stored in the Arc Reactor. A long drawn out battle can use up the nanobots with no way for Tony to replace them.
  • Morph Weapon: Being made entirely of nanobots, it can reshape itself at a thought to form a wide variety of gadgets and weapons.
  • Hollywood Healing: With the Bleeding Edge nanomachine colony at his disposal, Stark becomes the first hero in the MCU capable of casting "Healing Magic", by spraying surplus Nanomachines over wounds, even critical ones, to staunch bleeding and, presumably, eat harmful virus/bacteria and knit together severed/broken tissue. The hasty application of this "healing spray" allowed him to survive having a nano-machine sword driven clean through his liver, intestines, left lung and kidney by Thanos. Though he is still weakened and required further medical treatment from Nebula to fully recover from this lethal injury.
  • Nanomachines: What his Mark 50 suit is made of. It assembles itself over him instantly very much like T'Challa's suit in Black Panther. It also has a surplus of nanos beyond what is needed to make the suit, which not only allows him to summon extra weapons and armor on the fly but also to immediately replace pieces of the suit that get torn off (though this has its upper limits, as his bout with Thanos shows).
  • New Powers as the Plot Demands: The Mark 50 suit features a vast array of new abilities on top of the ones introduced in previous movies. No matter what the bad guys throw at Iron Man, he'll counter it with something you've never seen him use before. Justified, because tinkering with his suit and improving its technology is what Tony does with his spare time.
  • Transformation Trinket: He now has a proper one, in the form of an attachable chest-mounted Arc Reactor. Tapping the reactor is all Tony needs to do to summon the armor. Endgame shows that Tony can simply stick it on and rip it off his chest with no external process needed or injury to him.
  • Walking Armory: His Bleeding Edge armor is a Morph Weapon allowing him to create anything from the reserves of nanorobots he has. So he adds to his arsenal a shield, additional big repulsors to create an even more intense blast, an Arm Cannon he threatens Drax with but never uses, even more powerful missiles, Power Fists that can at least stagger Thanos, a Blade Below the Shoulder and a fancy sword.
  • The Worf Barrage: Iron Man unleashes everything he has on Thanos in a one-on-one confrontation. The end result: a cut on Thanos's cheek.
    Thanos: All that for a drop of blood...

    Mark 85 

Mark 85

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mk85.png
Mark 85

Appearances: Avengers: Endgame

Tony's final armor, built five years after the Snap. In many ways, it is pretty much identical to the Mark 50 in terms of technology, with some minor upgrades to its weaponry. Unless noted, much of the tropes regarding its abilities are the same as the Mark 50.
  • Bling-Bling-BANG!: After the more gilded Mark 42, the Mark 85 has very prominent gold, primarily on the shoulders, upper arms, and thighs, as seen in the character page picture for Tony. Particularly notable as the featured suits for Tony between this and 43 placed more focus on red as the primary color with gold as merely accents (with the exception of the Mark 47)
  • Composite Character: While functionally identical to the nanotech Mark 50, the armor brings back the signature faceplate mechanism of previous armors, when, being nanotech, it didn't need to have that again.
  • Hard Light: The shields are now made of this rather than solid material. Presumably, this was done to address Mark 50's ultimate handicap—in that generating solid weaponry eats up the nanomachines for the armor.
  • Mythology Gag: As the final armor, it is only fitting that its appearance evokes the classic Ditko armors (Model 2 and Model 4). Not simply in color scheme, but the organic aesthetics of the nanomachine armors allow the suit to evoke the musculature of the armors.
  • Multiform Balance: Somewhat. In addition to this armor, Tony also has his quantum suit when travelling through the Quantum Realm, and switches between the two. Unlike with Rhodeynote , Tony can't, or at least isn't shown to be able to, simultaneously don both at once, and certainly doesn't wear his Iron Man helmet with his quantum suit like toy packaging would have you believe.
  • Nanomachines: Same as the Mark 50, but we see the full extent of how fluid the nanotechnology is when Tony configures his right gauntlet into a makeshift Infinity Gauntlet by floating the six stones pilfered from Thanos into position.
  • Walking Armory: Mostly same as the Mark 50.
  • The Worf Effect: Despite this armor supposedly being far more powerful than its predecessor the Mark 50, Tony has far more trouble fighting against Thanos this time round compared to back in Infinity War, despite the fact this Thanos should be less powerful due to lacking the Infinity Gauntlet and several stones. Justified in that while the armor is stronger than before, Tony is weaker and out of practice meaning he can't take full advantage of its power.

 
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Ironman 2 - three point land

Ironman arriving at his expo and giving an entrance only he could give. Epic.

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