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Characters / House of Mouse

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This is a page listing (original) characters that make up the cast of House of Mouse.

See also the Mickey Mouse Comic Universe, Disney Ducks Comic Universe, and Disney Mouse and Duck Comics character lists for the cast from which House of Mouse drew and added to.


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House of Mouse

     Mike the Microphone 

Mike the Microphone

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/house_of_mouse_mike_microphone.png
First appearance: "The Stolen Cartoons", 2001
Voiced by: Rod Roddy

A sapient microphone who co-hosts the House of Mouse.


  • Aside Comment: Mike's effective audience is the real-life audience, even though it is pretended that he addresses the fictional guests.
  • Animate Inanimate Object: Unusual for the Duck-Mouse setting, but fits the setting of more than a few guests. Mike's also not the only living object that's part of the staff.
  • Excited Kids' Show Host: Type Informative Over Sixes Host.
  • Punny Name: Coupled with Alliterative Name. He's a mike named Mike.

     Mr. Battery 

Mr. Battery

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/house_of_mouse_battery.png
First appearance: "Unplugged Club", 2001
Voiced by: Unknown

The sapient battery that powers the House of Mouse.


  • Animate Inanimate Object: Unusual for the Duck-Mouse setting, but fits the setting of more than a few guests. Mr. Battery's also not the only living object that's part of the staff.
  • Big Blackout: The blackout's limited to the House of Mouse, but it's awfully big compared to the small battery powering it all. The blackout occurs because Pete takes out the battery in an effort to sabotage the show.
  • Moon Logic Puzzle: How does the staff recharge the battery after it's been left without support? By charging him, weapons, trumpet, and banner in hand.

     DVD player 

DVD player

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/house_of_mouse_dvd_player.png
First appearance: "The Stolen Cartoons", 2001
Voiced by: Jim Cummings

The sapient DVD player that plays the shorts at the House of Mouse.


  • Animate Inanimate Object: Unusual for the Duck-Mouse setting, but fits the setting of more than a few guests. DVD player's also not the only living object that's part of the staff.
  • Beleaguered Assistant: He is this to Horace.
  • Running Gag: The joke where Horace is ordered to "Hit it!" and then physically slams the equipment with a tool first occurs in "The Stolen Cartoons". "Pete's House Of Villains" changes it up by putting the Big Bad Wolf in Horace's seat and him blowing at the DVD player to get it going. The DVD player is confused, but not in pain this time.

     Thermostat 

Thermostat

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/house_of_mouse_thermostat.png
First appearance: "Suddenly Hades", 2002
Voiced by: Corey Burton

The sapient thermostat that keeps the temperature right at the House of Mouse.


  • Animate Inanimate Object: Unusual for the Duck-Mouse setting, but fits the setting of more than a few guests. Thermostat's also not the only living object that's part of the staff.
  • Gag Nose: It's the knob in the center, red and round. It breaks open when Thermostat realizes he can't repay Pete.
  • Moon Logic Puzzle: Pete tries to sabotage the House of Mouse by messing with the club's air conditioning. To break Thermostat, he demands the ten bucks back the equipment owes him. Thermostat's got only five on him, meaning he's now broke.
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     The Censor Monkeys 

The Censor Monkeys

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mickey_mouse_works_censor_monkeys.png
First appearance: "Big Bad Wolf Daddy", 2001
Voiced by: Jim Cummings

Three monkeys tasked with keeping the show acceptable for children.


  • Breaking the Fourth Wall: Almost all of the humor surrounding them breaking the fourth wall in some manner, usually in regards to cartoon violence. In "The Three Caballeros", there's Product Placement joke where they can't endorse Donald Duck merchandise to be sold on the show. Donald's lawyer at the time argues it's not Donald Duck merchandise but The Duck Formerly Known as Donald merchandise. After some discussion, they consider that acceptable, much to Mickey's incredulity.
  • Everything's Better with Monkeys: The mocking kind of inclusion, as the monkeys are stand-ins for real-life people.
  • Jerkass Has a Point: The Product Placement thing on the show was probably the only time they made real sense given Disney's rep regarding merchandise and the Cash Cow. However, they were convinced by Donald's weasel lawyer.
  • Monkey Morality Pose: The Censor Monkey are based on the Three Wise Monkeys, which in their case symbolizes their refusal to watch or listen to material deemed too violent. The "speak no evil" moneky simply never talks.
  • Out of Focus: They were present in the second and third episode, but disappeared after that. Their last appearance ended on an I'm Okay! after they got another safe on them.
  • Take That!: Whatever happened behind the scenes that inspired the Censor Monkeys must have been something, because "mean-spirited" is too light a word to use for their first appearance. They stop the short "Donald's Charmed Date" because it's too violent and without consequences. They want Donald to wear a helmet and pillows and for the sound effects to be replaced by comical ones. At that last demand, a safe falls on the trio while making a comical sound and Mickey turns to the audience to ask, "Was that comical enough?" with one of the most sadistic faces ever drawn on him.

     Dennis the Duck 

Dennis the Duck

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/house_of_mouse_dennis_the_duck.png
First appearance: "Dennis the Duck", 2002
Voiced by: Jeff Bennett

A 1930s-styled duck. He runs the Donald Duck Fan Club.


  • Catchphrase: "Have a Sandwich!", which is uttered before shoving a sandwich in the addressee's face or otherwise hitting them with one.
  • Hammerspace: Dennis always has a sandwich stored somewhere on him.
  • I'm Your Biggest Fan: He is this to Donald Duck, being his fan club's "president, vice president, treasurer, and only member", but Donald wanted nothing to with him at first. Dennis broke down when Donald told him he didn't think he's funny, eventually opting for suicide over the Broken Pedestal. Donald, by this time, realized his error and saved Dennis. Well, Dennis technically succeeded in committing suicide by erasing himself, so Donald drew him back in. He even learned to appreciate Dennis's brand of humor... when it's done onto others and the two became friends.
  • Retraux: He's a 2000s character drawn as if he's from the 1930s.

     Ludwig's female clone 

Ludwig's female clone

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/house_of_mouse_ludwig_female_clone.png
First appearance: "Goofy's Valentine Date", 2001
Voiced by: Corey Burton

A female clone of Ludwig Von Drake.


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Mickey Mouse Works

     The Abominable Snowman 

The Abominable Snowman

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mickey_mouse_works_abominable_snowman.png
First appearance: "Donald on Ice", 1999
Voiced by: Frank Welker

A sapient snowman living in a cave.


  • Dark Horse Victory: Accidentally won the snowman competition instead of Huey, Dewey, and Louie, who were troubled by Donald's unintentional yet repeated destruction of their entry creation.
  • Exactly What It Says on the Tin: "Abominable Snowman" evokes Bigfoot, Sasquatch and Yeti. He's not. He's an actual snowman.
  • Matchlight Danger Revelation: Donald already saw his eyes, but not the rest until he lighted a match.
  • Snowlems: The friendly version, although he at first seemed to be the killer version. Thing is that Donald entered his cave when there was a clear "Do Not Disturb" sign outside, so of course he was cranky. His mood improved when he accidentally won the snowman competition with himself and got a few nice ice skates out of it.

     The Admiral 

The Admiral

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mickey_mouse_works_sub_shop_admiral.png
First appearance: "Sandwich Makers", 1999
Voiced by: Jeff Bennett

The owner of the Sub Shop.


  • No Name Given: He's only referred to as "the Admiral".
  • Punny Name: The store is called the Sub Shop because it sells sandwiches and because it is shaped like a submarine.
  • Reasonable Authority Figure: He bellows his instructions when he hands his store over to Goofy, Mickey, and Donald for a day's work, but he compliments them when they've done a good job.
  • Retired Badass: Implied. He's not in the navy anymore if he runs the Sub Shop, but he's got all the behaviors of someone who has military expertise.
  • Warm-Hearted Walrus: He's a walrus and a kind soul, although it takes a little for that latter trait to be clear.

     Bert 

Bert

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mickey_mouse_works_bert.png
First appearance: "Mickey's New Car", 1999

A lazy staff member at the Ajax Gas Station.


  • Expy: Specifically his role in "Mickey's New Car" evokes Maurice from Disney's Marsupilami adaptation. The only noteworthy difference is that Bert does not do anything gross like the earlier ape.
  • Everything's Better with Monkeys: He was the first new character created for Mickey Mouse Works.
  • Lazy Bum: Overlaps with The Stoic in that nothing is interesting enough to get him to go through the effort of a reaction. The only time he's seen performing any activity is when he's (disinterestedly) kiting with some friends in "Donald's Valentine Dollar".
  • The Voiceless: Implied to be talkative off-screen in "Mickey's New Car", but never says a word in the show.

     The Goat Man 

The Goat Man

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mickey_mouse_works_goat_man.png
First appearance: "Mickey and the Goat Man", 2002
Voiced by: Corey Burton

A selfish collector who does not distinguish beteen objects and people.


     Host at the Rorschach Club 

Host at the Rorschach Club

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mickey_mouse_works_rorschach_waiter.png
First appearance: "Mickey Foils the Phantom Blot", 1999
Voiced by: Jim Cummings

The host at the Rorschach Club, which may or may not be owned by the Phantom Blot. Either way, both club and host are best avoided.


     Insect collector 

Insect collector

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mickey_mouse_works_insect_collector.png
First appearance: "Dance of the Goofys", 1999

A boy who kills insects to add to his collection.


  • Bug Catching: Not the kind that ever lets his prey go, though.
  • Evil Redhead: Comes complete with Youthful Freckles. He certainly takes a macabre delight in his hobby.
  • Kids Are Cruel: At least from the Goofys' perspective.
  • No Name Given: As the short is Silly Symphony-styled, no one speaks, so no name is attached to the boy.
  • Parasol of Pain: He picks an umbrella to fight the Goofy that comes to free the king.
  • Shout-Out: As "Dance of the Goofys" is an ode to Fantasia, the boy's opening scene is inspired by Chernabog's.

     Mr. Jollyland 

Mr. Jollyland

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mickey_mouse_works_mister_jollyland.png
First appearance: "Roller Coaster Painters", 1999
Voiced by: Jeff Bennett

The owner of Jollyland and a regular judge in contests.


  • Big Fun: He's not a big as the trope usually goes for, but he's also far from thin.
  • High-Class Glass: He has a monocle on his right eye.
  • One Judge to Rule Them All: Wherever Mr. Jollyland shows up as a judge, he is the one who makes the decision on who wins. Even if the winner is a monster, like "Donald on Ice", or a dog, like in "Mickey's Christmas Chaos". Notably, he always goes for a Dark Horse Victory.
  • Only Known by Their Nickname: Either that or Jollyland is named after him. Which is less likely.

     Magical Mouse 

Magical Mouse

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mickey_mouse_works_magical_mouse.png
First appearance: "Presto Pluto", 2000
Voiced by: Jeff Bennett

A stage magician who is friends with Mickey and Minnie.


  • Lovely Assistant: He has two who probably are twins. No Name Given is in effect for them.
  • Only Known by Their Nickname: Unless "Magical" would actually by his real name.
  • Power Source: A version of Clothes Make the Superman in that his White Gloves are enchanted and necessary for him to perform his tricks. The gloves have a mind of their own and desire to be with him, doing all they can to find him as long as they aren't being worn by someone else.
  • Stage Magician: He is one, but he falls under Magicians Are Wizards because the magic of his gloves is real.
  • Unfortunate Item Swap: Magical and Mickey bring their clothes to the same cleaner and inevitably their White Gloves got swapped. Mickey and Minnie have been invited to Magical's show and leave that evening. Magical's gloves are left in Mickey's rooms, from which they tried to escape but accidentally ended up on Pluto's paws. He gained functional hands from wearing them and access to their magic, which he immediately exploited. His downfall came when he performed a Glove Slap on Butch, thereby freeing one glove that quickly freed the other. Meanwhile, Magical's performance had been awful and he finally realized the gloves he was wearing weren't his (going so far as to recognize they were Mickey's). Before the break was over, though, his gloves came back to him and he could finish the show adequately.

     Pelican couple 

Pelican couple

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mickey_mouse_works_pelican_couple.png
First appearance: "Donald's Valentine Dollar", 1999

A pelican couple.


     The Reform Club 

The Reform Club

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mickey_mouse_works_reform_club.png
First appearance: "Around the World in Eighty Days", 1999
Voiced by: Tony Jay (ostrich) and April Winchell (pelican)

The Reform Club is situated in London and only includes wealthy members.


     Seagull 

Seagull

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mickey_mouse_works_seagull.png
First appearance: "Mickey and the Seagull", 2000

A member of the seagull patrol that guide boats safely from and to the harbor.


  • Furry Confusion: The seagulls are an organized part of the harbor and the patrol leader even wears some clothes, but they still qualify as animal-animals instead of people-animals.
  • Invincible Incompetent: The seagull that'd become Mickey's partner is this. Through his bumbling, he incapacitated the rest of the patrol thus leaving no one to go with Mickey but him. Troublesomely, he was afraid of flying. Only when a heavy storm came up that threatened to smash Mickey against the rocks did he gather the courage to head out and somehow managed to do a good job despite his inexperience and the dire circumstances. He lost his fear of flying after that and became a full member of the patrol.
  • Non-Human Sidekick: The seagulls are this to the boatsmen while they're at sea.
  • Swallowed Whole: Done to the seagull by a shark. After traveling a bit through the Ribcage Stomach, the seagull unknowingly sat down on a keg filled with gunpowder and lit it with his lantern. The explosion allowed him to escape.

     Turkey 

Turkey

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mickey_mouse_works_turkey.png
First appearance: "Turkey Catchers", 1999
Voiced by: Jeff Bennett

An educated bird with a signature gobble he owes his sizeable fanbase to.


  • Animated Actors: Got upgraded to this with the House of Mouse episode "House of Turkey". His character isn't intelligent, but he's cultured and hates to be confused for his character.
  • Everything Trying to Kill You: Many employees and guests try to kill the turkey in "House of Turkey". Gus Goose, the Big Bad Wolf, Gaston, Little Peter, the hyenas, and even the Beast stops to think of eating him. It becomes a Running Gag, literally, that the turkey tries to convince the staff he isn't safe while the staff dismisses his worries. Mickey is forced to acknowledge the problem when the carnivores and hunters in the audience turn on the other guests when it seems the turkey is out of reach.
  • Furry Confusion Played straight in the Mickey Mouse Works short and accompanied by Carnivore Confusion. Averted in the House of Mouse episode.
  • Paper-Thin Disguise: Mickey as the turkey convinces a little. The turkey as Mickey, with Mickey's pants over his tail feathers, not so much.

     Tiki 

Tiki

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mickey_mouse_works_tiki.png
First appearance: "Pluto's Penthouse Sweet", 1999
Voiced by: Russi Taylor

A Maltese terrier Pluto was interested in for a short while.


  • Abhorrent Admirer: Tiki becomes this once Pluto decides he rather stays with Mickey than start anything with her and she refuses to acknowledge his "no".
  • Huge Guy, Tiny Girl: Tiki's a small dog compared to Pluto; a trend with his girlfriends. She and Butch take over once he becomes her romantic interest.
  • Innocent Blue Eyes: Qualified until she didn't let Pluto go, although even then she's presented as silly instead of malicious.
  • Pair the Spares: Tiki and Butch after Pluto manages to escape. The two knew each other before Pluto's involvement, but had no interest in each other at that time.
  • Sexy Walk: Performed one when she met Pluto.
  • Uptown Girl: Pluto had to outsmart Butch, the guard dog, before he could make it to Tiki's penthouse to reunite after meeting her when she was out walking with her owner.

     Mr. Pettibone 

Mr. Pettibone

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mickey_mouse_works_mister_pettibone.png
First appearance: "Goofy's Big Kitty", 1999
Voiced by: Frank Welker

Goofy's cat.


     The Toymaker 

The Toymaker

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mickey_mouse_works_toymaker.png
First appearance: "Organ Donors", 1999
Voiced by: Matt Frewer

The owner of a toy factory who uses real organs in his creations.


  • Expy: The Toymaker is likely based on Winslow Schott Jr., the Toyman of Superman fame, as he first appeared in Superman: The Animated Series. Overlaps with an Affectionate Parody of both Victor Frankenstein and the Creature from Frankenstein and its movie spinoff Bride of Frankenstein.
  • Frankenstein's Monster: For starters, it's hard to tell what manner of creature the Toymaker is. He is most likely a Cyborg; his legs are mechanical and his face does not appear truly organic, but the exact balance of flesh and metal isn't clear. His legs, furthermore, are duck-like and he goes around pantless like Donald. His head, on the other hand, is monkey-like. In the short, he seeks to take Mickey's heart and use it to bring his bride to live.
  • Obviously Evil: His demand for an organ and blatant disappointment at being presented with the musical one, his The Hyena tendencies, and his factory that has no workers but him and is rather far removed from society should've tipped off the trio much sooner.
  • Organ Theft: In his defense, when he called Organ Donors he thought he was going to get a heart legitimately. Turns out the name refers to the musical instrument and then he might as well take the heart of one of the delivery boys to stay on schedule. Once Donald and Goofy tried to rescue Mickey, he decided he'd had use for all their organs. They escaped before he could harvest them.
  • Pygmalion Plot: He was supposed to be the Pygmalion.
  • Supervillain Lair: He owns a toy factory bordering on toy kingdom atop a hill.
  • Wicked Toymaker: No toy weapons are seen in action, but his lair is toy-themed, his bride-to-be is a doll, and he himself seems to be part toy.
  • Wingding Eyes: He gets spiral eyes twice as a sign of high spirits. Once it's followed by an Eye Colour Change to green.

     The Toymaker's bride 

The Toymaker's bride

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mickey_mouse_works_toymaker_bride.png
First appearance: "Organ Donors", 1999

The intended partner of the Toymaker, but he couldn't get a heart to complete her.


     Mrs. Turtle 

Mrs. Turtle

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mickey_mouse_works_missus_turtle.png
First appearance: "Donald's Shell Shots", 1999
Voiced by: Estelle Harris

Shelby's overprotective mother.


     Shelby Turtle 

Shelby Turtle

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mickey_mouse_works_shelby_turtle.png
First appearance: "Donald's Shell Shots", 1999
Voiced by: Jeff Bennett

A young child that likes to create chaos.


  • Bratty Half-Pint: Shelby is solely concerned with doing what he wants, which often enough includes purposely being a pain to look after. He knows he's protected by his mother's aggression set to unleash if he'd not be taken care of properly. Acting like a responsible adult therefore doesn't net results nearly as good as fighting fire with fire does. As happens in "Mickey vs. Shelby":
    Mickey: "You're sure he won't get away?"
    Donald: "I glued him to the stage."
  • Massive Numbered Siblings: Abandoned. As the punchline to the events of "Donald's Shell Shots", Mrs. Turtle tells Donald he can photograph all of Shelby's siblings, which are some thirty in numbers. None of them have been featured since, even in situations where they'd logically be around like when Mrs. Turtle needs a babysitter in "Domesticated Donald".
  • Performance Anxiety: Unexpectedly suffers this, which comes up in "Mickey vs. Shelby". Mickey comes to his rescue by performing with him.
  • Removable Shell: Shelby can leave his shell to run around either naked or in diapers. In "Domesticated Donald", Donald crawls into his shell, which is Bigger on the Inside, to retrieve his video game.
  • Signature Laugh: It sounds something like "heeeh-eh-eh-eh!".
  • Suspiciously Similar Substitute: Baby New Year in "Babysitters".

     The Witch in the Candy House 

The Witch in the Candy House

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mickey_mouse_works_candy_witch.png
First appearance: "Hansel and Gretel", 1999

A witch looking for a good meal of roasted mice.


     Zeke 

Zeke

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mickey_mouse_works_cousin_zeke.png
First appearance: "Mickey's Cabin", 2000
Voiced by: Jim Cummings

Pete's cousin and occasional partner-in-crime.


  • Cats Are Mean: Nothing new for members of Pete's family.
  • Country Cousin: He's not very smart, or at least is intellectually overpowered by Pete, dresses the part, and speaks with a thick accent.
  • The Family That Slays Together: He and Pete are cousins within a family that traditionally has been depicted as producing more crooks than law-abiding citizens, who despite their criminal lifestyle do get along well and are often in schemes together.
  • Fat Bastard: He's not as needlessly cruel as Pete, but still large and mean.
  • Old Friend: Zeke makes various references to having worked together with Pete before, for better of for worse, responding to events and accusations with the phrase "just like old times".

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