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ALL spoilers on this page are UNMARKED. It's highly recommended you see the movie (and Frozen Fever) and read A Frozen Heart first before reading this page.

Prince Hans Westergaard of the Southern Isles

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/f09ed417bb2724861653fdf7d55b9c21.png
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Voiced by: Santino Fontana (English); Erik Segerstedt (Swedish)
Appearances: Frozen | Frozen Fever | Frozen IInote 
Appearances in alternate continuities: Once Upon a Time | Frozen Free Fall | Big Hero 6note  | Kingdom Hearts IIInote 

A prince of the Southern Isles, he comes to Arendelle for Elsa's coronation and quickly makes an impression on Anna. He's actually using Anna to rule the kingdom himself.


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  • 13 Is Unlucky:
    • Being 13th in line for his kingdom's throne, he knows he doesn't stand a chance to be king in his homeland, which leads to his desire to become the ruler of another kingdom.
    • In A Frozen Heart, he's the proverbial Black Sheep and the odd one out of the large Westergaard clan, often picked on by the older members of the family.
  • Aborted Arc: In 2014, an interview with Santino Fontana stated the writers wanted to make Hans return in Frozen II and go through a redemption arc. However, the idea was scrapped, likely for story reasons (as Hans finding his way to Northuldra would have made little sense).
  • Adaptational Nice Guy: A Frozen Heart portrays him as a more sympathetic and tragic character, who starts off the book capable of caring about other people before becoming cruel, as opposed to The Sociopath of the film.
  • Age Lift: Inverted in A Frozen Heart. Hans is twenty in the novelization instead of twenty-three as in the movie.
  • Alas, Poor Villain:
    • As shown in Frozen Fever, it's implied that he was penalized to hard labor, which includes shoveling manure in the royal stables. He's currently in a dank environment, with the stables alone looking dark and uninviting.
    • In his final chapter of A Frozen Heart, he's panicking when the guards drag him to be shipped back to the Southern Isles without even seeing Anna and Elsa one last time. Considering the book gives him an expanded backstory, it's clear to the reader that he will suffer far worse treatment than he has from his family beforehand, who were already horrible to him. As he was desperately trying to never go back, he's begging to be let go, treating his return trip as a Fate Worse than Death.
  • All for Nothing:
    • All he really wanted was to be king and had he pursued it the right way, he could have gotten his wish. At the end of Frozen II, Anna actually becomes queen of Arendelle, therefore Hans would have become king had he married her, and Elsa abdicated the throne to live in the Enchanted Forest, which makes his plan to murder Elsa even more meaningless.
    • In A Frozen Heart. The plan he and Lars spent three years for, in hopes of finding love and a new home in Arendelle, are ruined because Hans just couldn't help himself and took the easier but less moral solution to get a kingdom and his father's respect quicker. He's now living a worse life than before.
  • All of the Other Reindeer: In A Frozen Heart. Hans feels "out of place" amongst his abusive family, as they (except for his mother and Lars) frequently belittle him for being a pushover.
  • All There in the Manual:
    • His last name is never spoken in the film. Film co-director Jennifer Lee revealed it to be Westergaard and since then, all media that mentions Hans having a last name, such as A Frozen Heart, uses it.
    • A Frozen Heart also delves into his backstory a bit more thoroughly than the film did, although how much of it is canon is up for debate.
  • Always Second Best: In A Frozen Heart. His father thinks little of his youngest son, seeing his older sons as better and ruthless. Hans agrees, and develops an inferiority complex as a result. To counter this, Hans tries to emulate them by becoming the king's gofer before setting off to Arendelle in the hopes of eventually earning his family's admiration.
  • Ambiguous Situation:
  • Ambition Is Evil: His whole plan was to make himself king, and he's neither squeamish nor apologetic of how he empties the throne of its previous occupants.
  • Animal Motifs:
    • The film's head animator compared him to a chameleon. The only difference is that instead of his appearance, Hans changes his personality to adapt to situations. To woo Anna, he pretends to be a lovesick Nice Guy. To earn Arendelle's admiration, he helps them during the winter and goes to rescue their princess. To get Elsa's trust, he acts like a friend who knows she doesn't want to hurt people. And to counter the Duke, he appears as a rude Jerkass.
    • In A Frozen Heart, his father and brothers compare him to a mouse, which is generally seen as weak and not useful, even though they're very clever and industrious. They claim that the Westergaards should be "lions, not mice".
  • Annoying Younger Sibling: Inverted. Except for one, who tries to help him leave home to find a better life, he sees most of his older brothers as obnoxious jerks. Three of them even pretended he was invisible for two years.
  • Anti-Villain: Subverted in A Frozen Heart. He's initially motivated by wanting to escape the horrible physical and emotional abuse of his family, but becomes more ambitious and cruel over the course of the book.
  • The Baby of the Bunch: He's the youngest of thirteen sons. In A Frozen Heart, growing up the smallest and most forgettable of the brood wound up being the source of his issues.
  • Bad Samaritan: He's implied to be the first person outside of the (much-reduced) castle staff that Anna had truly socialized with in years. Naturally, he's also the villain.
  • Badass Bookworm: An excellent strategist, Manipulative Bastard, and a good swordsman all rolled into one.
  • Badass Longcoat: It's a greatcoat with that caped bit at the shoulders, but in principle it's this.
  • Bait the Dog: His character is a major subversion of the classical Disney Prince: handsome, brave outwardly friendly and polite, and even played by Santino Fontana, known at the time of his casting for playing a more straightforward Prince Charming role in the Broadway run of Rodgers and Hammerstein's Cinderella. He's friendly to Anna and is shown helping the common folk and standing up to the Duke when the old man starts complaining that he's giving away "tradable goods" and that Anna "may be conspiring with a sorceress." He later goes after the sisters himself when Anna's horse comes back without her, stops Elsa from killing the Duke's men who had attacked her, stops one of the men from shooting her, and then later when Elsa is imprisoned, pleads with her to stop the eternal winter and seems nothing but sympathetic. Then when a cursed Anna comes to him for a True Love's Kiss, Hans smiles as romantic music swells, leans in... and the music abruptly stops as he flashes a Slasher Smile and reveals that he was faking his romance with Anna and pretending being a Nice Guy to the dignitaries and locals to usurp the Arendellian throne with both sisters out of the way and with enough support to avoid too much objection.
  • Bavarian Fire Drill: This is one of the reasons why no one realizes Hans is an usurper until it's too late: everyone is panicking after the snow begins to fall, and it's not obvious who should have authority, as Elsa bailed out and Anna left to find her — so Hans calmly takes charge on Anna's instructions. He acts like he has the whole situation under control, and people obey him as a result. Since the quickest way to become a leader in a crisis situation is usually to just behave like one, Hans has that down to an art. People might not even mind until later that his claims are decidedly dodgy.
  • Became Their Own Antithesis: In A Frozen Heart. He vows not to use violence like his family routinely does, yet he resorts to the tactics they use once things go south in Arendelle.
  • Beneath the Mask:
  • Betty and Veronica: Anna is the "Archie" to Kristoff's "Veronica" (manly ice harvester) and Hans's "Betty" (cultured prince, her apparent counterpart). The contrast goes further when Kristoff is revealed to have a good heart under his gruff exterior while Hans turns out to be a Bitch in Sheep's Clothing.
  • Beyond Redemption: In Frozen II, Elsa considers him to be an "irredeemable monster."
  • Big Bad Slippage: In the tie-in book A Frozen Heart, a Broad Strokes retelling of Frozen. The book goes into his backstory and perspective. He starts out as a selfish but still well-meaning man who seeks his father's approval before slowly turning into the "frozen-hearted" villain he ends up as.
  • Big Brother Worship: In A Frozen Heart towards Lars. While it's debatable if he wants to earn the respect of his brothers aside from leaving their shadow, he does genuinely admire Lars, the third oldest of his siblings, if just for being the only brother to show him any humanity.
  • Birds of a Feather: Exploited and subverted on his part: he pretends to be like Anna to woo her and get the throne, his real goal. He and Anna bond over seeming to have many things in common: being the youngest child of their respective families, looking for love, ignored by their siblings, etc. However when Hans reveals his true colors, their similarities turn out to be either superficial (although the creators have confirmed that Hans's claims of having a troubled childhood were true, Hans became a ruthless, power-hungry man while Anna has maintained her optimism and compassion) or feigned on his part (Hans couldn't care less about finding love, and made it clear he has no intentions to reconcile with his brothers). Hans ends up being Anna's Evil Counterpart.
  • Bitch in Sheep's Clothing: His acts of kindness, as well as his sweet wooing of the impressionable, happy-go-lucky princess Anna, are revealed to be parts of a calculated plot to marry into Arendelle's royal family and ultimately murder Queen Elsa so he can ascend to the throne much quicker.
  • Black-and-Gray Morality: In A Frozen Heart, he starts off as an Anti-Villain driven to escape the tyranny of his homeland, while simultaneously trying to please his father at all costs. But as the story progresses, the abuse brings out the worst of him and he becomes very similar to his father and brothers.
  • Black-and-White Morality: In A Frozen Heart, he literally forces himself to think this way during his journey to take down Elsa. Whenever he begins to realize that Elsa isn't such a bad person after all or feels sorry for her, he panics and starts throwing out reasons to why Elsa must be the villain and that everything "bad" that has happened to him is completely her fault. He also quickly dehumanizes her as a "monster" so he can feel less bad when killing her.
  • Black Sheep: In A Frozen Heart. His father and older brothers see him as this due to his reluctance in conforming to their Social Darwinist leanings. Ironically, Hans being against the violence of his family made him the White Sheep, but his desire to appeal to his father darkened him. Even Hans acknowledges that he's the odd one out in his large family.
  • Break the Haughty: In his final chapter of A Frozen Heart, after his father's influence has finally brought out the worst in him, Hans panics when he's informed that he's being shipped home and tries desperately to escape.
  • Break Them by Talking:
    • A wise thing to do before attacking a borderline Goddess of Winter with a sword when she knows he is coming is to mentally break her. It effectively leaves her suicidal, because being told that her sister is dead due to her own actions is her worst fear come true. Luckily, Anna isn't dead, and saves Elsa in the nick of time from his attempt to decapitate her.
    • He also does this to Anna by telling her that she was only ever a means to an end to him and what a fool she was for trusting him. It leaves her depressed for a while, but Anna eventually realizes that there are still people (Kristoff and Olaf) who care about her.
  • Bright Is Not Good: Wears lots of white and blue and is evil.
  • Broken Ace:
    • He is handsome, charming, a skilled fighter, and a prince, but a desperate hunger for recognition and glory corrupted him.
    • In A Frozen Heart, his villainy stemmed from years of abuse, severe family issues, and neglect.
  • Butt-Monkey: He gets crapped on a lot following his infamous betrayal, both directly and indirectly.
    • In Frozen Fever, Elsa accidentally launches a giant snowball all the way to the Southern Isles, where it lands on Hans and sends him straight into a wagon full of literal horse crap.
    • In the sequel, Elsa passes by a snow memory of Hans on Ahtohallan and casually destroys it. He's even the butt of jokes during a game of charades the heroes play.
    • He isn't even safe in other Disney films, as shown in Big Hero 6, when a statue of Hans is promptly destroyed by Baymax.
  • Bully Magnet: In A Frozen Heart. Being the easiest target for bullying in his family, he has been subjected to countless pranks by his brothers as a reminder of his low status in the familial pecking order.
  • The Cameo:
    • In Big Hero 6, his photo can be seen on the police desk when Hiro tries reporting Yokai to the police. Later, Baymax also destroys a statue of him at Fred's house.
    • While not appearing in Zootopia proper, his character model was used to help determine the height differences between humans and animals during the development.
  • Cannot Tell a Joke: Played with in A Frozen Heart. Whenever he tried to crack a joke with his brothers, it was they who made a laughing stock out of him.
  • Can't Catch Up: In A Frozen Heart. As lampshaded by the king and his older sons, no matter how hard Hans tries, one of his brothers will always do something better. They even rub it in Hans's face, pointing out that he "could learn a thing or two from [his brothers] if [he] stopped acting like [he was] better than them."
  • Can't Kill You, Still Need You: His concern about not wanting harm to come to Anna basically translates to him needing Anna alive so he can become king. Though he goes out to find Anna, he also wants Elsa alive so that he can try and charm her too. Once he realizes that Anna will shortly die because his kiss won't work and Elsa can't lift the curse, he decides it's time to get to killing.
  • The Charmer: He has an awkward kind of charm which turns out to be an evil version of this, and thus an invoked trope.
  • The Chessmaster: The scene where he gives his Motive Rant has a chess set visible, symbolizing his exploitation of Anna as a "pawn" in his plans. On a grander note, he proves to be a very effective and crafty Villain with Good Publicity, even fooling the viewer into thinking he's the Prince Charming and Knight in Shining Armor.
  • Classy Cravat: Wears a pinkish one as seen on the image above. In Frozen Fever, it's not so classy anymore, worn out and dangling from his neck due to all of the physical labor he's been doing.
  • Classic Villain: Represents Ambition, and a little bit of Envy. Knowing that he could never inherit a kingdom of his own, he intends to take over Arendelle by marrying into the royal family, and then killing both sisters. Although he's not the direct cause of the movie's main conflicts, it's his deceptions, i.e. pretending to be Anna's Love Interest and causing her to argue with Elsa over their whimsical relationship, that trigger the plot into such direction. He also shares a number of similarities to both Anna and Elsa: like Anna, he is estranged to his older siblings, and like Elsa, he conceals his true emotions. But while the sisters wish to reconcile with each other, Hans clearly doesn't, as he's willing to abandon his family to get Arendelle. While Elsa tries to control her emotions to stop herself from harming her loved ones, Hans hides his in order to manipulate others.
  • Clothing Reflects Personality: Like Elsa, he hides his true persona via his gloves. In fact, as he gloats to Anna during The Reveal, he removes his right glove to reveal his selfish side. As he leaves Anna to die, he puts it back on, showing that he is about to put his metaphorical mask back on for the world and pretend to be a hero mourning her death, although he doesn't care at all, because has no need for her now that she's dying from the curse.
  • Color Motif: White. Every single one of his outfits has white in some shape or form, particularly in the form of his gloves, which only drives home his status as a subversion of the Disney Nice Guy and Prince Charming archetypes.
  • Conspicuous Gloves:
    • Not as conspicuous as Elsa's, but he's still the only other character onscreen who always wears them. Much like how Elsa's gloves symbolise how she conceals her true self, Hans's are symbolic of how he conceals his true nature beneath an affable and noble exterior. The only instance he removes them is when he is during The Reveal, which symbolises how his darker nature has come to light.
    • In A Frozen Heart, he wears them to hide self-inflicted scars.
  • Consummate Liar: Described by his animator as a "chameleon", he's slippery to the point that fans argue ad infinitum about what his real personality is under all the lies.
  • Contrived Coincidence: Hoping for a chance to gain the throne of some kingdom, Prince Hans visits a royal family he knows nothing about due to their reclusiveness. Before the coronation even starts, he has a Meet Cute with Princess Anna, who after years of isolation and neglect is naive and Desperately Craves Affection, leaving her vulnerable enough that he is able to get her to accept a marriage proposal that night. Shortly afterward, the queen bails out after revealing her secret ice powers, the princess goes after her, and Hans is given acting command of the kingdom. The next day Anna is wounded in a way he can easily pin on Elsa, giving him all the cover he needs to murder them both and become king.
  • The Cynic: In A Frozen Heart. His upbringing made him to think Love Is a Weakness, so when Anna and Elsa reconcile with each other, it leaves him shocked.
  • Dark and Troubled Past:
    • Implied in the film. One of the first things he says when asked about his family is that three of his brothers pretended he was invisible for two years and even tries to downplay it as "what brothers do", suggesting the rest of his relationships with his family aren't much better. Jennifer Lee has confirmed he grew up without love.
    • The Tie-In Novel A Frozen Heart delves into his background much further, and it's not good. Except for his mother and Lars, who treat him with kindness, Hans is abused and ignored by his family. The Frozen portion in the comic compilation Disney Storied Places has Hans barely getting to eat at mealtime because his older brothers get there first.
  • Dark Reprise: On a score-related note, his leitmotif plays again with a more sinister tone after he reveals his true colors.
  • Deconstructed Character Archetype: The adaptation A Frozen Heart deconstructs the Prince Charmless archetype through him, exploring how a childhood in an abusive family with Social Darwinist values slowly molds him into a power-hungry and ruthless man hellbent on seeking fame and personal glory at all costs. This even causes him to assume Love Is a Weakness.
  • Defeat Means Menial Labor: As shown in Frozen Fever, he was penalized to hard labor by his brothers for his attempted takeover of Arendelle, part of which includes shoveling manure in the royal stables.
  • Determinator: In A Frozen Heart, this is his Fatal Flaw. He's zealously determined to prove his worth to his abusive family regardless of the consequences. There are moments where he realizes he chose the wrong path, but his stubborn desire to be The Dutiful Son drives him to continue on regardless.
  • Despair Event Horizon: In A Frozen Heart. On his mother's birthday, Hans has enough of his father and brothers treating him poorly and leaves, not caring how he'd be punished. While at the pier to calm himself down, Hans accepts that he'll be a "throwaway" prince and remain unmarried for the rest of his life. The day after, he learns from Lars that the reclusive princess of Arendelle is without a suitor. Though reluctant, Hans decides to go for it since he has nothing to lose.
  • Did I Just Say That Out Loud?: In A Frozen Heart. When dancing with Anna and she says he makes her look graceful, he says without thinking that she makes him look happy. He quickly back-pedals and changes the subject before Anna can ask him what he means.
  • Didn't Think This Through:
    • In the film, he proposes to Anna the same day they meet, not realizing that Elsa probably won't bless a marriage between two people who just met, which, sure enough, is exactly what happens.
    • A Frozen Heart also gives him a couple more incidents in addition to the above. Because of his do-whatever-it-takes-to-get-my-goal attitude, he never thinks or considers the possibility of things going wrong. For example:
      • When he decides to talk with his father about going to Arendelle, he forgets the king doesn't like him, and considers turning back. But he's determined to earn his father's respect, and decides he must follow whatever order the king may give, even if it involves violence, so he can earn his father's trust in going to Arendelle.
      • His first instinct coming to Arendelle is to look around the marketplace so he can find Elsa and hopefully start a romance with her, then realizes the reason she doesn't have a suitor yet is because she's a reclusive shut-in who avoids people.
      • He agrees to stay behind in Arendelle, instead of accompanying Anna on her journey to find Elsa, to take care of the people so that he can have a chance to be in charge, only to quickly realize when Anna's horse returns that if she died, then no one would be able to convince Elsa to stop her winter. Add to the fact that if nobody found Elsa or Anna, he would have to contend with a rebellion in his hands, not to mention derailing his plans.
  • Disposable Fiancé: He and Anna get engaged quickly, but then the story makes it clear that she's really supposed to be with Kristoff... good thing that Hans was Evil All Along! This is even lampshaded by one of the trolls in "Fixer Upper": "Get the fiance out of the way and then the whole thing will be fixed!"
  • Disappointing Older Sibling: Inverted and zig-zagged in A Frozen Heart. Hans is the youngest of 13 sons, yet he is seen as a let-down by his family. Conversely, Hans and Lars see their oldest brother Caleb as woefully incompetent for his role as heir to the Southern Isles' throne, as he's a Manchild who takes his role with slackness.
  • Driven by Envy:
    • His envy towards not being able to inherit a kingdom is his motivator to try and usurp Arendelle.
    • In A Frozen Heart, his drive to come into power within a kingdom of his own stems from being overshadowed by his 12 older brothers, causing him to develop self-esteem issues.
  • Drunk on Milk: In "Love is an Open Door", when Hans tells Anna he has feelings for her, he says "maybe it's the party talking, or the chocolate fondue."
  • Dude, Where's My Respect?: In A Frozen Heart, his father and most of his brothers think low of him because he often fails to meet their cruel standards. Frequently mocked for being ineffectual by his family, being a Spare to the Throne, and massive self-esteem issues eventually become the breaking point and drive him to pursue power within another kingdom no matter what to gain the recognition he feels he deserves.
  • The Dutiful Son: His ultimate goal in A Frozen Heartwin the respect of his neglectful and abusive family regardless of the consequences he faces.
  • Et Tu, Brute?: His betrayal of Anna in the climax — she thought he was her true love!
  • Even Bad Men Love Their Mamas: In A Frozen Heart. He cares for his mother and is probably one of the few who still does so. Despite being regularly humiliated by his father and mocked by his brothers, he's willing to attend her birthday. It's implied his brothers resent him for being their mother's favorite.
  • Even Evil Has Loved Ones: In A Frozen Heart. Hans is on good terms with only one of his brothers, Lars, who is the only one to not abuse him and have a meaningful conversation with him. He also genuinely cares for his mother.
  • Even Evil Has Standards:
    • Averted in the film. He shows no moral qualms with his murder plans, and whenever he seems to object to something, his objection (or show of apparent objection) benefits him.
    • In A Frozen Heart, Hans does have some morals despite not attempting to excuse his general sociopathic villainy from the film:
      • Aware of the tyranny he saw in his father back home and secretly hating his job as the king's errand boy, he prefers to iron out issues and manipulate people, but use force as a last resort if things go south. He also hates oppressing the common people and prefers to treat them with kindness, even though it is mostly to further his own goals.
      • Subverted in the 2nd example. While he hates how his father and brothers ill-treat their wives, he comes off as a hypocrite for the cruel way he treats Anna once he no longer thinks it's useful to manipulate her.
  • Evil All Along: You'll be very surprised when you find out he's the true villain of the movie, considering how he looks like he is going to be a supporting character and a potential love interest for either Anna or Elsa in promo photos for the movie. Hans is that rare Disney villain whose true nature casts a very dark pallor over all of the supposedly altruistic and benevolent deeds he had done prior to The Reveal, when it becomes apparent that he had been planning to murder our heroes and usurp the kingdom right from the start. "Love is an Open Door"? Hollow lies. His charitable deeds for the people while Anna is gone? Calculated to make his rise to power easier. His drive to keep Anna safe? A mask of concern, casually discarded when he realizes he can no longer use her: it's safe to let her die.
  • Evil Cannot Comprehend Good: In the film, he calls Anna "dumb" for going after Elsa in the first place, showing he never understood Anna's unconditional love for her sister. A Frozen Heart justifies this by showing his perspective on love and affection being skewered by his family, which teaches him to believe Love Is a Weakness. Upon noticing how Elsa reacts to Anna's supposed death at her own hands, he thinks it makes her look weak.
  • Evil Counterpart:
    • To Anna and Elsa. His name, which means "God is gracious", reflects his role as a mirror toward Elsa (whose own name has the meaning "God's oath") and Anna (whose name means "gracious"), and unlike the two of them, he became both ruthless and cruel.
    • He is also this to Kristoff to a lesser extent. While both are set up as Anna's Love Interest, Kristoff is a Nice Guy despite his initial appearance as a detached misanthrope while Hans is built up as someone who cares for others, but is revealed to be a selfish and duplicitous man.
    • His role as Anna and Elsa's Evil Counterpart is fleshed out a bit more thoroughly in A Frozen Heart, as some of his thoughts regarding his brothers indicate that he even plans to rub his achievements in their faces instead of reconciling with them if he did win.
  • Evil Gloating: During his Motive Rant to Anna, he reveals his plot to marry her, kill Elsa, and become king of Arendelle through ascension, verbally abusing her in the process. He knew that he would never be able to rule the Southern Isles due to being the 13th son, so he sought to rule somewhere else. He subsequently announces that his next move is to kill Elsa and restore summer, making him a hero in the eyes of Arendelle's citizens.
  • Evil Has a Bad Sense of Humor: After The Reveal, he cruelly mocks Anna for being so desperate for love that she agreed to marry him "just like that", which made his plan that much easier.
  • Evil Plan: Seize control of Arendelle by his calculated plot to marry Anna, kill Elsa, and become king of Arendelle through ascension.
  • Evil Prince: He is most certainly evil, but unlike most examples of this trope, it's not his own kingdom he's trying to kill the rightful heirs to and usurp, as he has twelve older brothers and there's no way he can get them out without casting suspicion onto himself.
  • Evil Redhead: Has auburn hair and he turns out to be the villain.
  • Evil Virtues: This is combined with Pragmatic Villainy in some cases. He is nice to Anna even before she introduces herself as the local princess, hands out supplies to the common folk, opens the castle to give them warmth and shelter, and stops Elsa from killing two of the Duke's guards, even if these may all be part of his plan to become a beloved King.
  • Evil vs. Evil: With the Duke of Weselton, but it's largely downplayed since both never really know about each others' plans until the end and any fighting they do is minor. However, it's clear they don't really like one another, and each attempt to back-stab one another.
  • Evil Wears Black: Subverted. In order to throw off the audience, he wears light colors while the Duke, Kristoff, Anna, and Elsa wear darker colors.
  • Exactly What I Aimed At: He redirects a crossbow one of the Duke's henchmen aimed at Elsa towards the ceiling... and the arrow breaks off a chandelier that falls on her, knocking her out. Rewatching with knowledge of The Reveal, in a combination of Rewatch Bonus and Freeze-Frame Bonus, a shot of him looking up at the chandelier before redirecting the crossbow becomes more noticeable. It seems that hitting the chandelier is intentional on his part: he wants to make Elsa's death look like an accident while giving the impression that he tried to save her and failed.
  • Exact Words:
    • "I would never shut you out." Now, shutting her in...
    • A lot of the stuff he says while seducing Anna is actually true, just reliant on double meanings that do not become apparent until his true nature is revealed.
      Hans: I've been searching my whole life to find my own place...
  • Extreme Doormat: Starts off as this in A Frozen Heart. By the time he's a young adult, Hans has already given up fighting back against his abusive family as he thinks it just makes their physical abuse worse, so he just keeps mum, but even this encourages them, too. His father often saw him as a whiner, and despite his objections, regularly sent him to do horrific tasks, from beating up critics of the king to killing delinquent taxpayers.
  • Eye Take: During the song "Love is an Open Door", there's a split-second of hidden confusion on his face when Anna completes his line "We finish each other's" with the word "sandwiches". He then backpedals and exclaims that's just what he was going to say, but for a split-second his facial expression seems to scream "What did she just say?". The expression shows that he is trying to mimic Anna's personality and to put himself further in line with his plan.
  • Face of an Angel, Mind of a Demon: In promotional photos for the film, he's depicted as a Nice Guy, until you watch the film, and you'll see that his mind totally contrasts his appearance.
  • Fake Ultimate Hero: Downplayed in that he really is willing to do the deeds, but his motives are less noble than he likes to make people think. When Hans spills the beans on his plan, he admits that he was already planning to kill Elsa to become king, and now he plans to kill her and bring back summer so can play the part of "the hero who is going to save Arendelle from destruction", with no one knowing he just wants to kill her to further his own ambition.
  • False Friend: He eventually reveals that he simply wanted to get close to Anna in order to marry into the royal family. After learning that Anna is dying and can only be saved by true love, he says his Wham Line.
  • False Reassurance: Right before the song "Love is an Open Door", Hans assures Anna that he won't shut her out like Elsa did. He does the exact opposite at The Reveal by shutting her in.
  • False Soulmate: Revealed to be this to Anna, in one of the worst ways possible. She's initially convinced Hans is her true love, as she's immediately attracted to him and they appear to have a lot in common, but she's actually rushing into the relationship because she's desperate to be loved by someone and doesn't really know much about him; she agrees to marry him the same day they met without really thinking it through. When other characters point this out to her, however, she insists it's true love. By the third act, Anna seems to be having some doubts about whether Hans is really her true love, but she still goes to him for a true love's kiss when she's cursed. It then turns out that he's a Jerkass who was only ever pretending to love her to gain Arendelle's throne, taking advantage of her desire to be loved.
  • Fatal Flaw: In A Frozen Heart, despite exploiting Anna and Elsa's flaws, he is unaware that his own weakness is ambition. He becomes too desperate in getting what he wants while ignoring the consequences when he takes unethical routes. At times, he knows what he's doing is wrong and even scolds himself, yet he impulsively goes through it. Being abused by his family for his ineptitude slowly becomes the breaking point and ultimately pushes him into desperately attempting to win his distant family's respect. Hans corrupts his own morals while serving as his father's gofer, committing things he once hated. As such, the time he spends prepping up on going to Arendelle is wasted because he can't contain his issues and goes to the extreme of attempting regicide. Only at the end does he have a Heel Realization, but by then, he's in damage control mode as he's being sent back to the same hellhole he wanted to escape from.
  • Fate Worse than Death:
    • Hans has a somewhat pitiable appearance in Frozen Fever. His family condemned him to forced labor, which includes shoveling horse manure. From the brief look at his condition in the Southern Isles, he's in a bleak and unfriendly environment, with the stables alone looking dark and uninviting.
    • In A Frozen Heart, he's panicking when the guards drag him to be shipped back to the Southern Isles without even seeing Anna and Elsa one last time. He's begging to be let go, not wanting to return to the hellhole he was desperately trying to escape from in the first place.
  • Father, I Don't Want to Fight: In A Frozen Heart. He initially doesn't live up to the strong masculine image of his father and older brothers, and as a result, he is ill-treated for most of his childhood. Due to the repeated abuse, he believes that if he wants their acceptance, he'll have to adopt their mentality. This is a rare case where the character slowly comes to accept his family's way of thinking.
  • Faux Affably Evil: As part of his status as The Sociopath. Again, he's good enough to fool everybody, including the audience.
  • Fiery Redhead: Inverted. Hans is pretty calm and rational, even in high-stress situations.
  • Finishing Each Other's Sentences: Anna completes his line about how people who are in love finish each other's - sandwiches, and Hans appears baffled for a moment, and then exclaims that that's just what he was going to say. This is part of his manipulative prowess, as he's trying to get her to marry him as part of his plan to usurp the kingdom.
  • Flaw Exploitation: He's quite good at manipulating people into getting what he wants.
    • Hans gets Elsa to have a Heroic BSoD by telling her that her sister is dead and it's her fault. Then he tries to kill her.
    • He exploits Anna's Fatal Flaw of being naive and needing affection by faking a romance with her so he can get closer to the throne.
  • Foil:
    • To the Duke of Weselton. Hans is a young man who does his plans on his own and is very good at hiding who he really is. The Duke is an elderly man who orders his two henchman to follow his orders, and he is horrible at hiding his true intentions.
    • While Kristoff is an orphan who was Happily Adopted by trolls that raised him with love and genuinely cares for Anna, Hans grew up in a human family that never cared for him, causing him to become ruthless and power-hungry and fake his romance with Anna. Plus, Kristoff has the warm love of family that Anna needs (and gets after she and Elsa are able to be together), while Hans has the cold family relationship that Anna doesn't want. Also, as they race back to the castle with Anna freezing because of the curse, Kristoff puts his hat on her head, but Hans makes no move to help Anna feel warmer while she's visibly shivering, instead pulling his own jacket tighter to him.
      • While both have animal companions, Sven remains on Kristoff's side to the end, but Sitron runs off during the ice castle siege, leaving the audience to wonder what happened to it. Metaphorically, both Sven and Sitron could serve as Kristoff's and Hans's respective consciences: Kristoff's persona as "Sven" is what often gets him to help others despite his own misanthropy, but Hans rarely interacts with Sitron, representing how the prince sheds his conscience in an instant from an utilitarian perspective.
    • Olaf the Snowlem represents the sisterly love between Elsa and Anna, but Hans represents that bond breaking apart, especially when Anna and Hans ask for Elsa's blessing of their Fourth Date Marriage. Also, Hans's charm masks a selfish and ruthless interior, while Olaf is a lovable goofball who genuinely cares for his friends.
  • Freeze-Frame Bonus: Doubles as Rewatch Bonus for The Reveal:
    • He looks confused while trying to copy Anna's loopy personality, especially when she completes his line about they finish each other's - sandwiches, and he then falsely agrees with her. In another instance, when the Duke asks Anna if she has powers as well, Hans is quick to parrot her when she describes herself as "completely ordinary", only to back-pedal and say that he means it in "the best way." At first, one might assume he's clumsy given he doesn't match Anna at times, but in hindsight, it shows that he's struggling to keep up with her.
    • When he and Anna announce their engagement to Elsa, he briefly sports an "Oh, Crap!" Smile after Anna declares that she wants to invite his entire family to the wedding, a sign that he doesn't get along with them.
    • During the ice castle siege, there's a glimpse of him looking up at the chandelier before grabbing the crossbow from the Duke's thug. It seems that hitting the chandelier is intentional on his part: he's trying to give the impression he wanted to save Elsa while killing her in the process.
    • In hindsight, one should closely note that his eyebrows don't budge an inch when he smiles, showing that he's faking it. There are a few times where his expressions are real, like when he's dangling from the stairway after Marshmallow tries taking him into the abyss.
    • As the snow starts falling, he pulls his own coat tighter to him, but makes no move to help Anna feel warmer when she's visibly shivering.
  • Freudian Excuse: The creators have affirmed that one thing that wasn't a lie was his twelve older brothers' unpleasant treatment of him and how it played a role in him becoming a villain.
    • The book A Frozen Heart expands upon this, showing his homeland as a terrible place of Might Makes Right, with his family outright abusing him to the point that it's implied he's a selfharmer but finding it to be more bearable than the abuse he suffers. He comes to think it's perfectly normal and even feels less than his brothers. Despite his reluctance to hurt anyone, he starts to use violence against the Southern Isles population as a means to seek his father's approval. By the end of the story, he is a totally different person from what he used to be.
    • One scene in the comic compilation Disney Storied Places that adapts the film has Hans barely getting to eat at mealtime because his older brothers get there first.
    • In the Disney on Ice adaptation, he nonchalantly comments about his brothers claiming he was a troll they had adopted.
  • Freudian Excuse Is No Excuse: In A Frozen Heart. Anna, Kristoff, and Elsa are in the dark on Hans's upbringing, especially because he hasn't told them much and since they are aware that he can be manipulative and dishonest, they don't know if they can trust even what little he has said about it. They wonder if it played a role in his decisions, but ultimately conclude that he should be responsible for his crimes instead of blaming others.
  • Freudian Slip: When Anna is asked by the Duke if she has powers as well, Hans is quick to parrot her when she describes herself as "completely ordinary", only to back-pedal and assure her that he means it in the most inoffensive way possible.
  • Friendless Background: The creators have affirmed he grew up neglected, and it's expanded in the spin-off novel A Frozen Heart. While he gets along with Lars and his mother, they're too distant or powerless to intervene when Hans needs help. It's implied the dysfunction in his family caused him to to think Love Is a Weakness, and he becomes The Unfettered after accepting the dirty tasks his father assigns him. Over time, the dysfunction in his family has left him clueless on what an actual happy relationship would be. After a lifetime in an abusive home, he never accepts a loving relationship, even when offered a shot at it with Anna.
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    G-L 
  • Glory Seeker:
    • He really wants to become king due to being unable to inherit the throne of his own kingdom.
    • In A Frozen Heart. Due to his "Well Done, Son!" Guy issues, he's dedicated to proving his worth to his abusive family by gaining a kingdom of his own and rubbing it in their faces. He takes it to the point of attempted regicide to become king.
  • Gold Digger: He arrives in Arendelle for the purpose of ultimately marrying into the kingdom's royal family so he can rule a kingdom of his own.
  • Green-Eyed Monster:
    • He is both a metaphorical and a literal case, as he has emerald-green eyes and is last in line for his kingdom's throne. It causes him to seek a throne for himself.
    • Expanded upon in A Frozen Heart. He's developed an Inferiority Superiority Complex, feeling less than his more prodigious brothers, who are favored more by their father. Hoping to seek a kingdom for himself, he even plans to rub his achievements in his family's faces instead of reconciliation, but the questionable methods he uses ironically contribute to his downfall.
  • Grew a Spine: Played with in A Frozen Heart. After years spent as his father's gofer, he begins choosing his own path in Arendelle. However, he still chooses this path in pursuit of his obsessive goal of winning his distant father's respect. It ultimately proves to be self-destructive, and he's now in a worse condition than before.
  • Hate Sink: While largely a Plot-Irrelevant Villain in a film where the main antagonistic force is fear, he provides the primary target for audience scorn.
    • He psychologically torments and attempts to murder the heroines, complete with Evil Gloating and Break Them by Talking monologues in which he brags about having "already" gotten away with his Evil Plan. The ending shows nobody having a good opinion of him for what he did: the dignitaries and soldiers clap to see him receive a Shut Up, Hannibal! punch (by Anna, whose forgiving nature is one of her defining qualities, of all characters), and the French dignitary even offers to return this "scoundrel" to his kingdom.
    • In Frozen II, he's the butt of jokes during a game of charades the heroes play out. During a round where it's Anna's turn to act out a word, Olaf guesses "Hans," followed by Elsa calling him an "irredeemable monster" and Kristoff calling him "the biggest mistake of your life!" When Anna reveals "villain" was the word she was trying to act out, Olaf comments that he, Elsa, and Kristoff "all kind of got it". And Elsa dismissively shatters an ice statue of him at one point.
    • In spin-offs, the heroes dislike him. In Frozen II: A Forest of Shadows, Anna thinks of him as "villainous" and "evil", and in The Secret Admirer, he is the only person Olaf does not like.
    • However, the Tie-In Novel A Frozen Heart downplays this and portrays him with some sympathetic qualities, shifting the total Hate Sink treatment to his Big, Screwed-Up Family, particularly his father — whose status as an abusive parent who enables his older sons to physically and emotionally bully Hans and a totalitarian who routinely tortures and kills his subjects for minor reasons, be it criticizing him or not providing favors — provides a foil for the relatively reasonable Hans.
  • Heel Realization:
    • Averted in the film. He is never shown questioning himself during his attempts to usurp the kingdom.
    • In A Frozen Heart, there are several moments where Hans second-guesses his actions, but his desire to be The Dutiful Son drives him to continue on.
  • His Own Worst Enemy: Looking at how he's depicted in A Frozen Heart, what stops him from the happiness he seeks isn't anyone but himself. He could have sought happiness by getting close to Anna or Elsa, but his ambitions and desperation to claim what he thinks will finally make his life better, his father's approval, undermine everything he worked so hard for, as he's deported home in disgrace for trying to take the throne by killing Anna and Elsa.
  • Hypocrite: His climatic betrayal is this in A Frozen Heart because of the additional backstory the book gives. He was on the receiving end of years of cruel pranks from most of his brothers, making him faking his romance with Anna, somebody who needs emotional validation, one giant cruel prank on her in return, and his verbal abuse of her becomes this as the book also implies that he hates the way his brothers and father treated their spouses, yet he treats his fiance cruelly once he no longer thinks it useful to manipulate her.
  • I Am Not My Father: Subverted in A Frozen Heart. Hans vows not to be like his family, but his desire to win their respect leads him to take on the same behavior of theirs he had disliked, including using violence to support his power.
  • Ignored Epiphany: A Frozen Heart depicts several moments where he almost realizes what he's doing is wrong:
    • When he goes to his father's study room hoping to be his gofer, he briefly mulls about turning back. But he then shakes his head, believing that if he wants to earn his father's respect and trust in going to Arendelle, then he'll have to follow his orders, even if it involves violence against their subjects.
    • When he tells Elsa that Anna died because of her and he's about to kill her with his sword, Hans doesn't take his weapon out because he's seeing what he's done to her. He realizes she's in grief over her dead sister and it seems he realizes he's gone too far... but then he shakes his head and decides he shouldn't waste time thinking on what she feels, believing that it makes her weak.
    • Also, the book portrays him as reluctant about hastily proposing a Fourth Date Marriage with Anna, wondering if he's going way too fast and how his family would react. But then, this is quickly overridden by his stubborn and single-minded goal to seize control of Arendelle.
  • I Just Want to Be Loved: In A Frozen Heart, he wants his family, mostly his father, to treat him with love and respect.
  • I Just Want to Be Special:
    • He really wants to rule a kingdom, because he won't inherit the throne in his own kingdom.
    • In A Frozen Heart, he daydreams about his father loving him, and those fantasies often involve the king taking him out to hunting, valuing his input during political meetings, naming him heir to the kingdom, and most of all, recognizing him as The Dutiful Son. However, it quickly gets overridden by a desire for power once he gets to try controlling Arendelle.
  • Inferiority Superiority Complex:
    • Seems to have this in the film, as being last in line in his own kingdom motivated him to seek out a kingdom of his own.
    • In A Frozen Heart, his Freudian Excuse causes him to feel less than his brothers. It's highly implied his apparent narcissism is just a mask for self-hatred and clinical depression. Hans was actually a sensitive and compassionate man (as shown in the novelization, he hates his father for treating their family and subjects like garbage), but began to see himself as inferior due to these perceived "weaknesses", especially next to his more prodigious, ruthless brothers.
  • Intentional Heartbreaker: He pretended to love Anna just to get close to the Arendellian throne, and even rubs it in her face. It briefly leaves her despondent, but Anna realizes that Elsa, Kristoff, and Olaf do care about her. He's confirmed to be a sociopath.
  • In the Blood: Double Subverted in A Frozen Heart, in which he starts out a decent guy opposing his father's violence and is seen as a pushover by his brothers, until he gets fed up being the "throwaway" son, and eventually picks up his family's attitude during the three-year stint as his father's gofer and brief regency in Arendelle.
  • Irony:
    • He spends more time in his coronation clothes than his gray coat or the pictured blue shirt and pants, and yet that's the only outfit where he's never shown doing anything remotely evil onscreen.
    • Despite pleading with Elsa to not become the monster people fear she may be, he ends up becoming the monster of Elsa and Anna’s story.
    • In the Tie-In Novel A Frozen Heart:
      • The Situational variety. His original intent is to leave the Southern Isles forever and prove his worth to his family, yet everything he does in pursuit of those goals has the opposite results. He also vows not to use violence willingly and be a brute like his brothers, but he has no qualms using the same tactics when things go south. This may have been due to his father's toxic influence, which corrupted his brothers after they underwent a similar treatment.
      • While the film presents him as Anna's first real relationship, the book states that no women were ever interested in him and it stung him. Anna is really the only girl to ever find him handsome and he does appear to like her just fine, but just like in the film, he has no real love for her and has no problem taunting her for her unreciprocated feelings. So Anna was also his first real relationship as well.
  • It Gets Easier: Deconstructed in A Frozen Heart. He's reluctant to beat up someone who insulted the king, but as time passes, justifying the violence gets easier, yet his personal life becomes more unstable as he continues to do what his father asks. By the time he's in Arendelle, he's so desensitized that he resorts to his family's tactics in order to become the king of Arendelle, despite having vowed not to use them.
  • I Thought You Were Dead: He has a confused reaction to Anna surviving the frozen heart curse. Anna bluntly states that he's "the only one with a frozen heart around here," then sucker-punches him.
  • It's All About Me:
    • During The Reveal, he talks about his calculated plot to fake his romance with Anna, kill Elsa, and become king of Arendelle. Aware that he'll never inherit his own kingdom's throne, so he sought to rule somewhere else. While noticing his reflection through a window, he sees only his own face, which shows that he cares only about himself. The few good deeds he does throughout the film, such as handing out goods to those suffering from the storm, were only done so he could gain their trust.
    • Averted in A Frozen Heart, in which he acts this way to hide his insecurities.
  • I've Come Too Far: In A Frozen Heart. When Hans momentarily regrets his actions when he tells Elsa that Anna is dead, he immediately gets over it, as he's already so close to his goal of being free from his father.
  • I Want Them Alive: Hans insists that Elsa be taken alive.
  • Jacob and Esau: In A Frozen Heart. His father favors his older brothers, who conform to his Social Darwinist worldview more, while he's implied to be their mother's favorite.
  • Jade-Colored Glasses: In the spin-off A Frozen Heart, he starts out as someone who had understanding of compassion and empathy, but the abuse he received at the hands of his family shattered this world-view and he came to adopt his family's cynical mindset.
  • Jerkass: Revealed to be this at the climax of the film. He does, however, show signs of this by angrily threatening to charge the Duke with treason, thus showing that he is quite ruthless and two-faced.
  • Jerkass Has a Point:
    • A strange case in that we don't realize at the time how much of a jerk he can be, but while Hans tells Elsa that if she killed the Duke's guards, she would become the monster the Duke was calling her, he has a point.
    • In his Break Them by Talking monologue, he mocks Anna for agreeing to marry him so quickly and for going after Elsa, believing she could be helped. Given the fact that Elsa and Kristoff expressed shock over the sudden engagement, and that Anna herself repeatedly noted that the speed of their relationship was "crazy", Fourth Date Marriages are just as uncommon in-universe as in Real Life, and just as risky. Anna also did have little reason to believe that Elsa was the Hero with Bad Publicity that she really was and was acting out of optimism and Undying Loyalty, something that the film acknowledges through the questioning of other characters as well, although as a Reconstruction of The Heart, she proves to be ultimately right about Elsa.
    • Even though he's motivated by wanting Elsa out of the way so he can become king himself, he is well within his rights to accuse Elsa of treason since she did curse the kingdom she was supposed to protect and her sister, who effectively inherited the kingdom as Elsa running away effectively renounced the throne to Anna. Since the only point when Elsa showed her true intentions was when she expressed shock to Anna that the kingdom was frozen (and only Anna, whom at this point Hans has locked up and who doesn't have any proof of her sister's innocence other than her word anyway), he and the rest of the chancellors have no real reason to think anything was an accident. The closest thing they have to one is that Anna vouched for her earlier when the Duke started accusing her of being a monster, and Anna had no proof other than her own faith in her big sister. And they all saw Anna come back with an ice curse before they quickly filed out of the room to give Hans a chance to try to save her with True Love's Kiss in private.
  • Jumping Off the Slippery Slope: In A Frozen Heart, once he gets his first taste of real power from controlling Arendelle in Elsa's absence, it corrupts his mind, driving him to start dehumanizing everyone else, manipulate others, and be desperate to cling onto power at all costs.
  • Just Between You and Me: He tells Anna of his Evil Plan to leave her to freeze to death while he executes Elsa in public. This way, he will be seen as the hero who saved Arendelle from a tyrant who brought eternal winter and killed her own sister from a PR standpoint. Then, he can rule the kingdom with both sisters out of commission. It's implied he pulled this because he thought that it would break Anna and the despair would speed up the freezing process.
  • Kick Them While They Are Down: Telling Anna his plans to kill Elsa and telling Elsa that she killed Anna are both verbal forms of this trope. Justified Trope in Elsa's case, as he's guilt-tripping her into despair so that she will allow him to kill her.
  • Knight in Shining Armor: The people are suffering from cold? Organize the guards to pass out soup and blankets. The princess went on a mission to save the kingdom and her sister, but her horse came back alone? Organize a team to find her. There's a sorceress at the root of the cold? Have her arrested. All For Great Justice! It's implied that he's invoking this trope to win people over and make his takeover more stable.
  • Lack of Empathy:
    • Callously dumping Anna to her death (and telling her that he didn't love her) and telling Elsa that she was responsible for Anna's death are indicators that he disregards the wellbeing of others, and as lampshaded by Anna, ends the movie with a "frozen heart". The creators have stated that Hans is indeed a sociopath.
    • Initially averted in the beginning of A Frozen Heart, and deconstructed — he was sympathetic to his mother (being married to an uncaring man who encouraged cruelty in his sons), the citizens of the Southern Isles (as his father is a corrupt tyrant), Caleb's wife (who's married to a man who takes advantage of being the king's favorite son and pays no attention to her pregnancy) and, surprisingly enough, to the people of Arendelle (for losing their king and queen). But he becomes increasingly callous and villainous as the book goes on, developing the frozen heart he was accused of having in the movie.
  • Lantern Jaw of Justice: Subverted. He possesses a big jaw, but actually fakes being a heroic man. The good deeds he does throughout the movie are done to make his takeover more stable.
  • Light Is Not Good: He is a prince with lighter clothing and the outfit he wears at the dance is white and gold, but he's actually a frozen-hearted Gold Digger.
  • Like Father, Unlike Son: Subverted in A Frozen Heart. Though he started out not wanting to become like his father and brothers, as things go by and he becomes desperate, Hans ends up becoming the same as his violent family, courtesy of their toxic influence.
  • Leitmotif: He has his own distinct theme that plays while wooing Anna, and it's especially noticeable when he pulls in for the kiss. After the betrayal, his theme can still be heard, albeit with a darker tone.
  • Lonely Rich Kid: In A Frozen Heart. Behind his daddy issues and fear of his family, Hans has no friends and few people who care for him due to his father. It was something that hurt him when he was younger. Before going through errands for his father and going on his life-changing trip, Hans legitimately wanted to meet someone and hoped that Arendelle would end his loneliness.
  • Love-Interest Traitor: He pretends to fall in Love at First Sight with Anna, but turns out to be a Gold digging sociopath.
  • Love Is a Weakness:
    • During his reveal, he says that Anna was "dumb enough" to go after Elsa and so desperate for love that she was willing to marry him "just like that".
    • Deconstructed in A Frozen Heart. Growing up in a dysfunctional household, he's never known real love, thanks to the abuse and the harsh upbringing that encouraged Social Darwinism, and comes to the conclusion that all love comes to weakness and brokenness. His reaction to Elsa's grief over Anna's death is of confusion, thinking it's evidence that love "only serves to make one weak".

    M-R 
  • Make It Look Like an Accident: His plan for Elsa in order to take the throne. There's also the previously mentioned incident with the chandelier. A Frozen Heart suggests that he wasn't actively trying to kill her, but wasn't against it if it ended up looking like a failed attempt to save her.
  • Manipulative Bastard:
    • He's very good at manipulating people to push them where he needs them to go and it's totally calculated. When he notices how naive Anna is, he plays that up to seduce her. He helps the kingdom to gain their trust, and when Anna reveals that she's dying, he says that she's dead just to get other people to follow him in killing Elsa, and he consciously mirrors people, showing them what he thinks they want to see. It's no wonder that by the time he reveals his betrayal, he's just inches away from winning.
    • Deconstructed in A Frozen Heart. From his view, the ends justify the means and Love Is a Weakness that can be easily exploited, as he sees the world as a Crapsack World courtesy of his dark upbringing. He plays a long game, planning his marriage to Elsa for years, but when Anna seems to be the easier path to getting what he wants, he changes gears slightly. He doesn't hesitate to lie and bribe, and starts to dehumanize Elsa so she is viewed as a monster and so that no one questions it when he kills her, and he does everything he can to play into that narrative. He isn't hesitant to use violence if others can be easily manipulated. However, once Anna sees through his cajolery, she points out that he's the only person around with a metaphorically "frozen heart."
  • Massive Numbered Siblings: Hans is the youngest of thirteen princes.
  • Master Actor: He mirrors his persona towards the person he's talking to in a calculated approach. The creators even compared him to a chameleon, and he's partially based on the concept of the Mirror in the original tale. He's so effective that many fans like to speculate that he has a secret twin or was brainwashed by the trolls at times, although these theories have been jossed. In hindsight, while there are a few times where his expressions are real, one should closely note that his eyebrows actually don't budge an inch.
  • Master Swordsman: He displays great skill in the use of a sword, having sliced Marshmallow's left leg in one clean swipe. Even for someone who would very likely never see combat, his military regimen and training as a naval officer included extensive knowledge and practice on swordsmanship, something which shaped up his body.
  • Meaningful Name:
    • His name is derived from Hans Christian Andersen, and he is in a film inspired by a tale by the same author.
    • His name is a derivative of the name "Johannes" in Northern-European languages (the English counterpart is "John"). The name means "God is gracious", reflecting his role as a mirror; he's functioning as one toward all the characters he interacts with, but particularly toward Elsa (whose own name has the meaning "God's oath") and Anna (whose own name has the meaning "graciousness"). Not only does his mirroring of his targets work as part of his manipulation, he also plays the thematic role of a dark version of each of the two sisters. Like Elsa, he hides much of himself, symbolized by their shared habit of wearing gloves, and like Anna, he also grew up in the shadow of older siblings. However, unlike the two of them, he became ruthless and cruel.
  • Momma's Boy: In A Frozen Heart. Hans is one of the few people who still cares for his mother, while his father claims that when Hans was late for her birthday, she'd be the only one to notice his absence. That being said, his mother, while she does love Hans, is too weak-willed to stand up to her husband and older sons, and could only show him a smile in her son's presence. Some of his brothers (especially Rudi and Runo) even ridicule him for being a momma's boy and resent him for being their mother's favorite.
  • Morality Pet: In A Frozen Heart, he genuinely gets along with Lars and his mother. Even as he gets desperate in trying to control Arendelle, he still cares for Sitron, his horse.
  • Moral Sociopathy: He has no qualms about seducing a princess or murdering a queen, but he also does everything he can to keep the people of Arendelle safe.
  • Moral Myopia: In A Frozen Heart, he hates the way his family treats him and their wives, but he has no problem tormenting his fiance when he no longer sees the need to manipulate her.
  • Motive Rant: During The Reveal, Hans reveals his plot to marry Anna, kill Elsa, and become king of Arendelle through ascension, verbally abusing Anna in the process by telling her that her sister "is preferable, of course". He says he feigned interest in her because he wanted to get closer to the throne through marriage, and Elsa was too reclusive to romance while Anna was vulnerable due to her abandonment issues.
  • Narcissist:
    • It appears that Hans is a bit narcissistic during The Reveal, envisioning himself as "the hero who [saved] Arendelle from destruction".
    • Averted in A Frozen Heart, in which he perceives himself as a loser and hides his insecurities by acting this way.
  • Nerves of Steel: Hans is a pretty competent fighter, has no issue with facing down danger, and even is the one to defeat Marshmallow.
  • Nice Guy: Subverted. He is kind, generous, and always speaking politely to both Anna and Elsa. It's all an act. In A Frozen Heart, it starts off genuine.
  • Nice to the Waiter: Deconstructed. He's nice to a random girl that just ran into his horse, making sure she's okay and even walking onto the not-that-stable boat to help her up — and that's before he learns that she's Princess Anna. He also doesn't hesitate to hand out supplies and let common people into the palace to keep them warm. Of course, this just shows how dedicated he is to being a Villain with Good Publicity.
  • Noble Male, Roguish Male: As the gentle nobleman, with Kristoff. Subverted, as Hans's true character is Machiavellian and uses the noble ruse as a tool to usurp the throne, while Kristoff's persona is implied by the trolls to have been created to protect himself and hide his inner kindness and goodness.
  • No Body Left Behind: A rare and strange non-fatal example: Hans is knocked out when he breaks his sword on the newly frozen Anna's hand, but is not visible in the wide-ish angle shots afterward. However, once Elsa thaws Arendelle, he regains consciousness and reappears on the ship's deck. Maybe he slid on his butt a few feet?
  • No Historical Figures Were Harmed: Some commentators have noted how Hans bears a certain resemblance to Jerome Bonaparte, the youngest brother of Napoléon Bonaparte and the King of Westphalia.
  • No, You:
  • Oh, Crap!: His little "Uh-oh" happens when his horse Sitron accidentally lets go of the boat he is standing on and causes him to fall into the fjord and get soaked.
  • "Oh, Crap!" Smile: Hans very briefly makes one of these when he and Anna are announcing their engagement to Elsa, after Anna declares she wants to invite his entire family to the wedding.
  • Opportunistic Bastard: By his own admission, Hans developed his scheme as he went along. At first, he plans on marrying Elsa to get the throne, but settles on Anna after Elsa turns out to be closed-off to forming new relationships. Next, he tries to murder Anna and just take over the kingdom directly. He always takes the path that will benefit him the most, as quickly as possible.
  • Peer Pressure Makes You Evil: In A Frozen Heart. He's often ignored by his father for his lack of assertiveness against his brothers. As a result, he decides that if he wants his family's acceptance, then he'll have to mirror their behavior and follow whatever orders they give.
  • Polite Villains, Rude Heroes: The Polite Villain to Kristoff's Rude Hero. Even after The Reveal, Hans is still smooth, charming, and well-dressed in contrast to Kristoff, who is the snarky, impolite, and sometimes insensitive Tritagonist of the film.
  • Playing Both Sides: Does this in the conflict between Anna and the Duke. He puts them both in situations where they feel they need to work with him. He almost wins.
  • Plot-Irrelevant Villain: He has nothing to do with the overall plot of the film, which is driven by the sisters' separation, and is largely indirect from the conflict with the eternal winter, taking advantage of those situations instead of causing them, with his main purpose being someone for Anna to protect Elsa from and perform an Act of True Love. A strange example, as there is a reason for Hans existing (to inadvertently start off the main conflict by trying to take the throne), but not much reason for him being a villain besides being part of the moral about true love.
  • Pragmatic Villainy: He is generally motivated by what will benefit him most. He gives blankets and food to the poor, so the people can accept him easily once he takes over the kingdom. He also dissuades Elsa from killing the Weselton soldiers and by the same token stops them from killing her, in order not to damage his Villain with Good Publicity standing.
  • Primary-Color Champion: Subverted. He wears a red scarf to match the blue clothing under his white coat, which has golden accents, and appears to be a heroic character, but turns out to be villainous.
  • Prince Charming: He invokes this trope to appeal to Anna's romanticism. He's brave, chivalrous, and acts kind. Him personally assisting with helping the citizens of Arendelle get warm during the winter crisis probably would have cemented him as this if it wasn't an act to gain the public's admiration. In truth, he is anything but charming. His character is a major subversion of the classical Disney Prince, using his charm and seemingly heroic acts to gain the trust of those around him and take power.
  • Prince Charmless:
  • Psychotic Smirk: He gives Anna a particularly unsettling one when he reveals that he's not the Prince Charming she thought him to be.
  • Reality Ensues:
    • He and Anna agree to a Fourth Date Marriage, and others quickly object. Elsa quickly blocks it when they try to gain her approval.
    • Royals throughout history have taken a dim view of family members A) trying to take shortcuts to any throne, especially without clearing it through them; and B) failing spectacularly at doing so, leaving the crowned head in question in a position to demand restitution. As seen in Frozen Fever, his family doesn't let him get off scot-free after his crimes in Arendelle.
    • In A Frozen Heart:
      • He also forgot that his father won't easily allow him to attend Elsa's coronation. He becomes the king's gofer to gain enough trust to leave for Arendelle.
      • The book also has him and Anna both even briefly wonder how others would react to their Fourth Date Marriage, but then, their doubts are quickly quashed, being aware that the gates will close soon and that it's their only shot at it despite their initial reservations.
  • Reasonable Authority Figure:
    • Despite being a Manipulative Bastard intent on murder and usurpation, and while some of it may have been an act, his brief regency while the sisters are away seems fair enough. He keeps the castle's gates open, opens up a soup kitchen in the castle, personally passes out blankets to the locals, and even defends Elsa from the accusations of the Duke of Weselton, a high-ranking official from a neighboring kingdom with designs on dominating Arendelle's economy.
    • In A Frozen Heart, he's sincerely committed to proving his greatness by transforming Arendelle from a backwater country into a powerhouse capable of warding off external threats, and as his father is a brutal tyrant, he's also determined to rule with kindness. However, he's too willing to become king, even using the methods he once despised.
  • "The Reason You Suck" Speech: Upon revealing his true nature to Anna, he makes fun of her for being so desperate for love that she agreed to marry him "just like that", which made his plan that much easier, and for being "dumb enough" to go on a journey to help Elsa.
  • Replacement Goldfish: Downplayed, Exploited, and Subverted. After years of isolation and Elsa appearing uninterested in maintaining their formerly-close relationship, Anna is fully willing to marry him immediately as she believes that he can fill the void left behind in her heart and replace Elsa as the most precious person in her life. Which makes his betrayal hurt even more as her supposed true love doesn't really love Anna at all and only uses her for his own goals.
  • Rich Suitor, Poor Suitor: The suave, wealthy, royal rich suitor to Kristoff's unglamorous, working-class poor.
  • The Rich Want to Be Richer: He's already rich due to his status as a prince, but wants to become the ruler of a kingdom by any means possible as he's the Spare to the Throne back home, and it's practically impossible to get away with overthrowing twelve older brothers.
  • Romantic False Lead: He's presented as being Anna's soulmate early on — then we meet Kristoff. Hans is also, you know, evil.
  • Royals Who Actually Do Something: Say what you want about him or his morals, he's very good at keeping the lid on things once Elsa bails out and Anna goes after her, running the kingdom for the sisters in their absence. Of course, he's a villainous example of the trope, but from what we're shown, he appears to be quite good at the job and at convincing the other characters that he's a good leader.
  • The Runt at the End:
    • In A Frozen Heart. At times, Hans does acknowledge that he's the Black Sheep of the Westergaard clan. So to escape from his grimy reality, he often fantasizes a world where he's appreciated by his family, but those daydreams often end with him realizing he'll never be loved. He even makes self-deprecating deadpan jokes about his low status in the familial pecking order and tries to downplay it, but only Lars knows the reality behind it.
    • The Frozen portion in the comic compilation Disney Storied Places has him barely getting to eat at mealtime because his older brothers get there first.

    S-Y 
  • Selective Obliviousness: In A Frozen Heart. He ignores any indication that Elsa is not the "monster" he imagines her as. Any moment he starts to pity her, he immediately attempts to rationalize why he shouldn't.
  • Self-Deprecation: In A Frozen Heart. He makes Self-Deprecating Humor about how he's The Runt at the End who's often neglected and tries to brush it off, but only Lars knew the reality behind these jokes.
  • Self-Harm: In A Frozen Heart. When forced to be in the company of his abusive family during one scene, he runs his fingers over the rough wood of an old table, but finds the physical pain of the splinters "oddly pleasant" compared to the psychological kind they heap on him regularly.
  • Sensitive Guy and Manly Man:
    • Sensitive guy to Kristoff's manly man. Switched around with The Reveal that Hans is actually anything but sensitive.
    • Played with in A Frozen Heart, in which Hans Used to Be a Sweet Kid who opposed his family's violence towards their subjects, but years of abuse and working as the king's errand boy slowly hardened him.
  • Shadow Archetype:
    • He embodies Anna's feelings of inadequacy and invisibility, representing what she could've been if she stopped reconciling with Elsa and focused instead on getting attention at all costs. They're both driven and active in pursuing their goals, but unlike Anna, Hans develops a low opinion on love and zealously focus on his own betterment at others' expense, while Anna makes an effort to find love again and zealously protects her sister. Taken further in the novel A Frozen Heart, in which he plans to rub it in his brothers' faces rather than reconcile with them.
    • He is also this to a lesser extent for Elsa, who fears becoming a monster, but is able to keep a grip on herself with the support of her family. While Elsa hurts people accidentally and fears doing so, Hans embraces causing harm and has no one to rely on for moral support. Also, while both hide key aspects of who they are, he does so to manipulate others.
  • Sharp-Dressed Man: Favors a Beau Brummel cut to his suits, admittedly with a different colour palette. It's complete with the Painted-On Pants. But in Frozen Fever, his trademark white suit is dirty, having been condemned to physical work at the royal stables.
  • Shout-Out:
    • His name is a reference to the creator of the story that the film is based on: "The Snow Queen" by Hans Christian Anderson.
    • There's also a homage to Donny Osmond during the song "Love is an Open Door", where Hans closes his eyes and tilts his shoulders and head while belting out a high note under the waterfall.
  • Significant Green-Eyed Redhead: Marks him as a person of interest, and he becomes Anna's first Love Interest and is also later revealed to be a threat.
  • Silly Rabbit, Romance Is for Kids!: Deconstructed in A Frozen Heart. Having witnessed the dysfunction within his family, he thinks this is where all relationships end up. Plus, his abusive upbringing emotionally stunts him to believe love is a laughable concept the weak-willed use to cover their shortcomings. However, as he's never known true love, it also leaves him clueless on what an actual happy relationship would be.
  • Sir Not-Appearing-in-This-Trailer: In the lead-up to the film's release, out of most of the human characters, he was the one who had the least acknowledgment and was only included in the merchandise if it was a set of the full cast.
  • Slasher Smile:
  • Slipping into Stink: In Frozen Fever, a sick Elsa accidentally launches a giant snowball all the way to the Southern Isles, where it pummels him into a wagon full of Road Apples.
  • Smug Snake: At The Reveal, Anna says "You won't get away with this!" as he is about to leave her to die. His response? "I already have." This ultimately leads to his downfall.
  • Social Climber: His whole goal is to become king, and he's willing to kill to do it. In his Motive Rant, he explains his plan was to "marry into the throne somewhere" and that he would kill Elsa to get her out of the way.
  • The Social Darwinist: Deconstructed in A Frozen Heart. He doesn't start out as one, but his abusive upbringing corrupts him with believing Love Is a Weakness, and by the end of the novel, he dehumanizes others in his quest for power. He's left baffled when Anna asks him for a True Love's Kiss, on how Elsa reacts to Anna's supposed death, and when both sisters reconcile after years of separation.
  • The Sociopath:
  • Sour Outside, Sad Inside: In A Frozen Heart. It's implied that his cruel behavior is a veneer for a sense of inferiority and clinical depression, picked up from a family with Social Darwinist attitudes.
  • Spare to the Throne: The youngest of thirteen princes, giving him a very slim chance at inheriting the throne.
  • Spell My Name with an "S": His last name has been spelled as Westerguard, Westergard, and even Westergaard. Considering the fact that Jennifer Lee never directly stated in her tumblr post on the subject how to spell it, and didn't correct the poster who asked the question, it can be assumed that Westerguard is meant to be correct.
  • Starting a New Life: In A Frozen Heart, Hans wants to escape and start a new life away from the tyranny of his homeland for good with nobody mocking him. Lars, the only one of Hans's brothers who is aware of this, suggests to Hans that he go to Arendelle, meet Elsa, and get her to fall in love with him.
  • Start of Darkness: In the spin-off A Frozen Heart, he Used to Be a Sweet Kid who opposed his father's violent regime, but years of abuse and Peer Pressure Makes You Evil corrupt his own morals over time while working as his father's assistant slowly darkens him.
  • Strange Minds Think Alike: Anna completes the sentence "We finish each other's..." with "sandwiches", and Hans indicates that he has the same thought. This is part of his manipulative prowess, as he's trying to get Anna to marry him as part of his plan to usurp the kingdom.
  • Stepford Smiler: His feigned charms hide his true intent of seizing the Arendellian throne and the internal bitterness he holds against his brothers. He mirrors his persona towards the person he's talking to in a calculated approach. The creators even compared him to a chameleon.
  • Stupid Evil: His betrayal was unnecessary, given that Anna was going to die anyway. All he would have to do is kiss her, and if it didn't work, he could've just claimed that he sincerely believed it was True Love. He could also have convinced her to stay in the room willingly while he pretended to get help, actually letting her freeze to death as he went to kill Elsa. But because he decides to be a jerk and to gloat about his plans, Anna ends up escaping the room with Olaf's help, and then exposing his lies and saving Elsa by throwing herself in front of his sword, which gets him arrested and sent back to the Southern Isles in disgrace.
  • Successful Sibling Syndrome: In A Frozen Heart. Hans often envies his older brothers, as they are favored more by the king. This desire of getting out of their shadow, alongside seeking his distant father's approval, is part of what motivates him.
  • Teeth-Clenched Teamwork: In A Frozen Heart. Hans has complete disdain working with the Duke of Weselton, and even snidely calls him a "weasel" behind his back. The feeling is mutual, because they have different ideas in dealing with the eternal winter.
  • They Died Because of You: Tells Elsa about Anna being dead from her curse in order to get her guard down so that he can kill her. It's also the page quote.
  • This Cannot Be!: After Elsa manages to finally control her powers and thaw out Anna after being frozen through The Power of Love, Hans has this very revelation when he sees them both alive and exclaims to Anna, "But she froze your heart!"
  • Trademark Favorite Food: In A Frozen Heart and the Disney Enchanted Tales mobile game, he does indeed like sandwiches.
  • Tragic Dream: In A Frozen Heart. He wants to earn the love and respect of his father. Not only have his actions ruined chances of that happening, but it's implied that his father has no love for anyone, not even the sons who are more useful to him. Meaning that even if he succeeded, he probably still wouldn't have been treated as an equal by his father.
  • Tragic Villain: Per the creators, as a result of growing up without love. Expanded upon in A Frozen Heart, as he is considered by his father and nearly all his brothers to be a pushover who doesn't know how to fight back even as a young adult and is implied to Self-Harm as well. Some scenes in the book depict him thinking of leaving home for good, yet ends up like the violent family he hated near the end.
  • Troll: Acts like he's going to kiss Anna and save her life, then backs out at the last minute to reveal his true nature.
  • Troubled Abuser: He's an outright evil bastard to Anna and Elsa, but back home he's given an equal, if not worse, amount of cruelty from his family.
  • Turn Out Like His Father: In A Frozen Heart. Hans tries defying this trope, but his desire to win his father's respect causes him to adopt his family's mindset.
  • Tyke Bomb: In A Frozen Heart. Downplayed, but Hans was raised by an abusive man who indoctrinated him and his brothers with Social Darwinism, and was endlessly bullied by his older brothers for failing to meet his family's harsh standards of ruling their kingdom. To earn their respect, Hans decides to become his father's errand boy in the hopes of being recognized as The Dutiful Son.
  • Tyrant Takes the Helm: Zigzagged. After Elsa flees the kingdom in panic and Anna goes after her, he is given the authority to take care of the people in Arendelle. Despite his status as an Evil Prince who attempts regicide against the sisters, he proves himself to be a far better rulernote  compared to the Queen of Arendelle, whose first act after the coronation is to accidentally freeze over all of Arendelle and then abandon the kingdom, leaving the populace to suffer. This is expanded upon in A Frozen Heart: due to the tyranny he saw back home, he's determined to be a better king than his father, despite using questionable means to achieve his goals.
  • Undercover When Alone: That moment when Hans smiles like he's quite taken with Anna, right after they first met. On the edge of a deserted market in the water under a boat when no one is watching.
  • The Unfavorite: In A Frozen Heart. Despite being seen as a "throwaway" by his entire family except for his mother and Lars, he often dreams about having a loving and caring family, even as an adult. His father is implied to really only care about his oldest son due to him being the heir, and Hans is the furthest from that status of thirteen children. Needless to say, his father does not treat him well.
  • The Unfettered:
    • Shows no moral qualms in the movie regarding his goal to become king, attempting to gain a throne through manipulation and murder.
    • Deconstructed in A Frozen Heart. Though he starts out as a decent person who opposes his father's brutal regime, his time as the king's gofer and his brothers' constant bullying make him cynical about love, on top of winning his heartless father's respect. By the end of the story, he's so desensitized in his quest for power that he has no qualms using the methods he hated in order to become the king of Arendelle.
  • Unwitting Instigator of Doom: Amusingly, for a guy who was villainous in the first place. Hans comes to Arendelle with a relatively simple plot to marry into the royal family and manipulate his way onto the throne, and ends up causing the royal family to fall apart and the queen to unintentionally plunge the kingdom into eternal winter entirely by accident. This turns out to be almost the best possible situation for him, but for much of the plot he's as nonplussed as anybody — though he ultimately finds out a way to use it to his advantage.
  • Used to Be a Sweet Kid: While the canonicity of A Frozen Heart is ambiguous, in it, he used to be a boy who simply wanted to be loved by his father and hated his family's cruelty. When word got out about the deaths of Arendelle's king and queen, he's sympathetic to their people and daughter Elsa. He doesn't automatically decide to go and woo their daughter, as it was Lars who suggested that Hans should marry Elsa so Hans can find love and leave the Southern Isles for good. Hans accepts the idea, but there is still no sign of ill intent, only figuring he has nothing to lose. He would think about what Elsa would look and be like, wondering if she might actually love him. He spends a few years doing "favors" for his father so he can go to Arendelle for her coronation, but his father only gives him one day to return home. His desperation to never go back, prove his worth to his family (especially his father), and become a king cause him to be more willing to do things he originally and ironically despised and less reluctant to do them. By the time Anna returns from the North Mountain, he's become unfettered in his goals.
  • The Usurper: Since he's 13th in line for the throne in his country, his main goal is to marry himself to the throne somewhere and rapidly make himself king as soon as he gets or/and sees the right chance. He originally intended to marry Elsa, since she's the heir, but since Anna was a much easier target for his charms due to Elsa's refusal to let anyone get close to her, he adjusted his plan to instead marry Anna and then become king by staging an "accident" for Elsa.
  • Vile Villain, Saccharine Show: He's one of the most chilling depictions of a sociopath in any Disney movie.
  • Villain Ball: Not only did he tell Anna his Evil Plan with Evil Gloating, he also decides to twist the knife further and demonstrate how little he cares by leaving her to die alone - before she's finished freezing. All because he thinks he's already gotten away with his plot, even though Anna is still a massive loose end. Had he kept the act up and pretended to be at least well-intentioned like Anna, even if not actually her One True Love, he could've kept his charade and avoided punishment.
  • Villain Protagonist: A Frozen Heart focuses on his perspective and Anna's, although he's still a villain who tries to kill the heroes to further his ambition.
  • Villainous Underdog: A Breaking Speech is a wise thing to do before attacking a sorceress with a sword when she knows he is coming. This effectively leaves Elsa despondent, as being told that her sister died due to her own actions is her worst fear come true.
  • Villain with Good Publicity: He is the living embodiment of this even towards the viewer. One would assume he's a classic Prince Charming, but nobody realizes he's actually faking it and plotting to usurp the throne until it's almost too late.
  • Villain in a White Suit: His characteristic blazer, atop otherwise blue inner vestments, as well as his distinctive white gloves and a full-white suit during Elsa's coronation party. Contrary to traditional Disney expectations, this doesn't affect his morality one bit. He's actually a cruel usurper who has no qualms about murdering his way to a throne, breaking an innocent girl's heart along the way.
  • Villainous Breakdown:
    • Hans has a blink-and-miss shot where he argues with the Duke that he will protect Arendelle from treason. He looks more irate than he should be in that scene, hinting at the cruelty boiling under the calm surface, but to viewers on the first watch, it's meant to come across as him standing firmly behind Anna and/or the Arendelle citizens who need the "tradable goods" to keep from freezing to death.
    • After witnessing Elsa's escape from the castle dungeon before he can murder her, he gets so pissed off that he pursues her into the blizzard in order to do so at any cost.
    • In his final chapter of A Frozen Heart, he panics when he's informed that he's being deported without being offered a chance to speak with Anna and tries desperately to escape.
  • Villainous Face Hold: During the climax, he holds a weakened Anna's chin up so she's looking him in the eye while gloating of his plan to kill Elsa and usurp the throne.
  • Villainous Valour: As evidenced by his fight with Marshmallow. He slices off the snow monster's leg, and goes to rescue the soldiers. Pursuing Elsa into the deadly snowstorm after she escapes from the dungeon may count as well.
  • Walking Spoiler: Used to be one before the movie's release, being built up as Anna's Love Interest.
  • Warrior Prince: As it turns out, Hans is pretty good with a sword and holds his own against giant snowlem Marshmallow. He's the only one to slash one of Marshmallow's legs.
  • "Well Done, Son!" Guy: In A Frozen Heart, he is this taken to extremes and it is the driving force behind his main goal. He often gets the short end of the stick, but despite this, he often daydreams about having a loving and caring father even as an adult, and to obtain his father's respect, Hans decides to become the king's errand boy in the hopes of being recognized as The Dutiful Son.
  • What Does She See in Him?: In A Frozen Heart, he wonders how and why any woman is willing to court his brutish twin brothers, and can't figure out how Runo's wife ended up marrying him despite his initial assumptions of her being immune to his slick charms.
  • Wicked Cultured: He's well-mannered, suave, and well-versed in the ways of royal leadership. He's also a power-hungry Jerkass.
  • Woobie, Destroyer of Worlds: In A Frozen Heart. Despite attempting to get two innocent women killed, Hans is a victim of a loveless household and an abusive family.
  • Would Hit a Girl: Tries to outright kill Elsa with his sword in the climax, being stopped only when Anna blocks him from her just when she freezes over completely.
  • Xanatos Speed Chess: He has a knack for taking advantage of events to further his own primary goals. The spin-off novelization A Frozen Heart, while not canon, goes into detail about how quickly he can adapt:
    • Plan A: Woo Elsa and convince her to marry him. (Hans bumps into Elsa's hitherto unknown sister Anna instead.)
    • Plan B: Woo Anna, convince Elsa to bless their marriage, and eventually arrange to overthrow Elsa, preferably without violence. (Elsa refuses to bless the marriage and reveals her ice magic; and then Anna sets out to look for her, leaving him in charge.)
    • Plan C: Rule Arendelle in Anna's absence. (Anna's horse comes back without Anna, and the people are worried; they might revolt if Hans just leaves her to her fate, so...)
    • Plan D: Set out in search of Anna and Elsa, to bring Anna back and/or convince Elsa to stop the snow. (He can't find Anna, and while he does manage to capture Elsa, he can't convince her to stop the snow.)
    • Plan E: With Elsa locked up and helpless and Anna missing and presumed dead, rule Arendelle as in Plan C. (Anna comes back, cursed by Elsa.)
    • Plan F: Leave Anna for dead, accuse Elsa of murdering her sister, and execute Elsa. (Anna wasn't quite dead, and she blocks his attack on Elsa.)
  • You Have Outlived Your Usefulness: His plan for everyone involved. Just tweak it to "no longer about to live", and this is how he treats Anna when she reveals her curse. He also decides to kill Elsa when she says she can't stop the winter she caused.
  • You Monster!: Not to him directly in Frozen II, but Elsa calls him an "irredeemable monster" when Olaf mentions his name.
  • You Must Be Cold: Averted. As the snow starts falling and Anna still wears her ballgown that leaves her arms and shoulders bare, he only pulls his jacket tighter around himself. It foreshadows his self-serving nature.
  • Youngest Child Wins: His backstory is that he's a inversion to this rule, being the youngest of thirteen siblings and growing up knowing he'll never receive the crown.
  • Youthful Freckles: In close-ups, we can see that Hans also has freckles. Like Elsa's, they aren't very noticeable.

Alternative Title(s): Frozen Prince Hans Westergaard Of The Southern Isles

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