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Character page for King Kong (2005). The page for the other versions is here.


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    Kong 

King Kong

Played By: Andy Serkis

  • Adaptational Heroism: While the 1933 version was just a straight-up possessive, vicious monster; this Killer Gorilla is given a lot more emphasis on his emotional state, emphasizing his loneliness and how he comes to view Ann as a friend or even a surrogate family member. Even during his rampage in New York, whereas the original Kong threw the "fake Ann" to her death, this one is shown tossing the women he mistakes for Ann in the street aside fairly gently.
  • Beast and Beauty: The Beast to Ann's Beauty.
  • Big Damn Heroes: To Ann as he saves her from both the Tyrannosaurs and from falling to her death from the Empire State Building when the airplane gun downs the ladder she was climbing.
  • Easily Forgiven: One has to remember, although Kong ends up saving Ann from other horrors in the jungle, the fact of the matter is that he kidnapped her in the first place. Making things worse, as explicitly pointed out early into the jungle sequence, Kong was originally going to just kill Ann at the same point where he killed all of the other sacrifices; if it hadn't been for her quick thinking and the pursuit of the ship's crew, which eventually gave her an opening to "bond" with him, she'd have been dead in the jungle because of Kong, not despite him.
  • Go Mad from the Isolation: This may explain why he's so attached to Ann, and why he took it very personally when Ann at first made him feel welcome in her heart but then angrily lashed out at him for playing with her too rough.
  • It's Personal: He certainly had it out for Jack Driscoll, as he was the one who was "stealing" Ann from him toward the end. He halted his rampage in the theater and in New York's city streets the second he saw Jack, who would have been a goner had Ann not appeared.
  • Last of His Kind: It is implied that Kong is the last giant ape on Skull Island: the most telling evidence is a shot of him entering his cave and walking past multiple skeletons of giant gorillas. This loneliness, along with the hostility of Skull Island's environment, accounts for both his ferocity and his need for company, which Ann Darrow supplies. Furthermore, as stated in the background materials, Skull Island's entire ecosystem is dying because the island is submerging due to geological activity. Only a few years after the events of the movie, a final earthquake buries Skull Island under the sea.
  • Made of Iron: His truly massive bones allow him to withstand bites from a V. rex without them snapping his bones more than once.
  • Murder the Hypotenuse: Kong makes it clear that he does not like Jack for snatching Ann away from his grasp.
  • Rasputinian Death: After being pock-marked by dozens upon dozens of machine gun rounds, Kong plummets to his death. It's possible that the bullets did him in before the fall.
  • Spared by the Adaptation: It's possible for the player to do this in the alternate ending to the tie-in game, where Kong is saved by Jack and Englehorn and returned to Skull Island.
  • Tragic Monster: More so than the original, there is much more evidence to suggest Kong is lonely from being the Last of His Kind.
  • Unstoppable Rage: Don't piss Kong off. You'll instantly regret it.

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Denham's Film Crew

    Carl 

Carl Denham

Played By: Jack Black

A film director who obtained the map to Skull Island. Due to his debts, Carl starts to lose his moral compass and obsesses over his film to the point that he disregards safety.


  • Aesop Amnesia: The novelization makes mention that one of his previous projects had a disastrous location shooting and Herb was crippled as a result, mauled by an animal while trying to get a take. So the events of the film — the Skull Island expedition to begin with, then capturing Kong when his film is ruined — shows that he's suffering from this twice over.
  • Berserk Button: Two. He loses his temper when asked if his films will include nudity, and snaps after his camera is destroyed.
  • Despair Event Horizon: Has one when his camera is destroyed in the log scene.
  • The Determinator: "Defeat is only momentary!", he says early in the film, and goes on to prove it by trying to finish a film that he stole from the studio he was fired from because he didn't liked Executive Meddling, dealing with all kinds of obstacles along the way. The plot shows that it is more of a Fatal Flaw, however, and for many other people it proves rather literal.
    Jack (talking to Preston): He destroys everything that he loves.
  • Doing It for the Art: In-Universe, and it eventually becomes a rather dark example: He wastes a lot of studio money (in the middle of the Great Depression, mind) in stuff like location shooting (he even tries to convince the executives to help fund an expedition to Skull Island just because it's a location nobody's ever filmed on) because the movie must be "right", he gets so outrageously pissed that he gives an executive "The Reason You Suck" Speech (which gets him fired) because he will not accept even the suggestion to add nudity to his film (which obviously will make more men come see the film, but it will ruin it from an artistic point of view) and he steals the incomplete film to do it himself even if that means swindling everybody he meets (and risking their lives). The novelization also makes mention that the reason Herb had a wooden leg in the film is because he was mauled by an animal in an earlier location shooting of one of Carl's films.
  • Heroic BSoD: Falls into one over his destroyed camera, only to break out of it to destroy some bugs attacking the crew. He ends the film suffering a second one, considering the way he sees Kong's dead body, says "it was beauty killed the beast", and walks away.
  • Jerk with a Heart of Gold: While he does lack in ethical morals, he is completely against the thought of having nudity shots of women in his film when a studio executive makes a request for them, showing he does have a few standards when it comes to filmmaking.
  • One-Man Army: Boy howdy, a pack of Weta-rexes come close to overwhelming Jack. Carl turns his fight with them into a Curb-Stomp Battle, beating down a few Deinocrida (giant crickets larger than he is) for good measure.
  • Pet the Dog: A deleted scene revealed that Carl took Preston in because the latter failed law school and Carl felt sorry for him. He's also genuinely disturbed by Herb's death and attempted to save him - his insistence on the tripod is because it's the best way to save Herb.
  • Plucky Comic Relief: He is played by Jack Black.

    Ann 

Ann Darrow

Played By: Naomi Watts

A struggling vaudeville actress who is desperate for work. Carl first meets her when she tries to steal an apple from a fruit stand. Further into the voyage, she falls in love with Jack and forms a special relationship with Kong.


  • Adaptational Badass: She is a vaudeville performer with strong personality when pushed. Entertaining Kong with some dancing and cartwheeling and putting her foot down when he literally pushes her around asking for more when she stops because she's tired is why he comes to like her so much.
  • Adaptational Heroism: In subtle ways, is far more outgoing and direct than her more Neutral Female counterpart from the original 1933 movie.
  • Beast and Beauty: The Beauty to Kong's Beast, which is a large theme that does not go unnoticed within the film.
  • Beauty Is Never Tarnished: Played with. Anne is extremely filthy, has torn clothes, and a scratch/scrape here and there, but considering the abuse she takes in the jungle, it's still pretty light.
  • Clothing Damage: Downplayed compared to her 1933 version, as her slip only suffers few rips on the lower side.
  • Fallen-on-Hard-Times Job: Early in the film, the show she works for is closed down, forcing her to accept Denham's offer. The events of the film have her nearly getting killed repeatedly, but overall is less denigrating from the actual example of this that Denham saved her from — almost dancing in a burlesque house.
  • Fluffy Tamer: She is the only human that Kong that he really comes to like.
  • Giving Them the Strip: In a blink and miss moment, Ann gets her dressing gown torn off by a Terapusmordax when Kong gets attacked by the giant bats.
  • Hair of Gold, Heart of Gold: Ann is blonde-haired and is probably the kindest and most moral character in the 2005 movie.
  • Losing a Shoe in the Struggle: Ann gets kidnapped as she was getting ready for bed. Consequently, her shoes get left behind, and she spends the entire time in the jungle barefoot. By all accounts, her feet should've been ripped to shreds by the rough terrain, especially in the jungle itself, long before Kong started carrying her from place to place, but she doesn't get so much as a thorn or a blister.
  • Ms. Fanservice: Ann spents most of her time at Skull Island in a nightgown.
  • Pajama-Clad Hero: As she was kidnapped as she prepared to sleep, she pretty much spends her time at the jungles of Skull Island in her nightgown.
  • Playing Against Type: In-universe. Carl tells Ann "you're the saddest girl I've ever seen" and chooses her to be his lead because she evokes The Woobie so well. Ann responds to this by telling him that she's a comedian who makes people laugh for a living.
  • Sweet Polly Oliver: When we first see Ann during the intro of the 2005 film, she's performing on stage in male drag.
  • Tom Hanks Syndrome: Invoked in-universe. Ann is a vaudeville clown who gets cast as The Ingenue lead in Carl's adventure film.

    Jack 

Jack Driscoll

Played By: Adrien Brody

A screenwriter (and part-time theatre actor) who falls in love with Ann. Coincidentally, she was an avid fan of his writing. He unwittingly becomes part of the voyage when, while delivering a script to Denham, he is delayed before he can get off of the Venture.


  • Action Survivor: Jack probably directly survives the most dangerous events in the film outside of Ann; he's forced to run among the Venatosaurus, is directly targeted by the Piranhodon, survives being mobbed by Weta-Rexes, and has several close encounters with Kong.
  • Badass Boast: Carl is dismayed by him only giving him the beginning of his script (due to the short notice). Jack points out that they're good.
  • Determinator: Nothing will stop him from rescuing Ann. Not the savage natives, not the prehistoric beasts, not giant bugs, not even the great ape itself.
  • Fat and Skinny: The skinny to Jack's fat.
  • The Hero: In the tie-in game, where the player plays as him and Kong.
  • Money, Dear Boy: Averted or played with. Even though Carl tells him that film is a more economically viable industry than theatre, Jack claims he's not in it for the money, he just enjoys theatre. Jack's already wealthy and he did not want to go on an excruciatingly long boat journey to some island. Though Carl did stall him long enough to stay on the boat and finish the screenplay (plus script) by writing him a series of bad checks.
  • The Rival: He becomes this to Kong over Ann's affections. It's possible he and Ann became a couple after the U.S. Air Force shoot down Kong.
  • Took a Level in Badass: Goes from being a playwright to managing to survive a trek across Skull Island...twice. A good part of it without any protection.

    Preston 

Preston

Played By: Colin Hanks

Denham's neurotic but honest personal assistant.

  • Action Survivor: He's one of the only four survivors of the original rescue crew alongside Jack, Jimmy and Carl. When Kong flipped the log into the ravine, he grabbed a hold of a vine just in time, preventing him from falling into the pit and getting eaten by the bugs.
  • Death by Adaptation: Sadly, in the video game adaptation, he was killed offscreen as mentioned by Jimmy.
  • Non-Action Guy: While he does survive, he never dishes out any action of his own. As mentioned above, he grabbed on the vines when the log fell, meaning he didn't have to fight for his life in the infamous insect scene.
  • Only Sane Man: Downplayed, since he helps Carl out with taking the camera gear along with little hesitation, but he's the most likely of the film crew to protest.
  • Scars Are Forever: He gets nicked in the right cheek during all of the chaos in Skull Island and when he meets Jack in New York the scar is shown in a Face-Revealing Turn.
  • Whatever Happened to the Mouse?: He disappears when Kong breaks free and rampages throughout New York and is not seen for the rest of the film.
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    Bruce 

Bruce Baxter

Played By: Kyle Chandler

An actor who specializes in adventure films.

  • Big Damn Heroes: He saves Carl, Jack, and Jimmy when they are about to get eaten by the giant spiders by gunning down said spiders.
  • Crouching Moron, Hidden Badass: The self-described "actor with a gun who's lost his motivation" turns out to be pretty handy with it and a rope.
  • Death by Adaptation: In the game, his mauled corpse is found next to a sniper rifle with Terapusmordax nearby...
  • Dirty Coward: Subverted. Jack calls him this, but he willingly returns to save Jack and the others, and he doesn't exactly take a backseat to do so either. Played straight when Kong starts his climactic rampage in New York, in which he silently skedaddles as soon as he notices the chains are beginning to strain.
  • I'll Take That as a Compliment: When he discovers Mustache Vandalism on one of his movie posters, he's offended for about two seconds, then starts to approve.
  • Jerkass Has a Point: After the Brontosaurus stampede, he's ready to give up on the search for Ann. While cowardly, said behavior is understandable. The search party only really survived the stampede due to sheer dumb luck and they would only encounter more threats during their search (the entire search party would've died in the insect pit, if it wasn't for Bruce's Big Damn Heroes moment). Additionally, Ann's rescue would seem to be a lost cause, given the dangers of Skull Island and the unlikeliness that she would befriend Kong. He's also the least equipped to handle the dangers of Skull Island, as he's only an actor and has minimal knowledge on firearms, so he has among the lowest chances of survival. Considering all of this and the fact that they only have nine hours left to find Ann, it's hard to blame Bruce for becoming disillusioned at that point, however cowardly it may be.
  • Non-Action Guy: While he plays action characters, he himself just wants to get off the island...until his aforementioned Big Damn Heroes scene.
  • Reality Ensues: He claims that real heroes don't look like him. Turns out to be Reality Is Unrealistic in his case.
  • Screw This, I'm Outta Here!: After the dinosaur stampede, he gaps it for the Venture. Subverted, since he returns in a Big Damn Heroes moment.
    • Played straight when he sees that Kong is about to break loose during the whole showcasing of Kong.
  • Tuckerization: He’s named after the late Bruce Cabot, the actor who portrayed Jack Driscoll in the original 1933 film.
  • Whatever Happened to the Mouse?: He disappears from the movie when Kong begins his rampage on New York, understandably gapping it as soon as he realizes Kong's getting pissed enough to break out.

    Herb 

Herb

Played By: John Sumner

Denham's loyal cameraman.

  • Cruel and Unusual Death: Dragged down to be savaged by the Venatosaurus pack.
  • Heroic Sacrifice: He allows himself to get caught and eaten by Venatosaurus pack in order for the others to get away.
  • Famous Last Words: “You gotta leave me!”
  • Nerves of Steel: Downplayed; but when assisting in filming oncoming Brontosaurs he reacts surprisingly calmly outside of some nervous looks. Though visibly more terrified when faced with the Venatosaurus pack that ultimately kill him, he still holds up quite well in comparison.
  • Reality Ensues: A chubby fellow with a prosthetic leg was never going to last long on Skull Island.
  • This Is Gonna Suck: His reaction to one of the raptors getting a hold of his prosthetic leg is a mix of this and Oh, Crap!.
  • Undying Loyalty: To Denham. He agrees with Denham's vows regarding Mike, and bravely assists in filming the oncoming Brontosaurs, and his last act is to pass Carl his tripod and tell him to leave him.
    • Even more doggedly applicable if you read the prequel tie-in novel, which reveals how Herb lost his leg: he was attacked by bull sea lions while trying to get a good shot for Carl's last disastrous attempt at an "exotic wild places" film.

    Mike 

Mike

Played By: Craig Hall

Denham's soundman for the journey.

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The Venture

    Englehorn 

Capt. Englehorn

The German captain (and evidently owner) of SS Venture. Englehorn shows a dislike for Denham, presumably because of his obsessive nature.

  • Combat Pragmatist: Though it likely wouldn't have made much difference, he enters by shooting first and talking later.
  • Crazy-Prepared: Considering that he is apparently a smuggler as a side job, it's pretty understandable why he has a crapload of guns aboard the Venture, including a crate full of Tommy Guns concealed under his bed.
  • No-Nonsense Nemesis: No boastful entrance for him, just bullets, which works out well for him.
  • Only in It for the Money: He would’ve thrown Denham overboard in New York if he had known Denham’s check would bounce. The only reason he agrees to continue the search for the island at all is to have a chance of covering costs, and he only agrees to try to capture Kong to offset his crew’s losses.

    Hayes 

First Mate Benjamin "Ben" Hayes

Played By: Evan Parke

Englehorn's first mate and a mentor to Jimmy who leads Ann's rescue mission because of his army training and combat experience gained during World War I.


  • Adaptation Expansion: He survives the log scene in the game and accompanies Jack through much of the game until he is trampled by a V. Rex and dies of his injuries.
  • The Big Guy: In the game, where he gets to live longer to help Jack more and upgrades to The Lancer after Denham's Despair Event Horizon.
  • Black Dude Dies First: Downplayed. While he’s not the first casualty in the film, he is the first one to die in the log scene and first on-screen human casualty at the hands of Kong.
  • Number Two: The first mate of the ship.
  • Spared by the Adaptation: Zigzagged. While he still dies in the game, he survives the log scene and dies in pursuit of Kong by a stampeding V. Rex instead.

    Jimmy 

Jimmy

Played By: Jamie Bell

A boy who was found on the Venture, wild and abandoned. He is a kleptomaniac and views Hayes as a father figure.

  • Tagalong Kid: He's the youngest character in the movie.
  • Took a Level in Badass: In the bug pit, he grabbed a hold of a Thompson and opens fire on the giant bugs crawling all over Jack's body, managing to hit and kill all of them without harming Jack before he runs out of ammo.
  • Tragic Keepsake: Hayes' hat, which he claims in the extended edition.

    Lumpy 

Lumpy

Played By: Andy Serkis

The ship's cook, barber, doctor and surgeon. He warns Denham about rumors he has heard about Skull Island and Kong.


  • Cordon Bleugh Chef: He makes poorly conceived meals such as lamb's brains in walnut sauce either because of a lack of funding or bizarre taste in cooking.
  • Cruel and Unusual Death: The worm creatures slowly devouring him limb by limb before swallowing his head is one of the better examples of this. To a much lesser extent, the game features a V.Rex tearing him apart.
  • Decomposite Character: Of the original Charlie the cook's occupation.
  • Death by Adaptation: The tie-in game has him killed by a V.Rex not long after Ann is captured, as opposed to getting knocked off the log and eaten by the Carnictis.
  • Heterosexual Life-Partners: With Choy.
  • Mythology Gag: An early script for the original King Kong included a cook named Lumpy, not Charlie. This "Lumpy" made it into the 1932 novelization, which may be where Peter Jackson got the idea.
  • Senseless Sacrifice: He largely fights off the Carnictis to prevent them from devouring Choy, but gets eaten himself.
  • The Worf Effect: With his machete, Lumpy was easily the most well-equipped sailor in the pit. Once the Carnictis overwhelm him things start getting bad.

    Choy 

Choy

Played By: Lobo Chan

Lumpy's best friend and a janitor on the Venture.


Creatures of Skull Island

    Shared tropes 

  • All There in the Manual: Most of them are not named in the film, but instead in promotional material and the companion book. Additionally, the book reveals animals that never made it into the film.
  • Big Creepy-Crawlies: You'll see a lot of these on Skull Island.
  • Bigger Is Better: Against all laws of nature, many of these monsters are huge.
  • Delicious Distraction: In the game, Jack can kill smaller, harmless creatures and use them as bait to drive the hungry monsters away, which is particularly useful if the player is low on ammo or needs to lure them into a trap. Killing other hostile creatures works as well, as the beasts will immediately swarm on the recent kill to feast on it.
  • Everything's Better with Dinosaurs: Many of them are the evolved descendants of dinosaurs which survived the Cretaceous extinction by hiding on Skull Island. This would indicate that Skull Island was immune to the extreme changes in temperature brought on following the end of the Mesozoic era such as the ice age, which today's scientists believe have contributed greatly to dinosaur extinction.
  • Kill All Humans: Most of them seem to have this attitude.
  • Mythology Gag: several of the animals in the companion book are expys of ones from the original film, such as a stegosaur which was clearly inspired by the first dinosaur seen in the 1933 version.
    • Shout-Out: And one of them is a giant, cannibalistic dimetrodon-like animal, a reference to the (in)famous slurpasaurs from the 1959 adaptation of Journey to the Center of the Earth.
  • Speculative Biology: The World Of Kong: A Natural History Of Skull Island presents itself as a treatise on the island's ecosystems.

    Vastatosaurus rex 

Vastatosaurus rex

A descendant of the Tyrannosaurus rex, these huge carnivores are the apex predators of Skull Island.


  • Advancing Boss of Doom: In the video game, they are utterly unkillable when playing as Jack. Some missions involve having to keep a V.rex away from Jack's companions and the only thing he can do is distract them either by shooting down a nearby Terapusmordax or throw spears and bones at them to drive their attention to him.
  • Artificial Brilliance: In the level "Rapids", the second V.Rex will walk over a patch of tall grass which can usually be set on fire to kill any enemies hiding there. If you try to get rid of the theropod this way, it will quickly take a detour and walk away from the fire just as it starts. In the "V-Rex" level, if you keep going through the open doorway a few times to avoid the V.Rex, this will cause it to destroy it.
  • All Your Powers Combined: The young V.rexes in the video game are fast just like the Venatosaurus, but have the strength of their adult forms.
  • Always a Bigger Fish: The first one kills a Foetodon that had attacked Ann. Then it goes after her.
  • Arch-Enemy: Of Kong and his entire species. The tie-in book The World of Kong: A Natural History of Skull Island reveals that the two species having been battling for dominance over the island since time immemorial.
  • Boss in Mook's Clothing: The video game does have a handful of bosses, but V.rexes are the obviously the most recurrent. In the segments as Jack, they can't be killed, and the objective is just to survive against them long enough to escape. As Kong, they are still very dangerous and if the player simply button mashes against them, the V. rexes will kill him.
    • Their younger counterparts can be killed by Jack, but are faster than the adults and will take a lot of punishment before going down thanks to their armored skin. They are also just as strong as the adults and can destroy any stone structures on which you attempt to hide, making them similar to a Mini-Boss.
  • Behemoth Battle: Three of them get into one with Kong, but the last of those three gets the most notable battle.
  • Cruel and Unusual Death: The three V. rexes that attacked Kong all suffered gruesome deaths: two had their skulls bashed in, but the third takes the cake: its jaw was cracked and its head smashed in by the ape's mighty arms.
  • Expy: Of the T. rex/Allosaurus from the original movie.
  • Immune to Bullets: In the game, shooting them just makes them angry. The young ones are killable by Jack but are still pretty strong.
  • Lightning Bruiser: For their massive size, these theropods are quite nimble when fighting Kong, and strong enough to present a threat.
  • Made of Iron: They takes some truly massive hits when fighting against Kong, and it barely slows them down.
  • Recurring Boss: Being the main apex predators of Skull Island and the bigger threat to Kong and the humans alike, you encounter 15 of them in the game.
  • Super-Persistent Predator: One chases Ann even when it has more substantial prey in its mouth.
  • Tyrannosaurus rex: A descendant of it, with a shorter skull, overlapping teeth and an additional finger. They're also much larger, nearly twice the weight.

    Brontosaurus 

Brontosaurus

A giant plant-eating sauropod that lives in the lowlands of Skull Island. They're the most populous wildlife species on the island, at least on-screen.


  • Animal Stampede: One caused by the Venatosauruses chasing them.
  • Expy: Of the Brontosaurus from the original.
  • Herbivores Are Friendly: Subverted—they're not gonna try to eat our heroes, but they're still dangerous when panicking, because they trampled several crewmen.
  • Immune to Bullets: Averted, despite their size. They have no armor, so Reality Ensues when Bruce accidentally shoots one.
  • Stock Dinosaurs: Their name is a lampshade hanging on it, and at the time technically not the name of a real species.

    Venatosaurus 

Venatosaurus

A giant, vicious genus of raptor. There are two species, but only the largest is seen in the film, though both are in the game.


  • Informed Species: It looks more like a carnosaur than a raptor. The fact that it's hunting sauropods only cements this.
  • It Can Think: Implied to have caused a stampede on purpose to pick off the Brontosauruses who leave the safety of their herd. Confirmed in the World of Kong companion book, which explains that this is typical hunting behavior of the venatosaurs and, seemingly, they're the only predators of the brontosaurs because of this and in spite of the sauropods' size.
  • Fragile Speedster: Par for the course of fictional raptors. They can outrun the humans, but are easily cut down by a few bullets.
  • Mini Mook: The smaller venatosaurs in the game are this to the larger species.
  • Raptor Attack: A huge featherless raptor that apparently gives live birth.
  • Super-Persistent Predator: Even with the tons of Brontosaur meat on the table, some of them go after the fleeing crew and kill Herb. Though one of them subverts this during the stampede—when Jack opts to run through the legs of a sauropod, the raptor promptly starts chasing Carl, who's closer.

    Ferrucutus 

Ferrucutus

A large, aggressive ceratopsian.


    Terapusmordax 

Terapusmordax

A huge, naked, batlike rodent.


  • Bat Out of Hell: Though it's actually a giant flying rodent.
  • Expy: Of the Pteranodon from the original film.
  • Giant Flyer: The lord of the skies over Skull Island.
  • Stealth Pun: They're literally rats with wings.
  • You Dirty Rat!: A gigantic, winged rat.
  • Zerg Rush: A swarm of them attacks Kong, Ann and Jack at one point. Though Kong proves that he can deal with them.

    Giant Centipedes 

Giant Centipedes

Centipedes that are giant. Skull Island has many, but the genus seen in the film and the game are specifically Megapede.


    Foetodon 

Foetodon

A large, primitive crocodilian, and primarily a scavenger.


  • Always a Bigger Fish: It's yanked out of a log by a V. rex with ease.
  • Never Smile at a Crocodile: A giant, killer crocodile that has taken to life on the land.
  • Scavengers Are Scum: It's shown to be a scavenger and its establishing character moment one gorging itself on a carcass before joining another in attacking Ann and then being killed by a larger, more imposing predator.
  • Who's Laughing Now?: According to the companion book, baby Foetodons are frequently eaten by herons, but the tables are turned when the little reptiles are grown.

    Piranhadon 

Piranhadon

A giant, serpentine fish that lives in the swamps of the island. Appears in a deleted scene.


  • Composite Character: Of the Brontosaurus and the giant snake from the 1933 King Kong film.
  • More Teeth than the Osmond Family: The name should be a tip off.
  • Piranha Problem: It's basically a lungsifh with the teeth of an oversized piranha. And it causes quite the trouble to the crew when they have to cross the swamp it lives in.
  • Sea Monster: It's more of a swamp monster but the principle is the same.

    Carnictis 

Carnictis

Giant, repulsive worms that live in the abyssal caverns of Skull Island.


  • Big Creepy-Crawlies: Gigantic, abominable worms.
  • Eaten Alive: They bestow this fate upon Lumpy and anything else unfortunate enough to fall into their lair.
  • Eldritch Abomination: Not quite, but they certainly look the part.
  • Eyeless Face: Like most worms. They're basically undulating stomachs.
  • Lamprey Mouth: Their faces are nothing more than this.
  • Squick: Invoked all over the place. They're indisputably the most vile monstrosities Skull Island has to offer.
  • Zerg Rush: Punches can drive them back, and they're easy enough to kill with a machete, but they slowly overwhelm Lumpy.

    Weta-rexes 

Weta-rexes

Huge insects that attack in swarms.


  • Aluminum Christmas Trees: Not only are wetas real, but they do actually grow to be quite large by insect standards, though nowhere near as big as the ones in the film, nor are they particularly aggressive.
  • Big Creepy-Crawlies: Cricket-like bugs the size of dogs. Real-life wetas can get to be as big as mice.
  • Mythology Gag: No surprises that they'd be included, as it's Weta Workshop that designed and animated the island's creatures.
  • Zerg Rush: Their method of attack.

    Ligocristus 

Ligocristus innocens

A lambeosaurine hadrosaur that is common throughout the lowlands of Skull Island.


  • Amazing Technicolor Wildlife: Ligocristus is a rather colourful animal compared to the other animals of Skull Island. That said, they are capable of camouflaging.
  • Herbivores Are Friendly: They are one of the more docile animals on the island.
  • Mama Bear: Ligocristus mothers will lay their eggs at small islets to discourage predators from reaching there during dry seasons. They would do their best to ensure protection towards the hatchlings until they are strong enough to swim to mainland.
  • Stock Dinosaurs: They are the island's residential hadrosaurs.

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