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Major groups that oppose the Church of Seiros through terrorizing the Academy and other nations in Fódlan.


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The Flame Emperor Army

    Flame Emperor 

Flame Emperor

Class: Flame Emperor

Crest: Goddess/Flames (Major)

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/feth_flame.png
Click here to see the Flame Emperor in Fire Emblem Heroes 

"We will cross paths again. I am the Flame Emperor... It is I who will reforge the world."

A mysterious masked figure whose identity is unknown. The Flame Emperor works in the shadows with an ill will towards the Church of Seiros, and was in fact behind the brigand attack on the Officers Academy students at the game's beginning.


  • Ambiguous Gender: Despite being consistently referred to as male in Three Houses, the Flame Emperor is referred to using they in Heroes and on Sharena's "Meet the Heroes" profile.
  • An Axe to Grind: Wields an axe in all released artwork and when confronted during the story. It's suspiciously similar to the Victorious Axe that Edelgard wields in Heroes.
  • Climax Boss: The boss battle with the Flame Emperor serves as the climax of Part One in all routes. The reveal of the Flame Emperor’s true identity and the subsequent fallout sparks the Wham Episode and represents the point after which the routes all greatly diverge.
  • Combat Stilettos: Closer inspection of the concept art and Heroes artwork reveals the Flame Emperor wears steel high-heeled boots. Given their true identity, it's likely they're meant to increase and disguise the Flame Emperor's real height.
  • Compressed Hair: After the reveal, you have to wonder how all that hair could fit under that helmet.
  • Contractual Boss Immunity: Has the Commander skill when confronted, granting the Flame Emperor multiple resistances other than just preventing instant death and reducing damage from gambits.
  • Cool Mask: Wears a white and red mask and a helmet to maintain a secret identity and a distorted voice.
  • Disc-One Final Boss: The main antagonist for the first half of the game; if you jump through the right hoops, it's possible for the two of you to ally against the Church.
  • Dramatic Unmask: If you're a Blue Lion or Golden Deer, which reveals the Flame Emperor is Edelgard. Averted if you're a Black Eagle, where Edelgard reveals from the start of the climactic battle that she is the Flame Emperor and forgoes the helmet completely in the resulting fight.
  • Even Evil Has Standards: Despite opposing the church, the Flame Emperor does not approve of what those who slither in the dark do to achieve their goals. Seeing what goes down in Remire Village elicits disgust and an offer of alliance, though this does little to dissuade a furious Jeralt and Byleth.
  • Foreshadowing: The Flame Emperor's true identity is hinted at in several ways:
    • The Flame Emperor's color scheme is primarily black and red, similar to Edelgard's.
    • You can see the Flame Emperor holding an axe at the end of chapter 6, which is Edelgard's strongest weapon proficiency.
    • The second word in the title is Emperor, the selfsame title Edelgard is supposed to inherit. Edelgard's C+ support also reveals she has the Crest of Flames.
    • Should Edelgard confront the Death Knight in Chapter 8 or Kronya and/or Solon in Chapter 10, they express surprise that they're attacking them like this wasn't at all a part of some plan. Similarly, the Death Knight is particularly bemused if Edelgard is made to fight him in Chapter 4.
    • If you're a Black Eagle, after the Chapter 8 battle, Edelgard has a very suspicious conversation with you where she not-so-subtly hints that one day you might figure out the Flame Emperor's objectives and be able to look them in their unmasked face to decide whether or not you'll follow them. She doesn't even react negatively if you suggest that you might be interested in teaming up with the Flame Emperor (though she does note that it would be smart not to trust someone whose face you don't even know).
    • If you're a Blue Lion, the Flame Emperor leaves a dagger behind after she is caught talking with Kronya and Thales, right after Dimitri tells Byleth that he gave Edelgard a gift of a dagger when they were children. Dimitri visibly panics at the sight of this dagger, damning her further. As a final nail in the coffin, eagle-eyed players will notice that this dagger is the same one Edelgard used in the prologue to defend herself from Kostas.
    • If you're a Blue Lion or Golden Deer, the Flame Emperor shows up commanding Adrestian soldiers when they fight you in Chapter 11. In addition, the Flame Emperor has Charm (typically associated with the Lord class, which only the house leaders can access) and Seal Strength and Seal Magic (which Edelgard always packs for the Battle of the Eagle and Lion in the Golden Deer route) in their skill pool.
    • During the battle for Remire Village, if you fail to save the villagers in time, they will all succumb to Solon's experimentation and perish. Afterwards, each of the three Lords will be furious towards Solon. This is right after The Reveal of Solon's identity, and while Dimitri and Claude are still in disbelief, still thinking Solon to be Tomas, Edelgard immediately refers to him as Solon without question.
    • After the battle at Remire, when Byleth refuses to join the Flame Emperor, they remark, "Pity." Edelgard used the exact same turn of phrase in Chapter 1 when Byleth got a job at the Officer's Academy instead of joining the Empire.
  • The Heavy: In some way or another, the Flame Emperor is connected to most of the skirmishes that Byleth faces during Part I.
  • Hidden Agenda Villain: For most of Part I and up until the Wham Episode, it's never made clear what exactly the Flame Emperor seeks to accomplish by attacking the Church or with their allying with those who slither in the dark.
  • Identity Concealment Disposal: After the Flame Emperor's true identity is revealed, the helmet and mask are dumped for the rest of the game, and physically destroyed on Azure Moon.
  • Implied Death Threat: When told by Thales that the Flame Emperor was created to bring "our salvation", the Flame Emperor responds with, "There will be no salvation for you and your kind." Considering the fact that the Flame Emperor is Edelgard, and she hates working with him, on the Crimson Flower route, she carries out that threat by having Hubert, Jeritza, Byleth, and the rest of the Black Eagle Strike Force wipe them out after they’ve conquered Fódlan.
  • Karma Houdini: If you go down the Crimson Flower route, the Flame Emperor does not face any sort of negative consequences for what went down in the first half of the game.
  • Late-Arrival Spoiler: In Heroes, while the Flame Emperor Grand Hero unit is completely spoiler-free, Legendary Edelgard has the epithet "Flame Emperor", which is a dead giveaway.
  • The Leader: Commands the Flame Emperor Army, and is the boss of the Death Knight, Kostas and Metodey.
  • Leitmotif: "Mask of Fire" plays during scenes related to the Flame Emperor and their cohorts.
  • Life Drain: Due to the Crest of Flames, the Flame Emperor's attacks have a chance of recovering health for a portion of the damage dealt.
  • Malevolent Masked Men: Terrorist operations against the Church of Seiros? Check. Face and identity hidden by a mask? Check.
  • Mighty Glacier: Boasts high HP, attack and defense, at the expense of subpar speed and resistance.
  • Moveset Clone: In Heroes, to Halloween Dorcas. They are both free armored axe units, they have nearly identical statlines (identical Spd and Def, and while Dorcas has 1 more Atk, the Flame Emperor has 1 more HP and 5 more Res), they both have Wary Fighter at 5* as their B skill and a two-stat Stance skill at 4* as their A skill (Sturdy Stance for Dorcas, Bracing Stance for the Flame Emperor). Their weapons, the Guard Axe+ for the Flame Emperor, and the Hack-o-Lantern+ for Dorcas, are identical in function: they both deter the foe from Special charges during combat, so the two axes are mechanically Palette Swaps of each other.
  • My Name Is ???: The Flame Emperor's name is displayed as "???" before meeting the heroes.
  • Noble Demon:
    • The Flame Emperor is a major antagonist, but does not relish any villainous action or desire to commit unnecessary bloodshed, even expressing disdain towards "those who slither in the dark" despite having teamed up with them.
    • In Heroes, the Flame Emperor is perfectly polite and sympathetic to your cause despite having plans to upend the social order in Fódlan. In addition, Sharena notes in her "Meet the Heroes" profile that she doesn't believe the Flame Emperor is truly a bad person, just someone with a dream dear to their heart.
  • Non-Indicative Name: Played with. Despite not having access to fire magic nor fire-themed weapons, the Flame Emperor's moniker likely comes from bearing the Crest of Flames.
  • Not Me This Time:
    • After the Remire calamity, the Flame Emperor disavows any responsibility for the massacre, placing the blame squarely on Solon's shoulders. Jeralt does not believe them.
    • Right before the big showdown if you're a Blue Lion, the Flame Emperor denies being involved in the Tragedy of Duscur. Dimitri does not believe them, even when the mask comes off and it's revealed she would have been an early teenager at the time, and likely locked down in a dungeon and undergoing experiments on top of that.
  • Palette Swap: Datamining the game reveals that the Flame Emperor class has identical stats to Edelgard's Armored Lord class.
  • Pre-Mortem One-Liner:
    "Perish!" (Heroes and Three Houses)
    "Ready yourself!" (Heroes and Three Houses)
    "Disgusting!" (Three Houses)
    "The end comes!" (Heroes and Three Houses)
    "Feed them to the maggots." (Heroes)
  • Promoted to Playable: The Flame Emperor became playable in Fire Emblem Heroes as a Grand Hero Battle unit. Though technically, the Flame Emperor has been a playable character in both Heroes and Three Houses under their true identity, just unable to make use of the actual Flame Emperor class in the latter case.
  • Red and Black and Evil All Over: With the exception of the mask which is partially white, the Flame Emperor's attire is black and red, fitting for one of the game's main antagonists.
  • Red Herring: Regardless of which house you choose to lead, the game leads you to believe that your chosen lord is the Flame Emperor. None of your lords are present whenever the Flame Emperor appears, such as in Chapter 6 and Chapter 8, the former more so due to the house leader being listed as unavailable for that battle. In Chapter 8, when the Flame Emperor talks with Byleth and Jeralt, Hubert, Dedue, or Hilda conveniently appears, allowing the Flame Emperor to vanish when Byleth and Jeralt's attention is drawn away. In addition, Edelgard hints that she knows more than is strictly sensible about the Flame Emperor's motivations, Dimitri makes it quite clear that he’s out for revenge against certain people who may be affiliated with the Church, and Claude is openly critical of the Church and shows a fixation on Byleth and the Sword of the Creator after the Flame Emperor states a need for more information about both. In addition, each of your lords is friendly with, and spends a lot of time with, someone who turns out to be evil and working with the Flame Emperor: namely, Edelgard and Monica, Dimitri and Lord Arundel, and Claude and Tomas. Towards the end of Part One, each of the Lords have a moment that settles their innocence. For Dimitri, he eavesdrops on a conversation with the Flame Emperor and "those who slither in the dark" in Chapter 10. For Claude, he is present when the Flame Emperor attacks the Holy Tomb in Chapter 11. For Edelgard, it's subverted: she flat-out admits that it was her in Chapter 11 and spends the rest of the fight unmasked.
  • Samus Is a Girl: Presumed to be male throughout Part I, but is ultimately revealed to be Edelgard in disguise.
  • Secret Identity: When not conspiring against the Church of Seiros, the Flame Emperor secretly lives a double life as Edelgard von Hresvelg, princess of Adrestia.
  • Secret Identity Vocal Shift: Their mask has a built-in voice modulator to maintain anonymity.
  • Shaped Like Itself: The Flame Emperor's unique class is called Flame Emperor.
  • The Starscream: Works with those who slither in the dark to accomplish their mutual objectives, but plainly intends to betray them once they outlive their usefulness. On the Crimson Flower route, with Byleth's help, she succeeds.
  • Teeth-Clenched Teamwork: Despite being allied with those who slither with the dark due to sharing a common enemy, it becomes fairly obvious as the story progresses the Flame Emperor is less than thrilled about this situation.
  • This Is Gonna Suck: What the Flame Emperor's battle conversation with Byleth basically amounts to in some routes:
    You are the one person I did not wish to make an enemy of...
  • Tin Tyrant: An enigmatic masked figure always seen wearing a full suit of armor.
  • Tranquil Fury: After Monica/Kronya kills Jeralt, the Flame Emperor tells Thales that, in no uncertain terms, there will be no salvation for him or his kind. Depending on the route, she can make good on her promise as soon as the next chapter.
  • The Unfettered: Willing to go to any lengths to change the world, including working with an evil cult with absolutely no moral restraints, who were responsible for pretty much every horrible thing that happened in her backstory. The Flame Emperor sums it up best in Heroes:
    Terrible power has its uses… and use it I will.
  • Villain Teleportation: Makes use of this to escape after confronting Byleth, and also makes an entrance in Chapter 6 this way. If you're leading the Black Eagles and choose to side with the Empire, the Flame Emperor stops doing this and escapes normally when Rhea transforms into the Immaculate One and threatens to kill the party herself.
  • Walking Spoiler: The reveal of the identity of the Flame Emperor has major ramifications on the game's story and sets the stage for the majority of the rest of the game.
  • We Can Rule Together: Tries to convince Byleth to join forces a couple of times, though by the battle in the Holy Tomb, the chances of Byleth actually turning coat are slim to none. On the Crimson Flower route, you take her up on her offer, to her surprise and gratefulness.

    Death Knight 

Death Knight

Class: Death Knight

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/feth_reaperknight.png
Click here to see the Death Knight in Fire Emblem Heroes 

"One of us will die, the other will live. I will enjoy this dance of damnation."

A grim reaper-themed knight who is rumored to prowl the streets of Garreg Mach at night, attacking people and abducting them. Their appearance invokes an otherworldly origin.


  • Achilles' Heel: As dangerous as he is and in spite of his Commander skill, the game balances him out by making it possible to beat him through a few small but notable weakness. His biggest one is the fact he is a mounted unit, meaning he has a weakness to anti-cavalry weapons such as the Horseslayer and weapon arts like Knightkneeler (which all Lance users can learn at C rank, which is very easy to get). In addition, while his Resistance stat is good enough to tank most hits, Hubert and Lysithea can learn Dark Spikes, which allows them to capitalize on their good magic stat to do effective damage against him, and both can learn it reasonably early if their Reason magic is focused on. He also can't retaliate against Battalions, meaning one can whittle him down using them.
  • Alas, Poor Villain: On the Azure Moon route, if Mercedes and Casper's paralogue was completed before the final battle against him, when he dies, Mercedes cradles him, tearfully apologizing for being a lousy older sister.
  • The Artifact: When you fight him in Cindered Shadows, he has his usual Dark Seal in his inventory. However, it's completely useless Vendor Trash since you can't take exams. Instead, he drops a Crescent Sickle.
  • Bloodbath Villain Origin: It's heavily implied the Death Knight was created after Jeritza snapped and murdered not just his father but all of House Bartels. He doesn't even remember doing anything, just blacking out and waking up at the scene of the massacre.
  • Blood Knight: He sees the conflict with the heroes as a game, and the Flame Emperor tells him that he'll have "more opportunities to play soon".
  • Bonus Boss: The first four times (or three, if you jump ship to work with his boss) you encounter him, he's far, far stronger than your units can reasonably hope to defeat. He's not invincible, though, and beating him nets you a rare Dark Seal.
  • But for Me, It Was Tuesday: His unique battle dialogue with Balthus in Cindered Shadows has the Ashen Wolf asking how many people he's slaughtered, to which the Death Knight simply replies "Countless."
  • Cain and Abel: Acts as the Cain to his half-sister Mercedes's Abel. ...Unless you poach Mercedes to the Black Eagles and stick with the Adrestians.
  • Card-Carrying Villain: In his summoning quote in Heroes, he calls his own deeds "ghastly".
  • Climax Boss: On the Azure Moon route, he's fought right before the Kingdom forces can invade Enbarr and enter the Point of No Return.
  • Darth Vader Clone: Scary black armor? Check. Deep, breathy, mask-filtered voice? Check. Extremely dangerous combatant? Check, for certain. Related to one of the heroes? Check, but instead of being an older relative, he's actually Mercedes's younger brother. Can redeem himself out of love for said relative? Check.
  • Died in Your Arms Tonight: On the Azure Moon route, provided you completed Mercedes' paralogue with Caspar, she will call the Death Knight by Emile and cradle him as he dies.
  • The Dragon: Serves this role for the Flame Emperor, being their most powerful servant. However, by the time Part II rolls around, he's settled into the role of The Brute and either Hubert or Byleth becomes their unquestioned second-in-command (assuming the first one didn't outrank him to begin with and the second one defects to their side).
  • Even Evil Has Loved Ones: Despite being a brutal villain, he still cares for his elder half-sister Mercedes, and tries to convince her to go somewhere safe in her Paralogue so he doesn't have to kill her, but instead has to settle for giving her the Relic.
  • Foe Romance Subtext: As Jeritza's supports reveal, the Death Knight's obsession with fighting Byleth to the death feels like something akin to romantic attraction for him. Get Jeritza's S Support, and the "subtext" part goes out the window.
  • Giant Space Flea from Nowhere: He randomly shows up during the second chapter of the Cindered Shadows DLC, having been drawn by the battle going on in Abyss. Tellingly, the game changes its objective to "Defeat all enemies, except the Death Knight".
  • The Grim Reaper: Part of their motif. Their Japanese name is quite literally the Grim Reaper Knight.
  • Guest-Star Party Member: Due to Edelgard being the Flame Emperor, he becomes an ally unit in Chapter 12 of the Crimson Flower route.
  • Helmets Are Hardly Heroic: Or as heroic as the Death Knight can be, anyway. As an enemy unit both before and after the timeskip, the Death Knight wears an intimidating, face-concealing skull helmet with a prominent set of horns and even glowing red eyes, that deepens and distorts his voice. After he becomes a playable unit on Crimson Flower post-timeskip however, he sheds the helmet completely, as well as the white mask he wore around the monastery as Jeritza.
  • Hero of Another Story: For a very, very strained definition of the word "hero". Before version 1.1.0 on the Crimson Flower route, he is mentioned to be off fighting on another front while Byleth accompanies Edelgard throughout the game.
  • Hypercompetent Sidekick: At least on the battlefield. He's an obscenely powerful Lightning Bruiser who is generally far stronger than your party can reasonably expect to defeat until the very end of the game; his boss the Flame Emperor is fairly slow and gets ripped up by most mages and anti-armor weaponry, and The Reveal of their true identity indicates that they start off as a level 1 Noble that the Death Knight could flick off like a booger.
  • Identity Concealment Disposal: On the Crimson Flower route, once he joins your party as Jeritza, he starts fighting without his helmet. Averted on the other routes, where he keeps the helmet even after everyone concludes that he's Jeritza.
  • Jack-of-All-Trades: While he primarily specializes in lances and riding, with the exception of faith magic he's got a little experience with everything.
  • Jekyll & Hyde: The Hyde to Jeritza's Jekyll.
  • Karma Houdini: On the Crimson Flower route, he completely evades punishment for aiding and abetting Flayn's kidnapping and the Remire massacre due to becoming Byleth's ally after their Hazy Feel Turn. He also downplays this in regards to shanking Manuela; she mentions he sincerely apologized offscreen, and her comments indicate that the matter is pretty much settled. Granted, with the revelation that the Death Knight is a split personality from Jeritza that he visibly struggles to control, it's hard to figure out how mentally competent he was during these moments. This is averted in Mercedes and Jeritza's paired ending, where the latter willingly turns himself over to a prison in Enbarr to atone for the crimes committed by the Death Knight, and his time in prison seems to have rehabilitated him by the time he's let out.
  • Kick the Dog: In his combat dialogue with Flayn, he mocks her for having been kidnapped and having her blood stolen in Chapter 6, which is something Flayn admits she has trauma over years after the fact.
  • Knight Templar Big Brother: The Death Knight was "born" when Emile's father decided to marry his own stepdaughter Mercedes to make more children with the Crest of Lamine. Emile flipped out and slaughtered all of House Bartels. Though in this case, the Knight Templar is actually the younger brother.
  • Large Ham: Unbelievably so, which is enhanced even further thanks to his voice filter.
  • Lone Wolf Boss: In the "Cindered Shadows" DLC, he has nothing to do with the overarching plot. He just shows up to pick a fight with you.
  • Malevolent Masked Men: He's a horrifying villain who helps villainous schemes and enjoys nothing more than combat, and he hides his face behind a mask and helmet shaped like a skull. Jeritza admits in his Support conversation with Bernadetta that he designed the Death Knight's armor and mask specifically to invoke such horrifying and fearsome images of death.
  • The Millstone: His desire for a fight with Byleth actively harms the Flame Emperor's goals on two occasions.
    • His military assistance of "those who slither in the dark" during the Remire massacre ties the Flame Emperor to a war crime that they had no part in and would have stopped if they knew of it, contributes to Dimitri's growing personal grudge against the Flame Emperor, and makes Byleth far less likely to join forces with the Flame Emperor.
    • On the Silver Snow and Verdant Wind routes, he warns the Resistance/Alliance forces about the "javelins of light", directly preventing them all from getting blown up. This allows them to invade Enbarr and kill him, Hubert, and Edelgard.
  • Names to Run Away from Really Fast: Whether "Grim Reaper Knight" in Japanese or "Death Knight" in English, their name isn't exactly comforting. This even applies to his weapon, as Sariel is one of the archangels of death.
  • The Only One Allowed to Defeat You: His attitude towards Byleth, and arguably the closest he has to a personal goal in general. His singular desire, stated several times in support conversations, is to either kill or be killed by Byleth.
  • OOC Is Serious Business:
    • When interacting with most characters, the Death Knight is either raring for battle, amused, or uninterested, depending on the character. Interactions with Mercedes are the exception, as early as the first encounter with him, where if Mercedes engages in combat with the Death Knight, he will ask in bewilderment if the encounter was a setup. This continues in a Paralogue involving Mercedes, where he is uncharacteristically nice to her (while also remaining somewhat vile, to the shock of everyone else present), leading to him giving her the Rafail Gem. A Justified Trope since he is her long lost brother.
    • When fought at Fort Merceus on the Verdant Wind and Silver Snow routes, he books it once your army gets close to him, and the map's objective changes to preventing his escape, which seems oddly out-of-character for a Blood Knight like him. At the chapter's end, this makes sense: he knew "those who slither in the dark" were about to obliterate the fort with "javelins of light" and obviously wanted to be as far away from that as possible, and also to goad his Worthy Opponent Byleth into following so they wouldn't die in the blast.
  • Orcus on His Throne: Despite the fact that he could very easily destroy Byleth and their students in early encounters if he was proactive in attacking them, he seems content to simply sit still and watch unless you deliberately provoke him. He will only start moving in later encounters once the team is more capable of taking him on, though he's still not to be taken lightly. On Maddening Mode, however, he's a lot more proactive as early as his first appearance.
  • Pet the Dog:
    • Before version 1.1.0, he gives a sincere apology to Manuela for stabbing her before he departs for the front lines on the Crimson Flower route.
    • He gives Mercedes their family's Relic in their paralogue, though not without saying he won't hesitate to kill her if they meet again.
    • In Caspar and Mercedes' paralogue, should Caspar best him in combat, he likewise bestows the Scythe of Sariel to him, likely with a Worthy Opponent justification.
  • Pre-Mortem One-Liner:
    "Squirm for me!" (Heroes and Three Houses)
    "Die!" (Three Houses)
    "Rapturous!" (Heroes and Three Houses)
    "Your life ends!" (Three Houses)
    "Your life is over." (Heroes)
    "Make them beg." (Heroes)
  • Promoted to Playable: He makes his playable debut in Fire Emblem Heroes as a Grand Hero Battle unit. And technically, he also becomes playable as Jeritza on the Crimson Flower route, even keeping the unique Death Knight class.
  • Psycho for Hire: The Death Knight has no real care for the Flame Emperor's goals. He is motivated by his desire for fighting and killing only. Jeritza stays with Edelgard precisely because she gives him targets to sate the Death Knight, as he would otherwise go on an endless killing spree if left to his own devices. Despite this, Edelgard seriously overestimates how much control she has over him, as his lust for killing leads him to directly get involved in Remire, and will even leave all his men to die at Fort Merceus when the javelins of light are coming on Verdant Wind/Silver Snow, showing exactly why he has a weakness in Authority.
  • Put on a Bus: Before version 1.1.0. on the Crimson Flower route, he is only mentioned in passing once or twice and spends the second half of the game fighting on another front. However, after the release of Wave 3 of DLC, Death Knight becomes a playable character under his other identity, Jeritza, after the timeskip in Crimson Flower, with his special Death Knight class included; and it's completely free.
  • Recurring Boss: He is currently tied for the record for most appearances in one game as an enemy, with 6; you fight him in chapters 4, 6, 8, 12, and either 17 and 18 on the Silver Snow route or 18 and 19 on the Verdant Wind route. If you count paralogues, the count goes up to 7, as you also fight him in Mercedes and Caspar's paralogue. He even shows up in "Cindered Shadows" for another swing at you.
  • Recurring Element: The Death Knight is essentially Three Houses' version of the psychotic attack dog archetype, in the vein of Kempf, Hans, and especially the Black Knight. He's a violently unhinged maniac who is mostly aligned with the Flame Emperor so he can sate his own bloodlust.
  • Redemption Demotion:
    • Downplayed. He's still undeniably powerful as a green NPC ally in chapter 12, provided you chose the Black Eagles and sided with Edelgard, who can take on nearly any opponent on the map save maybe the Golem enemies by himself (even the stage boss Rhea will find herself on the losing end of their clashes), but he has an unfortunate tendency to go Leeroy Jenkins and get splattered into the ground by Catherine.
    • Averted with a vengeance when he's made fully playable as Jeritza, as he starts with very good stats and has excellent growths across the board, the exceptions being his below-average Charm and Resistance. He does lose access to the Counterattack skill when he's playable, but he can regain it by mastering the Death Knight class (which will happen very quickly thanks to his Mastermind skill).
  • Red Eyes, Take Warning: His mask gives him glowing red eyes, and he's a very dangerous antagonist.
  • Secret Identity: When not conspiring against the Church of Seiros, he lives a double life as Jeritza von Hrym, fencing instructor of the Officer's Academy.
  • Secret Identity Vocal Shift: His mask has a built-in voice modulator to sound more intimidating and protect his true identity.
  • Shaped Like Itself: He has a unique version of the Dark Knight class, called the Death Knight class.
  • Sinister Scythe: Wields one called the Scythe of Sariel (classified as a lance for gameplay purposes).
  • Spanner in the Works: During the battle to claim Fort Merceus on the Verdant Wind and the Silver Snow route, he starts fleeing the fort and points to the missiles launched by "those who slither in the dark," giving the Church and Alliance time to escape its destruction. All to keep his Worthy Opponent Byleth from dying and giving the heroes the chance to eventually defeat the Empire and their allies.
  • Split Personality: He is this to Jeritza, being a violent, psychopathic persona formed after he murdered his father. At times Jeritza can't control him, even threatening to kill Mercedes.
  • Villain Forgot to Level Grind: Averted. He actually does get stronger every time you encounter him, it's just that the students will eventually start growing faster than he does.
  • Villain Teleportation: Makes use of this to escape in his first three appearances.
  • Worthy Opponent:
    • Initially subverted with Byleth. The first time the Death Knight encounters them, he thinks of the professor as a mere weakling. It's only after Byleth obtains the Sword of the Creator that the Death Knight comes to consider them a worthy foe, and becomes rather annoyed when the Flame Emperor prevents them from fighting Byleth during the events of Chapter 6.
    • It’s implied during Mercedes’ and Caspar’s paralogue that he sees the latter as a worthy opponent, but only if Caspar actually manages to best him in combat. If the latter condition is fulfilled (both since the Death Knight is a tough opponent and the mission objective specifically says the mission can be finished without routing him), the following cutscene adds an extra bit after the Death Knight hands Mercedes a Relic where he simply hands Caspar the Scythe of Sariel, declaring that Mercedes should be safe until the Death Knight can kill her.

    Kostas 

Kostas

Class: Thief

Voiced by: Yoshikazu Nagano (Japanese), Brad Venable (English)

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/kostas_portrait.png
A bandit whose band attacks Edelgard, Dimitri and Claude at the very start of the game. Turns out to have been working for the Flame Emperor.
  • An Axe to Grind: As is tradition for Fire Emblem brigands.
  • Flat Character: He's little more than a violent thug who has contempt for the nobility.
  • Ironic Echo: Shouts, "You'll die!" before he nearly kills Byleth and Edelgard at the end of the prologue. When the job he received from the Flame Emperor goes awry and he demands to know what's going to happen to him now, the Emperor simply replies, "You die." This is foreshadowing that Edelgard in the Flame Emperor.
  • Irony: Almost kills Edelgard at the end of the prologue, never mind the fact that she is the one who hired him to attack the students in the first place.
  • Oh, Crap!: If Jeralt engages him during the tutorial, Kostas instantly recognizes him as the widely-feared Blade Breaker.
  • Pre-Mortem One-Liner:
    "Hate me yet?"
    "Die!"
    "Ngh!"
    "Just die already!"
  • Small Role, Big Impact: It's his attack on the students of Garreg Mach that leads to Byleth getting noticed by the Officers Academy, thus kickstarting the entire plot.
  • Starter Villain: Just like in most Fire Emblem games, a bandit serves as the first villain you encounter. That said, he survives a little longer than your average prologue bandit boss, as he's also the boss of Chapter 2's mission.
  • Warm-Up Boss: He's the first boss of the game, and he's fairly easy compared to what's to come. The same applies when you face him again as the boss of the first "real" mission with your house.
  • You Have Failed Me: The Flame Emperor leaves him out to hang at the beginning of the game after he fails to assassinate the lords. Depending on the route, she can even kill him with her own two hands.
  • You Have Outlived Your Usefulness: When Kostas asks the Flame Emperor what they are going to do, given the botched attack in the prologue, the Emperor's response is a laconic "You die," before teleporting out, leaving Kostas out to dry.

    Metodey 

Metodey

Class: Assassin

Voiced by: Takahiro Miwa (Japanese), Todd Haberkorn (English)

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/metodey_portrait.png
A subordinate of the Flame Emperor. When Byleth is requested by Rhea to make a trip to the Holy Tomb beneath Garreg Mach, he tracks them down in order to seize the Crest Stones hidden within.
  • Ain't Too Proud to Beg: If defeated by Edelgard in "Cindered Shadows", he pathetically begs for mercy. Edelgard spares him, stating that he isn't worth her time (although she's actually making use of the thug's skills for her own ends).
  • Ascended Extra: He shows up in "Cindered Shadows" as one of the leaders of the mercenaries invading Abyss.
  • Foreshadowing: Two examples in Cindered Shadows, though mostly concerning Part I rather than the side story:
    • When he's confronted during the sidestory, he almost lets slip up he was hired by the Empire.
    • Metodey starts sweating bullets should Edelgard initiate combat with him, and the latter pretends to not know him.
  • Fragile Speedster: Due to being an assassin, Metodey's strong forte lies on his speed and avoidance. In Cindered Shadows, he also has the skill Alert Stance+, which enhances his dodging capabilities even further.
  • Just Following Orders: When he's defeated in the Holy Tomb, he tries to desperately play this card as he dies.
  • Karma Houdini Warranty: In "Cindered Shadows", he suffers no punishment for kidnapping Aelfric and attacking the heroes. He isn't so lucky in the main story.
  • Pre-Mortem One-Liner:
    "Your work here is done!"
    "Hahahaha!"
    "Writhe in pain!"
    "I'm going to make this hurt!"
  • Poison Is Evil: In the main story, he has the Poison Strike skill and wields a Venin Edge.
  • Psycho for Hire: Cindered Shadows makes quite clear that while he's a hired muscle for whoever can pay his services in gold, he also relishes doing his job. One Rogue NPC notes that she's seen him before, and states that he's the type to slaughter an entire town if he could profit from it.
  • Recurring Element: From what little characterization he had in the original game, it was made quite clear that he's a throwback to 'self-serving scumbag Psycho for Hire that relishes killing and humiliating his victims', which dated back to Kempf and was made more apparent with Valter and Caellach and Hans. His reappearance in Wave 4 DLC further solidifies his status as this.
  • Saying Too Much: During his appearance in Cindered Shadows, he almost blurts out that he's working for the Adrestian Empire.
  • Skippable Boss: During Metodey's appearance in the Holy Tomb, it's entirely possible to finish the chapter while ignoring him entirely. He's close to the Flame Emperor, but it's possible to take the other set of stairs up to the exit to the Holy Tomb and defeat the Flame Emperor without engaging Metodey.
  • Slasher Smile: He shows a really deranged one when he initiates battle with everyone (save for his boss).
  • Smug Snake: Talks a big game when he gets into a fight and boasts about his intent to kill, but once defeated he begs for mercy and tries to claim he was Just Following Orders.
  • Villain: Exit, Stage Left: He escapes once Byleth and co. defeats him in "Cindered Shadows", because he's meant to reappear (and possibly die) later in the story.
  • We Hardly Knew Ye: Prior to the Wave 4 DLC, he was only introduced immediately prior to the battle in the Holy Tomb, only to end up likely dead by the end of the chapter.
  • What Happened to the Mouse?: If he is left alive on the Holy Tomb (seeing as you only need to defeat the Flame Emperor to finish the battle), he makes no later appearances whatsoever and is never seen again, even on the Crimson Flower route (where you side with Edelgard).
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"Those who slither in the dark"

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/twsitd_banner.png
A mysterious faction manipulating everything within Fódlan for some unseen purpose, only that they are an enemy of the Church of Seiros. While the Flame Emperor Army is allied with them to achieve their goals, at the same time those are seemingly at odds with their own.

    In General 
  • Abusive Precursors: Overlapping with Villainous Legacy. They are the descendants of the technologically advanced civilization of Agartha, which developed a god complex and tried to kill Sothis to conquer Fódlan. This didn’t work as expected, considering the organization is comprised of the descendants of the remnant that survived Sothis’ retaliation.
  • all lowercase letters: They are referred to in-game like this.
  • Always Chaotic Evil: The Agarthan descendants seen in the game do not paint a positive picture of their group as a whole, to put it lightly.
  • Amazing Technicolor Population: All members of the group openly identified as Agarthans have ghastly white skin. Considering that they’ve spent most of their lives hiding underground, it’s fairly likely that this is due to their lack of exposure to sunlight.
  • Badass Normal: They're the only relevant faction native to Fódlan lacking crest bearers in their ranksnote , choosing to rely instead in their highly advanced weaponry, Demonic Beasts, and their Titanus. That said, it's implied that their most important members also enhance their own bodies with their technology, mitigating the "normal" part, which manifest with the personal ability Agarthan Technology.
  • Blood Magic: Their spells and rituals often require blood in some manner, as do many of their experiments.
  • Casting a Shadow: They have many dark mages among their ranks. Since dark magic is associated with science in this game, it's natural that darkness and technology would go hand in hand.
  • Decapitated Army: On the Azure Moon route, as a result of Cornelia and a disguised Thales’ death, they’re essentially left without any remaining leadership other than Myson, who can meet the same fate, which results in whatever troops he’s commanding deciding to turn tail and run.
  • Deliberately Bad Example: The various factions are knee-deep in Grey-and-Gray Morality, as they have their own moral failings and blood on their hands. By contrast, those who slither in the dark have zero qualms or remorse over mass murder and deadly experimentation with innocent people, making the flawed lords look like saints regardless of story path.
  • Dungeon Punk: They fit the bill of the aesthetic as a secret society utilizing both Magitek and Blood Magic in tandem with each other.
  • Evil Cannot Comprehend Good: Implied in one of the books located on the Abyss Library, which narrates the Agarthans’ conflict with the Children of the Goddess from their point of view. In it, it’s mentioned that the “False God” (Sothis) will bring ruin to the “children of men” (Agarthans) due to them having spilled too much blood, all while never trying to justify nor defend themselves over it. Judging by the Agarthans seen in the present day, it’s likely that the narrator never dwells on it because they simply don’t see anything wrong with that.
  • Fantastic Racism:
  • Freaky Electronic Music: In contrast to the rest of the soundtrack's orchestral sound with a light EDM touch, they are associated with electronic genres such as Dubstep.
  • Fun with Acronyms: TWSITD, which looks a lot like the word "twisted".
  • Hate Sink: As the rest of the game's factions are rooted in Grey-and-Gray Morality, those who slither in the dark stand out as the only wholly unsympathetic faction.
  • He Who Fights Monsters: The Nintendo Dream interview states that their ancient ancestors originally were simply people who hated that Sothis and the Nabatea held positions of power over them at the time, and they wanted humans to rule themselves (though they also wanted access to the dragon's powers). By the time of the game, they have become a race alien to the surface of Fódlan who seek to rule over it while despising every other human as a savage beast to be experimented on, used, or killed; worse than the Nabateans who at least acted out of a desire to benefit and advance humanity.
  • Humanity Is Superior: Due to their ancestors' war with the Children of the Goddess, they long to erase them off the face of the earth to ensure human dominance. Though by "human", they seem to only mean themselves, regarding the rest of humanity as little more than simple animals to be used, experimented on, or destroyed.
  • Humiliation Conga: Inevitably, they are subjected to this on all routes to various degrees. They never come out on top no matter what route they are on and they are more or less destroyed by the end of the game.
    • Although they succeed in destroying the Church on the Crimson Flower route, Edelgard proceeds to turn on them, with it being strongly implied that she eventually wipes them out completely, as both Byleth's S-support with Jeritza and Balthus's solo ending confirm that the Empire manages to bring the battle all the way to their last stronghold of Shambhala.
    • By the end of the Azure Moon route, they've lost Edelgard and the Empire, their infiltrators in Faerghus and Garreg Mach are all slain, their role in the tragedy of Duscur is revealed by Cornelia, and Thales is killed while still disguised as Arundel, all without Dimitri even becoming aware of the group as a whole. And should Dimitri have a paired ending with Hapi, he eventually hunts them all down.
    • At the end of Verdant Wind and Silver Snow, their last major base is raided and destroyed, all their major figureheads are slain, and the Church rebuilds itself with the land united under more peaceful terms. In the Silver Snow route, they can potentially fail to kill Rhea, making all their work All for Nothing, while on the Verdant Wind route, their trump card, a revived Nemesis, is slain along with their remaning army, with Cornelia being the only known survivor.
  • Inevitable Mutual Betrayal: Their relationship with the Flame Emperor. Edelgard hates the Agarthans' guts for the horrible experiments they put her through while the Agarthans only see her as a tool to be used to destroy humanity, but they have to work together to defeat the Church of Seiros. Afterwards, they fully intend to kill each other, and Edelgard makes good on it personally in Crimson Flower, and posthumously in Verdant Wind and Silver Snow.
  • Karma Houdini: On the Azure Moon route. While most of their major onscreen leaders have been killed, Dimitri ultimately does not have the knowledge or tools to pursue them any further and they have plenty of time to reorganize and become a threat to Fódlan once again. Subverted if one includes the DLC, where his supports with Hapi give him additional information/motivation to expose just who Cornelia was working with, and they fight the slithers in their paired ending. Hapi also tends to end up helping defeat them in many of her paired or solo endings.
  • Karma Houdini Warranty: On the Crimson Flower route. While they remain at large at the end of the game, Edelgard has every intention of wiping them out after the Church is dealt with and many of the ending slides make mention of the conflict between them and the Empire (for example, Balthus' solo ending mentions a battle in Shambhala took place sometime after the end of the story, and Byleth's S-support with Jeritza actually takes place during said battle).
  • Kill and Replace: This is their modus operandi. Monica and Tomas were both real people that they murdered to disguise themselves as, and the same is implied to have been the case for Cornelia and Arundel.
  • Leitmotif: "Those Who Sow Darkness" plays whenever a member of those who slither in the dark is around.
  • Let's You and Him Fight: One of their key overarching plans is to manipulate Edelgard and Dimitri into instigating a major continent-wide war against each other with the hope that they would take the Church of Seiros and the vast majority of Fódlan's power structure down with them. This plan is made most explicit on the Azure Moon route, where members of the group like Cornelia and Arundel/Thales keep urging Dimitri and Edelgard to go kill each other.
  • Mad Scientist: They are dedicated to pushing the boundaries of magic and science, but have absolutely zero moral scruples in how they do so. Putting Remire village under a Hate Plague, performing horrific experiments on Edelgard and Lysithea to empower them with Crests at the cost of drastically reducing their lifespans, manipulating Nemesis into murdering Sothis and her children and making weapons out of their corpses, and these are just the things we know about.
  • The Man Behind the Man:
    • They attempt to invoke this trope with Edelgard. They're responsible for implanting her with the Crest of Flames, provide her rare weaponry like her relic Aymr, the Death Knight's Scythe of Sariel and the Arrow of Indra, troops of their own and even demonic beasts so she may fight against the Children of the Goddess as well as the people of Fódlan in their stead. However, how much control they actually have once Part II rolls around can wildly vary depending on the route.
    • They are implied by the Abyss Library to be this to Loog's Rebellion, as not only did Loog have numerous Heroes' Relic-like weapons just like Edelgard's Aymr or the Evil Knockoff of the Heroes Relics' from Verdant Wind, his famed strategist was named Pan after a Greek figure, fitting into the Agarthans' Theme Naming. Other tidbits imply but don't directly state they were behind the separation of the Kingdom into three nations, Leicester's Archduke's illness leading to their own rebellion against the Kingdom, and even implied to have been behind Claude's uncle Godfrey's death rather than House Gloucester.
  • Meaningful Name: The actual name of their civilization, Agartha, is a Hindu word for the underworld that would later be the name for a mythical dwelling believed to be located in the core of the earth—fitting for a race that was banished to live underground. Shambhala, the name of its only stronghold, is sometimes said to be Agartha's capital.
  • Mole Men: Highly implied to be this if Thales’s Motive Rant in the Verdant Wind/Silver Snow routes is any indication.
  • Names to Run Away from Really Fast: With a name like "those who slither in the dark," you'd think they were some kind of cult or assassin ring. You'd be right, except they're worse.
  • A Nazi by Any Other Name: They're turbo-racists who consider individuals outside their own race to be subhuman. Their dominant colour is black, and they have strong influence over and association with the Adrestian Empire, a nation whose colour is red and whose iconic animal is a double-headed eagle. They're really into eugenics and torturous human experimentation on unwilling subjects. Plus, they have a thing for Indic names.
  • Necromancer: On the Verdant Wind route, they bring Nemesis and his Liberation Army back from the dead, which happens to comprise the Ten Elites as well.
  • Nicknaming the Enemy: "Those who slither in the dark" is a nickname for the organization used by Hubert, who indirectly refers to them as such on certain occasions (also collectively referred to as "the threat that slithers in the dark"). The official name of the group is the "Agarthans", which Thales uses on numerous occasions.
  • Orbital Bombardment: Their 'Javelins of Light' are this. They are magitek-enhanced tungsten rods launched from orbit, and records say one of them hit a region long ago and turned it into a hellish, blasted wasteland known as the Valley of Torment today.
  • Out of Focus: The organization as a whole takes a backseat during Part II as a result of the Adrestian Empire waging war against the Church of Seiros and the rest of Fódlan, though they retake the spotlight in the Verdant Wind and, to a lesser extent, the Silver Snow routes.
  • Outside-Genre Foe: Fire Emblem has always been a fantasy SRPG locked in medieval-era tech level. These guys possess advanced weapons and tech such as ballistic missiles and giant mechs, and their home base is full of Tron Lines.
  • The Remnant: Even on the routes where their last known stronghold, Shambala, is destroyed, enough of them survive to rise back up and continue causing problems for Fódlan. Many of Hapi's character endings, as well as Byleth and Claude's paired ending, make note of how "those who slither in the dark" return some years later and have to be defeated once more. Even before losing Shambala, the Agarthans are a mere remnant of what they were in ancient history, hanging on underground and in hiding, desperate for vengeance over a war they lost thousands of years ago. Lacking the numbers and resources to take on the continent on their own, they focus on manipulating larger and more expendable forces, be it Nemesis and his people, the Kingdom, or the Empire. While they hold some aspirations of returning to their former power, they also are fine with outright destroying themselves and simply ruining the world around them if it can accomplish their vengeance against Sothis and the people of Fódlan.
  • The Reveal: The Verdant Wind route eventually reveals what their deal is. The truth is, they are in fact descendants of a race called the Agarthans, a technologically advanced civilization that was helped by Sothis and the Nabateans to its rise by the dragons sharing their knowledge with them. However, they tried to kill her in order to conquer Fódlan. Sothis promptly destroyed them for their hubris, but the survivors became a cult, manipulating Nemesis into murdering the sleeping Sothis and her children for use of their body parts to create the first Crests and the Heroes' Relics. Their master plan is to resurrect Nemesis and use him to dispose of Seiros and the church by using Edelgard, who also seeks to depose the church for her own reasons, in order to "save humanity”.
  • Revenge Myopia: Sothis and the Nabateans helped them develop advanced technology and shared their knowledge with them. They respond by having repeated wars with orbital weapons of mass destruction, against Sothis' teachings, eventually culminating in them turning their weapons on Sothis herself. It didn't end well for them, with Sothis striking back in a war that devastated the land and left most of the humans dead, then fixing the land they ruined. Instead of admitting any fault, they blame her and her children for all of it. This then created a huge Cycle of Revenge that ravages Fódlan (The remnants using Nemesis and the Ten Elites to kill the sleeping Sothis and her children, Seiros and the Four Saints rightfully slaying them in the War of Heroes, the remnants from that time dividing the land and later are responsible for the Tragedy of Duscur that haunts Dimitri and the horrible experiments on Lysithea, Hapi, and Edelgard with the last being the most notable attempt to attack the Nabateans with varying degrees of success depending on the route) to the time Byleth comes to Garreg Mach Monastery.
  • Tautological Templar: Ignatz notes that they truly believe themselves to be righteous saviors out to "free humanity", and so they'll commit any act to liberate mankind from the Goddess.
    Ignatz: They were trying to wipe out the goddess and her followers in hopes of taking back the surface. That's why they called themselves saviors. To their mind, they were.
  • Theme Naming: All of their names are Greek in origin, and in particular, six of them share names with an equivalent number of the Seven Sages of Greece: Thales, Solon, Myson, Chilon, Bias, and Pittacus. Meanwhile, Kronya herself is likely named after an ancient Greek harvest festival, and Odesse's name comes from the root word "odessa", meaning "long journey".
  • Unknown Rival: Downplayed in general. While most characters do learn of their existence, they never truly grasp what exactly they are sans in the Verdant Wind route (and Silver Snow, to a lesser extent). With that said, the trope gets played straight in Azure Moon, where Thales gets wiped out while he's still disguised as Arundel.
  • Ungrateful Bastard:
    • Sothis and the Nabateans helped them develop advanced technology and shared their knowledge with them. They respond by having repeated wars with orbital weapons of mass destruction, against Sothis' teachings, eventually culminating in them turning their weapons on Sothis herself. It didn't end well for them, with Sothis striking back in a war that devastated the land and left most of the humans dead, then fixing the land they ruined. Instead of admitting any fault, they blame her and her children for all of it.
    • On the Crimson Flower route, the mooks you're forced to save in Hubert's paralogue will express disgust over the idea of being saved by surface-dwellers. Meanwhile, this can be subverted by Arundel/Thales, as he can congratulate you for the job as long you managed to save all of them.
  • Unusually Uninteresting Sight:
    • Zigzagged example depending on the route. After the timeskip, observant players can notice some soldiers from the group aiding the Adrestian army during key battles the game doesn’t bring attention to, namely; the Battle at Gronder on Azure Moon and Verdant Wind, as well as the invasion of Enbarr and the Imperial Palace’s infiltration on the Verdant Wind/Silver Snow routes. While on the Silver Snow route, the trope is played straight, on the Azure Moon and Verdant Wind routes, this is eventually averted, as during the former’s final battle, Ingrid/Gilbert will bring attention to the fact that the Empire is fighting alongside an unknown party, while in Verdant Wind, Lysithea will mention after the battle at Gronder that there were some mysterious mages fighting on Adrestia’s side, which remind her of the same people who experimented on her and her siblings.
    • Discussed in Lysithea's A-Support with Byleth, in particular in non-Verdant Wind routes. She mentions that, during the time Ordelia territory was governed by the Adrestian Empire as a result of them helping House Hrym revolt, multiple mages with "skin pale as death" came along with the Adrestians meant to replace the killed staff and experimented on her house's children while under supervision of the Empire. This suggests both sides openly collaborated during the ensuing process, which is corroborated further as the people who fled to Hrym to avoid intervention were forced to return, at a time said territory's governance was managed by Duke Aegir.
  • You Have Outlived Your Usefulness: In the Crimson Flower route, their assistance is considered a necessary evil by Edelgard and Hubert, as they can use the extra help taking on the powerful Church of Seiros. At the end of the war, Edelgard follows through with wiping them off the face of the earth, ending their threat.

    Thales 

Thales

Class: Agastya

Voiced by: Masaki Terasoma (Japanese), Christopher Corey Smith (credited as Chris Smith) (English)

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/feth_thales_6.png

A major figure of "those who slither in the dark" and Solon and Kronya’s boss. In order to carry out his master plan, he acts in the shadows of Fódlan.


  • Armor and Magic Don't Mix: Averted. He wears black armor and he's primarily a spellcaster.
  • Beard of Evil: He sports a notable goatee and is one of the main antagonists of the game.
  • Big Bad: Wavers between this and Greater-Scope Villain depending on the route. As the leader of "those who slither in the dark" and the one with the closest connection with Edelgard's past, he's directly responsible for Edelgard's ambitions and resources. Stopping Edelgard destroys his main agent of Fódlan's destruction, and even in the Crimson Flower route, Edelgard recognizes he's the threat that must be stopped after defeating the Church and unifying Fódlan.
  • Big Bad Ensemble: He's one of the overall main antagonists alongside Edelgard or, only in the Crimson Flower route, Rhea. He is far and away the most malevolent and dangerous character in the game, and all of the heroes save Dimitri want to kill him to bring peace to Fódlan. note 
  • Can't Kill You, Still Need You: When he saves Kronya from Byleth after she kills Jeralt, he states it's because she still has another role to play. He later clarifies it was to keep the nature of their bodies a secret, only for Solon to later reveal that "role" involves being a Human Sacrifice for Solon's spell to deal with Byleth in the very next chapter.
  • Character Death: He will always die in some form through all routes. On the Crimson Flower route, he’s implied to be dealt with sometime after the end of the story; in Azure Moon he’s killed by Dimitri during the Empire’s assault on Derdriu under the appearance of Lord Arundel; and in the Verdant Wind and Silver Snow routes, he ends up being crushed alive as Shambhala collapses over him, with one shot even focusing on his lifeless body.
  • The Chessmaster: Thales’ machinations and overall influence under his public identity as the current Lord Arundel can be seen in many of Fódlan’s current conflicts, which he seeks to fully take advantage of as much as possible:
    • His experiments on the Hresvelg family is one of the mayor catalysts driving Edelgard to reunify Fódlan and remove the Crest system by force, which he is more than happy to assist in as it allows him to expand those who slither in the dark’s influence on the surface world, despite being well aware that Edelgard is planning to get rid of him once his assistance is no longer needed. This is more blatant on the Verdant Wind and Silver Snow routes, as he essentially has Edelgard wage war and destroy as much of Fódlan as possible in his stead while ultimately outliving her, and the only reason he doesn't get away with it is because Hubert leaves a note to Byleth and their allies post-mortem disclosing the location of his hideout.
    • His part in the Tragedy of Duscur resulted in most of the Blaiddyd family line being wiped out sans Dimitri and his uncle Rufus, leaving both survivors not only at the mercy of Cornelia’s future manipulations, but also inducing in Dimitri a desire for revenge towards those responsible for the slaughter and their allies. By Edelgard’s own admission in her route, this was a deliberate move on his part, since it ultimately provided another source of conflict that his group could take advantage of, which is seen on the Azure Moon route as both Cornelia and a disguised Thales attempt to encourage Dimitri to kill Edelgard. Abyss records also indicate that in addition to plunging the Kingdom into instability and chaos, the fallout from the Tragedy of Duscur drew a deeper wedge between the Central and Western churches, paving the way for Thales to use the Western church in his own plans and increase his group's influence on the Kingdom.
  • Climax Boss: On the Verdant Wind route (and by extension, Silver Snow), he's the last opponent fought in the story before the path's respective final boss.
  • Cold Ham: He tends to be very cold and collected while speaking in a very dramatic and imposing fashion, all without raising his voice. Should he be caught by surprise by having Shambhala invaded, however, Thales will begin to shout orders like a madman as he demands the death of those who oppose him.
  • Contractual Boss Immunity: By having access to the Commander skill, Thales boasts multiple resistances other than just preventing instant death and reducing damage from gambits.
  • Curtains Match the Window: His white hair and beard match his Prophet Eyes.
  • Dead Person Impersonation: It's heavily implied that his group killed Arundel and that he has been impersonating him ever since Imperial Year 1174.
  • Dying Curse: Thematically, his dying moment has him deliver one, accompanied by the BGM 'The Curse'. The reality is more mundane, but a whole lot more destructive.
  • Evil Counterpart: To post-timeskip Dimitri. Both leaders of their respective groups dedicate themselves to avenging the deaths of their people. They're willing to sacrifice themselves and their allies ruthlessly pursuing their enemies (the Church, Rhea, and Children of the Goddess for Thales, and Edelgard for Dimitri), and they tend to refer to said enemies as "beasts". They differ, however, in that Dimitri was personally affected by the truly senseless Tragedy of Duscur, while Thales obsesses over a "crime" that happened to his long-dead ancestors, who deserved their own destruction. Additionally, Dimitri mourns the deaths of his companions even in his most psychotic moments. Thales, meanwhile, couldn't care less about who or what he has to defile or kill to further his plans.
  • Evil Sorcerer: He’s a Guru (per his class’ description) with mastery in dark magic and wants his organization to rule the surface world through any means necessary.
  • Fantastic Racism: If confronted by Flayn or Seteth in battle in his true form, he says the following (keep in mind that those he is speaking to were not even born when what he's talking about happened, and that the event in question was entirely justified):
    Thales: Your eyes, hair, ears and blood... we remember it all! We remember how you ruined us. How you stole our light and condemned us to eternal darkness!
  • A Father to His Men: Subverted. It's clear Thales only values his troops as long they’re useful to him in some form. While he goes out of his way to save disguised Kronya from Byleth, he also makes clear he did so only because he still had something in mind planned for her. Also, under Arundel’s guise on Azure Moon, he insults a dead Cornelia for having the Faerghus Dukedom snatched away by Dimitri, while in Crimson Flower, it becomes obvious that behind his calm composure, he’s absolutely livid over Cornelia’s “accidental” death at the hands of Edelgard’s army, as she had been slain before getting the chance to sabotage the Kingdom army.
  • Famous Last Words: On the Verdant Wind and Silver Snow routes, when he activates the missiles to destroy Byleth, Rhea, and Shambhala:
    Thales: For all Agarthans, let there be light!
  • Fluffy Fashion Feathers: Sports some mahogany colored feathers around his collar, which happen to be connected to his armor's pauldrons.
  • Gone Horribly Right: His main plan in the years leading up to the game's events was to imbue Edelgard with the Crest of Flames and turn her into a weapon to take revenge on the Nabateans and all of humanity. On the Crimson Flower route, she does use that power to take out their arch-enemy Seiros… before turning on him and wiping his group to the last, just as she said she would.
  • Herd-Hitting Attack: He's the only enemy in game capable of using Quake Σ, a dark magic spell hitting every non-flying character on the map. And unlike previous area-of-effect attacks in the series, this one can kill your units if they're weakened.
  • Hero Killer: Downplayed on non-Crimson Flower routes. By pushing Byleth into a canyon with a blast of dark magic during the the Empire's invasion of Garreg Mach, Thales essentially leaves Byleth M.I.A. for 5 whole years.
  • Irony: For all the association with darkness he has alongside his organization, even practicing dark magic, Thales longs for the light. His vendetta is motivated by a desire to embrace the light once more, and in his guise as Arundel, he finally finds peace when dying in the light on the Azure Moon route. His obsession with the light leads his entire nation to its downfall on the Verdant Wind and Silver Snow routes. He uses the last of his strength to launch "javelins of light" onto Shambhala both to kill his enemies and shine light upon the underground city at last (quite literally, since its earth ceiling collapses around it).
  • Jack-of-All-Stats: In contrast to Solon and Kronya, Thales’ stats are balanced all around, even having similar prowess in attack and magic despite the latter being his main means of offense. note 
  • Karma Houdini: Subverted on the Azure Moon route. While he definitively seems to be this at first, his death at the hands of Dimitri under his Arundel guise essentially means that the former avenged his family and the Duscur people without even realizing it.
  • Large and in Charge: Datamining the game reveals his height is 186 cm, meaning he towers over his underlings Solon (176 cm), Cornelia (168 cm), and Kronya (157 cm).
  • Last Stand: While some remnants of his people always survive to cause problems years later, Thales considers the battle in Shambala to be this in terms of a realistic opportunity for his people's vengeance to be realized. In his orders to his forces, he tells them to "activate all that remain" in terms of their advanced technological weapons, implying that he is putting everything they have left into this battle.
  • The Leader: All members of the organization answer to him, and his class' description all but states that he's the member with the highest rank. On the Crimson Flower route, Hubert's declaration that Lord Arundel is the boss of the organization is another hint that he and Thales are the one and the same.
  • Motive Rant: Delivers one on the Verdant Wind and Silver Snow routes once the party arrive into Shambhala.
    Thales: For thousands of years, we have existed underground, living on only that we might someday see our vengeance realized.
  • Not Me This Time: In Crimson Flower Chapter 17, when Kingdom soldiers start turning into Demonic Beasts, Hubert briefly questions whether Thales was responsible. It wasn't him; it was Dedue, driven to desperation by the Imperial army breathing down their necks.
  • Nice Job Fixing It, Villain!: If he hadn't decided to experiment on Edelgard and her siblings, nobody would have known his faction existed. This in the long turn leads to his whole group getting wiped in three routes and their leadership being destroyed in the fourth (and that's assuming that Dimitri doesn't get his paired ending with Hapi).
  • Out-Gambitted: Unfortunately for Thales, his plans are always eventually derailed in some form through all paths.
  • Psychotic Smirk: During the end of Chapter 12 in non-Crimson Flower routes, Thales can be seen smirking for a brief moment right as he blasts Byleth away into a canyon with a sphere of dark magic.
  • Pre-Mortem One-Liner:
    "Do not stand in my way!"
    "A waste of life!"
    "Behold my revenge!"
    "You cannot stop me!"
  • Prophet Eyes: His eyes are a solid white hue without pupils.
  • Recurring Element: He's basically a classical take of the Gharnef archetype: an unnaturally ugly dark mage that manipulates events in his favor and even moreso, on the Verdant Wind and Silver Snow route, he attempts to resurrect a powerful figure with godlike powers (Nemesis) from the past to help his cause. To be more precise, he takes the most influence from Manfroy, an embittered Dark mage obsessed with the past oppression of his people, a hatred of the surface dwellers of the continent, and forces an influential noble with grand ambitions for the continent to ally with him in a Teeth-Clenched Teamwork position. Ironically, the primary target of his hatred, Rhea, takes influence from the more modern Gharnef archetypes.
  • Revenge: This is essentially his whole motive behind throwing Fódlan into chaos and desiring to kill the Children of the Goddess. As far as Thales is concerned, Sothis and her children purged Agartha and exiled his kin from the surface when they "rightfully" attempted to impose their hegemony over them, so in his eyes, he's merely avenging his people and trying to reclaim what he believes should have been rightfully theirs; the world of the surface.
  • Smug Snake:
    • During his meeting with the Flame Emperor after Jeralt's death, when the former gives him an Implied Death Threat for their actions, Thales chooses to ignore his co-worker's warnings entirely and focuses instead on claiming that all of his group's actions have been for the Flame Emperor's sake.
    • Should Claude confront him during battle, Thales will show amusement over the very idea of a creature like him being capable of even scratching his body.
  • The Stoic: Downplayed. While Thales isn’t that expressive for the most part, he’s not afraid to flaunt his superiority when things go his way.
  • Story-Breaker Power: Thales has the ability to deploy the "javelins of light" towards whatever location he desires, making him one of the most powerful characters in the setting. It's implied this doesn’t come without drawbacks, however, as not only do Claude and Hubert speculate that there must be something preventing their frequent use, as Thales seems to be deliberately preventing himself from abusing them (save for when he’s being pushed into a corner and has nothing left to lose), because of their absence in the Azure Moon route as a result of his premature death as Lord Arundel, it's also implied that he's the only member of the group capable of activating them.
  • Taking You with Me: Spitefully tries to obliterate Byleth, Rhea, and Shambhala off the face of Fódlan once he's defeated in battle. He's willing to destroy not only himself, but the last stronghold of his own people, just on the off-chance it achieves his vengeance.
    Thales: You will never… get to enjoy your victory.
  • The Unfought: On the Crimson Flower route, you never actually fight him, since his group is technically working for you at that point. Instead, the closing text says that Edelgard's new empire went to war with his group and took them down after defeating the Church of Seiros. Zigzagged on the Azure Moon route, as while you don't fight Thales specifically, you instead kill him under his guise as Lord Arundel.
  • Villainous Breakdown: Once Byleth enters Shambhala, his mostly stoic contempt drops, and he immediately barks orders to overload the stronghold's defense sentries and release the Titanus' inhibitors, all while he rants about the coming vengeance, and contemplating destroying Shambhala just so his enemies are vanquished.
  • What Happened to the Mouse?: In the Crimson Flower and Azure Moon routes, he makes no story appearances after Part I. Ultimately subverted, given it's heavily implied he still reappears in the story later but under the identity of Lord Arundel.

    Solon 

Solon

Class: Dark Bishop

Voiced by: Shinya Fukumatsu (Japanese), Joseph Whimms (English)

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/feth_solon_2.png
Click here to see Solon in Fire Emblem Heroes 

A man with the appearance of a mage. Suitable for his appearance, he uses cunning schemes and tricks. A highly dangerous individual.


  • Asshole Victim: After his role in the tragedy in Remire Village, no one sheds any tears for him after Byleth kills him after returning from Zaharas.
  • Batman Gambit: He's described as someone who relies on cunning schemes and tricks. Notably, he makes use of Kronya’s presence (who had just killed Jeralt) in the Sealed Forest as a way to lure a very angry Byleth into a trap, conveniently omitting to Kronya what exactly such a trap entails for her.
  • Black Eyes of Crazy: His eyes are differing shades of yellow with black sclerae, and he's referred to as highly dangerous.
  • The Cameo: He pops up in Byleth's reveal trailer for Super Smash Bros. Ultimate, is shocked when Byleth escapes his trap by running off to Smash, and freaks out when Byleth gains all four of the protagonists' Heroes' Relics.
  • Contractual Boss Immunity: He bears the Unsealable Magic skill on all of his appearances.
  • Dark Messiah: A very dark take on the trope. Solon proclaims himself “the savior of all” just as Remire Village burns around him and the villagers he infected are trying to kill each other.
  • Dead Person Impersonation: It's heavily implied his group killed Tomas sometime after he left the Monastery and that he has been impersonating him ever since his "return".
  • Defiant to the End: When Byleth returns from what should have been their Fate Worse than Death sporting Sothis' power and a Death Glare, Solon realizes how screwed he is, but chooses to go down fighting to the end with the last of his troops and fell beasts.
  • Evil Gloating: He engages in this right after discarding his disguise as Tomas in Remire Village.
  • Evil Old Folks: Having a bent back and needing a walking stick doesn't hinder his ability to be a bastard. Datamining the game even reveals he's 73 years old.
  • Evil Cripple: Concept art reveals his big right eye is actually prosthetic and made from advanced technology.
  • For Science!: The reason he caused chaos in Remire. It brought absolutely no benefit to the group's goals (and in fact, given he had to abandon his disguise as Tomas as a result, actively hurt them if anything), but he wanted to see what would happen.
  • Kick the Dog: In Chapter 8, if the player fails to save any villager before Solon reveals his true form, he will declare the "experiment" has been finished right before having every villager not driven mad killed on the spot.
  • Hero Killer: Subverted. By using the Forbidden Spell of Zaharas on Byleth, he essentially traps them into Another Dimension of eternal darkness where they would’ve eventually died under normal circumstances. Unfortunately for him, they manage to get out anyway thanks to performing a Fusion Dance with Sothis, giving them the power to break free.
  • Life Drain: Thanks to his Lifetaker skill, Solon can replenish his health every time he defeats an enemy unit.
  • Magic Staff: He wields the Circe Staff, which for all intents and purposes is also his walking stick.
  • Manipulative Bastard: In the Golden Deer route, it’s implied that under his Tomas disguise, Solon deliberately made Claude more antagonistic towards the Church of Seiros. He casually discloses to Claude that the church has been covering up the dark nature of the Heroes’ Relics and Crests for quite some time, even suggesting that the Sword of Creator could've been what corrupted Nemesis to begin with.
  • Master of Disguise: In-universe, Solon is the only Agarthan who manages to successfully pose as someone else without raising any suspicions, and when he willingly chooses to discard his Tomas disguise, it comes as a legit shock to many. note 
  • My Brain Is Big: His forehead is big and veiny, fitting for a character described as cunning.
  • Obviously Evil: Pale, veiny forehead, black eyes, and a sinister expression all point to him being no good.
  • Oh, Crap!: He freaks out when Byleth escapes his spell, and even more when he realizes how they did it.
  • Pre-Mortem One-Liner:
    "This is the end!"
    "Beasts! All of you!"
    "Beg for mercy!"
    "Die!"
  • Promoted to Playable: He makes his playable debut in Fire Emblem Heroes as a Grand Hero Battle unit.
  • Recurring Element: Solon is a downplayed version of the Smug Minister archetype, as he is rather competent as The Mole, and rather than being a Dirty Coward or Smug Snake, he goes out fighting.
  • Red and Black and Evil All Over: Has a black and red robe, and is one of the most morally-corrupt villains in the game, rivaling his superior Thales in cruelty.
  • Red Right Hand: His right eye is open abnormally far, has a different color than his left eye, and has unusual markings around it.
  • Squishy Wizard: Solon has a sky-high magic stat but pitiful physical defense and speed, leaving him prone to get one-shotted by strong physical attacks.
  • Tron Lines: His gloves and staff have lines that glow dark blue.
  • Turns Red: Once Solon's in a pinch, his Defiant Magic skill increases his magic stat to dangerous degrees.
  • Unusable Enemy Equipment: His Circe Staff cannot be wielded by any of the playable characters.
  • Villain Ball: The Remire Tragedy progresses none of his faction's goals. He even drops his disguise, revealing that Tomas has been replaced and that there is a faction in direct opposition to the church. This from a man who's described as a cunning schemer.
  • Villainous Valor: After his plans are thwarted, he makes a last stand against Byleth and their house.
  • What Is This Feeling?: After Byleth frees themselves from the Forbidden Spell of Zahras thanks to their Fusion Dance with Sothis, Solon openly admits to Byleth that they have become The Dreaded to him… and because he does not like the feeling one bit, he decides he has to kill Byleth for it, because according to him, "fear" is not an emotion that should have a place within him.
  • Weapon of Choice: Both times you fight him, he has a Magitek staff called the Staff of Circe.
  • You Gotta Have Blue Hair: His hair is a pale blue.

    Kronya 

Kronya

Class: Assassin

Voiced by: Marika Kono (Japanese), Colleen O'Shaughnessey (English)

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/feth_cronje.png
Click here to see Kronya in Fire Emblem Heroes 

One of "those who slither in the dark." She looks like a happy young woman, but she acts like a child and exhibits a brutal disposition.


  • Animal Motifs: Scorpions. Concept art reveals the three sharp "tails" attached to Kronya's leotard are meant to invoke the image of a scorpion's tail.
  • Advertised Extra: Her unique design, as well as some early pre-release material and her appearance in Heroes suggested she'd be a major antagonist. While she is the one who kills Jeralt, she herself ends up getting killed midway through the next mission, when Solon uses her as a sacrifice to take out Byleth.
  • Asshole Victim: When Solon uses her as fuel for his ritual to seal Byleth away, she falls to the ground and reaches her hand out to Byleth as she begs for help. Given that she's the one who killed Jeralt and taunted the player with that fact, it's easy to say that many didn't feel bad about her violent death as a Human Sacrifice.
  • Ax-Crazy: This woman is not right in the head. Half of her Heroes quotes involve her going on and on about bloodshed and violence and pain.
  • Beat Still, My Heart: Solon sacrifices Kronya by plunging his hand through her chest, slowly ripping out what's implied to be her heart and crushes it to activate his banishment spell. Kronya is still alive and screaming in pain while the entire scene unfolds.
  • Dead Person Impersonation: It's heavily implied that her group killed Monica sometime before her graduation and that she's been impersonating her as a means to infiltrate the Monastery.
  • Dirty Coward: After all her bluster and cruel taunting of Byleth, once they have her cornered she books it, visibly terrified. And when Solon begins to kill her, she spends her last moments pathetically begging for Byleth to save her.
  • Do Not Call Me "Paul": Inverted. If you sic Leonie on her during her boss fight, she is enraged when Leonie refers to her by her alias Monica.
  • Evil Feels Good: She isn’t subtle in the slightest about how much she enjoys killing and such.
  • Faux Action Girl:
    • She's one of the assassins for "those who slither in the dark" but she would have failed her assassination attempt on Jeralt had Thales not interfered.
    • Averted with a vengeance in Heroes, as Kronya is a fairly competent and useful unit there.
  • Fragile Speedster: Kronya has respectable offenses and high speed and avoidance, but any connecting blows will bring her down pretty quickly.
  • The Friend Nobody Likes: It's made clear early on that neither Solon or Thales can stand her. The latter tells her to her face she was saved from death because she still was useful to him, only for said "use" being to serve as fuel for Solon's ritual.
  • Hate Sink:
    • In the midst of many complex characters in Three Houses, Kronya stands out for her screentime, as she spends all of it making you really hate her. Between being a Dirty Coward Faux Action Girl, killing Jeralt via cheap shot, reveling in taunting the hell out of Byleth, and being a considerably less complex character, it is very difficult for players to feel sorry for her when she's begging for help as she lays dying. She certainly fulfills the necessity of a character the audience can squarely hate, when the majority of the cast of characters are morally gray, and while this could apply to everyone from "those who slither in the dark", she also lacks Thales' overall leadership and cunning and Solon's Villainous Valor.
    • This continues in Heroes to some extent. Kronya gushes about her lust for bloodshed and repeatedly insults and threatens to kill Kiran/the player if they interact with her, in a game where Zephiel, Gharnef, and even the human-hating Grima are able to show restraint and some degree of respect.
  • Hero Killer: She kills Jeralt with a cheap shot after he lowers his guard.
  • Human Sacrifice: Solon uses her as one to cast a powerful dark magic spell that almost sentences Byleth to a Fate Worse than Death.
  • Hidden Depths: Believe it or not, she does get some in Heroes:
  • Knife Nut: While there aren't any actual daggers in the game as an usable weapon, Athame is more of a dagger than a sword and is even named after a type of ceremonial blade. Heroes adapts her into a Dagger unit using Athame.
  • Laser-Guided Karma: The sadistic and cruel Kronya who relishes in killing receives "help" from Solon that ends with her becoming a Human Sacrifice begging to live.
  • Monster Clown: The pale-white skin and eyeliner give off that kind of motif.
  • Ms. Fanservice: Her outfit is very revealing, showing off her curves quite well, especially in Heroes.
  • Peek-a-Bangs: Her hairstyle covers her right eye.
  • Perky Female Minion: She's a youthful and childlike 18 year old girl with a sadistic steak on a team led by men.
  • Pre-Mortem One-Liner: Kronya shares the same critical quotes in both Heroes and Three Houses.
    "Just a nuisance!"
    "Guess you wanna die?"
    "You fool!"
    "You're in my way!"
  • Promoted to Playable: She makes her playable debut in Fire Emblem Heroes as a Grand Hero Battle unit.
  • Psychopathic Manchild: Kronya embodies the worst aspects of this, being very hyperactive, lacking any sort of restraints, incapable of understanding basic empathy, and being a Sore Loser when things don't go her way.
  • Recurring Element: She is basically the first female take of the Kempf archetype, with her being the closest "those who slither in the dark" have to a psychotic attack dog whose rank is in the middle between leaders such as Thales and Solon and glorified mooks like Myson and Odesse, as well as having a tendency to mock and taunt those beneath her. As part of "those who slither in the dark" and their modus operandi, she is similar to many Dark Ladies who 'used to be virtuous in the past', but with a twist: Kronya and Monica are not the same person, and whether or not the real Monica was a nice person has no bearing on Kronya's Misanthrope Supreme nature, making Kronya a throwback to thoroughly unsympathetic dark ladies such as Jugdral's Hilda and Elibe's Sonia.
  • Smug Snake: She loves to taunt inferior beings and mock them for being unable to harm her. Not only does she quickly turn into a Dirty Coward when easily outmatched, whining about how unfair it is, she only succeeded with killing Jeralt thanks to Thales intercepting Byleth.
  • Stripperiffic: The things coming out of her back seem to cover more surface area than her Leotard of Power, which also includes Cleavage Window, Underboobs, and Bare Your Midriff.
  • Traitor Shot: While in her alias as Monica, she's briefly seen during the battle at the chapel, giving a "..." line as Jeralt deals with the monsters. By the end of the mission, she reveals herself as a spy by stabbing Jeralt In the Back.
  • Unusable Enemy Equipment: Her Athame cannot be wielded by any of the playable characters.
  • We Hardly Knew Ye: She's killed off in the same chapter where she is formally introduced as Kronya.
  • Villains Want Mercy: Has the gall to beg Byleth, whose father she just killed a chapter ago, to save her when Solon uses her as a human sacrifice.
  • Your Size May Vary: Athame is consistently depicted as a dagger, except during combat where it is upscaled to be as big as a sword.
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    Faerghus Member 
MASSIVE spoilers. 
An important member residing in the Holy Kingdom of Faerghus. Her entry can be found on the Characters page.

    Myson 

Myson

Class: Warlock

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/myson_portrait.png

A member of "those who slither in the dark" that appears on the Azure Moon and Verdant Wind routes. He shows up during the final battle between the Holy Kingdom of Faerghus and the Adrestian Empire at the Imperial Palace.


  • Ascended Extra: Downplayed. Following the fourth wave of DLC, he has a paralogue dedicated solely to his activities within Adrestia, including experimentation with the various beasts. He's still not a major character — and even in the paralogue, Constance and Yuri get the lion's share of spotlight — but now he's more than just a random enemy that appears in three of the four routes.
  • Bad Boss: In "A Cursed Relic", it's implied that he experimented with the thieves he hired to steal Duke Gerth's relic in order for them to turn into Demonic Beasts, a process which left them experiencing a lot of pain.
  • Bonus Boss: Appears in Constance and Yuri's Paralogue, where he is performing experiments and attempting to steal the Hero's Relic of Aubin from Duke Gerth.
  • Boss in Mook's Clothing: On the Azure Moon route, don't let his appearance as a generic Warlock fool you. He wields Bohr Χ, the strongest spell in the game, which reduces any unit's HP to 1 from a whopping range of 3-10. This is effectively a death sentence considering that Hegemon Edelgard is throwing fireballs around the map and that he has some demonic beasts guarding him.
  • Casting a Shadow: He’s notably the only enemy Warlock in the game capable of using dark magic.
  • Contractual Boss Immunity: Myson usually bears either the Unsealable Magic or the Inmune Status skills in battle.
  • Decapitated Army: The moment he's defeated on Azure Moon, any remaining underlings on the map retreat to fight another day, leaving only Imperial soldiers and Demonic Beasts.
  • Demoted to Extra: He appears in the penultimate battle of the Verdant Wind/Silver Snow routes, but unlike his appearance in Azure Moon, he has no dialogue and essentially functions as an elite mook who happens to have a name.
  • Dragon Their Feet: On the Azure Moon route, he outlives Thales (heavily implied to have been killed under Lord Arundel's identity in Derdriu) to lead a contingent of "those who slither in the dark" in the final battle.
  • Fantastic Racism:
    • States rather succinctly his group's goals and feelings toward the Nabateans when he first launches an attack on the Azure Moon route:
      Myson: We will return this world to mortal hands... May that filthy race of beasts wither and die...
    • He also shows off his people's disdain for non-Agarthans during Constance and Yuri's paralogue, referring to those he experimented on as "children of the beasts" and referring to their monstrous transformations as their "true nature".
  • For Science!: In Constance and Yuri's paralogue he loses the relic he sought, as well as all his test subjects and a large number of Agarthan soldiers. Still, he is satisfied that his experiments on the thieves at least yielded results, remarking that ultimately that was all that mattered.
  • HP to 1: On Azure Moon, he comes equipped with the Bohr Χ spell, which reduces the target's HP to 1 from a long range, similar to the Hel spell from the Jugdral series.
  • Karma Houdini: On the Crimson Flower route, he's never seen again after escaping the heroes in "A Cursed Relic". That being said, since Edelgard is implied to have successfully eliminated the Agarthans after winning the war, there's a good chance he ended up being killed offscreen anyways.
  • Karma Houdini Warranty: On all routes other than Crimson Flower, he escapes punishment for his actions in "A Cursed Relic", only to be killed at the end of the war by Byleth and their companions.
  • Unusable Enemy Equipment: Bohr Χ cannot be learned by any of the playable characters.
  • Villain: Exit, Stage Left: He escapes when defeated in "A Cursed Relic".
  • The Voiceless: Myson has no lines of dialogue whatsoever when fought in Shambhala.

    Chilon 

Chilon

Class: Great Knight

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/fe3h_great_knight.png

A member of "those who slither in the dark" who can be found in Shambhala. Quiet and taciturn, he guards the main room within Shambhala.


  • Elite Mook: He's a slightly tougher enemy with a name and mildly important role on the map (namely, guarding Thales's room).
  • The Generic Guy: Considering how the only thing special about him is the fact that he has a name, it would be more accurate to call him a normal enemy rather than a full-fledged boss.
  • Magic Knight: Of a sort. While he uses a traditionally physically oriented class, he has a respectable magic stat which he can abuse with his Bolt Axe.
  • Mighty Glacier: Literally, as he's blocking the entrance to Shambhala's main room and sports massive strength and physical defense at the expense of low speed and resistance.

    Bias 

Bias

Class: Gremory

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/fe3h_gremory.png

A member of "those who slither in the dark" who can be found in one of Shambhala's hidden rooms. She hides in a chamber and summons Titanus reinforcements.


  • The Beastmaster: She's in charge of constantly summoning Titanus reinforcements. Killing her is necessary to stop them from spawning.
  • Elite Mook: She's a slightly tougher enemy with a name and mildly important role on the map (namely, summoning Titanuses).
  • Squishy Wizard: Bias is a magic caster who specializes in fire magic.
  • The Generic Guy: Considering how the only thing special about her is the fact that she has a name, it would be more accurate to call her a normal enemy rather than a full-fledged boss.

    Pittacus 

Pittacus

Class: Gremory

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/fe3h_gremory.png

A member of "those who slither in the dark" who can be found in one of Shambhala's hidden rooms. She hides in a chamber and operates the Viskams within Shambhala.


  • Elite Mook: She's a slightly tougher enemy with a name and mildly important role on the map (namely, operating the Viskams).
  • The Generic Guy: Considering how the only thing special about her is the fact that she has a name, it would be more accurate to call her a normal enemy rather than a full-fledged boss.
  • Squishy Wizard: Pittacus is a magic caster who specializes in offensive Faith magic.
  • The Turret Master: She's in charge of keeping the Viskams operational. Once she falls, the turrets become as good as useless.

    Odesse 

Odesse

Class: Dark Bishop

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/fe3h_odesse.png

A surviving member of "those who slither in the dark" that appears in the final map of the Verdant Wind route. He and the remaining members of the Agarthans support Nemesis and his forces during the battle.


  • Dragon Their Feet: On the Verdant Wind route, he outlives Thales and the other Agarthan commanders to lead the remnants of "those who slither in the dark" in the final battle. His defeat will stop reinforcements from coming, and any remaining Agarthans turn tail and leave.
  • Elite Mook: He's a slightly tougher enemy with a name and a mildly important role on the map (namely, issuing a warning about the poison swamp, and summoning Demonic Beast reinforcements).
  • The Generic Guy: Considering how the only thing special about him is the fact that he has a name, it would be more accurate to call him a normal enemy than a full-fledged boss.
  • Last Stand: He and the rest of the Agarthans are this on the last map, as Shambhala, the main fortress of the Agarthans, has been destroyed.
  • Odd Name Out: He's one of only two named Agarthans (the other being Kronya) who isn't named for one of the Seven Sages of Ancient Greece, though his name is still Greek in origin—even odder because without him the Agarthan leadership is missing a sage namesake.

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