Follow TV Tropes

Following

Characters / MCU: Citizens

Go To

Main Character Index > Other Individuals and Organizations > Citizens > United States Citizens > New Orleans | Westview, New Jersey | New York City > New York City Police Department | Midtown School of Science and Technology


Spoilers for all works set prior to Avengers: Infinity War and Avengers: Endgame are unmarked.

    open/close all folders 
Advertisement:

United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland Citizens

Scotland

    Alistair Fitz 

Alistair Fitz

Species: Human

Portrayed By: David O'Hara

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

"He was not a good man. Always telling Fitz he was stupid and worthless. I think that's why Fitz became so clever."
Jemma Simmons

The father of S.H.I.E.L.D. Agent Leopold Fitz.

For his virtual counterpart within the Framework, see the Framework page.

  • Abusive Parents: Alistair frequently told a young Fitz that he was always stupid and worthless. If the Framework is anything to go by, Alistair's verbal abuse would have eventually evolved into physical abuse, assuming it hadn't already.
  • The Alcoholic: According to Holden Radcliffe, Alistair is a pathetic drunk.
  • Berserk Button: Mentioning him is a huge one for Fitz. To the point that he's never talked to anyone about Alistair except Simmons, and she knows well enough to leave the subject alone.
  • Disappeared Dad: Alistair abandoned his son and his mother when he was ten years old.
  • The Ghost: The real Alistair Fitz never even appears in person.
  • Hate Sink: Was emotionally abusive toward Fitz before he abandoned him as a child. Seems to be an In-Universe Hate Sink as well; Simmons and Mack both despise Alistair without even meeting him, simply based on how he treated his own son.
  • Jerkass: Based on his virtual reality counterpart in the Framework, and what Simmons tells Mack, Alistair was a chauvinist and a jerk who constantly belittled Leopold.
  • Small Role, Big Impact: The real Alistair never even makes a cameo appearance, but his actions lead to Fitz's lingering resentment and the creation of his alternate reality counterpart in the Framework.

England

    Dane Whitman 

Professor Dane Whitman

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/a64f59b7_dff2_4d08_a848_6620e078503_3.png
"Mors Mihi Lucrum."

Species: Human

Citizenship: British

Affiliation(s): Natural History Museum

Portrayed By: Kit Harington

Voiced By: Elliot Leguizamo (Latin American Spanish), Eiji Hanawa (Japanese)

Appearances: Eternals

A human who gets entangled in the Eternals' exploits due to his relationship with Sersi.


  • Adaptational Nationality: In the comics, while being descended from Briton knights, he was very much an American. In the film, he's portrayed by Kit Harington with his London accent fully intact.
  • Adaptational Wimp: In the comics he's the superhero Black Knight with a magical cursed sword. In Eternals, he's Sersi's coworker and boyfriend who becomes acquainted with her race. He doesn't even tag along with the Eternals, staying in London while they go on their actual quest… but in The Stinger, he opens up the chest containing the cursed Ebony Blade and psychs himself up to grab it, presumably in desperation at Sersi's abduction, but is interrupted by a mysterious voice before he actually touches it.
  • Arbitrary Skepticism: Played with. Despite Sprite apparently having told him all about the Eternals and the Deviants, and living in a world where superheroes are famous, he initially doesn’t believe her and instead suspects Sersi is a wizard like Doctor Strange. But once a real Deviant actually shows up, he immediately understands Sprite was telling the truth.
  • Casting Gag: Kit Harington portrayed Jon Snow, a warrior in a medieval setting in Game of Thrones, which also starred Richard Madden (Ikaris) as Robb Stark, Jon's beloved half-brother. The only scene where they physically meet is dripping with subtext due to this.
  • Comic-Book Movies Don't Use Codenames: He's never referred to as Black Knight in the Eternals film as he has yet to claim the Ebony Blade, which it seems he's about to do at The Stinger.
  • Dark Is Not Evil: The Ebony Blade is a dark, seemingly cursed sword branded with a morbid Latin motto, but Dane is a kindhearted Nice Guy who only even considers taking up the sword to help his beloved girlfriend.
  • The Missus and the Ex: He's the "missus". Ikaris and Sersi were married for more than a thousand years, but he abandoned her, and she started dating Dane in the present day. After Ikaris helps dispatch a Deviant in London, Dane quickly realizes that Ikaris is Sersi's ex.
    Dane: I'm guessing that was the pilot.
  • Nice Guy: Dane is a friendly, easygoing guy who is perfectly understanding of the complicated history that comes out when Sersi is exposed as an Eternal.
  • Understanding Boyfriend: Once Sersi comes clean about being an immortal superheroine, he takes it more or less in stride, and at the end of the day, they resume their relationship. It's implied that he's understanding in part because of his family history, since The Stinger implies a legacy of superpowers.
  • What the Hell, Hero?: In the film, he asks Sersi why the Eternals never interfered against Thanos or anywhen else during human history.

    Ian Boothby 

Ian Boothby

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/ian_boothby_tdw_3446.png

Species: Human

Portrayed By: Jonathan Howard

Voiced By: Luis Leonardo Suárez (Latin-American Spanish)

Appearances: Thor: The Dark World

Darcy's intern in Thor: The Dark World. Mostly gets dragged around with no idea of what's going on and made to carry things.


    Donna 

Donna

Species: Human

Citizenship: British

Portrayed By: Lucy Thackeray

Appearances: Moon Knight

Steven's boss at the National Art Gallery.


  • Malicious Misnaming: She calls Steven "Stevie" even when he corrects her.
  • Mean Boss: She sounds very smug about wanting to replace Steven and even calls him "Stevie".
Advertisement:

The Thompson Family

    Albert Thompson 

Albert Thompson

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/thompson_albert.png

Species: Human

Portrayed By: Michael Siberry

Appearances: Jessica Jones (2015)

A scientist who experimented on his son Kevin, who went on to become Kilgrave.


  • An Arm and a Leg: When Jessica finds him in the finale, he's had both his arms chopped off and one of them is being stuck in a blender by one of Kilgrave's thralls. He is still alive at this point.
  • Abusive Parents: To Kilgrave, who he experimented on. Played with, when it's revealed that he was actually trying to save Kilgrave's life with his experiments.
  • Gorn: Kilgrave has him kill himself by extensive mutilation.
  • Parental Abandonment: Albert and his wife abandoned their son and went on the run because they were so terrified of him.
  • Psychic-Assisted Suicide: His ultimate fate at the hands of Kilgrave.

    Louise Thompson 

Louise Thompson

Species: Human

Portrayed By: Lisa Emery

Appearances: Jessica Jones (2015)

A scientist who experimented on her son Kevin, who went on to become Kilgrave.


  • Abusive Parents: To Kilgrave, who she experimented on. Played with, when it's revealed that she was actually trying to save his life with her experiments.
  • Broken Bird: Louise is very damaged, both emotionally and physically, by her experiences. She feels an immense amount of guilt for Kilgrave's existence.
  • Offing the Offspring: She tries to kill her son, but fails and is killed herself.
  • Parental Abandonment: Louise and her husband abandoned their son and went on the run because they were so terrified of him.
  • Psychic-Assisted Suicide: Kilgrave orders her to stab herself to death with a pair of scissors.
  • Spanner in the Works: Just when it seems like Jessica's plan is working, Louise puts her own plan into motion: she tries to kill Kilgrave and subsequently everything falls apart (although Jeri had more than a hand in it).

Advertisement:

Sokovia Citizens

    Sokovia in General 
https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/9f80a6c9_3520_4b82_b080_15164cf8e263_1_201_a.jpeg
"Sokovia was a failed state long before you blew it to hell."— Helmut Zemo
"Sokovia's had a rough history. It's nowhere special, but it's on the way to everywhere special."
Maria Hill, Avengers: Age of Ultron

Appearances: Captain America: The Winter Soldier note  | Avengers: Age of Ultron | Iron Fist | WandaVision | The Falcon and the Winter Soldier

A small, landlocked country in Central and Southeastern Europe. Plagued by civil unrest, revolving door revolutions, and corruption for so many decades that it's considered a failed state. And that was before Ultron showed up.


  • Bookends: The movie Avengers: Age of Ultron begins with a battle in Sokovia, with some robots being sent to the city to protect the civilians. At the end of the film, there is a new battle in Sokovia, and another army of robots is sent into the city to attack the civilians.
  • Canon Immigrant: The country was created specifically for the MCU as the home country of Quicksilver and Scarlet Witch. Sokovia later appeared in the comics as a former Soviet Bloc dictatorship led by General Kamil Novoty.
  • Crapsack World: Let's just say that Sokovia isn't the nicest place to live in, especially after Ultron leveled Novi Grad and killed thousands of people there.
  • Colony Drop: Ultron's plan is to transform the entire city into a Floating Continent powered by a vibranium reactor, raise it up into orbit and drop it on the Earth to create an extinction level event.
  • Early-Bird Cameo: First prominently introduced in Avengers: Age of Ultron, it technically first appeared in the post-credits scene to Captain America: The Winter Soldier, though this only showed the inside of the HYDRA base there, to introduce the Maximoff twins.
  • Expy: Loosely of Serbia or other breakaway states in the Balkans, but with a mishmash of traits so it isn't one specific country - see "Ruritania" below. As it relates to Marvel continuities, "Sokovia" was actually invented for 2015's Avengers: Age of Ultron movie, and didn't exist in the comics before (though it has subsequently been mentioned). Within the MCU itself, it seems to be a loose expy of Transia - a similar Ruritania country, home of the Maximoff twins.
  • Floating Continent / Ominous Floating Castle: Ultron uses a vibranium anti-gravity device to lift the city into the sky, planning to drop it once he has sent it high enough to instigate an extinction-level event. The film's final act takes place in the floating city.
  • Killed Offscreen: In The Falcon and the Winter Soldier, Zemo mentions that the entire country was partitioned and absorbed by it's neighbors.
  • Revolving Door Revolution: The tie-in Prelude to Age of Ultron comics openly state that there's new rebellions on a monthly basis in Sokovia. There isn't a really long "civil war" in the country, it's an outright "failed state" (as Zemo openly admits). Public order has collapsed and one fragile government after another keeps getting toppled, facing another pop-up rebellion, getting overthrown by some other junta, etc. They're not fighting for anything anymore. And it's been this way since at least the mid-1990s. And even before that it was a contested border region.
  • Ruritania: Introduced in Avengers: Age of Ultron as a tiny fictional Balkan nation with HYDRA operations, and home to Pietro and Wanda Maximoff. It's loosely based on Serbia or its other breakaway republics, but if you pay close attention it has a mishmash of a few other characteristics added in that don't correspond to any one real-life country. The architecture is a toned-down mix of East European-style facades and cement buildings that don't link it to any specific style (perhaps justified in that their civil wars have been going on so long that there's been no significantly new construction since the Cold War ended, hence all the generic Brutalist architecture that could be found anywhere behind the Iron Curtain).
    • The in-universe maps are intentionally vague and contradictory: in Age of Ultron Sokovia seemed to be between the borders of Czechia, Slovakia, and Hungary, but then in Civil War, it seemed to be flat out on the other side of Romania and near the Black Sea. Other maps intentionally use large, vague icons that might put it near Slovenia for all we know (near Italy and Austria). They're keeping their options open.
    • It seems primarily based off Serbia, or perhaps the break-off territory equivalent of Kosovo (but populated by ethnic Serbians), as the name seems to be a cross between "Kosovo" and "Serbia". All the street signs are in Serbian Cyrillic - and the only Balkan countries that use Cyrillic are Serbia, Bosnia, Bulgaria, and North Macedonia (Croatia, Hungary, and Albania do not - more importantly, Czechia and Slovakia, on the north side of Hungary, don't use this alpahbet either). Its flag◊ is also very similar to Serbia's, being a red-white-blue tricolor (only vertical, like the French or Romania flag) with an eagle at the center. Its capital is called Novi Grad, which in real life is the name of a suburb of Serbia's capital, Belgrade.
    • Also in Civil War, it's noted that Zemo comes from Sokovia, where he was a colonel in the "EKO Scorpion black ops unit", which operated during an unknown conflict in Sokovia and apparently behaved quite brutally. Scorpion was also the name of a Serb black ops unit during the Yugoslav Wars, involved in war crimes in Bosnia.
    • Sokovia was explicitly shown to have a Christian church at the center of its capital city, so it isn't a majority-Muslim nation like Bosnia. Apparently also an East Orthodox church, so it's not like Croatia either (which is Catholic).
    • At another point in Civil War, however, it's stated that a common dish in Sokovia is chicken paprikash... which is a Hungarian dish, though it is also popular in the northern parts of Serbia that border Hungary such as Vojvodina (areas with Hungarian minorities). This wasn't a one-off reference either: a deleted scene from Spider-man: Homecoming had Peter's high school holding a Sokovian Relief Lunch with an all-you-can-eat paprikash buffet.
    • Then came WandaVision, with several prominent flashbacks to Sokovia, and much more prominent dialogue in "Sokovian". Elizabeth Olsen stated in interviews that Sokovian is supposed to be accented like ''Slovakian'' - which opens up a whole bunch of other issues, because Slovakia isn't in "the Balkans", is on the north side of Hungary from Serbia, and is actually Catholic and uses the Latin alphabet. Slovakia also doesn't have the unstable political history of a Balkan state (after the Cold War ended it peacefully separated from Czechia, joined the EU, and is doing reasonably well).
      • Googling around, fans who speak Slovak have noted that it has the sounds of Slovakian, and some generically almost recognizable words, but isn't actually Slovak. It appears to be some sort of Proto-Slavic dialect that the MCU producers put together, which could come from across Eastern Europe (sort of like how Wakandans speak a dialect of the real-life language Xhosa, with the sounds of Xhosa, but it isn't quite like real Xhosa).
    • The etymology of the names in Sokovia don't help either - Maximoff is Russian a derived, but Pietro is the Italian version of the name, while Wanda is Polish-derived. Helmut is German, but Zemo’s last name isn’t as readily identifiable - even though he’s apparently a high ranking nobleman.
  • Urban Ruins: Happens during the climax of Age of Ultron when Ultron’s army of drones invade the city and turn it into a floating meteor.

    Sokovia Citizens in General 

Species: Humans

The citizens of Sokovia.


  • Apathetic Citizens: When the Avengers begin the evacuation of the city, Pietro Maximoff runs into the police department and tells everyone to leave the city for their own safety. He leaves, and the citizens just get back to whatever they were doing. Moments later, Pietro returns with an assault rifle and starts shooting the ceiling to be sure everyone's paying attention and gets moving.
  • Citywide Evacuation: During the climax of Age of Ultron, the heroes try to evacuate the entire population of Sokovia. However, they're unable to get all the inhabitants out before Ultron lifts the city into the sky to become a makeshift meteor. Fortunately, Nick Fury and the new S.H.I.E.L.D. arrive with the Helicarrier to help evacuate the rest of the civilians before the city is destroyed.
  • Mass Hypnosis: Before the final battle, Wanda uses her mind powers to alert the denizens of Sokovia of the rampage that Ultron is about to unleash. This triggers quite a lot of them to book it.
  • Occupiers Out of Our Country: This is the attitude the people of Sokovia have toward the Avengers. It's boosted by HYDRA propaganda.
  • Teetering on the Edge: The launching of Sokovia leaves several cars precariously dangling over the edge of broken roads. Captain America specifically tries to stop one red convertible, visibly straining to pull it to safety, only to lose his grip when the bumper snaps off sending the car and driver plunging thousands of feet towards the ground. Luckily, Thor is able to catch the car and fly it and its occupant back to solid ground.

    Zrinka 

Zrinka

Species: Human

Portrayed By: Dominique Provost-Chalkley

Appearances: Avengers: Age of Ultron

A Sokovian woman and the older sister of Costel.


  • Big Sister Instinct: She is very protective of her little brother. When he wanders away from her at the market and approaches an angry crowd throwing things at the Iron Legion, she runs to him and hold him back from the chaos.
  • Cool Big Sis: From what little is shown, she appears to have a good relationship with her younger brother Costel.
  • Ms. Fanservice: She's an attractive young woman who wears an Absolute Cleavage dress and gives tons of cleavage shots. It's no wonder Pietro is interested in her.
  • Nice Girl: She seems to be a kind girl who truly cares about her brother and is thankful to Pietro when he offers her gifts.
  • Only One Name: Her last name is unknown.
  • Practically Different Generations: She's a grown woman while her brother Costel is a young child.
  • Suspiciously Similar Substitute: To Beth from the first Avengers movie. Like Beth, Zrinka is a young woman living in the city where the movie's climax will take place, who is introduced early on in the film as a potential Love Interest for one of the Avengers (Steve Rogers for Beth, Pietro Maximoff for Zrinka), and is given more attention than the other civilians in danger during the final battle. Coincidently, both of them have their introduction scene in which they interact with one of the Avengers members cut for the final product (although Zrinka still makes a brief appearance at the beginning of her film).

    Costel 

Costel

Species: Human

Portrayed By: Isaac Andrews

Appearances: Avengers: Age of Ultron

A Sokovian kid and the younger brother of Zrinka.


  • Annoying Younger Sibling: Downplayed, but his big sister Zrinka doesn't like his habit of wandering away from her.
  • Harmful to Minors: The poor kid had to see the bullet-riddled corpse of Pietro Maximoff after his Heroic Sacrifice.
  • Improbable Infant Survival: When the city is evacuated with flying vehicles, Costel gets trapped by debris and is left behind. But of course, Clint and Pietro come to his rescue and manage to get him to safety before the city falls from the sky.
  • Kid Amid the Chaos: He gets separated from his sister during the evacuation of the city due to being trapped by debris, and needs to be saved by Hawkeye and Pietro.
  • Only One Name: His last name is unknown.
  • Practically Different Generations: He's a young child while his sister Zrinka is a grown woman.
  • Small Role, Big Impact:
    • He is the one who brought the Maximoff twins into contact with Ultron, as shown in a deleted scene.
    • It's also to save him (and Hawkeye) that Pietro sacrifices his life at the end of the film.

The Maximoff Family

    Wanda Maximoff 

    Pietro Maximoff 

    Iryna and Oleg Maximoff 

Iryna and Oleg Maximoff

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/dd5d3f7f_5f49_4991_aeb4_218fdaf8e599_1_201_a.jpeg
"Yeah, like mischief. But a silly mischief that always becomes fine!"

Species: Humans

Portrayed By: Ilana Kohanchi & Daniyar Aynitdinov

Appearances: WandaVision

The parents of Pietro and Wanda Maximoff.


  • Adaptational Name Change: In the comics, Pietro and Wanda's mother is named Natalya Maximoff; here she is named Iryna. And their adoptive parents were named Django (Natalya's brother) and Marya Maximoff.
  • Canon Foreigner: At the time of writing, Pietro and Wanda's father is completely unknown in the comics, even to them. For a long time, Magneto was their father, but that was eventually retconned and their adoptive father was Django Maximoff. In WandaVision, their father is known, and was present in their lives up until his death.
  • Deceased Parents Are the Best: They were loving and caring parents, trying to raise their children in the harsh and violent reality of late 90s Sokovia, and, of course, they get killed.
  • Happily Married: Seem to genuinely love each other even in the harsh, war-torn country of Sokovia, which makes it all the more tragic when they get killed.
  • Good Parents: In the limited time we see them, we can see that they both loved their kids dearly and wanted a good life for them in Sokovia.
  • Not Enough to Bury: They get the brunt of the explosion that destroys the Maximoff apartment and as such, their corpses are not clearly seen when Wanda comes to, presumably in bits and pieces.
  • Start of Darkness: Not them, but their deaths were the catalyst for Wanda and Pietro’s enlistment in HYDRA.
  • Unseen No More: They were mentioned a few times before finally appearing in Episode 8 of WandaVision via flashback.

The Zemo Family

    In General 

The Zemo family

Species: Humans

Appearances: Captain America: Civil War

The late family of Colonel Helmut Zemo, killed during the events of Avengers: Age of Ultron.


  • Blue Blood: Helmut is a baron.
  • Dead All Along: Only by the end of Civil War is it revealed that Zemo's family is already dead and that the voicemail he's introduced constantly listening to was the last thing they left him before being killed by an exploding Ultron sentry.
  • Death by Origin Story: Their deaths are what prompts Helmut to attempt to destroy the Avengers, whom he blames for the deaths of his family.
  • Even Evil Has Loved Ones: They are the late loved ones of Colonel Zemo, who was a member of a death squad in the Sokovian army.
  • Killed Offscreen: All of them died during Ultron's attack of Sokovia, but their deaths aren't actually shown to the audience.
  • Posthumous Character: They were killed during the events of Age of Ultron, and their deaths have a huge influence on the plot of Civil War since it's what drives Helmut Zemo to seek revenge on the Avengers.

    Helmut Zemo 

    Helmut Zemo's father 

Helmut Zemo's father

Species: Human

Appearances: Captain America: Civil War (mentioned only)

The deceased father of Helmut Zemo.


  • Adaptational Heroism: Helmut Zemo's father in the comics was Baron Heinrich Zemo, a Nazi supervillain who wanted to Take Over the World. In the MCU, even though Zemo's father never appeared directly, nothing implies that he was anything more than a relatively minor Sokovian noble.
  • Blue Blood: Was a Baron.
  • Deceased Parents Are the Best: He seems to have had a good relationship with his son, his daughter in law and his grandson, and his death causes much grief to Helmut.
  • Decomposite Character: He still has the role of being Helmut's father whose death was partly caused by some members of the Avengers, making his son want to avenge him, but his role as the enemy of Captain America during World War II who is responsible for him being frozen in the Arctic and for the apparent death of Bucky Barnes has been given to Red Skull.
  • Demoted to Extra: Exaggerated. In the comics, Helmut Zemo's father Heinrich is a major supervillain and one of the archenemies of Captain America who notably caused his freezing in the Arctic Ocean and Bucky Barnes's "death". In the MCU, Zemo's father doesn't even appear in-person and is only mentioned once in Captain America: Civil War.
  • The Ghost: He never appears on screen, but he is mentioned by his son.
  • No Name Given: His first name is not revealed. Going by the source material, it should be "Heinrich", but we don't get any confirmation of that.
  • Old Money: Generationally wealthy due to his status as Sokovian nobility. Owned property in Berlin and in Latvia.

    Helmut Zemo's wife 

Helmut Zemo's wife

Species: Human

Voiced By: Ann Russo

Appearances: Captain America: Civil War (voice only)

The deceased wife of Helmut Zemo.


  • Creator Cameo: She is voiced by Ann Russo, the wife of the movie co-director Anthony Russo.
  • Died in Your Arms Tonight: Zemo mentions that he found the dead body of his wife in his father's arms.
  • Disposable Woman: The character's only purpose is to be killed off as a way to cause her husband's desire for revenge.
  • The Lost Lenore: Her death had a huge impact on her husband Helmut Zemo, who seeks to avenge her, as well as their son and his father.
  • No Name Given: Her name is not revealed.
  • The Voice: She never appears on screen, but her voice is heard throughout the movie when Helmut Zemo listens to her voicemail messages.

    Carl Zemo 

Carl Zemo

Species: Human

Appearances: Captain America: Civil War (mentioned only)

The deceased son of Helmut Zemo.


  • Death of a Child: His exact age is not known, but he was clearly a young child and his death is important for the events of Captain America: Civil War.
  • Died in Your Arms Tonight: Zemo mentions that he found the dead body of his son in his father's arms.
  • Fanboy: Unlike everyone else in Sokovia, Carl seems to have been a big fan of the Avengers, especially Iron Man.
    Helmut Zemo: My son was excited. He could see the Iron Man from the car window.
  • Death Of Achild: Being a child didn't prevent him from being one of Ultron's victims.
  • The Ghost: He never appears on screen, but he is mentioned by his parents.
  • When You Coming Home, Dad?: The voicemail messages of Zemo's wife indicate that he was quite affected by the fact that his father wasn't always present.
    Zemo's wife: He asked me again if you were going to be there. I said I wasn't sure. You should've seen his little face.

    Oeznik 

Oeznik

Species: Human

Portrayed By: Nicholas Pryor

Appearances: The Falcon and the Winter Soldier

The Zemo family butler.


  • The Butler Did It: He remote bombs the last prison van carrying the remaining Flag Smashers known to the GRC in a effort to eliminate them.
  • Corrupted Character Copy: He's Alfred Pennyworth working for a villain instead of a hero.
  • Crouching Moron, Hidden Badass: He seems like a silly and relatively harmless old servant when Sam and Bucky first meet him on Zemo's jet. However, the finale of The Falcon and the Winter Soldier shows that he's skilled enough to sneak a remote detonator onto a prison transport and trigger it without being noticed.
  • Evil Old Folks: He's up there in age and Oeznik's final appearance in the show has him planting a car bomb on the prison transport that kills the remaining Flag-Smashers on his master's orders.
  • Undying Loyalty: Remains loyal to the Zemo family and by extension to Helmut even after Helmut gets jailed for eight years, and is so loyal that he is willing to commit murder against the Flag-Smashers to help his master with his goals.

Russian Federation Citizens

The Romanoff Family

    Natasha Romanoff 

    Ivan Romanoff 

Ivan Romanoff

Species: Human

Appearances: Avengers: Endgame (mentioned only)

The father of Natasha Romanoff / Black Widow.


  • Composite Character: Of Black Widow's biological father from the comics and her foster father Ivan Petrovich Bezukhov, with whom he shares the first name.
  • The Ghost: He is mentioned a few times, but he never makes an actual appearance.
  • One Steve Limit: Averted. There are several other MCU characters named "Ivan", notably Ivan Vanko, another Russian guy who met his daughter.
  • Mythology Gag: His first name is the same as Ivan Petrovich Bezukhov, who acted as Black Widow's mentor and foster father in the comics.
  • What Happened to the Mouse?: Unlike his wife, we don't know exactly what happened to Ivan.

    Natasha Romanoff's mother 

Natasha Romanoff's mother

Species: Human

Appearances: Black Widow (2021) (mentioned only)

The late mother of Natasha Romanoff / Black Widow.


  • Determinator: According to Melina, she was relentless in her search for her daughter, which is why Dreykov decided to execute her.
  • The Ghost: She is mentioned a few times, but she never makes an actual appearance.
  • Like Mother, Like Daughter: Apparently, she and Natasha have one thing in common: They're both equally relentless.
  • Mama Bear: She never stopped looking for her daughter to save her from the Red Room. Unfortunately, she was executed by Dreykov before she could find her.
  • No Name Given: Even Natasha never learned her real name. When she asks Dreykov about it, he tells her that the only thing written on her tombstone is "Unknown".
  • Posthumous Character: She was executed by Dreykov a long time ago.

Ta Lo Citizens

    Ta Lo in General 

Appearances: Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings

"I always thought it was a fairy tale."

An alternate dimension of magical creatures, roughly equivalent to rural China of centuries past.


  • Hidden Elf Village: It's a parallel magical world, and the only way to access it from Earth is through a dizzying maze of bamboo. On the other side are people protected by a mighty water dragon and imbued with mystical martial arts talents.
  • Holy Burns Evil: Ta Lo's human inhabitants use weapons and armor coated in dragon scales to effectively combat the Dweller-in-Darkness and its minions.
  • Magic Staff: The primary melee weapons of the Ta Lo villagers are staffs covered in dragon scales.
  • Minorly Mentioned Myths and Monsters: All sorts of beasts from Chinese mythology populate Ta Lo, including several rarely seen in Hollywood movies, like the qilin or hundun.
  • Pocket Dimension: Like its comic-book source, Ta Lo is less an independent version of Earth and more a direct consequence of it: it is the home of all the magic and mythology of the Chinese spiritual imagination.
  • Red Is Heroic: The villagers of Ta Lo all wear red robes made of dragon scales into battle.

    Guang Bo 

Guang Bo (光伯)

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/guang_bo_shang_chi.png

Species: Human

Portrayed by: Yuen Wah

Appearances: Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings

An elder and community leader of the Ta Lo village.


  • Jerk with a Heart of Gold: At first seems to be very xenophobic towards the heroes in general and is dismissive of Katy in particular. But beneath the crusty surface, he really does have the best intentions and even takes Katy under his wing in his own cantankerous way.
  • Mentor Occupational Hazard: He gives Katy some much-needed advice both on the battlefield and in her directionless adult life. He dies by her side in the final battle.
  • Racist Grandpa: Invoked by Xu Wenwu in his self-serving version of his courtship with Ying Li. Wenwu claims that the elders of Ta Lo refused to let him and Li live together in Ta Lo because they did not like that he came from Earth. When Wenwu and Guang Bo meet again years later, he tells him that he would not accept their union because of Wenwu's violent past, which would put their community at risk. And given Ying Li's eventual fate, the argument has its merits.
  • Reasonable Authority Figure: At first, he tries to tell the heroes to leave, in a harsh tone, when they come to warn Ta Lo that Wenwu is coming. Then when they're able to explain that Wenwu thinks Ying Li is trapped behind the gate and he's coming with an army, Guang Bo is quick to agree with Ying Nan that their new guests deserve Sacred Hospitality, and training. When Katy wants to fight, Guang Bo tells her to stay where it's safe because she might be a fast-learner at archery, but as an amateur on the field she'll be a liability for the experienced villagers. She comes out anyway after the Soulsuckers emerge, and Guang Bo relents to tell her, "Don't die!" He spends his last moments telling her to aim for the Dweller-in-Darkness's throat.

    Ying Li 

Ying Li (映麗)

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/6328af21_2da8_40ec_95aa_e7f206d8df56.jpeg

Species: Human

Portrayed by: Fala Chen

Appearances: Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings

A Ta Lo villager who fell in love with a man from Earth, leaving her homeland behind to marry him.


  • Blow You Away: Ying Li uses wind manipulation with her martial arts. She loses the ability after leaving Ta Lo.
  • Brought Down to Badass: Her powers only work in Ta Lo, but that doesn't mean she's not good at martial arts without them. Although ultimately overwhelmed by sheer numbers, she makes the Iron Gang pay dearly in their attempt to kill her.
  • Canon Immigrant: Created for Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings but has since made it into comics as Shang-Chi's real mother, albeit renamed as Jiang Li.
  • Deceased Parents Are the Best: In contrast to their horrid relationships with their father, Shang-Chi and Xialing have nothing but fond memories of their mother.
  • The Heart: Of her family. When she died, they completely fell apart.
  • The Lost Lenore: To Xu Wenwu, and in a platonic way, to her children as well. It's her death and her family's inability to properly mourn her and move on from it that ultimately drives the plot of Shang-Chi, as it made Wenwu susceptible to the manipulations of the Dweller-In-Darkness.
  • Lightning/Fire Juxtaposition: Downplayed, as she tends to use more wind-themed attacks in her clash with Wenwu, but the moment she takes control of the Ten Rings, she changes their color from electric purple to a glowing fiery orange. In a bit of Foreshadowing, Shang-Chi, her son, would eventually invoke this same effect when he finally takes control of the Ten Rings himself.
  • Love at First Punch: Wenwu fell for her during their first fight, where she kicked his ass. While he was using the Ten Rings no less.
  • Love Redeems: After several lifetimes of conquest and crime, Ying Li inspires Xu Wenwu to be a better man. However, after her death...
  • Mama Bear: She gave her life protecting both of her children from the Iron Gang.
  • May–December Romance: Supernatural Martial Arts aside, she was a mortal woman who fell in love with a thousand-year-old warlord.
  • Morality Chain: To Xu Wenwu. His love for her drove him to put his past as an immortal warlord behind him, and as soon as she died he went right back to his old ways.
  • One True Love: To Xu Wenwu, the leader of the Ten Rings. One thousand years of conquest and she is the one and only woman he ever loved, to the point he willingly gave up all his power and immortality just to grow old with her.
  • Posthumous Character: She is long dead by the time of Shang-Chi, killed when her son was only seven years old.
  • World's Best Warrior: Possibly. Her husband is a contender for this on Earth, being a centuries-old warlord and conqueror with immeasurable experience and skill... and yet she beat him the first time they met. Shang-Chi later admits that the only person he's ever known to be able to beat his father in a straight fight was her.
  • You Can't Go Home Again: Subverted. She was always welcome to come back to Ta Lo at any time and even had a pair of pendants that showed her an easy path back, which she would later pass on to her children. However, she stayed away because she wanted to stay with her husband, who was denied permission to reside in Ta Lo with her.

    Ying Nan 

Ying Nan (映南)

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/stmb_specialod_4825x72_jiang_nan_v2_lg.png

Species: Human

Portrayed By: Michelle Yeoh

Appearances: Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings

Ying Li's sister, who stayed behind in Ta Lo and leads the warriors in their ongoing fight to keep the Dweller-in-Darkness at bay.


  • Blow You Away: She can manipulate the wind just like her sister.
  • Cool Aunt: Hard to get much cooler than a master martial artist with supernatural powers who gives you the first genuine positive attention a relative has given you in nearly a decade.

Japan (日本国) Citizens

    Kenji Ozawa 

Kenji Ozawa

Species: Human

Appearances: Iron Fist (2017)

The grandfather of Colleen Wing, who trained her in the ways of Bushido.


    Azumi Ozawa 

Azumi Ozawa

Species: Human

Appearances: Iron Fist (2017)

The mother of Colleen Wing.


  • Adaptational Job Change: In the MCU, she's a regular civilian, unlike her comic books counterpart, a member of a team of assassins for the Hand called the Nail.
  • Missing Mom: She had walked out on Colleen when the latter was a child and migrated to New York City.
  • Posthumous Character: She's long dead dead by the time of Iron Fist.

    Dr. Kenji Oyama 

Kenji Oyama

Species: Human

Portrayed By: Glenn Kubota

Appearances: Daredevil (2015)

A surgeon that operates on Benjamin Poindexter after his spine is broken by the Kingpin.


  • Comic-Book Movies Don't Use Codenames: Justified because he's presented as a doctor and not the crimelord Lord Dark Wind.
  • We Can Rebuild Him: Despite Dex's heavy spinal injuries, Oyama insists on using a Cogmiun steel reinforcing framework to replace his pulverized vertebrae, regardless of the risks.

Commonwealth of Australia Citizens

    Agnes Kitsworth 

Agnes Kitsworth

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/agnes_kitsworth.jpg
"I wake up and face death everyday. You think I'm scared of you?"

Species: Human

Portrayed By: Mallory Jansen

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. (appears in Episode 79: "BOOM", Episode 83: "Identity and Change")

An Australian woman and former lover of Holden Radcliffe, whom he modeled Aida after.


  • Brain Uploading: By the end of "BOOM", she's uploaded into the Framework.
  • Canon Foreigner: There's no Agnes Kitsworth in the comics.
  • Deader Than Dead: After her physical body is dead, Fitz kills Agnes' consciousness in the Framework.
  • Don't You Dare Pity Me!: She was so annoyed at being pitied for her illness that she moved to Spain to escape it.
  • Due to the Dead: In "Identity and Change", she's mentioned as having been buried at sea following her death.
  • Hope Is Scary: Has this reaction at first when Radcliffe tells her that he can save her.
  • May–December Romance: She's over twenty years younger than Radcliffe, going by the ages for their actors.
  • Small Role, Big Impact: Her role in the series is quite brief, but the major character of Aida (Season 4's Big Bad) was modeled after her appearance. Additionally, her final death in the Framework ultimately spurs Radcliffe to try and make amends for his actions.
  • Tranquil Fury: She's clearly not happy about Holden Radcliffe coming back into her life. At first, anyway.
  • We Hardly Knew Ye: Is dead by the end of her debut episode. Even after being uploaded into the Framework, we don't see much of her before Fitz kills her.
  • Your Days Are Numbered: Has terminal cancer.

    Jonah 

Jonah

Species: Human

Portrayed By: Julian McMahon

Appearances: Runaways (2017)

An Australian doctor specialized in infectious diseases.


  • Demonic Possession: He's possessed by the Magistrate of Gibborim until he's mortally injured.
  • Dying as Yourself: The Magistrate leaves his body prior to his death, leaving him without memories of the decades he spent as his host body.
  • Older Than They Look: Thanks to the process of regeneration through the demateralization box, Jonah is several decades old but still keeps looks in his forties.

Other Nationalities

    Dr. Ho Yinsen 

Dr. Ho Yinsen

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/ho_yinsen_im1_9656.png
"Don't waste it... don't waste your life, Stark."

Species: Human

Citizenship: Afghan

Portrayed By: Shaun Toub

Voiced By: Roberto Mendiola (Latin-American Spanish)

Appearances: Iron Man | Iron Man 3

"So you're a man who has everything, but nothing."

An Afghan physicist who saves Tony Stark's life, and brings out his true potential.


  • A-Team Firing: It's justified because he's a doctor and likely has no combat experience. The novelisation explains because he's a doctor and holds life as precious even in the hellhole he's in.
  • Adaptation Name Change: A minor one. In the comics Ho is his family and Yinsen was his given name. They switched it for the film.
  • Adaptational Nationality: He's Vietnamese in the comics, but is an Afghan here. Justified in a case of Real Life Writes the Plot - at the time the comics were written, the Vietnam War was the major conflict on Americans' minds, whereas the Aghanistan War and the War on Terror were the big issues of the 2000s and the early New Tens.
  • Call-Forward: Appears in the opening scene of Iron Man 3, a flashback to New Year's Eve 1999. He tries to introduce himself to Tony at a party but is brushed off — an event he referenced during their first conversation in Iron Man.
  • Death by Origin Story: The only difference between the film version of Iron Man and the various comic origins is that Dr. Yinsen is now a Pashtun. He's still a respected colleague, and he still sacrifices himself to allow Tony to escape.
  • Death Seeker: Wanted to die so he can be reunited with his family, but not before helping Stark escape and become a better man.
  • Doomed Hometown: Yinsen mentions hailing from a village called Gulmira. Guess where Raza decides to test his brand new Stark Industries toys?
  • Firing in the Air a Lot: When he and Tony make their escape attempt, he does this to buy Tony more time. He's not even aiming at the terrorists, he just shoot his guns skywards while screaming and running after them. Once they realize he has no intention of firing at them Surprisingly Realistic Outcome occurs.
  • For Want of a Nail: If he didn't sacrifice himself for Tony in the first movie, the entire MCU would have played out very differently.
  • Heroic Sacrifice: He sacrifices himself to buy Tony time to activate his first Iron Man suit.
  • The Medic: He's a skilled and resourceful field surgeon. He is capable to remove much of the shrapnel from Tony Stark's body, and helped keep him alive long enough to build an electromagnet piece in his chest to keep the remaining shrapnel from entering his heart.
  • Last-Name Basis: With Tony. Justified in that he never tells Tony his first name in the first film. In Yinsen's cameo at the start of Iron Man 3 he tells him his first name is "Ho", but Tony doesn't remember the meeting years later.
  • MacGyvering: Gerry rigged an electromagnet out of a car battery for Tony's heart. It won't last long, but it gives Tony enough time to patch together a unique upgrade.
  • Mentor Occupational Hazard: He teaches and inspires Tony when he was at his lowest. He later dies to ensure Tony would live.
  • Nice Guy: An upstanding doctor.
  • The Paragon: He is the main reason for Tony's Heel–Face Turn.
  • The Power of Acting: How he keeps Tony alive for a while when they are in captivity, acting as though he were on the side of the Ten Rings when the members are present.
  • Race Lift: He's Vietnamese in the comics, even when Tony's origin isn't tied to the Vietnam war. Amusingly, this means the MCU Yinsen still has an East Asian name despite being of Middle Eastern descent (Shaun Toub is Iranian).
  • Small Role, Big Impact: Major. He only appeared for a small part of the original Iron Man and made a brief cameo in Iron Man 3. He shares almost as much responsibility for the creation of Iron Man (and by extension the entire MCU) as Tony himself- not only by keeping Tony alive, but by driving him to become a better person. This one man led to Tony Stark turning to the side of heroes, which helped kickstart The Avengers and gave Tony the courage to make that final snap. Tony Stark saved the universe, but Ho Yinsen made it possible.
  • Together in Death: In his final moments, Yinsen expresses hope that he will reunite with his family in the afterlife.

    Martina 

Martina

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/martina_mcu.jpg

Species: Human

Citizenship: Brazilian

Portrayed By: Débora Nascimento

Appearances: The Incredible Hulk

Martina was Bruce Banner's former colleague during his factory job while hiding in Brazil.


    Theo Broussard 

Theo Broussard

Species: Human

Citizenship: Swiss

Portrayed By: Joe Russo

Appearances: Captain America: Civil War

A Swiss psychiatrist hired by the United Nation and the Joint Counter Terrorist Centre to interrogate Bucky Barnes.


    Anon 

Anon

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/anon.jpg
"Hello. My name is Anon. Do you have an appointment with the doctor?"

Species: Enhanced human

Portrayed By: Camille De Pazzis

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. (appears in Episode 62: "The Singularity")

A transhumanist follower and assistant of Doctor Holden Radcliffe.


  • Girl Friday: She was Radcliffe's assistant before he created and replaced her with Aida.
  • Meaningful Name: Anon is the shorter way of saying anonymous, which she is.
  • One-Shot Character: Anon only appears in "The Singularity", with her role of follower and assistant to Radcliffe filled out by Aida.
  • Suspiciously Similar Substitute: Subverted. She was the assistant to Radcliffe, whom decided to make Aida once he became part of S.H.I.E.L.D.
  • Transhuman: She's extensively modified to drastic levels.
    Mack: [looking at Anon on wide-spectrum bands] Guys, this woman has been heavily modified. In ways you wouldn't even anticipate. Man, I need to get out more.

    Thomas Nash 

Thomas Nash

Species: Human

Citizenship: Canadian

Portrayed By: Brad Dourif

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

A former recruit of Canada's Department H and candidate for S.H.I.E.L.D.'s Index due to his alleged psychic abilities. He was later rendered catatonic by a head-on collision. He was used by the real Clairvoyant as a decoy to keep his true identity in secret.


  • Canon Foreigner: He has no counterpart in the comics.
  • Character Death: He's killed by Grant Ward in a fit of rage. Actually, in order to help maintain Garrett's cover.
  • Red Herring: He's just a decoy for the real Clairvoyant, John Garrett.
  • The Voiceless: As a result of his catatonic state. He supposedly talked through a voice synthetizer but the device was actually controlled by Garrett.

    Orson Randall 

Orson Randall

Species: Human

Appearances: Iron Fist (2017)

A black market dealer who sold the body of the 1948 Iron Fist to Davos.


  • Adaptational Job Change: From a former Iron Fist to a black market dealer
  • Decomposite Character: In the comics, Orson Randall was the Iron Fist in the 1940s
  • The Ghost: He just get mentioned in the second season of Iron Fist. Due to the show's cancellation, he'll remain as such.
  • Mysterious Backer: He sold the body of the 1948 Iron Fist to Davos. As a result, he's searched for by Danny Rand with Ward Meachum's help.

    Donya Madani 

Donya "Mama Donya" Madani

Species: Human

Citizenship: Unknown

Portrayed By: Veronica Falcón

Appearances: The Falcon and the Winter Soldier

A leading figure in the refugee community in Latvia and Karli Morgenthau's adoptive mother.


  • Affectionate Nickname: Due to her status as adoptive mother to many refugees, she's known to them as "Mama Donya".
  • Fake Nationality: Though her precise nationality is unknown, her surname indicates she's not from Latin America, while her actress is Mexican.
  • Ill Girl: She contracted tuberculosis from being in a crowded displacement camp.
  • Parental Substitute: To Karli Morgenthau and many others in the Latvian GRC Resetlement Camp
  • Posthumous Character: She’s already died from tuberculosis the first time we see her on screen, and all her appearances afterwards are as a corpse.
  • Same Surname Means Related: There was a Dinah Madani in The Punisher (2017), although there’s no indication that her and Donya are related.

    Valentina Allegra de Fontaine 

Contessa Valentina Allegra de Fontaine

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/contessa_valentina_allegra_de_fontaine.jpg
"Things are about to get weird. So when they do, we're not gonna need a Captain America. We're gonna need a U.S. Agent."

Species: Human

Citizenship: Unknown

Portrayed By: Julia Louis-Dreyfus

Appearances: The Falcon and the Winter Soldier | Black Widow note 

"Well, these boots are not made for walking. Valentina Allegra de Fontaine. Actually, it's Contessa Valentina Allegra de Fontaine. I know it's hard, but I don't like to repeat myself, so you can just call me Val. But don't call me Val, just keep it in your head."

A representative for an organization interested in John Walker's superhuman abilities.


  • Adaptation Dye-Job: She has a purple Skunk Stripe, which was gray/white in her comic book appearances.
  • Adaptation Name Change: A very minor one. In the comics, her last name is Allegra de la Fontaine, while here, it's just Allegra de Fontaine.
  • Adaptational Modesty: The original Contessa was very much a Femme Fatale Ms. Fanservice in the style of a Bond Girl. The MCU Contessa is undeniably attractive, but an older woman whose charm relies on her wits instead of her sex appeal.
  • Age Lift: Valentina is significantly older here than she was in the comics, hence why she relies on her charm rather than her appearance to manipulate others.
  • Ambiguous Situation:
    • John Walker seems to assume she's working for an Over-the-Top Secret deniable branch of the US government, and accepts the codename "U.S. Agent" on this premise. But she never actually says so, and there's an awful lot of hints that she isn't. (For one thing, an American citizen wouldn't have a European aristocratic title like "Contessa".) She also somehow knows that John took the Super Soldier Serum.)
    • Exactly why Valentina frames Hawkeye for Natasha's death isn't clear in The Stinger for Black Widow. Does she genuinely want Clint Barton dead for some reason (and if so, why?), or is she simply sending Yelena Belova on a wild goose chase for shits and giggles?
      • It is reveal in the Hawkeye mini-series that Valentina was hired by Kate Bishop's mother, Eleanor, to put a hit on Clint to prevent him and her daughter from getting close to finding the connections between her and Kingpin.
  • Ambiguously Evil:
    • Her comics counterpart turned out to be a bad guy during the Secret Warriors arc, and she's introduced here setting herself up as a Toxic Friend Influence to John Walker, telling him he did nothing wrong by murdering Nico and shouldn't feel bad. The final episode of The Falcon and the Winter Soldier reveals she's apparently in cahoots with Baron Zemo and arranged for the extrajudicial execution of the remaining Flag-Smashers. (Even if she didn't arrange it, she seems awfully pleased about their deaths saving the effort of giving them a fair trial). This makes her, at best, morally ambiguous.
    • In the post-credits scene for Black Widow, she hires Yelena Belova to kill Hawkeye for his role in Natasha's death, seemingly tipping her firmly to the evil side.
  • Blue Blood: She's an aristocrat, holding the title of Contessa (Countess).
  • Composite Character: She appears to be a combination of the comics Contessa and Valerie "Val" Cooper, who in the comics recruited and collaborated with John Walker, right down to being called "Val" for short.
  • Conspicuous Trenchcoat: Wears a stylish trenchcoat complete with leather gloves in both The Falcon and the Winter Soldier and Black Widow.
  • Early-Bird Cameo: Meta case. Due to the COVID-19 Pandemic continuously pushing back the release date of her intended debut, she instead made her first appearance in The Falcon and the Winter Soldier, with Marvel confirming that we were supposed to have already met her in Black Widow (where she appears in The Stinger).
  • Eccentric Mentor: Seems to be setting herself up in this role for future MCU installments — speaks with a breezy, disturbingly casual tone about mayhem and death, has an eccentric, meandering Motor Mouth way of talking and seems to almost be deliberately acting weird and off-putting to keep John Walker and his wife off-balance.
  • The Handler: Appears to have been one for Yelena Belova for a time, and approaches her to offer her a mission to take down Clint Barton. She later becomes this to John Walker as well, giving him the title of U.S Agent in the process.
  • High-Heel Power: Introduced with the ominous clack-clack of her spike-heeled boots down the hallway. She lampshades it with her first line:
    Contessa: Well these boots were not made for walkin'.
  • In-Series Nickname: She tells John he can think of her as "Val" for short, for justifiable reasons. (But, hilariously, he's only allowed to think of her as "Val" and not actually address her as such.)
  • Lady in a Power Suit: In contrast to the slinky spy catsuits from the comics, this is a much more businesslike version of the Contessa.
  • Manipulative Bitch: The Stinger of Black Widow has her convincing Yelena Belova that Hawkeye was responsible for her sister's death, and sends her on a mission to kill him.
  • Mirror Character: Appears to be one for Nick Fury, in regards to the role he played in the Phase I movies. Both of them are mysterious figures who are interested in recruiting powerful individuals on behalf of the organization they work for. However, while Fury was recruiting the Avengers to represent an Anti-Hero organization to protect the world, Valentina has recruited Yelena Belova and later John Walker for an Ambiguously Evil cause. They also are very different in terms of demeanor, with Fury being a Scary Black Cynical Mentor who is undoubtedly on the side of good despite doing some morally gray things, whereas Valentina is a chipper white woman and an Eccentric Mentor who is friendly towards those she meets, but also appears to have sinister goals in mind (one of which is sending Yelena to take out Clint Barton, someone who coincidentally was recruited by Fury).
  • Mouth of Sauron: She's an envoy for an organization interested in recruiting John Walker.
  • My Card: She gives Walker one, though it is empty on both sides except for being black on one side and white on the other.
  • Mysterious Benefactor:
    • Serves as one for John Walker. The final episode of The Falcon and the Winter Soldier has him taking on a new superhero role in her service as US Agent, without her revealing anything about who her superiors are, what his mission is going to be or even giving him a way to proactively contact her ("Just keep your phone on").
    • The Stinger for Black Widow reveals that Yelena Belova has been working for her for some time. Valentina approaches her during her "time off" with a new mission to kill Clint Barton.
  • Non-Specifically Foreign: It seems like if she's a Blue Blood with an aristocratic title she can't be an American citizen, but she speaks with a fluent American accent and vaguely presents herself as representing the US government. Her title and her first two names are Italian, while her surname is French. (In the comics the character was Italian.)
  • Overly Long Name: Contessa Valentina Allegra de Fontaine doesn't exactly roll off the tongue too well, which is why she doesn't like to repeat herself. Just call her "Val." But don't actually do that.
  • Red and Black and Evil All Over: Valentina's default outfit consists of a black trenchcoat with a red turtleneck and gloves in her first two appearances.
  • Sinister Shades: Wears a pair of blue sunglasses when she introduces herself to John Walker in the 5th episode.
  • Stealth Hi/Bye: In the post-credits scene of Black Widow, a wide shot indicates that Yelena is the only one near Natasha's grave. Less than a minute later, Valentina suddenly appears next to Yelena without the latter (a trained Red Room agent) noticing her approach.
  • The Upper Crass: Between the Preppy Name with a nobility title and snarking she's "allergic to the Mid-West", certainly gives this vibe.
  • Villain Respect: Valentina expresses her admiration for Natasha Romanoff while visiting her grave with Yelena, although one gets the impression that she doesn't entirely mean it.

    Karun Patel 

Karun Patel (Hindi: करुण पटेल)

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/af97b809_3238_4e08_ba83_446265e1d9af.jpeg

Species: Human

Citizenship: Indian

Portrayed By: Harish Patel

Appearances: Eternals

Kingo's valet.


  • Admiring the Abomination: He calls the first dead Deviant he sees "beautiful", much to Kingo's confusion.
  • Audience Surrogate: Karun is the only human hanging out with the Eternals on their mission, and he behaves and makes a lot of remarks like the audience would, such as pointing to the corpse of a Deviant in awe and saying Kingo has "a very angry family".
  • Crazy-Prepared: The Eternals keep destroying his cameras out of annoyance, only for him to reveal he has several spares.
    Sprite: How many cameras do you have, young man?
    Karun: I always have backups!
  • Hidden Depths: He mostly acts as comic relief, but occasionally shows serious backbone. He chides Kingo for not wanting to help his family and convinces him to go with the other Eternals, and when Druig argues that Humans Are Bastards he coolly responds that he believes they can learn from their mistakes.
  • In-Universe Camera: He travels with the Eternals to help Kingo produce a documentary about them.
  • It Has Been an Honor: As he and Kingo bid the rest of the Eternals adieu, Karun turns around and genuinely thanks the group in his native language before leaving, under the impression that he and his planet will soon die.
  • Nice Guy: His innate goodness is infectious. The brooding Druig gives him a nod of respect, and even Sprite bites back on the sarcasm with Karun.
  • Secret-Keeper: He's aware that Kingo's immortal and helps facilitate his illusion of being several generations of a family of actors.
  • Shoo Out the Clowns: He leaves with Kingo, the other comic relief character, before the climax, saying that it was a pleasure to be with the other Eternals. He only returns at the end, after the final confrontation.
  • Tagalong Chronicler: Kingo has Karun accompany him to film a documentary about the Eternals.
  • Tuckerization: Karun Patel is played by Harish Patel.
  • Undying Loyalty: Recognizing that he will die if the Emergence happens, he decides to remain with Kingo for his final moments, telling the other Eternals that it was an honor to know them.
  • Unfazed Everyman: He's the most prominent normal human in Eternals and he's not especially shocked by the things he sees. Understandable, since this is the Marvel Cinematic Universe and he's known about Kingo for decades.
  • Vitriolic Best Buds: With Kingo. Apparently, Karun once tried to stake him after mistaking him for a vampire. Apart from a little friendly ribbing, Kingo apparently does not hold a grudge.

    Arthur Harrow 

Arthur Harrow

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/harrowing.jpeg
"There's chaos in you."

Species: Human

Citizenship: Unknown

Portrayed By: Ethan Hawke

Appearances: Moon Knight

A cult leader who encourages Marc Spector to embrace his inner darkness.


  • Adaptational Attractiveness: In the comics, Harrow had a Red Right Hand in the form of a facial paralysis which kept the left side of his face locked in a perpetual scowl. Here, he has a normal face void of any disfigurement.

Top