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Mister Fantastic

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mister_fantastic.jpg

Alter Ego: Reed Richards

Notable Aliases: Invincible Man, Reed Benjamin

First Appearance: The Fantastic Four #1 (November 1961)

"I've done it! I'm drifting into a world of limitless dimensions!! It's the crossroads of infinity — the junction to everywhere!"
Reed Richards, Fantastic Four #51, "This Man, This Monster", written by Stan Lee

Reed Richards, better known as Mister Fantastic, is a Marvel Comics character created by Jack Kirby and Stan Lee, first appearing in The Fantastic Four #1 (dated Nov. 1961).

Dubbed one of the smartest people in the Marvel Universe, Reed was a mild-mannered scientist who —alongside his girlfriend Sue Storm, best friend Benjamin Grimm, and Sue's younger brother Johnny— gained fantastic powers and abilities together while on a mission in outer space. In a classic example of superhero irony, the accident turned obstinate, rigid Reed into a Rubber Man with super-flexibility.

In the years since becoming Mister Fantastic, Reed has married Sue, became a father, joined The Illuminati, and reconstructed the multiverse with his family. In many ways, he's the father of the Marvel Universe, and is perhaps the most well-known superhero dad in all of fiction.

While far from a joke character in the truest sense, Reed has a reputation of being somewhat ineffectual, and is the trope namer of Reed Richards Is Useless. By contrast, he's also the namer of Alternate Universe Reed Richards Is Awesome, which is references the popular opinion that alternate universe versions of himself (such as the villainous Maker of Ultimate Marvel) are superior to the original.

As one of the first true Marvel characters, Reed has appeared quite often in other media. In the Fantastic Four films, he has been portrayed by Alex Hyde-White, Ioan Gruffudd, and Miles Teller.


Mister Fantastic has appeared in:

Notable Comic Books

  • Fantastic Four (various runs):
    • vol. 1 (1961 — 1996, 2002 — 2012, 2015)
    • vol. 2 (1996 — 1997)
    • vol. 3 (1998 — 2003)
    • vol. 4 (2013 — 2014)
    • vol. 5 (2014 — 2015)
    • vol. 6 (2018 — present)
  • FF vol. 1 (2011 — 2012)
  • New Avengers vol. 3 (2013 — 2015)
  • Secret Wars vol. 2 (2015 — 2016)

Film

Animation

Video Games


Mister Fantastic contains examples of:

  • Absent-Minded Professor: Sometimes extending as far as Ditzy Genius. Whenever there's a Broke Episode, Reed is usually the culprit.
  • Action Hero: He is actively involved in the battles of his heroic team.
  • Aesop Amnesia: He learns during the arc with the Council of Reeds and the Four Cities not to do everything alone and that he should rely on and involve people and heroes he knows who can help. He promptly ignores this while remaining a member of the Illuminati and completely forgets it during the Incursion crisis. In fact it can be said for such an intelligent man Reed consistently finds a reason to ignore the lessons he's learned to screw things up by himself for not trusting his family.
  • Age Lift: In the classic Marvel Universe, Reed (and Ben Grimm and Doctor Doom) is a middle-aged man around a decade or two Sue and Johnny's senior and the white in his hair is the result of age. Both the original Heroes Reborn and the Fantastic Four (2005) film series depict him as closer in age to Sue and the latter had the white streaks by by-product of the accident that gave the Four their powers (and in the former, all of Reed's hair stayed brown). While also closer in age to Sue, Ultimate Fantastic Four and Fantastic Four (2015) depict Reed (and Ben and Doom) as a teenager or in his early 20s.
  • Alliterative Name: Reed Richards.
  • Alternate Universe Reed Richards Is Awesome: In universes when Reed is not bound by Status Quo Is God, he's capable of even more amazing scientific accomplishments than in the main 616 verse. Gets deconstructed in Hickman's run, where every other Reed Richards is awesome because they've either morally corrupt arseholes, or they abandoned their families in the name of the Greater Good.
  • Always Someone Better: Mixed with Always Second Best when it comes to Tony Stark. As Reed explains to Steve Rogers, when it comes to problem-solving a single problem, Reed is just a little bit smarter than Tony, but when it comes to multi-tasking, Tony has the advantage.
  • Anti-Villain: Becomes this in the 'Perfect world' storyline. While he still has good intentions and didn't push the button himself; it doesn't change the fact (as he himself points out) that he helped murder an entire team of superheroes and destroy an inhabited planet.
  • The Atoner: At the start of Mark Waid's run, Reed revealed to his infant daughter Valeria that he still felt guilty for the circumstances that led to the creation of the Fantastic Four, and that he made them celebrities in part to make up for robbing them of their normal lives.
  • Badass Beard: Reed has begun to be consistently drawn with a full beard starting in the late 2000s, under the tenures of Slott and Hickman.
  • Badass Bookworm: Something that tends to get lost in many adaptations. People often forget that he's a war vet, and in his younger days he did some very Indiana Jones-esque missions for the US government and, oh yeah, stole a rocket and tried to fly to the moon.
  • Chosen Conception Partner: Double Subversion. His college sweetheart, Alyssa Moy turned him down because she believed that she should try and have children with less intelligent men to smarten up future generations. When this didn't work out, she became interested in Reed again, but by this time, he was Happily Married.
  • Comic-Book Fantasy Casting: Recently, some artists have given Reed a resemblance to John Krasinski.
  • Constantly Curious: Partial justification for his ditzy, shortsighted or otherwise callous actions. Notably, one evil scientist that stole his intellect began suffering Sanity Slippage, as he couldn't stop questioning how things worked and how to improve them. He found being disintegrated a relief from the stress.
  • Defeat Means Friendship: After the combined forces of the Fantastic Four, The Avengers and Doctor Strange prevent a starving Galactus from destroying the Earth, Reed Richards shows the Devourer of Worlds mercy. In exchange, Galactus calls Richards "friend" before vowing that Earth need no longer fear his hunger.
  • Depending on the Writer: Reed's disposition varies from series to series. Sometimes he's nice but a bit unnecessarily gruff, sometimes he's a complete Jerkass, sometimes he's just absent minded.
  • Distinguished Gentleman's Pipe: Reed used to smoke a pipe from time to time, before the dangers of smoking became well-known.
  • Enemy Mine:
    • Happens a lot with major antagonists for Reed, such as with Doctor Doom and Galactus.
    • Notable when Reed's daughter Valeria brokered a deal with Doom. Doom will work with the Future Foundation to bring down a group of amoral alternate Reed Richards. In exchange, they would heal his super-intelligence crippling brain damage. Doom upon being restored gathers a summit of the FF's most intelligent enemies to work on strategies to kill the Reeds. At the Foundation's headquarters.
  • Flexibility Equals Sex Ability: Reed's Power Perversion Potential is known, and is considered highly attractive.
  • Foil: To his brother-in-law Johnny. Reed is law-abiding hero with a sense of duty who plans things ahead for his teammates, while Johnny is a reckless Leeroy Jenkins hero who has little care about laws and want to do what is right. Both Reed and Johnny also took different sides during the Civil War events.
  • Happily Married: To Susan.
  • Heart Is an Awesome Power: The first issue of the comic has him stop a fighter plane missile and save a falling Johnny's life all in a single page. The use of his somewhat less flashy powers (which, given that one member of the team creates invisible constructs, is saying something) just gets crazier and more creative from there.
  • Jerk with a Heart of Gold: It really depends on the era the book was written and who is writing it. In the 60's he came off as bit offish and the early 70's had him as a Jerk with a Heart of Gold, Afterwards, he's been consistently portrayed as the Nice Guy.
  • Licked by the Dog: By the rest of the team. Especially Sue and Ben though.
  • Master of Disguise: Mr. Fantastic has infrequently used his stretching powers to assume a different face.
  • Military Superhero: An oft-overlooked in adaptations fact about Reed and Ben is that they served in the army. In the early comics, it was World War II until Comic-Book Time made that impossible and it spent decades dropped. In 2019, it was reinstated as part of the Siancong War.
  • Mirror Character: With Victor. Although they're on opposite ends of the good vs. evil thing, both Reed and Doom are insanely intelligent, somewhat condescending, and often only care about completing whatever task at hand will best benefit whatever, tossing aside everything else. They both also fall into the same spectrum in the Order Versus Chaos area (being the "lawful" type character).
  • My Greatest Failure: Being responsible for changing Ben into the Thing, as well as his failure in being able to reverse it, gives Reed a lot of grief. To a lesser extent, he feels like he wrecked Sue and Johnny as well, having ruined all three of their chances to live normal lives; it being his idea to steal the starship that led to the events granting them their powers. His formation of the Fantastic Four and turning the team into celebrities is his attempt to make up for it.
  • Nay-Theist: Reed is stated to be a humanist, although he does believe in the existence of God, as he has actually met God face to face (in the form of Jack Kirby, incidentally) and he even brought Ben Back from the Dead.
  • Nigh-Invulnerability: Mister Fantastic's skin is virtually impervious to laceration or punctures unless he willfully relaxes his reflexive control over small areas of his body. In that case, scalpels and ordinary needles can penetrate his skin.
    • Due to the great malleability and elasticity of his molecular structure, Mister Fantastic is able to absorb the impact of any type of man-made ballistic projectile by deforming his body along the path of the projectile's trajectory at the point of initial impact. He can also contain explosions by enveloping them and allowing their force to expand him.
  • Omnidisciplinary Scientist: Reed is an expert in biochemistry, human and alien biology, chemistry, communications, computers, electronics, energy generation, electrical, mechanical and aerospace engineering, extra-dimensional travel, holography, mutations, all levels of physics, robotics, space travel, spectral analysis, synthetic polymers, time travel, transportation, and more. He's the namesake for an in-universe science award for excellence in multiple disciplines.
    • This was also lampshaded in the mini-series Fantastic Four: True Story, where Reed said at one point; "This will require me to create an entirely new field of scientific study. Give me a couple of days."
    • Middle-lampshaded when Reed told Hank Pym he's the best biochemist in the world, so he would need weeks to be as good as him. Pym comments it's no wonder that people hate Reed.
    • Has come up in other stories; Reed once went to great lengths to recruit the aid of Doctor Octopus to help during the last stages of Sue's second pregnancy (the first time around) because he recognised that Otto Octavius had superior knowledge of radiation compared to him, and in another storyline that saw the FF work with Spider-Man to deal with an alien invasion that had mutated most of the human race, Reed noted that Spider-Man was better suited to view the problem from the perspective of a biologist than Reed was.
  • Papa Wolf: Don't mess with his kids.
  • Power Perversion Potential: Reed can stretch any part of his body — and yes, it has come up in subtext that this is why he and Sue are so Happily Married.
  • Power Stereotype Flip: Reed is a stubborn and strict man. He's also a Rubber Man.
  • Reed Richards Is Useless: The Trope Namer. A certified super-genius and one of the smartest people in the whole universe, he regularly invents mind-bending devices that tell physics where to shove it, but almost never devotes his considerable talents to anything other than superheroics. While Marvel has attempted to justify his lack of world-changiness in various ways, including that his inventions are too expensive and that nobody else can understand them, the real reason is that allowing him to make a real difference would make the world far too different to reality. The justification being used in Jonathan Hickman's run on Fantastic Four and F.F. and by Bendis in the Ultimate Marvel universe, is that it's his family which prevents Reed from putting all his efforts into changing the world. He has to choose between being a loving father and husband and devoting himself to advancing humanity (although why Reed can't take a middle ground has yet to be explained). It's implied that the world is lucky when Reed takes the first option since, if he doesn't or if things don't work out between him and Sue, he becomes a Knight Templar (Hickman's books) or full on villain (the Ultimate 'verse).
    • Other justifications given (making this both the Trope Namer and the Unbuilt Trope) is that while a lot of Reed's stuff does get patented, he avoids a lot of dangerous superhero stuff like the death rays and portals to hell that can't be trusted to the general public. Also, many companies pay him explicitly not to patent his stuff because they know they can't keep up with his inventions, which would put millions of people out of work.
    • Subverted in that he does invent many things that have everyday uses. Most of them are bought by companies with competing products in order to keep them from hitting the streets and putting them out of business.
  • Rubber Man: He possesses the ability to convert the mass of his entire body into a highly malleable state at will. How his body's respiration and circulatory systems function at these distorted extremes is as yet unknown. He can alter his form in a matter of seconds, often much less (depending on the complexity of the shape), and revert to his normal humanoid shape within a similar time. The greater the distance he stretches or the more extended the size of the object he becomes, the weaker his overall strength becomes.
  • Science Hero: He uses science in the name of heroism and has always considered his mind to be his true super-power.
  • Sealed Evil in a Duel: Tried to protect the world from Doctor Doom once and for all by trapping them both in a pocket dimension where Reed could keep watch over his one-time friend and lifelong nemesis. Forever.
  • Sesquipedalian Loquaciousness: With frequent requests from Ben to dial it down a notch so everyone else can understand.
  • Skunk Stripe: His hair includes grey temples.
  • Small Steps Hero: What originally made Reed different from Doom. While Doom believes Utopia Justifies the Means, Reed will forego scientific progress if it harms too many people. Later stories, however, started to revoke this.
  • Smart People Build Robots: Every other week, it seems like.
  • Smart People Play Chess: Against Doctor Doom. With no board. Finishing a game started decades before. While setting things in motion to thwart Doom. Who's basically doing the same thing.
  • The Smart Guy: Even by Marvel standards where everyone seems to have a minimum IQ of 240, Reed is recognised as the go to guy for intelligence. He is one of the most intelligent beings on the planet.
  • Super Intelligence: Often held as the standard for Super Intelligence in the Marvel Universe. It's generally accepted that Reed is the World's Smartest Man. It is generally accepted that his powers really do give him this, as while he is naturally a scientific genius with an Improbably High I.Q. without them, the fact that his brain is literally malleable gives him an intelligence boost even to that. On the rare occasions he loses his powers he sometimes gets slightly dumber - still super-smart, but not solving problems quite as easily as he could before.
  • Teen Genius: Entered university at age 14, had doctorates by the age of 20.
  • To Be Lawful or Good: Often finds himself in this situation, particularly in regards to Doctor Doom's Diplomatic Impunity. Unfortunately, he often ends up siding in the "lawful" in many of these situations as evident with his hesitation trying to break international law to capture Doctor Doom and the events during the Civil War events where he sided with the Pro-Registration superheroes.
  • What the Hell, Hero?: Reed will usually always pick out the easiest solution, not giving any foresight to matters such as tact, emotions, feelings, practicality, or possible future consequences (such as permanently shrinking an alien race to evacuate them off a doomed planet, or turning Skrulls into cows without considering the ramifications of ingesting alien flesh or the morality of it). When this happens, Sue will usually call him out on it.
    • One of the interesting common threads in alternate-universe Marvel stories is that in the event something terrible happens to Sue, Franklin, and/or Valeria, Reed will immediately go straight off the deep end. He's relying so heavily upon his family to keep him in check that if the unthinkable happens, he rapidly goes through all the stages of grief and right into insanity. This can be seen most clearly in the What If? where Sue died while giving birth to Franklin; Reed ignores the baby in favor of going on a suicide run against Annihilus. In more modern stories, Reed goes instantly nuts in the Marvel Zombies universe when Franklin and Valeria are killed.
    • Made a plot-point in Jonathan Hickman's run. Reed is faced with two choices. One: run off and join an interdimensional Council of Reeds from different universes committed to making creation itself a better place—ahem, by any means necessary, up to and including murdering Beyonders, killing Galactuses and carving up solar systems. The other choice is to stay at home in the 616 with his loving family and be the father to Franklin that Nathaniel never was to Reed. The Council of Reeds is by far the more logical choice—Valeria and even Nathaniel (a little) call him out on it—but Reed stalwartly refuses. Why? One reason: Franklin. The one thing our Reed created that all those other Reeds, with all their science and vast machinery and good intentions never could.
  • World's Smartest Man: Reed Richards is usually recognized as the smartest man in the Marvel Universe, being the most esteemed mind in the scientific community. In fact he himself considers his intellect to be his real superpower rather than his elasticity.
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    The Invisible Woman 

The Invisible Woman

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/invisible_woman2.jpg

Alter Ego: Susan "Sue" Storm-Richards

Notable Aliases: Invisible Girl, Captain Universe, Susan Benjamin, Malice, Mistress of Hate, Baroness Von Doom, Tabitha Deneuve

First Appearance: The Fantastic Four #1 (November 1961)

"You're pathetic. One of the best minds on the planet and you waste it for years, doing magic tricks - then trying to best a man who'd never really harm you, despite your endless provocation. But that's the difference between my husband and me. He doesn't understand revenge. Me? I can't decide which of the many ways I can hurt you I'm going to use."
Sue threatening The Wizard

If the Fantastic Four can be considered the "first family" of the Marvel Universe, then Sue Storm is their first lady. While she's not technically the first female superhero created by the company note , Sue was the only one with any sort of substantial focus for quite some time. By comparison, Jean Grey hit the scene nearly two years after Sue's introduction, though many think she didn't hit her own stride until The '70s.

Sue, alongside the rest of the F4, is a classic case of Silver Age science fiction. While on an expedition in outer space, Sue —with her younger brother Johnny, boyfriend Dr. Reed Richards, and his friend Ben Grimm— experienced cosmic radiation, gaining invisibility (and later, force fields) as a result. With them, she became a founding member of the Fantastic Four, using their powers for the betterment of humanity.

In the following decades since her superhero genesis, Sue goes through lots of character development, including (but not limited to) marrying Reed, becoming a mother, and being tasked with the reconstruction of the multiverse. Oh, and a secret agent. She also notably transitions from being the Invisible Girl to the Invisible Woman, which is reflected by a mixture of her increase in confidence and self-esteem and, after being possessed by Malice, a feeling that she's lost her innocence.

As one of Marvel's first family, Sue has obviously appeared quite frequently in other media. She's been a leading character of every Fantastic Four movie made to date, most notably portrayed by Jessica Alba and Kate Mara in their 2005 and 2015 film adaptations.

Not to be confused with The Invisible Woman, a spinoff of the classic horror film The Invisible Man (1933).


The Invisible Woman appears in:

Notable Comic Books

  • Fantastic Four (various runs):
    • vol. 1 (1961 — 1996, 2002 — 2012, 2015)
    • vol. 2 (1996 — 1997)
    • vol. 3 (1998 — 2003)
    • vol. 4 (2013 — 2014)
    • vol. 5 (2014 — 2015)
    • vol. 6 (2018 — present)
  • FF vol. 1 (2011 — 2012)
  • Secret Wars vol. 2 (2015 — 2016)
  • Invisible Woman (2019)

Film

Animation

Video Games


The Invisible Woman provides examples of:

  • Action Girl: She's generally portrayed as the strongest member of the team these days. Doctor Doom is more afraid of her than he is of The Thing.
  • Action Mom: She is a mother of two, and still the strongest member of the four. Do not hurt her children if you know what's good for you.
  • Amazonian Beauty: Some comics and other media depictions show Sue with a good bit of muscle. Marvel Ultimate Alliance 3: The Black Order, in particular, shows her as being absolutely RIPPED!
  • Alliterative Name: Before she got married, anyway. Susan "Sue" Storm.
  • Awesome Mc Coolname: Again, Susan Storm.
  • Badass Family: She's related to two of the Fantastic Four, being the older sister of Human Torch and wife of Mister Fantastic. In many continuities, her and Reed's children eventually become superheroes themselves.
  • Barrier Warrior: As a veteran superhero, she's gotten quite good at using her forcefields offensively, such as threatening to use them to create a brain embolism/aneurysm at one point.
  • Battle Couple: With Reed Richards, both of them being one of Marvel Comics' most prominent examples of this trope.
  • Beware the Nice Ones: During the Civil War storyline, she confronted Reed about his pro-registration stance and Reed stated that he did it all to protect Sue. Sue then proceeded to send an invisible column above and below all 35 floors of the Baxter building and asked Reed if she looked like she needed protection.
    • She's also Reed's ace in the hole in the run up to Secret Wars (2015), playing Captain America and his supporters into thinking that she's on their side in the hunt for the Illuminati, then almost casually imprisoning him and his Mighty Avengers (a team including several powerhouses, including Blue Marvel) and Bobby Da Costa's Avengers World team (also including several powerhouses) in individual cube-like fields.
  • Big Sister Instinct: Towards Johnny.
  • Blue Is Heroic: She wears the same blue uniform that her team mates wear and her constructs are sometimes drawn as bluiesh-white.
  • Boobs of Steel: She is a powerful heroine and also one of the most stacked women in the Marvel Universe.
  • Brother–Sister Team: She and younger brother Johnny are half of the Fantastic Four.
  • Character Development: Went from the team's resident Damsel in Distress to a confident, nigh-unstoppable badass.
  • Cleavage Window: She had one, shaped like the figure 4, in her Stripperific 1990s outfit. On more than one occasion has it been pointed out the physical improbability of maintaining the appearance of a number 4 in such a manner.
  • Combo Platter Powers: Subverted. While Invisibility and Force Fields initially seem to be a non-intuitive combination, over time, Marvel lore has detailed that Sue's mental control over invisible energy fields allows her to create strong protective force fields or surround herself in a field that causes all wavelengths of light to bend around her causing invisibility.
  • Cool Big Sis: To Johnny.
  • Custom Uniform: Early on, Sue experimented with a miniskirt variation that didn't last. Then came the Stripperific outfit in the 90s, followed by a more modest variation.
  • Deadpan Snarker: She's nowhere near as snarky as Ben or even Johnny, but she's definitely a lot more deadpan than either of them.
  • Deadly Force Field: Sue Storm is the poster girl for Took a Level in Badass precisely because of this trope. In the original comics, she had a more passive role, often playing the Damsel in Distress. The writers gave her invisibility powers a force field aspect to make her more active and useful, other writers gave her more creative ways to use them, and now "lil' Suzie" is one of the most powerful characters in the Marvel Universe, period. Notably, she can deal out all four main manners of death this trope describes: cutting, crushing, popping, and internal blockage.
  • Disability Immunity: While her powers normally lend themselves to stealth and subtlety, such efforts are occasionally foiled by those who could not see her to begin with and are not thrown off by the lack of visual cues from her force fields
  • The Dreaded: She is sometimes depicted as the scariest member of the Fantastic Four. The Black Cat has stated that Sue is the most terrifying thing in the Baxter Building and specifically waited until Sue was away to go through with her plan to steal a book from Reed's collection.
  • Dressed Like a Dominatrix:
    • As Malice, Sue wore a very skimpy black leather costume, a spiked collar, opera gloves with spiky bracelets, thigh-high high-heeled boots, a spiked gimp mask, and a cape.
    • In an alternate universe where she became Madame Hydra, Sue wore a green thigh-cut evening dress, a green choker, opera gloves, high-heeled boots, and carried a whip.
  • Dude Magnet: Sue is married to Reed and both Namor and Doom have shown attraction to her. She also went on a date with Spider-Man once.
  • Everyone Loves Blondes: Sue has been desired by many men in the Marvel Comics other than her husband Reed.
  • Faux Action Girl: She started off as one of these, but Character Development kicked in.
  • Female Fighter, Male Handler: In an out-of-continuity comic, she briefly joined S.H.I.E.L.D., due to feeling underappreciated in her own team. She turned out to be quite a badass superspy, what with her invisibility powers and force fields and whatnot. Her handler was Nick Fury himself.
  • Fluffy the Terrible: Invisible Girl or Invisible Woman doesn't quite strike fear in the hearts of evildoers. Then again her name isn't what makes her so dangerous.
  • Guile Hero: Invisible Woman should be portrayed as this. She shamed Ben Grimm into piloting the ship during the first issue. She was also told to distract many of the Silver Age male supervillains. After Psycho Man temporarily turned her into Malice she used her knowledge of Reed and Psycho Man's personalities to track him down and take revenge on him. When Dr. Doom stole the power cosmic from the Silver Surfer, she tricked him into flying into a mountain. During the Civil War, she spied on Reed. As any real chessmaster/manipulative bastard/guile hero would tell you, the greatest achievements in theses tropes is to make certain that your opponents don't realize you are a social expert.
  • Happily Married: Ever since their well-publicized wedding, Sue and Reed have been Marvel's power couple.
  • Heart Is an Awesome Power: Once the writers found out some really creative ways to use her powers...
  • Hot Scientist: A scientist like her husband and a notable Ms. Fanservice (see below) for Marvel Comics.
  • Imagination-Based Superpower: Sue can mold her force fields into any shape she wants with the added bonus that they are invisible to everyone but her.
  • Instant Armor: She's used her forcefields in this way once or twice.
  • Leotard of Power: Her 90s outfit.
  • Love at First Sight: When she was 12-13, she met a 19-year-old uni student and got a Precocious Crush on him. Fortunately, they didn't hook up until she was much older.
  • Mama Bear: DO NOT mess with her children. Biological or adopted. At one point in the comics the government bars Reed and Sue from their home and their children. They call in the Avengers to do so. Ten of them, in fact, which might look like overkill at first. And then Sue loses her temper, and one panel later anyone not named Thor or Hulk is knocked flat. The original Torch intervenes before she seriously injures anyone.
  • Master of Illusion: Sue's ability to turn herself and other things invisible is a manipulation of light waves. The Mark Waid miniseries has her develop the ability to manipulate light in a way that alters color after a conversation she had with her daughter Valeria. She uses this new trick to make her skin tan and turn her blonde hair brown.
  • Most Common Super Power: Sue is one of the most powerful woman in the Marvel Universe and also one of the most stacked.
  • Ms. Fanservice: Her regular costume(s) already flatter her, but her sex appeal often gets dialled up in alternate universes, especially ones where her invisibility is tweaked to put her in Naked People Are Funny situations (as seen in 1602).
  • Names to Run Away from Really Fast: Her evil split personality goes by Malice, Mistress of Hate.
  • Not Quite Flight: Sue can create floating discs or bubbles to carry herself and who ever is travelling with her through the air or jump around on invisible platforms into the sky.
    • In the Marvel Adventures setting, she keeps pace with Johnny by making a force-field hang glider and gliding on the heat his flaming aura produces.
  • Only Sane Woman: She keeps Reed in check, and in the team's earlier day was usually the only thing keeping Johnny and Ben from each other's throats.
  • Personality Powers: Originally, Sue was very shy and her invisible powers showcase her introverted nature. Later, her forcefields became incredibly powerful - as in, strong enough to stand off punches from the Void at the height of his power, and hold off the Worldbreaker Hulk (until her concentration got broken) - which symbolises how protective she is of her family.
  • Precocious Crush: Sue met Reed when he was 19 and she was 12, getting a crush on him at first sight. Thankfully, they got together much later in life.
  • Promotion to Parent: After Susan and Johnny's father, Franklin Storm, turned to gambling and ended up being sent to prison for manslaughter, Sue was responsible for raising Johnny. To the point where Johnny has stated that he doesn't even remember his mother, and believes his father to be dead.
  • Psychic Nosebleed: Often, when Sue is holding a forcefield against a particularly strong opponent.
  • Rags to Riches: Her father lost their family fortune and she became a ward of her aunt, but Sue has never been wealthier after marrying into the super-rich Richards household and other than an occasional setback their fortune has grown even more after the cosmic ray accident.
  • Riches to Rags: When she and her brother were kids, their mother died and their doctor father turned to alcohol and gambling, eventually squandering the family fortune and killing his loan shark. Sue and Johnny were forced to live with their aunt.
  • Religious Bruiser: She’s one of the strongest heroes in the universe. She’s also a very devout Christian, though her brother, Johnny Storm/Human Torch, says she’s quiet about it. Indeed, every Christmas and Easter, she goes to the St. Patrick’s Cathedral (which implies she’s specifically Catholic), lights the candles, and prays to her deceased parents.
    • That being said, in an issue before entering into Heaven to get Ben Grimm back, she expresses skepticism that it even exists.
  • Required Secondary Powers: As revealed in issue four of the Mark Waid miniseries, Sue's entire optic structure is very different from a regular person's. While normal people's retinas register objects using reflected light, Sue's eyes also interpolate shapes based on ambient cosmic energy in the atmosphere. This is how she is able to see her constructs or anything else that is invisible and it allows her to see even when the villains cut off the flow of blood to her retinas.
  • Sibling Team: She and Johnny are half of the Fantastic Four.
  • Single Woman Seeks Good Man: Her relationship with Reed.
  • Sky Surfing: By shaping the matter she creates into discs to stand on, Sue can fly across the air.
  • The Smurfette Principle: The sole female member of the original Fantastic Four.
  • Spontaneous Weapon Creation: One of the many possible uses of her force fields. In one X-Men/Fantastic Four miniseries, she has a Mama Bear moment and uses a force sword to slay a Brood queen in close combat, leaving the males of both teams rather shocked.
  • Spikes of Villainy: Malice's outfit included a spiked collar, spiky bracelets and a spiked gimp mask.
  • Strong and Skilled: She has a very versatile and deadly power set which she uses with great skill and creativity. This easily makes her the most dangerous of the Fantastic Four.
  • Stripperific: Unusual for a comic series in that the team's main female member only rarely falls under this trope, preferring a modest blue bodysuit identical to the ones Reed and Johnny wear, but it does happen - like when she wore a certain costume for a few years in the 1990s. The change was widely panned by fans and removed. As Malice, she wore a leather S&M-inspired outfit.
  • Superpowered Evil Side: Malice is an evil personality created by Psycho-Man preying on Sue's vulnerable emotions after she lost her child. Malice used her powers in a much more aggressive style such as creating explosions and forming spikes.
  • Swiss-Army Superpower: Her force-fields act as this. Basically, she's become an Invisible Lantern over the years, being able to shape her invisible forcefield into any sort of constructs she wants but with the added advantage that her enemies can't see them. She's been shown enclosing an opponent's head in a force bubble to suffocate them into unconsciousness, wrap objects within a force field to move them around and even project a pin-sized force bubble into a zombie's head that she rapidly expands to baskeball size, destroying the zombie. She's also, on a suggestion from her daughter, learned how to use them to create a limited glamour effect by changing how light reflects on her - so she can't change her features, but she can change her hair colour and skin tone, which are convenient for disguise.
  • Team Mom: Reed is usually more focused on his latest project, Ben sulking about his appearance or fighting with Johnny, and Johnny... is Johnny. Sue's usually the one keeping them all together (or in Johnny and Ben's case, apart).
  • This Looks Like a Job for Aquaman: Suffered from this before getting her force field power because her only power was Invisibility, so the team was put into situations where stealth was required so her power could come off as being useful.
  • Took a Level in Badass: Hoo boy. She's the page picture for a reason. See her entry on Comic Books for specifically why.
  • True Blue Femininity: Blue is the color of the Fantastic Four's costume and Sue is Team Mom.
  • Unstable Powered Woman: She was once subjected to a villain's mental manipulation and developed a dark personality called "Malice", which caused her to dress in darker, skimpier, bondage-themed clothes and a more evil, sinister personality. Infamously, she is literally freed from the villain's control by her husband Reed slapping her across the face.
  • Violently Protective Wife: It's a horrible idea to mess with Reed when Susan is around.
  • Xenafication: She was originally The Chick of the team with a near useless power of invisibility. Stan Lee and Jack Kirby took partial steps to fix that early on giving her force field projecting powers. However, it was John Byrne who really powered her up by having her nifty new ways of using her powers and learning to get aggressive enough to really use them well. Today, she is now considered one of the most powerful superheroes of the Marvel Universe and even the character of Doctor Doom underestimates her at his peril.

    The Human Torch 

The Human Torch

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/human_torch_2.jpg

Alter Ego: Jonathan Lowell Spencer "Johnny" Storm

Notable Aliases: Invisible Man

First Appearance: The Fantastic Four #1 (November 1961)

An impulsive (and soon, literal) hothead, Johnny is the younger brother of Sue Storm, the Invisible Woman. A classic case of Silver Age science fiction, Johnny was part of an outer space expedition that —alongside Sue, her boyfriend Dr. Reed Richards, and his associate Ben Grimm — granted him special powers via cosmic radiation. In his case, Johnny gained fire-based abilities, including flight. With them, Johnny became a founding member of the Fantastic Four, using their powers for the betterment of humanity.

In the following years, Johnny would join up with varying factions of the Marvel Universe outside the F4, including the Avengers and Inhumans. He's also become synonymous for his friendship with Spider-Man, as well as his antagonistic (but still loving) rapport with Ben, now known as The Thing.

As a member of Marvel's founding family, Johnny has appeared quite frequently in other media. He's perhaps most remembered for his role in the 2005 Fantastic Four film (and its 2007 sequel, Rise of the Silver Surfer), as portrayed by (a pre-Captain America: The First Avenger) Chris Evans. Johnny also features in the 2015 Fantastic Four reboot, portrayed there by (a pre-Killmonger) Michael B. Jordan. Apparently, playing the Human Torch in a subpar feature film prepares you for roles in better superhero movies. Who knew!

Not to be confused with the original Golden Age Human Torch, Jim Hammond.


The Human Torch appears in:

Notable Comic Books

  • Fantastic Four (various runs):
    • vol. 1 (1961 — 1996, 2002 — 2012, 2015)
    • vol. 2 (1996 — 1997)
    • vol. 3 (1998 — 2003)
    • vol. 4 (2013 — 2014)
    • vol. 5 (2014 — 2015)
    • vol. 6 (2018)
  • Human Torch (various runs):
    • vol. 1 (1974 — 1975)
    • vol. 2 (2003 — 2004)
  • FF vol. 1 (2011 — 2012)
  • Secret Wars vol. 2 (2015 — 2016)
  • Uncanny Inhumans (2015 — 2016)
  • Uncanny Avengers vol. 3 (2015 — 2017)
  • Marvel Two-in-One vol. 2 (2017 — present)

Film

Animation

Video Games


The Human Torch provides examples of:

  • Action Hero: Perhaps one of the most energetic of this trope, whatever he goes up against he goes straight to attack-mode without any thought or caution. Ben lampshades that Johnny was the one who strung the Fantastic Four.
  • Annoying Younger Sibling: To Susan.
  • Anyone Can Die: Was killed off in the "Three" storyline, but got better. As it turned out, almost immediately after, too. He just spent the equivalent of several years fighting and dying at the hands of Annihilus, who had the means to bring him back.
  • Awesome Mc Coolname: Johnny Storm
  • Boisterous Bruiser: Quick to brag about his abilities during battle, yet more downplayed compared to Hercules or Thor.
  • Brother–Sister Team: He and older sister Sue are half of the Fantastic Four.
  • The Casanova: If it isn't him fighting in battle or talking smack, it's him flirting with almost any attractive female within his vicinity.
  • Catchphrase: "Flame on!" In Mexico and Latin America, his catchphrase is translated as ¡LLAMAS A MI! (Roughly translated from Spanish as "(I invoke the) Flames to me!") and it has become a Memetic Mutation there.
  • Celebrity Superhero: Johnny, along with the rest of the Fantastic Four, are considered celebrities. They don't have secret identities and Johnny often capitalizes on his fame.
  • The Charmer: A frequent charmer of the ladies, judging by the amount of girlfriends he had, he's quite successful. Although sustaining a relationship with of a love interest with him is another thing.
  • Chivalrous Pervert: Willing to flirt with almost anyone under the sun (including one's not his one), but is respectful when he's rejected and knows more how to back off even in his youth.
  • Cool Uncle: He loves Reed and Sue's children, who in turn love him in return. Ironically, they think he's cool because of of his powers which are anything but.
  • Custom Uniform: Wore a red-and-gold variation of the team costume in the mid-70s.
  • The Dandy: Sometimes dialed up into Camp Straight, such as in World's Greatest Heroes.
  • Deadpan Snarker: Generally with Ben, has shades of this with Spider-Man or when he feels the need to crack wise about the situation.
  • Death Is Cheap: Got killed by Annihilus's army, came back less than a year later (in real-time, that is).
  • Depending on the Writer: Johnny Storm has alternated between self-obsessed prima donna and self-obsessed whiny asshat. Some FF writers, most notably Tom DeFalco, have tried to upgrade Johnny to at least being savvy about his powers and status. Later ones felt the need to make him dumb and dumber both.
  • Dimension Lord: Of the Negative Zone.
  • The Ditz: On his worse days. Admittedly, when a regular twenty-something's standing in a room with Reed Richards, they're going to look a little dumb.
  • Double Standard: Rape, Female on Male: With Lyja, who lied about her identity multiple times in order to trick him into a relationship with her, as well as with Ravonna, Zodiac, and multiple others who kiss him against his will.
  • Dumb Blonde: A male example depending on the writer.
  • Elemental Baggage: For Johnny's power source in creating flame. Occasionally justified by him feeling tired or very hungry after using extremely hot flames.
    • And then there's the part about his body and his powers both needing oxygen to function. There have been times when he's been trapped in airtight spaces, causing him to pass out when his flame powers used up all the oxygen.
  • Flying Firepower: The Human Torch's plasma has a high hydrogen content, and is surrounded by an exuded cloud of mono-atmoic hydrogen atoms. The hot cloud provides sufficient positive buoyancy for him to float. With mental stimulation of his flame, he can provide enough lift to carry around 180 pounds. By forming a jet from his feet, directed behind him, he can achieve a normal flight speed of 140 miles per hour.
  • Foil: To his brother-in-law, Reed. Johnny is a reckless Leeroy Jenkins hero who has little care about laws and want to do what is right, while Reed is law-abiding hero with a sense of duty who plans things ahead for his teammates. Both Reed and Johnny also took different sides during the Civil War events.
  • Friendly Rivalry: With Spider-Man. Though at first, it was just that Johnny couldn't stand the guy. They become less competitive with each other as they get older, but there's still an element of ragging on each other/trying to outdo each other there, only now mixed with actual respect - to the extent that Johnny left instructions for Peter to replace him on the team in the event of his death.
  • Fun Personified: In a good mood, he's cheerful, easygoing and quick to celebrate with his friends.
  • Future Badass: A future version of Johnny had the ability to burn white-hot and shut off his younger self's flame.
  • Glass Cannon: Johnny is extremely powerful, as he can light up supernovas, decimate large areas like mountain ranges, and absorb the energy of atom bombs. However, all of his powers are directly related to fire and nothing else, which means Johnny has no Super Strength or Super Toughness inherent to his own body, and thus is vulnerable to those who do possess augmented physical abilities.
  • Grass Is Greener: He admits to some jealousy of Peter Parker. Johnny is aware that he has it much better in terms of public standing, admirers, and financial security (all things Spider-Man often lacks), but Peter always had Aunt May to go home to. Watching Peter and May hug in Spider-Man/Human Torch #1 makes Johnny think how he'd give up anything to be hugged by a parent.
  • Hidden Depths: Not quite the superficial himbo slacker he seems, this one. As immature and impulsive as he can be, Sue learns he invests a lot of self control in keeping his powers in check when she ends up with them.
  • Heroic Sacrifice: Then he got better.
  • Hot-Blooded: Like his powers, he's a very temperamental person and it doesn't take much for him to go berserk on things with his powers.
  • Jerk with a Heart of Gold: Frequently petulant, childish, selfish and bone-dead stupid, but his heart is in the right place.
  • Kid-Appeal Character: When the series started, he was the teenager in a cast of adults. Early on in the series, he was extremely popular and was the Breakout Character with his own spinoff within a year after the series started. His popularity was one of the reasons why Marvel created other teen superheroes like Spider-Man and the X-Men.
  • Large Ham: Usually his default mode in battle, but also with Ben or Spider-Man.
  • Leeroy Jenkins: He's matured a bit, though.
    Mark Waid: The Avengers' battle cry is "Avengers, Assemble!" The Fantastic Four's battle cry is "Johnny, wait!"
  • Legacy Character: The Human Torch is loosely based on the Golden Age Human Torch.
  • Mr. Fanservice: Of course the Human Torch is hot! Johnny has been portrayed as the Marvel universe's most eligible bachelor.
  • Personality Powers: Johnny is hot-headed and impulsive, which goes along with his power of fire.
  • Playing with Fire: He can generate shapes composed of fire from any point on his body (He usually employs his hands to "sculpt" the flames, occasionally as a lasso to ensnare enemies) .He can form fire into long streams, spheres, or even more complex shapes like letters in skywriting. These flames-objects will only remain their shapes as long as he concentrates upon them. The objects will only burn about 3 minutes before expiring unless the Torch continues to infuse them with energy
  • Uncle Wolf: Just to round it off; although he doesn't take that much seriously, messing with his nephew and niece is a good way to increase your chances of being reduced to charcoal in the near future.
  • Sibling Team: He and Sue are half of the Fantastic Four.
  • Smarter Than You Look: Johnny's love for cars goes beyond the superficial aspect of things, and he's actually a competent mechanic who was able to overhaul a car's transmission as a teenager. He has also helped Reed build countless of vehicles, including the Fantasti-car.
  • Speed Demon: While not strictly a speedster, the Human Torch is the fastest of the team. He loves flying fast through the air using his fiery powers and tends to leave others behind.
  • Status Quo Is God:
    • Johnny dying a year before the FF's 50th anniversary. Yeaaaah, that'll stick.
      • All part of the plan - Johnny ends up in the Negative Zone leading a Five-Man Band to overthrow Annihilus and gains control over the Annihilation Wave. Took a Level in Badass indeed.
    • There have been dozens of "Johnny-learns-to-act-more-mature" stories over the decades. Then the next writer comes along and it starts all over again.
  • Token Flyer: Johnny is the only member of the team who can fly under his own power. His sister has Not Quite Flight but can't reach the heights and speeds Johnny can.
  • Vitriolic Best Buds:
    • With Ben. They spend most of their time either sniping and snarking at each other, planning increasingly elaborate practical jokes on each other, or lambasting each other with creatively brutal threats about what they'll do to the other (which are hardly ever followed through) after said practical jokes. They are, of course, practically inseparable.
    • And Peter Parker. Spidey and the Torch's team-ups usually consist of them trying to one-up each other, with the expected volley of insults and snark. But at the end of the day, Spider-Man is probably Johnny's closest superhero friend outside of the FF.
  • Wreathed in Flames: He has the physical ability to transform his entire body, or portions of his body into a fiery, plasma-like state of will.

    The Thing 

The Thing

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/fantastic_four_vol_6_1_the_thing_variant_textless.jpg

Alter Ego: Benjamin Jacob Grimm

Notable Aliases: Blackbeard the Pirate, Angrir: Breaker of Souls, Dr. Josiah Verpoorteen, El Morrito

First Appearance: The Fantastic Four #1 (November 1961)

"My point, an' I got one, is this: Safety ain't all it's cracked up t' be. Not if ya live a life worth th' risks. Sure, I coulda wallowed over one lousy break instead o' facin' th' world. An' some days, I still do. I backslide. And yer gonna do that, too. It's hard not ta. Yer gonna get lost in th' bad. But so long as ya got folks around who love ya, ya gotta remember tomorrow c'n always be better."
Ben talking to Franklin Richards

Idol O’ Millions, The ever-lovin’ blue eyed Thing, one fourth of Marvel’s First Family.

The Super Team Big Guy. "IT'S CLOBBERIN' TIME!"

A quintessential tough guy and Ace Pilot, Ben was part of an outer space expedition led by Dr. Reed Richards, alongside Susan Storm, and Johnny Storm. A classic example of the Silver Age in science fiction, the group was hit by a wave of cosmic rays, resulting in Ben's skin mutating into a rock-like substance, granting him with superhuman levels of strength, stamina, and durability.

Naturally, Ben is not happy with his new appearance, though eventually grows comfortable with his new-found role as an "idol o' millions".

A founding member of Marvel's first family, Ben is known to show up frequently in other comic books. Most notably, however, he has appeared in the 2005 Fantastic Four film (and its 2007 sequel, Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer), as portrayed by Michael Chiklis. Ben also features in the 2015 Fantastic Four reboot, portrayed there by Jamie Bell.


The Thing appears in:

Comic Books

  • Fantastic Four (various runs):
    • vol. 1 (1961 — 1996, 2002 — 2012, 2015)
    • vol. 2 (1996 — 1997)
    • vol. 3 (1998 — 2003)
    • vol. 4 (2013 — 2014)
    • vol. 5 (2014 — 2015)
    • vol. 6 (2018)
  • Marvel Two-in-One (various runs):
    • vol. 1 (1974 — 1983)
    • vol. 2 (2018 — 2019)
  • The Thing (various runs):
    • vol. 1 (1983 — 1986)
    • vol. 2 (2006)
  • FF vol. 1 (2011 — 2012)
  • Secret Wars vol. 2 (2015 — 2016)
  • Uncanny Inhumans (2015 — 2016)
  • Uncanny Avengers vol. 3 (2015 — 2017)

Film

Animation

Video Games


See: The Thing.

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Recruits

    Crystal 

Crystal

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/6249058_crystal_9.jpg

Alter Ego: Crystalia Amaquelin

Notable Aliases: The People's Princess, Crystalia Amaquelin-Maximoff

First Appearance: Fantastic Four #45 (December 1965)

See The Inhumans


    Medusa 

Medusa

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/6554634_medusa_21.jpg

Alter Ego: Medusalith Amaquelin-Boltagon

Notable Aliases: Madame Medusa

First Appearance: Fantastic Four #36 (March 1965)

See The Inhumans


    Luke Cage 

Luke Cage

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/5446084_uykibxy.png

Alter Ego: Luke Cage note 

Notable Aliases: Power Man

First Appearance: Luke Cage, Hero For Hire #1 (June 1972)

See Luke Cage


    Nova 

Nova

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/3169559_nova.jpg

Alter Ego: Frankie Raye

Notable Aliases: Human Torch

First Appearance: Fantastic Four #164 (November 1975)

See Heralds of Galactus


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    She-Hulk 

She-Hulk

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/6984082_she_hulk.jpg

Alter Ego: Jennifer Susan Walters

Notable Aliases: Hulk

First Appearance: Savage She-Hulk #1 (February 1980)

See She-Hulk


    Ms. Marvel II 

Ms. Marvel II

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/6269292_f8fbaa7e_9b43_4140_ab3c_e9bbd104b5f7.jpeg

Alter Ego: Sharon Ventura

Notable Aliases: She-Thing

First Appearance: The Thing #27 (September 1985)

See Ms. Marvel


    Ant-Man II 

Ant-Man II

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/4153676_ant_man_samnee_variant_a2299.jpg

Alter Ego: Scott Edward Harris Lang

Notable Aliases:

First Appearance: Marvel Premiere #47 (April 1979)

See Ant-Man


    Namorita 

Namorita

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/1352591_1262634406_2.jpg

Alter Ego: Namorita "Nita" Prentiss

Notable Aliases: Kymaera, Hard

First Appearance: Sub-Mariner #50 (June 1972)

See New Warriors


    Storm 

Storm

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/6939889_fearless2019002_cov.jpg

Alter Ego: Ororo Munroe

Notable Aliases: Ororo Iquadi T'Challa

First Appearance: Giant-Size X-Men #1 (May 1975)

See Storm


    Black Panther 

Black Panther

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/5011137_blap2016001_cov_d6d2a.jpg

Alter Ego: T'Challa

Notable Aliases: King of the Dead, Mr. Okonkwo

First Appearance: Fantastic Four #52 (July 1966)

See Black Panther


    Powerhouse 

Powerhouse

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/franklin_richards_28earth_61629_from_fantastic_four_vol_6_10_001.jpg

Alter Ego: Franklin Benjamin Richards

Notable Aliases: Powerhouse, Psi-Lord, Ego-Spawn, Avatar, Tattletale, Franklin Benjamin, Richard Franklin

First Appearance: Fantastic Four Annual #6 (November 1968)

Franklin is the son of Reed Richards and Sue Storm. Franklin is an Omega-level mutant with reality-warping abilities; even at a young age he is one of the most powerful beings in the Universe.


  • Astral Projection: Latent. While he is in this trance, he can project an intangible, ghost like image of himself to another location, through which he can see and hear what goes on at the location. What Franklin has called the “dreams” he has while in this state are not truly dreams, but his conscious awareness of the environment into which he has projected his “dream-self.”
  • Breakout Character: Originally a bit character at best, he quickly became popular among fans. As he got older, he gained bigger roles in Fantastic Four books, was featured in the Power Pack and a few events, and even got several spin-offs, the most popular being the non-canon Franklin Richards: Son of a Genius series.
  • Broke Your Arm Punching Out Cthulhu: Almost literally happens in issue #25 of the 2018 series. He punches out the Cormorant, an entity from a higher plane of existence, and is the first one to hurt it, something that impresses the Cormorant. Unfortunately, this uses up the last of Franklin's power, making him a normal human. Franklin also failed to actually bring the Cormorant down.
  • Brought Down to Normal: In issue #25 of the 2018 series, Franklin finally runs out of power and becomes normal. Also becomes a Broken Pedestal moment when he can't use the Krakoan gates anymore, meaning the mutants only cared about him because he was a mutant. Issue #26 revealed that this is because Franklin was never really a mutant in the first place. His Reality Warper powers responded to his subconscious childhood wish to be special and made him appear to be a Mutant down to the cellular level. When his powers ran out in the previous issue, his body went back to being a baseline human.
  • Dead Guy Junior: He's named after Sue and Johnny's late father Franklin Storm, who died saving the lives of the team.
  • Dreaming of Things to Come: He has "special dreams" which are prophetic. May be symbolic: before a clash among the Fantastic Four, the X-Men and Doctor Doom, he dreamed of the Fantastic Four and the X-Men dying, and his father turning into Doom, which foretold aspects of the clash. May also be literal: in his first meeting with Power Pack, they deduce why an alien is chasing them — Katie Power is carrying an alien artifact that could be traced — he recounts how he had dreamed that the alien chased him, and so they give him the artifact, which leads to their victory.
  • Deus ex Machina: Why Franklin is rarely ever shown fully powered.
  • Emo Teen: Vague Age aside, learning in the 2018 series that he's reached a limit on his powers after recreating the multiverse, that they'll eventually run out, as well the fact that the Griever has destroyed some of the realities he created, he's become angsty and broody coping with the fact that the people and places he created are gone and that he'll eventually be powerless. This is illustrated by him dyeing his hair black.
  • Foolish Sibling, Responsible Sibling: Downplayed and Played With. While he's not lazy, he's definitely a lot less mature than his sister... in some respects. On the other hand, when they become teenagers in Slott's run, he passes his (flying car) driving test, while Valeria fails, because when they were inevitably attacked, he first ensured that his car was safely parked and his passenger was safe before turning to fight. Valeria... not so much.
  • Future Badass: A future version of Franklin, who he calls Mister Franklin that taught him to regain some of his powers and defeated Mad Celestials alongside Galactus.
  • Giver of Lame Names: When playing superhero with Leech, he gave them the names "Hyperstorm" and "Kid Incredible". A future version of Franklin who happened to be watching commented on the names. Considering that "Hyperstorm" was the name of an alternate future child of Franklin and Rachel Summers, this was probably a nod to that.
  • Goo-Goo-Godlike: Some Celestials once analysed Franklin, and determined him to be an Omega Level Plus Mutant. Omega is as high as Mutant powers are meant to go.
  • Guardian Entity: His will eventually be Galactus or he will be one for him when he grows older but they will be together long enough to witness the end of the universe with each other.
  • Hybrid Power: Franklin is in interesting case because he's a hybrid but not of different species but rather different power sets. It's generally assumed that his natural mutant powers are psychic in nature but this wouldn't explain his Reality Warper powers. This is most likely due to the fact that both of his parents are non-mutant superhumans but also passed on the mutant gene which was recessive in them but dominant in Franklin. Franklin is not only a mutant but is also enhanced by the cosmic powers he inherited from his parents which allows him to do things that even Omega level psychics like Jean Grey or Nathan Summers are incapable of - though his old buddy Nate Grey is shown in Age of X-Man to at least be in the same rough category.
  • Immortality Begins at Twenty: Future Franklin apparently just stopped ageing somewhere in his thirties.
  • Intergenerational Friendship:
    • With Nate Grey who's physically 17 when they meet during the Onslaught crisis. Some time afterwards, Nate hung out with the Fantastic Four for a while, looking to get a cure for his genetic degradation and became a big brother figure to Franklin, mentoring him in the use of his powers and discussing their favourite Avengers (Franklin said his was Scarlet Witch, and Nate immediately assumed that it was because of her costume - Franklin was oblivious). When he left, Franklin was visibly upset, and the usually stand-offish Nate hugged him, promising to come back and fulfil his promise to teach Franklin how to make psionic armour. This never came about, partly because Status Quo Is God and partly because Nate 'died' shortly afterwards.
    • He also gets along very well with Jarvis and (to Johnny's annoyance) with Spider-Man.
  • Killed Offscreen: Immortal Hulk #24 has the One Below All reveal to the sentience of the universe that he kills/killed Franklin and Galactus two billion years before the end of the universe.
  • Lamarck Was Right: His parents are powerful superheroes, so he became powerful in his own right.
  • Mind over Matter: Latent. Possesses telekinetic abilities enabling him to levitate and manipulate living beings, inanimate objects, and to some extent energy psionically. This also enables him to fly.
  • Mr. Fanservice: In Dan Slott's run, Franklin has the honor of being the first of the newly aged up Future Foundation to be stripped down to his boxer briefs to show off his toned body.
  • Multicolored Hair: In Dan Slott's run, he dyed his blonde hair blue with black streaks.
  • No Ontological Inertia: Done inconsistently; In the past his creations have generally lasted until he unmade them, but in Dan Slott's run it's revealed that his X-Gene was a forgery created by subconscious use of his powers, with it disappearing when he uses them all up. Yet near immediately after, all the beings from the realities he created are shown to still exist, with their homes only ending because a cosmic being made them end.
  • Not Allowed to Grow Up: He was born in 1968. Aside from an incident of using his powers to temporarily age himself to adulthood, and the usual range of alternate reality versions, he has remained a child for more than four decades of real world time. The fact that he was injudiciously given a Story-Breaker Power contributes heavily to the problem of ever letting him grow up. It is very glaring though, because characters that were born long after him are now either teenagers or actual adults. Averted in the 2018 run, where he has been significantly aged up.
  • Other Me Annoys Me: Subverted - Present Franklin and Future Adult Franklin get along great, happily calling each other Kid Franklin and Mister Franklin. Then again, Franklin has the power of being superhumanly well-adjusted, far more than any kid who's been repeatedly kidnapped, has seen every one of his relatives die at least once, sometimes possesses godlike powers, and was once trapped in hell has any right to be.
  • Power Limiter: Psychic blocks keep him from being as all-powerful as his full potential. Whatever his power set at any given time is what leaks through. Naturally, using his full power tends to make any of it unusable for some time. These days, he has no powers and feels like the odd one out with the Fantastic Four as his family and a beyond-Reed-class genius as his little sister.
  • Psychic Powers: As "Psi-Lord", he demonstrated a wide variety of psionic powers.
  • Reality Warper: He's capable of creating his own universes, and that's not the least of his powers.
  • Seers: Can see into the future somewhat.
  • Shout-Out: His own short series was a pretty clear homage to Calvin and Hobbes.
  • Sibling Yin-Yang: Even in his teen years, he's more energetic, loud and simple than his sister.
  • Story-Breaker Power: A Reality Warper on a cosmic scale, he has been largely kept as a child for decades specifically because it has been demonstrated that his mature power levels would be so far off the scale that he would become virtually unusable as a character.
  • Superpower Lottery: His Reality Warping powers and insane amount of Psychic Powers. When Franklin achieves the conscious use of his full powers, he will have telepathic powers, tremendous telekinetic powers, the ability to fire enormously powerful energy blasts, and the ability to rearrange the molecular structure of matter and energy. His powers are so great that he has been able to create pocket universes, and his abilities have been described as equal to the Celestials. After Secret Wars (2015), he spent a long time recreating the multiverse. He's definitely the most powerful mutant on Earth, and possibly one of the most powerful being in the overall Marvel Universe.
  • Touched by Vorlons: His powers are in part due to the Cosmic Control Rod being used to keep the cosmic radiation he was absorbing from Sue while she was pregnant with him from killing him.
  • The Unfavorite: Reed has a difficult time relating to Franklin, but the two try to bond whenever they can.
  • Vague Age: As mentioned under Timey-Wimey Ball, Franklin's exact age is rather nebulous, usually floating somewhere between six and ten. Writers will occasionally give an exact number but they generally won't stick to it for long. In Dan Slott's run, Franklin and his sister have aged, but neither of them have exact ages - just that they're teenagers, and old enough to get driving licenses.
  • The Worf Effect: In Dan Slott's run, Franklin is one-shotted by Griever in order to build her credibility as a threat.

    Brainstorm 

Brainstorm

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/valeria_richards_earth_616_from_fantastic_four_vol_6_10_001.jpg

Alter Ego: Valeria "Val" Richards

Notable Aliases: Brainstorm, Marvel Girl

First Appearance: Fantastic Four Vol 3 #15 (March 1999) note  Fantastic Four Vol 3 #54 (June 2002) note 

The daughter of Sue and Reed Richards and younger sister of Franklin.


  • Brainy Baby -> Child Prodigy: She's not even four when she's already equalling/exceeding her father. It's later suggested that she's a mutant and her intellect is her superpower.
  • Characterization Marches On: At first, Valeria was just an ordinary two-year old. It was Mark Millar who introduced the idea of her being much smarter than she looked, and Valeria's stayed that way since.
  • Did You Just Flip Off Cthulhu?: Did this to MacGargan, when he was Venom.
  • Enfante Terrible: She has moments that show how much Doom rubbed off on her.
  • Foolish Sibling, Responsible Sibling: The responsible sibling to Franklin's foolish, though sometimes they flip the script, as when they're learning to drive (when they are inevitably attacked, Franklin first takes care to make sure his examiner is safe. Valeria first takes care to use her occupied car as a weapon).
  • Jerk with a Heart of Gold: She is certainly the most amoral of the group, but she does mean well and tries to be a good person, and gets somewhat nicer as she grows up.
  • Kid from the Future: She was introduced this way as Valeria Von Doom (A.K.A. Marvel Girl), with Doctor Doom as her adopted father (Sue was still her mother), having been sent, alive, to the future by Franklin after she was stillborn. Then Franklin ended up retconning his mother into suddenly being about nine months pregnant with Valeria (It Makes Sense in Context, or about as much sense as it could be expected to when a reality-bending Cheerful Child resurrected his time-travelling sister by knocking up his mother - it's weird enough that even Sue is utterly baffled), with her father being Reed, beyond all doubt. Her current incarnation is named Valeria Richards, yet she still has connections to Doctor Doom, given that he had a hand in her delivery and named her after a girl he loved (and Valeria was even his familiar at one point).
  • Little Miss Snarker: Depending on the writer.
  • Mini Dress Of Power: As Marvel Girl, as her costume had elements of the FF uniform and Doctor Doom's.
  • Morality Pet: For Doctor Doom, who is far more moral when around her, and works hard to make her happy.
  • Obfuscating Stupidity: Up until Mark Millar's run, Valeria acted like a normal toddler, until a version of Sue from a Bad Future called her out on it. Valeria had been doing this because she'd calculated revealing her intelligence would've split the family apart.
  • Odd Friendship: About the only person in the world who can call Doctor Doom 'uncle'. Doom has also declared, among other things, that Valeria has unlimited access to him (she never needs an appointment), and that she is under his personal protection at all times. Everyone in the Marvel Universe knows that this means he will fucking kill anyone who so much as gives her a dirty look...
  • Other Me Annoys Me: After the events of "Forever/All Hope Lies In Doom" arc(s), both the future adult Valeria and current child version Valeria seem to dislike each other for no reason. One reason may involve her status as a Token Evil Teammate. When child Valeria was writing up a plan on conquering the Kree Empire for fun in her computer, her older self browbeat her into deleting it, implying that her older self dislikes how amoral she used to be.
  • The Runaway:After the events of the family's cosmic vacation, Valeria upset over being lied to about the family's situation runs away to stay with Uncle Doom.
  • Science Hero: During Axis, she thwarted a hate plague in Latveria with SCIENCE (and a ray gun).
  • Sesquipedalian Loquaciousness: In a few stories, she'll have a very colorful vocabulary, full of long words.
  • Sibling Yin-Yang: Is more poised, reserved and morally questionable than her brother.
  • Smitten Teenage Girl: Has shades of this in Slott's run. She was willing to take the Future Foundation into a collapsing universe to save one boy.
  • The Spock: Always advocates the pragmatic or coldly logical choice, and thinks her dad's an idiot sometimes for choosing his family over the "greater good".
  • Token Evil Teammate: Well, not really evil, but her brain is definitely much bigger than her heart and she is mainly ruled by her intellect coupled with childish selfishness. If it comes to the emotional decision against the pragmatic one, Valeria will head straight for the pragmatic choice. This pragmatism often stems towards straight out amorality where she gets to the point where she can work well with Dr. Doom of all people and make up plans to destroy and subjugate intergalactic empires like the Kree for fun.
  • Took a Level in Kindness: In a more peculiar example; when we see her future self, she certainly frowns upon Valeria making plans to conquer the Kree, so it's possible that she grew up out of her Token Evil Teammate status as she matured.

    Flux 

Flux

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/2325874_sykes.jpg

Alter Ego: Dennis Sykes

Notable Aliases: Matter, Mighty Dennis, Captain Dennis, Denniserine

First Appearance: Heroic Age: One Month to Live #1 (November 2010)

Unhappy parent & banker, Dennis Sykes was gifted & cursed the day he gained his new super powers because he was doomed to die after 30 days. He is the main character from Marvel's One Month To Live mini series.

See Avengers: Honorary Members


    Spider-Man 

Spider-Man

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/4831078_spider_man_1.jpg

Alter Ego: Peter Benjamin Parker

Notable Aliases: Ricochet, Dusk, Prodigy, Hornet, Ben Reilly, Scarlet Spider, Captain Universe, Liar

First Appearance: Amazing Fantasy #15 (August 1962)

See Spider-Man


    Ms. Thing 

Ms. Thing

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/2549312_ff2.jpg

Alter Ego: Darla Deering

Notable Aliases:

First Appearance: Marvel NOW! Point One #1 (December 2012)

Darla Deering was a trendy socialite who after a romantic encounter with Johnny Storm, wound up as a substitute member of the Fantastic Four. Now as a member of the team, she wears a suit previously used by the Thing when he was de-powered which grants her superhuman strength.



Alternative Title(s): Marvel Comics Human Torch, Marvel Comics Invisible Woman, Marvel Comics Mister Fantastic

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