Follow TV Tropes

Following

Characters / Child Of The Storm Harry Thorson

Go To

This page lists tropes associated with Harry Thorson, the main character of Child of the Storm.

See the character page for links to the pages of other groups of characters in the story here.

Harry Thorson né Potter a.k.a. Red Son a.k.a. Dark Phoenix

I never wanted power. I never wanted to be god. And I am done playing.

The Hero of the story, and for the most part, as sweet, kind-hearted, and Adorkable as in canon... but also as temperamental. The discovery that his father wasn't just James Potter - he was Prince Thor of Asgard, member of the Avengers and all round awesome guy, and the often chaotic ramifications of this, shape the story. Increasingly, Harry's responses to those ramifications (which, being a Doom Magnet par excellence, he's usually in the middle of) takes the role of shaping the story, and Harry himself takes centre stage in the great supernatural chess game as a player in his own right.

Needless to say, this also drastically affects his Character Development - not all of which is for the better. An increasingly snarky, increasingly confident and assertive individual, he's more proactive and thoroughly resigned to the absurdity of his life. However, he's also somewhat traumatised, occasionally ruthless, and with a darker side and a sometimes dangerous temper. Even with his struggles, however, he's still a hero at heart.

For tropes pertaining to the Red Son and the Dark Phoenix, see their respective entries here.

Advertisement:



  • Ace Pilot: He is a natural at flying, even with a Quinjet, though somewhat deconstructed - he can fly a Quinjet once it's in the air (according to the author, flying planes once they're in the air is apparently remarkably easy) but he couldn't make it take off or land it, because that is much, much more complicated.
  • Adaptational Attractiveness: A rare written version, since he's explicitly fancast as a young Tom Welling (Tall, Dark, and Handsome heart-throb) who's growing into a young Pierce Brosnan (ditto), rather than Daniel Radcliffe (short and good looking, but not startlingly so).
  • Adaptational Badass: Extends beyond the obvious (Adaptational Muscles and winning the Superpower Lottery). By Ghosts, he's lethal in close combat, but he's also - far more importantly - far more tactically adept. Canonically, he generally wandered into trouble and then pulled an Indy Ploy to get out. However, while this incarnation seeks out trouble, he's better at planning - usually, using Xanatos Speed Chess such as when he dived back into the Red Room to free Maddie and worked with her to put his mind in Laevateinn (though that still went horribly wrong), and, after Bucky's tutelage, when he kept his head and planned in advance how to counter Dracula's efforts to kidnap Carol rather than rushing straight in.
  • Advertisement:
  • Adaptational Muscles: Thanks to: magical correction of stunted growth, a properly regulated diet (both courtesy of his grandmother), a son-of-Thor related growth spurt, and training with Sean Cassidy/Bucky Barnes. Thus, he's considerably taller and somewhat more muscular than his novel counterpart (who went from short and skinny to tall and a bit less skinny). The end result is that he's younger than he looks, being able to pass for 18 at the age of 14 - which, since he usually acts closer to 18, is an easy mistake to make.
  • Adorkable: Even with all his increased confidence, it remains one of his defining characteristics.
  • Afraid of Their Own Strength: Played Straight, at first - he's downright terrified of it, especially once his psychic powers fully manifest, as he's perfectly aware of what he's capable of. By Ghosts, however, he's no longer exactly afraid of his powers, but scared witless of the thought of letting the Phoenix fragment within him off the chain. Then he stops being afraid of it and things... devolve.
  • Advertisement:
  • A God Am I: While usually very much against this trope, he veers into it in chapters 14 and 15 of Ghosts of the Past when he snaps and becomes the Dark Phoenix. He snaps out of it again shortly afterwards.
  • A God I Am Not: While he's aware that, technically speaking, he's a demigod, he's not entirely happy with the idea and is very uncomfortable with the idea of being worshipped.
    "I never wanted power. I never wanted to be god. And I am done playing."
  • All Genes Are Codominant: Averted - he looks like his father (as James), eyes excepted, and he's got latent Super Strength, but he acts like his mother and his Psychic Powers, which he has a greater natural affinity for, come from her. He even starts looking more like her as time goes on (though he still favours his dad).
  • All-Loving Hero: He is this, most of the time, even after his traumatic experiences result in his steady evolution into a Knight in Sour Armour. It becomes a plot point in chapter 9 of Ghosts, when the Avengers note that it would be just like him to befriend and basically adopt the possibly evil Living Weapon clone of his beloved cousin - she's not actually a clone, but that's another matter. Bucky discusses it in chapter 25, and commends Harry for it, remarking how it can bring out the better natures of people who didn't actually know they had better natures, but warns him to be careful.
  • Alternate Self: Spends most of chapter 41 of Ghosts talking to an older version of himself thanks to an enchantment malfunctioning under his powers' influence, and still present cracks in reality. The counterpart refers to himself as 'Nathan' for simplicity's sake, and comes from a timeline where Wanda adopted him after the events of his First Year. He then shows Harry a number of other alternate timelines, varying from the hilarious to the horrifying (and all apparently picked out by Harry's subconscious), in aid of teaching him a lesson or two - though he refuses to spoon-feed him.
  • Amazon Chaser: Harry's magnetic attraction to danger extends to his nascent taste in women. If he's interested, it's because the lady in question is, at the very least, formidable, if not terrifying. Of course, it helps that about 90% of the women he meets are pretty badass to start with.
  • Ambiguously Human: He starts becoming this more and more as time goes by, particularly when he gets angry, at which point he starts shading into Humanoid Abomination territory. It scares him witless.
  • And This Is for...: In Chapter 76, when ripping Gravemoss's heart out, he makes it clear it's for what he did to Sif under Paris.
    • Subverts it in chilling fashion in chapter 32 of Ghosts, when dismembering Dudley, calmly explaining that this is not being done out of revenge, or rage, but because it must be done.
  • Animal Motifs: Powerful, pyrokinetically inclined, prone to shrugging off things that should kill him and coming back if they succeed... really, the Phoenix motif is fitting.
    • He's also repeatedly described as resembling a young bird of prey, often a falcon, fitting his lean physique, aerial talents, razor-sharp eyesight, and habit of working alone.
  • Animal Themed Super Being: Is increasingly associated with the Phoenix, pyrokinesis and all. More generally, he's sometimes described as resembling a bird of prey.
  • The Anti-Nihilist: Starts out as a textbook idealist, albeit with a cynical streak. After his more unpleasant experiences and rapidly expanded knowledge of just what makes the cosmos tick, plus a brief dabbling with Nihilism, he comes around to this idea in chapter 35 of Ghosts of the Past.
    If you took apart the universe down to its smallest bits, I’m willing to bet you wouldn’t find any justice, or any mercy. There’s no mercy in the universe. No justice. Just us. And what we do. [..] If the universe is a dark place, then I want to bring some light into it. If there’s no justice, then I’d like to bring some. And if there’s no mercy in the universe, then I’d like to try and show some.
  • Apocalypse Maiden: Part and parcel for being connected to the Phoenix, which he underlines by nearly destroying the world as the Dark Phoenix.
  • Astral Projection: He can do it (and has, twice), but prefers not to, and isn't very good at doing it safely. The first time, it's by accident in chapter 45 of the first book, and it's ambiguous whether he even knew he was doing it. Later, it's mentioned he avoids it because he dislikes leaving his body behind after his experiences as the Red Son. However, in chapter 30 of Ghosts, when Carol is kidnapped by a Grey Court strike team, he does this through their link to create a psychic construct of himself to help her out, one that functions more or less like Chamber's energy form. Since they're on opposite sides of the Atlantic, this nearly killed him, and as a result, Gorakhnath later considers it impressive... and like watching a child juggle hand-grenades.
  • Attack! Attack! Attack!: While he usually plays it smart, his strategy devolves into this in chapter 70 once Luna dies and Daken taunts him, so he quite understandably really loses his rag. He's powerful enough by this point that it almost works. Almost.
  • Back from the Dead: In chapter 71, via the Phoenix.
  • Back-to-Back Badasses: With Carol in Chapter 76, and with his father later in the same chapter.
  • Badass Boast: He has one towards the Disir, essentially telling them that if they hurt his friends, he will destroy them. He makes a couple more in chapter 70 in the throes of Tranquil Fury that are truer than anyone, least of all him, realises. While he suffers a Disney Death at the end of chapter 70, the Phoenix instantly resurrects him and goes on a rampage.
    If there’s one thing I can guarantee, just one, it is this. You have never faced anything like me.
    Because Daken, there is no power on this Earth that can stop me now!
    • Again in chapter 74, in a similar mood combined with/as a short "World of Cardboard" Speech.
    • And in chapter 28 of Ghosts of the Past, he gives this one to a surprised group of adults, including Crouch Senior, Bagman, Karkaroff, and Maxime, he has this to say after being selected for the Triwizard and irritably demonstrating his powers by levitating the Durmstrang ship, all 6,000 tons of it, while inspecting his fingernails when they're called into question, channelling 616!Madelyne Pryor in the process.
      What? Surprised? Let me make it very simple. I don't know what you've heard, what you know, or what you think you know, but it boils down to this: you have limits. I don't.
  • Badass in Distress: Once or twice.
    • Particularly in the Forever Red arc of Ghosts of the Past, when he's captured, then re-captured, by the Red Room, and tortured in an ultimately successful attempt to transform him in the Red Son.
  • Badass Finger Snap: Develops a habit of signalling a telepathic or telekinetic manoeuvre with one of these, something picked up from his mother, at the end of Child of the Storm. Hermione disapprovingly notes in Ghosts that it's an unnecessary piece of theatrics, and Harry admits that she's right.
  • Badass Longcoat: Twice in Ghosts of the Past, first when adapting the Power Limiter the Red Room gave him, and secondly when pretending to be the Dark Phoenix to trick Dracula.
  • Battle Couple: In chapter 77, Thor teases him by saying that he and Carol (with whom Harry is Just Friends) make a very fine Battle Couple. Harry lets out a wail of teenage embarrassment, but doesn't exactly deny it. This gets a Call-Back in Ghosts when Harry brings up the battle, and Thor snarks that it wasn't a battle, it was a first date. Cue another wail of teenage embarrassment. Nevertheless, by Ghosts they're frequently seen fighting side-by-side, and their psychic connection means that they're much more in-tune with each other than would otherwise be possible - and after chapter 46, they're dating.
  • Battle-Halting Duel: Gets into one with Daken in chapter 70 of Book 1. It ends abruptly when Daken kills him. Then the Phoenix takes over.
  • Battle in the Center of the Mind: When Chthon possesses him, thanks to the machinations of Doctor Strange, and with some support from his parents, he's able to cast the Elder God out.
    • He has another epic one with Maddie Pryor. She's more powerful than him, but he's got cunning to spare, and he's intentionally avoiding a direct fight, allowing him to hold his own - though it's made clear that he's fighting a losing battle. Since winning the fight wasn't ever part of his actual plan, this suits him just fine.
  • Became Their Own Antithesis: Briefly, when he snaps and becomes the Dark Phoenix.
  • Be Careful What You Wish For: Gets hit with this hard when he darkly remarks that he hopes the telepath (Sinister) who intervened to keep him at Privet Drive to study him comes around and has a go. Then he does. Cue the Forever Red arc, a hideously brutal Trauma Conga Line involving Mind Rape, Body Horror, and the rise of the Dark Phoenix, an event which leads to more than a few mortals and gods concluding that Harry is an Apocalypse Maiden and too dangerous to live, while Harry is a traumatised wreck.
  • Because Doctor Strange Says So: Subverted. Harry gets particularly angry and resentful about the extent of Strange's manipulations of time and him personally (and considering the suffering he gets put through, it's not surprising) claiming that he doesn't have a choice in anything he does. Strange retorts that he doesn't control people. Rather, he arranges situations so they'll choose to do what he intends for them to do. All the powers, cosmic protections, etcetera that Strange arranges for him could have been done for anyone. The fact that Harry is a hero in spite of what he's got is the important part, because he will always choose to do what is right rather than what is easy.
  • Being Tortured Makes You Evil: How he wound up as the Red Son, then the Dark Phoenix. He is, thankfully, talked down.
  • Berserk Button: Don't hurt or threaten the innocent in his presence. Ever. And that goes double for one of his friends. Also, trying to control him is a really, really bad idea.
    • Mind Rape in general sets him off, especially if someone asks him to do it - especially to a friend. It only gets worse after Forever Red, to the point where Steve quietly concedes that if Mr Danvers had asked him to alter Carol's mind after that arc rather than before, Harry wouldn't have just scared him with a "Reason You Suck" Speech and a few intimidating effects - he would have killed him.
  • Beware the Nice Ones: He's Adorkable, almost unfailingly kind to the downtrodden and ignored, simply disregards prejudices of all kinds and is unfailingly respectful and polite to those below him. Even after he evolves into a Knight in Sour Armour, he's still generally kind (or kinder, at least) to those beneath him. He also, however, has a very nasty temper, an extreme intolerance for injustice and a creatively vengeful streak, which if pushed far enough, results in a cold rage disturbingly reminiscent of Magneto or Doctor Strange. By Ghosts, he has graduated to 'hurt my friends and I will melt your brain.' Or, 'force me to abuse my powers and I will become the Dark Phoenix and make you wish that I had killed you.'
  • Beware the Superman: Comparisons are made to a young Magneto - even Magneto himself notes the similarities - and not without reason. His temper, his Pay Evil unto Evil attitude, and disturbing Tranquil Fury tendencies are particular examples. The Forever Red arc illustrates this quite aptly, from his being transformed in the Red Son to his willing transformation into the Dark Phoenix.
  • Big Brother Instinct: Subtle, but he has this towards Uhtred and Diana. After being kidnapped by the Disir, he encourages them and leads them in a gambit to escape, and afterwards, enjoys sparring and helping them. In addition, he serves as a Shipper on Deck for Uhtred/Jean-Paul and Diana/Ginny. When talking to Jean-Paul in Book 2, he quietly tells his friend that if he thought the latter were cheating on Uhtred, he would break Jean-Paul's leg and interrogate him.
    • Harry had a strong case of this towards Luna Lovegood, pulling a "Dangerous Dai" Decoy on the Ravenclaw Quidditch team when he heard that they had been bullying her, and entertaining the thought of setting the whole tower on fire (his inner monologue notes that "all prior evidence suggested that it wasn’t, but maybe all prior evidence simply hadn’t been trying hard enough.") After she died (and after he had died shortly after), he attempted to telepathically imprint a message on the minds of everyone in her House, but fortunately Thor stopped him.
    • In addition, he has this towards Ginny Weasley, setting her up with Diana and firmly telling her that he's more than happy to intimidate anyone who has a problem with her sexuality - though he also acknowledges that she might not want this 'help' as the last time he tried it (with Luna), it backfired horribly.
    • And when they finally meet in chapter 54 of Ghosts, he immediately demonstrates this towards Clark Kent, being the older and wiser type, offering the benefit of his experience to help Clark through his issues and ensure that he won't make the same mistakes. Oh, and naturally, he's thoroughly protective towards him. It helps that they can actually pass quite easily for brothers (no longer being total Identical Strangers), and Harry's Skunk Stripe and demeanour make him seem notably older than Clark. When it turns out that the latter is having his life force drained, he is furious.
  • Blackmail: It's not his preferred tactic, but by chapter 33 of Ghosts, he's entirely willing to use it to achieve his ends (in this case, on the Council Elite, to cure Peter and save Carol - bringing her back to life if needs be) if more conventional methods don't work. Jesus and Thor point out why, in this specific situation, it would have caused more problems than it solved.
  • Blessed with Suck: See Hybrid Power. Also more generally, his new-found family and rank, while awesome, attracts trouble like nobody's business and sparks the renaissance of HYDRA, leading to the deaths of Arthur Weasley and Luna Lovegood.
  • Blood Knight: Reluctantly comes to realize that a large part of him enjoys being in life-or-death fights.
  • Blow You Away: What he's next best at, after fire magic, though again, he generally prefers his telekinesis.
  • Blue Blood: Very much so, on his dad's side. He's in direct line to the throne of Asgard, his great-grandmother was Zeus's Aunt and, also through his dad, he may very distantly be related to the House of El. It has been explicitly stated that the relation, in the latter case, is either non-existent or so distant that it might as well be, but it's interesting nonetheless.
  • Borrowed Catchphrase: He borrowed the Eleventh Doctor's "Geronimo!" when going into the Chamber of Secrets shortly after meeting his uncle, and later the Tenth Doctor's "Allons-y!". In a much darker example, when going up against Dracula, he gives the following Pre Ass Kicking One Liner, borrowed from his father:
    " Dracula, King of Corpses, Lord of Leeches. I, Harry Thorson, Prince of Asgard, would have words. Words, vampire, with thee."
  • Boxing Lessons for Superman: Sean Cassidy, among others, trains him explicitly to supplement his powers, while Betsy Braddock and Loki give him extra psychic and magic tuition. In Ghosts, he's also getting spycraft and hand-to-hand lessons from Bucky Barnes and during Forever Red, he has programming similar to that of the Winter Soldier uploaded into his brain. Fandral later teaches him swordsmanship, and Doctor Strange is giving him advanced magical tutelage and arranging other lessons; among them is Magneto teaching him to open his mind and how to use his powers - particularly telekinesis - in far more unconventional and creative ways than the usual basic Mind over Matter.
  • Break the Cutie: Chapter 60 starts this, before chapter 70 doubles down, with Luna (who he'd been particularly protective of) being killed, before he gets killed himself. Is it any surprise that when the Phoenix resurrects him, the immediate result is an extremely violent rampage? Then Chapter 74 breaks him even further, though chapters 76 and 77 put him back together again... then, in the sequel, Forever Red breaks him all over again, and the repair process takes much longer.
  • Bring It: In chapter 7 of Ghosts of the Past, beckons Dudley's gang, after flattening their new leader, Piers Polkiss, mockingly saying he'll even make it fair by not using his powers. They take his challenge. It ends badly for them. He also says this to Maddie right before their epic psychic brawl a few chapters later.
  • Bruiser With A Soft Centre: By chapter 70, he could blow up a reasonably sized mountain, and by chapter 40 of the sequel, he's estimated as being one of the most powerful people in Europe. He is also, for the most part, a total sweetie - though in the sequel, that centre can be harder to find.
  • Brutal Honesty: Occasionally on display, especially in the second book, when confronting what he perceives as teenage stupidity (not that he ever displays such stupidity himself, of course).
  • Bullet Dodges You: In chapter 71 the Phoenix does this while in charge of his body, with magic and energy bolts as well as bullets. In chapter 74, he does it himself.
    • In chapter 12 of Ghosts of the Past he repeats the trick as the Red Son.
  • Bully Hunter: He is this, because he wants to protect people who can't protect themselves. However, it tends to do more harm than good.
  • Burning with Anger: After he develops a talent for Playing with Fire, when he gets really, really angry the air around him tends to get extremely hot and dry and starting wavering as in a heat haze - and, after Forever Red, the smell of wood-smoke appears when he gets extremely hacked off. The latter in particular is generally a sign that you should start running. Preferably to another galaxy.
  • Catchphrase: Burn. Fortunately, it only shows up when some supernatural monster has jumped up and down on his Berserk Button. Unfortunately, he's not always entirely discriminating once said button has been pressed.
  • The Call Put Me on Hold: Despite his parentage, no unusual abilities really appear until chapter 60, whereupon he starts (slowly) learning to control them.
  • The Champion: Early on, he's prone to The Dulcinea Effect as part of his Knight In Shining Armour instincts, and even after it begins to moderate, he's platonically protective of Luna Lovegood (which goes some way to explaining why he went berserk after she was killed). Later, he becomes this not-so-platonically to Carol, with it being made clear that he will do anything for her - she generally serves as a Morality Chain during those periods when he needs one, and if something were to happen to her, it's made clear that the consequences could be downright horrifying.
  • Character Development: In spades. In the space of a year (the start of Child of the Storm to around chapter 45 in Ghosts), he changes from an Adorkable, relatively shy, and emotionally repressed boy who's unconsciously sweet, trusting, and (mostly) optimistic, if a little sarcastic - a genuine All-Loving Hero with a very strong set of ethics. He's also heavily reliant on the Indy Ploy to get himself out of trouble. A year later, he's lost the remaining innocence, is confident, mature, emotionally open (Heroic BSoD notwithstanding), and a Guile Hero and a morally flexible Knight in Sour Armour who's been Taught by Experience. He's also a Shell-Shocked Veteran thanks to the Forever Red arc, with a dangerous temper, and a a ruthless streak, being (reluctantly) willing to Mind Rape opponents. He's also a Consummate Liar. However, he mellows out considerably, ending up as an Anti-Nihilist. In general, he's on the wiser side of Fiery Stoic, and still Adorkable, loving, and genuinely kind, but as Hermione points out, their fellow students see Harry as 'decent, but not nice'.
    • It's fairly subtle, but at first, he keeps his original surname, remarking in chapter 20 of the first book that he prefers "Potter" over "Thorson." As time goes by, however, he increasingly identifies as Harry Thorson, showing how he comes to accept his role as not just the Boy Who Lived, but the Prince of Asgard who will send the monsters running.
  • Chest Insignia: The brief age up netted him some rather nice armour as well, including a Phoenix symbol on his chest. It reappears when he's resurrected and possessed by the Phoenix in chapter 71 and when he taps into the Phoenix's power in chapter 2 of Ghosts of the Past, and later becomes the Dark Phoenix.
    • In chapter 32, he seems to explicitly choose a version of one used by his distant ancestor, Frey; a stylised Yggdrasil with seven stars over it, in gold on a silver-white background. It reappears in chapter 43 as part of Project Galahad.
  • Chekhov's Skill: In his first sparring match against Uhtred, he flips over his opponent's head to deliver a finishing blow, albeit hurting his ankle in the process. About a year later in Ghosts of the Past, he does this again to the mutated Dudley, this time landing gracefully.
  • Chick Magnet: Due to a combination of being a) The Chosen One, b) Tall, Dark, and Handsome, and c) a literal Knight in Shining Armor, even if he's sometimes rather short-tempered due to his PTSD. He finds it very irritating, and employs a variety of means to avoid female attention.
    • Ironically, as is pointed out, his attitude post-Forever Red actually makes him more attractive to a certain group - though as is also pointed out, it makes him less attractive to others.
  • The Chosen One: He is this, much to his irritation/resignation.
  • Chronic Hero Syndrome: If he sees someone in trouble, he'll immediately go over and help.
    • It arguably reaches its apogee in chapter 10 of Ghosts of the Past when, having just escaped from the Red Room, he dives right back in, as they're vanishing to parts unknown, to try and save Maddie Pryor/Rachel Grey.
    • As a result of the above incident in particular, this trait is identified as a Fatal Flaw, as it leads to him charging into trouble - often more than even he can handle - without thinking about the consequences and, noble as his intentions may be, it often has nasty consequences. By Bloody Hell, he grows out of it - at least, the acting without thinking part.
  • Color-Coded Eyes: Has green eyes per canon. They fit his spitfire nature like a glove and they're even more significant than usual owing to the facts that Jean Grey is his second cousin (as is Maddie Pryor) and his mother merged with the Phoenix Force.
  • Cool and Unusual Punishment: As the Ravenclaw Quidditch team found out (for their part in the bullying of Luna Lovegood), he has a proclivity for these.
  • Cool Crown: Favours circlets for official occasions - initially a simple golden one with a triskelion design, then a silvery-gold one with a gem that resembles pure starlight set in the brow - with the usual connotations of Modest Royalty who do stuff.
  • Cool Sword: The altered Second Prophecy, and Trelawney's unexpectedly accurate tarot reading, make it very clear that a 'sword of fire waits for his hand'. In chapter 23 of Ghosts, Uhtred gives him a sword that he forged personally, under Tony's guidance (with additional enchantments from Loki) as a belated birthday gift. It's a sabre, on the model of Fandral's sword, and is, as Harry notes, almost perfectly balanced. At first, its design sets off some rather unfortunate memories, but he quickly warms up to it. It later gets an upgrade (see Reforged Blade).
  • Combat Pragmatist: When he's actually in a fight, it becomes clear that Harry's learned from people like Black Widow, meaning that he won't fight clean and he won't fight nice. His Guile Hero tendencies (as noted below) and his quick thinking, combined with his raw power, make him very dangerous when he's thinking clearly. However, he's still got Chronic Hero Syndrome, he's still impulsive, and suffers from a non-romantic version of The Dulcinea Effect. This has absolutely horrific consequences in the Forever Red arc, after which he gets more pragmatic.
    When it came to fighting creatures such as this, Harry left his scruples at the door.
  • Consummate Liar: Develops into this by chapter 24 of Ghosts of the Past, when he smoothly and effortlessly lies to Ron about the details of a telepathic discussion he and Hermione were having (about Harry playing Shipper on Deck for Ginny). Hermione is disconcerted, noting that while Harry wasn't a bad liar before, this is something else. When asked, Harry brushes it off as something he picked up from hanging around Natasha, but he's aware of it - in chapter 45, he bluntly tells Ron that he's not only a good liar, he's one of the best Ron will ever meet. While lying, via Exact Words, about the Winter Soldier still being alive.
  • Covert Pervert: While generally sweet and gentlemanly, he's a teenage telepath with an active imagination, and to his mortal embarrassment, an increasingly active sex drive. Exceptions include Jane, Hermione (who he barely notices is female, most of the time), Jean... sort of (emotionally, he sees her as a big sister type figure. His hormones have other ideas) and excepting one reported excruciatingly embarrassing dream, Wanda (his drop-dead gorgeous godmother and Parental Substitute). This leads to a few reasonably serious scenes being punctuated by him trying to focus and ignore his libido: e.g. when he's mulling over a vision of multiple universes and the implications of the fact that his subconscious selected them for him to view and learn a Very Important Lesson from, a large part of his mind is stuck on one universe where an older version of him and Carol were about to have a Shower of Love and comparing Naked!AU!Carol to Sleepwear!Carol. This is actually justified - the subconscious, after all, includes the libido.
  • Crazy Enough to Work: His plans are considered in-universe to be absolutely crazy, yet surprisingly effective (usually). It gets to the point where estimating how crazy something is tends to be considered a good way of figuring out whether or not something is one of his ideas.
  • Creepy Child: At times, particularly to those who don't know him so well. He acts far older than he is (characters frequently having to remind themselves that he's still a child because he usually acts closer to his apparent age than his actual age), he knows far too damn much/is far too perceptive for anyone's comfort, and moves just a little too gracefully to be human.
  • Crush Blush: Occasionally, usually around Carol. This happens even after he's gone Dark Phoenix and by all logic, should not be able to blush. A particularly prize-winning version pops up in chapter 33 of Ghosts after Carol kisses him on the cheek.
  • Cry into Chest: Several times in chapter 72, with good reason, first Wanda, then Thor, then Carol.
  • Curbstomp Battle: Starts handing these out after chapter 50 of Book 1, particularly in Ghosts. Notable examples include both rounds with Dudley, as a Blob-type mutant and a mutant vampire and the Elder Wyrm). However, he's also on the receiving end in chapter 7 of Ghosts from Maddie Pryor and Dracula in chapters 32 and 33.
  • Curb Stomp Cushion: Though Dracula batters him from pillar to post, Harry gets several good strikes in, actually hurting the Vampire Monarch, and if he had been up against almost any other vampire, he probably would have won.
  • Cuddle Bug: He has evolved into this, now that affection is freely given.
  • A Date with Rosie Palms: Obliquely hinted at via references to a Raging Stiffie.
  • Deadly Upgrade: The Dark Phoenix usually functions as this.
    • In chapter 33 of Ghosts, Harry gets a short-lived power boost from Jean and Maddie - short-lived because there's no way he can sustain it for more than a couple of minutes, and it leads to him getting drunk on power, but it serves its purpose ( make Dracula think he's facing a Phoenix host).
  • Deadpan Snarker: He started out as a Stepford Snarker, then developed into a straighter version of this in response to his colossally weird life (and the bad influence of the Avengers).
  • Death-Activated Superpower: In chapter 71, the Phoenix resurrects him and goes on a rampage.
  • Defense Mechanism Superpower: His mother's protection a.k.a. a fragment of the Phoenix Force, which activates whenever he's in mortal danger. The results are never, ever, pretty.
  • Defiant to the End: When being battered from pillar to post by the mutated Dudley, Harry refuses to give up, and his refusal to lay down and die gives him a Heroic Second Wind.
    • When Dracula considers killing him, Harry tells him to go ahead, as it can't be more painful than listening to him talk.
  • Deity of Human Origin: A complicated example, since his father was human when he was conceived, but he's now beginning to develop the usual godly powers. This is actually a minor plot point in Ghosts, since Doctor Milbury a.k.a. Sinister states that Harry's unique nature holds the key to the transformation from humanity to divinity.
  • Demonic Possession: Is briefly possessed by Cthon during the Final Battle of Child of the Storm, but casts him out.
  • Destructive Saviour: A recurring habit, from chapter 60 onwards, when he blows a very large hole in a very large mountain. Additionally, while possessed by the Phoenix in chapter 71, he takes out most of the Great Hall and all of the Entrance Hall of Hogwarts fighting HYDRA. Bucky and Natasha both lampshade this tendency in Ghosts, along with his habit of making big entrances.
  • Detect Evil: As part of his Sensor Character shtick, primarily via his Telepathy, though as chapter 74 shows, and Jean-Paul reminds him in chapter 7 of Ghosts, it's not always entirely reliable. After he studies under Magneto, it gets much better.
  • Did You Just Punch Out Cthulhu?: He goes mind to mind with Chthon (admittedly, a weakened fragment) in the finale of Book 1 and wins. This reaction is intentionally invoked by Doctor Strange in the sequel, who sets him up to face down and slay (with help) the Elder Wyrm, so Harry can very definitely and very publicly demonstrate how powerful he has become.
    • He also goes mind to mind with Surtur in chapter 51 of the sequel, and comes out honours even - while he doesn't lay a glove on Surtur, he resists handily, gets under his skin with a good "Reason You Suck" Speech and escapes with nothing more than burns to his face, temporarily impaired vision, and a nasty headache. This is particularly impressive because while this psychic contact/battle was through the medium of a vision into the future and across time, which reduced Surtur's capacity to get at him, he's a vastly powerful Eldritch Abomination; even reduced, in related situations, his sheer force of will has destroyed entire armies of gods.
  • Dishing Out Dirt: Like with water, it's not his thing and he prefers to use his telekinesis for anything he might use Earth Magic for, but in Ghosts he gets the basics under his belt.
  • Disney Death: He's killed by Daken at the end of Chapter 70, only to then be immediately resurrected by the Phoenix at the start of Chapter 71.
  • Determinator: He is insanely stubborn, as underlined in Ghosts of the Past when he resists psychic attacks from Sinister, brainwashing from the Red Room, and torture for two whole days without sleep, food, or water, all while simultaneously keeping his Phoenix fragment locked away inside him, despite/because he knows it could get him out of there instantly, and obliterate everything in his way.
  • Didn't See That Coming: This is usually the root of his status as a Spanner in the Works. A lot of antagonists either dismiss him as a child or don't expect him to get involved. The more dangerous villains tend to be those who either plan specifically to deal with him or adapt to his involvement.
  • Did You Just Punch Out Cthulhu?: After casting Chthon out of his body, he burns out his foothold in reality, re-banishing him.
  • Dissonant Serenity: Like his canon counterpart, he tends to be disturbingly calm and relaxed in hideously dangerous situations. This, and the associated Casual Danger Dialogue (and, where Carol is concerned, Flirting Under Fire), is something that those around him - even his grandfather, who's got five millennia of adventures and cosmic warfare under his belt - tend to find disturbing.
  • Divine Parentage: His father is Thor. Also, his mother became the White Phoenix of the Crown and conferred upon him a fragment of the Phoenix.
  • Does Not Know His Own Strength: He has Super Strength, but it tends to switch on without warning whenever he's particularly stressed/angry. The worst this has done so far is crush a goblet, but Harry is not unreasonably rather worried about it. By Ghosts of the Past, he's gotten it under better control.
  • Doom Magnet: A Justified Trope, as one day, he will be King of Asgard and a Strong and Skilled Physical God with a wide variety of Combo Platter Powers, one who will come down hard (or as much as he can, anyway) on any monsters who dare to threaten the innocent. And that's not even getting into the whole Phoenix thing. Therefore, a lot of mortal and supernatural beings and organizations would like to either control that power for their own ends, or to stop him before he grows into a significant/even more significant threat to them.
    • Furthermore, his Chronic Hero Syndrome means that even if monsters such as HYDRA or the Grey Court aren't explicitly interested in going after him, he's still going to get mixed up with them if they go after someone he's determined to protect, like Bobby Drake, his family, Maddie, or Carol.
  • Doting Grandparent: Has one in Frigga. Odin, too, to a lesser extent, though he's gruffer and more stand off-ish by nature, being instead more of an epic scale Papa Wolf.
  • Drama Queen: He's usually fairly serious, or at least, much more of a Deadpan Snarker than a Large Ham, with George Weasley noting in Ghosts that "understated sarcasm is his coping mechanism of choice." However, he can also occasionally be spectacularly histrionic - usually when particularly stressed out. Carol does not hesitate to point this out.
    Carol: Oh my god, you total fucking drama queen.
    • He sometimes plays up to it for effect, wryly admitting in chapter 44 of Ghosts that he was a bit dramatic when slaying the downed Elder Wyrm, stating that it was to get Surtur's attention, since Surtur is pretty dramatic himself.
  • The Dreaded: By the sequel, if only because of the Phoenix fragment within, though as more than one person points out, in his own right, he's not someone to take lightly - he's repeatedly survived things that should have been outright impossible to survive, and repeatedly left supposedly far more powerful, skilled, and experienced enemies and groups in ruins behind him... and that was before he got high-end Person of Mass Destruction level powers and the skill and experience to properly use them. Even Surtur is afraid of him.
  • Drunk on the Dark Side: A potential Dark Phoenix related hazard.
  • The Dulcinea Effect: Very, very prone to a non-romantic version of this due to his Chronic Hero Syndrome, and it frequently gets him into trouble, as the latter half of the Forever Red arc in Ghosts of the Past demonstrates.
  • Eating the Eye Candy: Downplayed. He's a Hormone-Addled Teenager and a bit of a Covert Pervert who's certainly not blind to the way women look, but mostly considers his immediate reaction to be a bit embarrassing, and understands how this can embarrass and upset the recipient (e.g. Carol and the tankini in chapter 1 of Ghosts). Also, having learned the psychic basics from the gorgeous Betsy Braddock means that he's much better at controlling and hiding his feelings than most teenagers.
  • Eerie Pale-Skinned Brunette: He has dark hair, pale skin, and from time to time is described as being 'fey', faintly unnerving, or even coming off as vaguely inhuman. After the Forever Red arc, he tends to give even the least psychically inclined Hogwarts students a case of the creeping horrors when he's in a bad mood - which is most of the time. He gets better about it, but the way he rarely acts his age, Dissonant Serenity and all, is generally considered to be more than a little unnerving.
  • Elemental Punch: Capable of the fire variant, as displayed in chapter 70. It worked on everyone who didn't have a Healing Factor.
    • Demonstrates it again in chapter 9 of Ghosts of the Past on the Beast a.k.a. Dudley, with additional telekinetic topspin. This time, the results are more in the order of a Megaton Punch.
  • Emotional Powers: See Psycho Active Powers.
  • Emotion Suppression: Life with the Dursleys taught him to do this, and a key part of his initial Character Development is discarding this, becoming more open with his emotions and more assertive. Considering that he's got some powerful and difficult to control Psycho Active Powers as well as a truly phenomenal amount of Suppressed Rage, this is a mixed blessing.
  • Enraged by Idiocy: He's always faintly irritated by it, but he gets considerably more annoyed by it (and generally tetchier) after the Forever Red arc in Ghosts of the Past, due to his Trauma Conga Line leaving him with a nasty case of PTSD and a Hair-Trigger Temper. While he mellows out somewhat, his increased impatience with standard teenage stupidity is one thing suggested to be separating him from his peers, as he just doesn't have the patience for them.
  • Expy: He's got a lot in common with several characters, which is sometimes lampshaded.
  • Eye Colour Change: From chapter 44 of Book 1 onwards, his eyes flash or outright burn gold when he's seriously using his powers, pissed off, or just wants to make an impression. They also go solid white when he's possessed by the Phoenix or willingly becoming the Dark Phoenix and red when he's possessed by Chthon. Neither is a particularly good sign.
  • Facial Markings: His scar.
  • Failure Knight: After Luna's death. He gets better.
  • Famed in Story: Much to his resigned irritation, through a combination of being "the Boy Who Lived" (even before the story started, he had Living Legends Doctor Strange as a paediatrician and the Scarlet Witch as a godmother), his deeds at Hogwarts, his Really Royalty Reveal giving him literally universal fame, association with the Avengers, and a growing reputation in the supernatural community for fighting and surviving everything from Chthon downwards.
  • Family Eye Resemblance: As per canon, he has his mother's eyes. These become more significant when it is revealed that Jean Grey is his second cousin and she shares the famous eyes, as does The Girl With Glowing Blue Eyes a.k.a. Maddie Pryor/Rachel Grey (when they aren't glowing, obviously).
  • Fantastically Indifferent: By Ghosts, it takes something very unusual to surprise him, and something very, very bad indeed to genuinely faze him.
  • Fatal Flaw: His Chronic Hero Syndrome crossed with his Impulsiveness (it makes him the Spanner in the Works for the bad guys, but also for the good guys too - sometimes, he's even one to himself), both of which are brutally exploited on more than one occasion. As his father sadly notes in Ghosts, a lot of what Harry's gone through is the product of acting without thinking (not that he blames him). Bucky's tutelage moderates this significantly.
    • He's also got a badly damaged sense of self-esteem. As Uhtred notes in Ghosts, he tends to regard himself as expendable, tends to be a Martyr Without a Cause. However, this is less due to being suicidal, more because he thinks that odds are pretty good that he'll survive whatever he's throwing himself into, and if he doesn't, he'll come back anyway - and he has a point about that.
  • The Fettered: Tries very hard to be this once his Psychic Powers come in, as noted by Carol, mostly because he's downright terrified of what he'll become if he takes the other path. As Forever Red demonstrates, this is not without reason.
  • Fiction 500: Thanks to the Potter vaults which, thanks to some smart investments by Thor's mortal father, Charlus Potter, including in Stark Industries (he met Howard during WWII and was favourably impressed), are conservatively estimated at £1.5 billion. He only reveals it to Hermione after casually mentioning that he could buy her a new laptop if she wanted, and mentions in passing that he offered to replace the X-Men's SR-71 Blackbird (which cost the equivalent of a little under $281 million per unit when originally built, and similar amounts to maintain it - and that's not taking into account their rarity, or the fact that the X-Men's version is heavily customised) after it got wrecked in the fight between the Red Son and Magneto in Ghosts. Otherwise, he doesn't talk about it and is mostly vaguely embarrassed by it whenever the subject comes up.
    • Naturally, as Prince of Asgard, he also has access to an incredible amount of money, though so far he hasn't taken advantage of it.
  • Fiery Stoic: Starts becoming this in Ghosts after Forever Red, as part of a general drift away from his previous Hot-Blooded and impulsive nature, and trying to control his inner Phoenix, becoming wiser and more thoughtful as he recovers and mellows out. However, the temper hasn't gone away.
  • Fights Like a Normal: Initially, he does this because powers don't always cut it. The problem comes when he starts defaulting to this, regardless of opponent and his other (ranged) abilities, which gets him killed when he fights Daken - the rematch, fought at range, goes much better. He starts shifting back to this in Ghosts, after the Red Room trapping him in a Power Limiter suit forced him to think fast and channel his telekinesis through his body to simulate Flying Brick powers, but doesn't simply default to it.
  • Finger Snap Lighter: Masters this trick and mostly uses it to show off (to Hermione's disapproval), with the exception of a Badass Finger Snap at the end of Child of the Storm, which he uses to banish Chthon.
  • Fireballs: Capable of creating these, though he mostly just plays with them.
  • Fish out of Water: In Asgard, though he adjusts fairly quickly.
  • Flying Brick: Sort of. In Child of the Storm, he's a Squishy Wizard/Glass Cannon, drifting into Flying Firepower by the end of the book. However, by the end of Forever Red arc in Ghosts, he's Made of Iron and can mimic this with his Psychic Powers.
  • The Force Is Strong with This One: Occasionally gets this reaction, including from Doctor Milbury a.k.a. Sinister.
  • Gallows Humour: Becomes increasingly prone to this as time goes by, after a number of near-death and actual death experiences turn his snark darker - mainly as a coping mechanism.
  • Game Face: Following Chapter 44, his eyes flash or glow gold when he gets annoyed. They're joined by a strange and compelling double voice that crops up when gets really angry.
    • And then there's what happens when he becomes the Dark Phoenix. The less said about that, the better.
  • Get a Hold of Yourself, Man!: To Uhtred in chapter 34, with a touch of Dare to Be Badass.
  • Generation Xerox: While there are the usual comments about his resemblance to his father, in appearance and in personality, it becomes apparent that he's most startling in his resemblance to his mother, at least in personality.
  • The Glasses Come Off: Harry gets a kind of Asgardian eye surgery leading to him ditch his glasses. The reactions are broadly along the lines of He Is All Grown Up, though Hermione inwardly notes that it, among other things, makes him look dangerous.
  • Glory Seeker: Inverted, like canon, though less so. Not because he's more interested in glory, but because he is much, much more vocal about objecting to it - notably, when he goes nuclear after he's picked for the Triwizard Tournament.
  • Glowing Eyes of Doom: Following Chapter 44, along with the strange double voice that crops up when gets angry. It usually means that something is about to be burned to a crisp.
  • Godzilla Threshold: Mind Rape. As Hermione observes, it's not that he can't do it, it's that he won't. Not unless he feels he absolutely has to.
    • The Dark Phoenix is several steps further.
    • Usually, he doesn't like Astral Projection, which involves leaving his body, for very understandable reasons. However, he projects his mind and powers through Carol via their Psychic Link when she gets kidnapped. Gorakhnath later sets about teaching him how to do it properly.
  • Good Is Not Soft: He has, for the most part, a strong moral centre, and a severe case of Chronic Hero Syndrome, even during his Knight in Sour Armour periods. However, he's entirely capable of being ruthless and when driven far enough, absolutely vicious.
  • Good Is Not Nice: Veers into this in Ghosts after Forever Red, due to a nasty case of PTSD, and even months after he's stabilised, Hermione points out that while most of his fellow students see him as fundamentally decent, 'nice' went out the window sometime ago. Harry, reluctantly, acknowledges this.
  • Good Scars, Evil Scars: His canon scar is followed by two silvery scars over his heart (from Daken), and in Ghosts, a vampire bite on the arm, and a stab mark through the shoulder surrounded by fern-like scars resulting from a lightning strike.
  • Grievous Harm with a Body: Bludgeons one bully with another in Ghosts of the Past.
  • Guile Hero: As Jean-Paul notes in Ghosts, it's easy enough to forget that Harry's actually very, very clever. This is particularly apparent early on, as he doesn't have the raw power to just bulldoze his way through opponents. When he does have that level of power (and hits a Rage Breaking Point) he tries Attack! Attack! Attack!, and pays for it. As part of his Character Development in the sequel, he develops the wisdom to start using his head again.
  • Guilt Complex: Somewhat, though nowhere near as badly as in canon - getting therapy probably helped with this, as did having Carol, Jean, Wanda, and Thor (among others) around to alternately console him and verbally kick him up the arse if necessary.
  • Had to Be Sharp: Repeated epic level murder attempts force something of an 'evolve or die' scenario upon him.
  • Hair-Trigger Temper: On his return to Hogwarts following the Forever Red arc in Ghosts of the Past, he has this for a little while, terrifying pretty much all his fellow students since they have no idea what's likely to make him go off like a claymore mine, until Cedric Diggory gives him a gentle What the Hell, Hero? and inspires a Jerkass Realization.
  • Half-Human Hybrid: Naturally, as the son of Thor. Though, considering the somewhat ambiguous nature of his mother, he may not even be half human to begin with.
  • Hand Blast: Once he starts seriously Playing with Fire, it becomes his default form of attack until Ghosts of the Past.
  • Handicapped Badass: Briefly in Ghosts. Losing an arm and an eye didn't slow him down much.
  • Has a Type: Badasses, especially (but not exclusively, as demonstrated by his crush on the brunette Betsy Braddock) blondes. It's implied more than once that a youth spent watching Buffy the Vampire Slayer might have something to do with this. Since Carol fits both categories like a glove, it's unsurprising that there's more than one Shipper on Deck for him and her (as there is much sparkage), ignoring assertions that they're Just Friends - indeed, Hermione independently notes their attraction and makes the connection to Buffy. As they get closer, it reaches the point where it's a Running Gag how everyone can see it - even people who've barely met them and supervillains - only cementing this. They finally get together in chapter 46 of Ghosts.
  • Heinz Hybrid: His father's an Asgardian who's one quarter Titan thanks to Bor marrying Theia, his mother was a witch and a latent mutant, and, to complicate matters further, while he was conceived his father was a human wizard, leaving him with three sets of biological grandparents and it's implied that the Asgardian side of the family intermarried with the House of El a very long way back (no one's quite sure). As it turns out, all this confluence of heritages really seems to succeed in doing is giving Harry a few Psycho Active Powers that, at best, he has limited control over (until chapter 70) and an absurdly complex family tree.
  • Heroic Lineage: He's the son of Thor, it kind of comes with the territory.
  • Heroic Self-Deprecation: Like canon, he's prone to this, though Carol is just as prone to puncturing this as she is his bouts of melodrama.
  • The Hero: Only to be expected. Strange elaborates on this in Ghosts, stating that Harry is not this because of all the abilities, powerful friends and family, and cosmic protections that Strange has lined up for him - if that were all that was required, Strange could have picked anyone. What makes Harry special is that he is a hero in spite of them. He is not perfect, he is not The Paragon, which means that he understands the darkness he faces and bends rather than breaks under pressure, and in the end, he will always choose to do what is right over what is easy. Strange also adds that he's seen all the heroes come and go, and compares Harry favourably to the likes of Sir Lancelot and King Arthur themselves.
  • Heroes Want Redheads: Subverted. While Harry finds Jean 'inconveniently attractive', ditto Maddie, his attraction is mostly just an awareness that they're gorgeous, and Word of God has it that Harry was originally going to be with Ginny (the idea was discarded long before the story reached that point), at this point he is completely baffled by the revelation that in another world he might have got together with Ginny. While he concedes that she is pretty, and technically does have a lot of personality traits he finds attractive, he doesn't really see her that way - and his periodic psychic outbursts have, in any case, done her psychic trauma no good.
  • Heroic Will Power: His stubbornness is legendary, allowing him to shrug off two days of physical and psychic torture - of course, this stubbornness is also revealed to have a number of downsides.
  • Holy Hand Grenade: When he whips out his fire magic, the Phoenix (and possibly his latent Asgardian heritage) tends to add a certain influence to it that's inimical to evil, even if he's not consciously using it. His blood is also apparently lethally dangerous to vampires, enough that some mingled blood and spit burns like acid, and a cup of it cures a part-turned Grey Court vampire.
  • Honor Before Reason: He will always, always do the dumb, noble thing to protect someone else, even if it means being possessed by an Elder God or chasing after Maddie and thereby putting himself at the mercy of the Red Room, who are now wise to his methods of escape. Even after he becomes more pragmatic, that usually just means putting a half-decent plan together, grabbing support and weapons before charging in. This often ends badly (the latter results in days of physical and psychic torture and his transformation into the Red Son), but he keeps doing it (even if he has got a bit savvier about it), because he tends to survive, and as Uhtred observes, this leads him to consider himself expendable. It's noted by more than one character that the crux of Doctor Strange's plan at the Battle of London hinged on this, with Harry intercepting Chthon's attempted possession of Wanda.
  • Hope Bringer: Specifically name checked as this. However, the flip side of this is that he could also become a terrifying Dark Messiah.
  • Hot-Blooded: As per canon, though it's more obvious because he's now being freer with his emotions. Uhtred and Diana note that the Warrior's blood of the Asgardian royal line flows hot in him. And cold.
  • Hot for Teacher: Develops a little bit of a crush on Betsy Braddock, one that lingers into Ghosts.
  • Hormone-Addled Teenager: Just a bit, every now and then, developing as time passes. Especially when Carol is around.
  • Humble Hero: Mostly, being somewhat embarrassed when people start treating him like royalty - which he is. However, he does become willing to pull rank as and when he finds it useful.
  • Hunk: He will grow up to be this. Unsurprising, since he's described by the author as slowly growing into something like a mixture of Henry Cavill and Pierce Brosnan.
  • Hurting Hero: Gets put through the wringer frequently, suffers from Power Incontinence of varying kinds, gets physically and mentally tortured, and is terrified of losing control of the Phoenix within. Oh, and by Ghosts of the Past, he has a raging case of PTSD. This culminates in an explosion of bitter fury after he's dragged into the Triwizard Tournament.
  • Hybrid Power: On the face of it. Thanks to his parentage (James was Thor) not only will he have the advantage of being a living magical reactor, as all Asgardians are, and develop his father's Super Strength in the process, he's also related to Jean Grey on his mother's side and inherited the vast psychic powers which, on top of everything else, will be stronger in that he can channel more energy. While this seems set to drive him straight into Mary Sue territory, this is Harry we're talking about. There are caveats.
    • Initially, the Super Strength appears completely at random, meaning that he lives in mortal fear of shaking someone's hand and squashing it or similar.
    • The Psychic Powers come through violently, are dangerously uncontrollable for a good while, nearly getting him, Ron and Hermione killed and leave him open for Voldemort to play Power Parasite, and Word of God says that he'll never be as strong as Jean is (or Maddie, for that matter), or as good as Xavier is. On the other hand, as Word of God also admits, this is not saying much, and he lacks the skill and until chapter 74, the will, to use those powers effectively. After, though, he gets a very, very rapid grip on them.
      • Oh, and Doctor McCoy theorises that the steady altering of his body and brain chemistry by his Asgardian genes could mean that his Psychic Powers will eventually short circuit his brain.
    • And when he does learn to use them effectively in combat between chapters 70 and 74, it's largely as a result of an epic case of Break the Cutie.
  • I Got Bigger: He quotes the trope to a puzzled Hulk after the Plot-Relevant Age-Up. It's temporary.
  • Impaled with Extreme Prejudice: This happen to him on a distressingly regular basis: he gets skewered by HYDRA's shapeshifting Destroyer replica under Zemo's control, then he gets stabbed by Daken, before, in the sequel, he gets this from Magneto when he's a Blank Slate as the Red Son - and blasted with a gigantic lightning bolt - and then through his shoulder by Dracula (with his own sword, no less), before, again, he gets walloped by a giant lightning bolt.
  • Incorruptible Pure Pureness: Played With. At first, it's Played Straight, until his temper starts emerging and he's put under greater strain, with several observations that he could turn into a new Magneto. And not affable, dry-witted, grandfatherly Magneto, either - murderous, rage-driven, borderline genocidal Magneto. More than once, he comes very close to snapping entirely. However, it seems that the only thing capable of corrupting him is his own rage - at any rate, he's enough this trope that Doctor Strange's entire grand scheme relies on him resisting Chthon's temptation to take Chthon's power and rewrite the universe into one where everything went right for him, where his mother was still alive.
    • As of Ghosts, however, this is increasingly called into question, with his dark side being brought up as something to watch out for, before the Trauma Conga Line of the Forever Red arc nearly drives him insane and does result in his briefly snapping and becoming the Dark Phoenix. While he manages to draw back from the edge, it's independently noted by several people that even ignoring the rampant PTSD, there's something of a shadow on him.
  • Indy Ploy: His hallmark, where plans are concerned, along with Crazy Enough to Work.
  • Ineffectual Loner: Downplayed. He's increasingly capable of looking after himself, but when it comes to really serious situations, going it alone tends to end very badly.
  • In Harm's Way: Tends to find trouble and as he reluctantly admits to himself, a considerable part of him actually enjoys the life or death fights he finds himself in.
  • Instant Costume Change: When the Phoenix is involved.
  • It's All My Fault: In chapter 72 he insistently blames himself for Luna's death, accurately pointing out that he could have telepathically switched off the HYDRA assault force as soon as he sensed them, without even getting out of bed, but didn't because he was too squeamish. Carol concedes that this is true, but points out that his warning and heavy involvement in driving HYDRA off saved pretty much everyone in the school and that he made the best call he could under the circumstances.
    • He also reserves a certain amount of blame for himself after becoming first the Red Son, then the Dark Phoenix, which happened because of an Indy Ploy gone horribly wrong.
  • It Sucks to Be the Chosen One: Discusses the trope with Hank McCoy in Child of the Storm, remarking in a light and matter-of-fact tone that while he likes the new family, he could really do without all the new and hard to control powers, new and powerful enemies and new and interesting murder attempts. As of Ghosts, he's initially much more bitter about it, before shifting to a kind of weary resignation.
  • Jack-of-All-Stats: While he's becoming a Flying Brick, Word of God has it that he'll only be about three-quarters as strong and durable as Superman, and though his psychic powers are incredibly vast in scale, he still doesn't have the raw power of Jean or Maddie, and Strange states he still won't have the skill of Charles Xavier. Furthermore, while Harry is becoming highly adept at magic, he will still presumably not be as good as his uncle, the actual God of Magic. However, taking all of that together still means that he's extremely formidable.
  • Jedi Mind Trick: Uses this and notes the Trope Namer in chapter 7 of Ghosts of the Past.
  • Jerkass Ball: In Ghosts, he picks this up after Forever Red and tapering off around the next big arc, Bloody Hell, because of an absolutely horrible case of PTSD. It gets better with his mental health, though he's still a bit grumpier than before, and Hermione notes that he's widely considered to be "decent, but not nice" afterwards.
  • Jerkass Realization: In chapter 22 of Ghosts, he has one when Cedric Diggory gently points out that while Harry's been through some fairly awful things (even if he, Cedric, doesn't know the details) and is understandably a bit messed up and angry over it, the Hogwarts students don't deserve to have him taking his anger out on them. It then really hits home when Harry sees just how he looks in Cedric's eyes just when he's about to go nuclear on him for nothing.
  • Jerk with a Heart of Gold: Becomes this in Ghosts of the Past, following the Trauma Conga Line of Forever Red. He (mostly) gets better, with diminishing quantities of jerk as time goes on.
  • Junior Counterpart: In terms of mannerisms and personality, he reminds people intensely of his mother. Others, though, see his father in him. More disturbingly, when he snaps into Tranquil Fury, he tends to remind people unnervingly of a young Magneto in full Dark Messiah mode.
    • In the sequel, he's noted on several occasions as acting, and sometimes looking, very like Bucky. Since Bucky was the Winter Soldier, and Harry's imitations reflect that part of him, this is not exactly reassuring (and tends to disturb both of them) - though given that they had similar experiences at the hands of the Red Room and he was explicitly intended to be the Winter Soldier's Superior Successor, and Bucky is his Sensei for Scoundrels, it's not entirely surprising, either.
    • Or, when he's just done something clever (especially if it's to make someone evil suffer), he gets a wicked smile that makes him look disturbingly like Doctor Strange. As the sequel goes on, he takes on more and more of Strange's mannerisms and tactics, to the point where one reviewer referred to him as 'Diet Doctor Strange'. Strange himself tries to head it off, on the grounds that he regards his own actions and personality as Necessarily Evil rather than anything to imitate.
  • Kansas City Shuffle: In Ghosts, he starts favouring this as part of his various gambits, with more than one reviewer commenting on it in relation to his becoming something of a 'Diet Doctor Strange'. It doesn't always work, but when it does, it's spectacular.
  • Kill It with Fire: Burn.
    • Then, at the end of Forever Red, he turns it up a notch, as the Dark Phoenix.
  • Knight In Shining Armour: He's steadily growing into this trope, even down to charming ladies without deliberately seducing them (in this case, Carol, the accidental charming is mutual) and a certain susceptibility to the Dulcinea Effect. This is repeatedly lampshaded. However, by Ghosts, this has veered sharply into a smoothie of this and Knight in Sour Armour - basically, he's a Knight In Shining Armour with added cynicism.
    • In chapter 32 of Ghosts, he winds up in a literal suit of this. It's silvery-white, with a gold Yggdrasil with seven stars on the chest, and a modified Corinthian helm with wings and a retracting visor. Surprisingly, it actually has a practical purpose, being transfigured by Sirius from pieces of damaged Iron Man suits and reinforced by Diana's gauntlet, so he can actually fight Dracula without his relative fragility screwing him over. Carol's somewhat dazed internal monologue refers to as looking like something from another age - which, since it was explicitly based on concept art of Numenorean armour, is unsurprising.
  • Knight in Sour Armour: Carries flavours of this by Ghosts, having become considerably more cynical thanks to his experiences in Child of the Storm. While he's largely accepted the inevitability of new and interesting murder attempts, and will unwaveringly stand in protection of what is right and good, as well as eventually developing into The Anti-Nihilist with more Knight In Shining Armour traits, this does not mean that he'll necessarily be particularly happy about it. Nor will it stop him providing a snarky commentary on events.
  • Lady and Knight: He and Carol develop this dynamic in Ghosts, though more of the Action Duo/nascent Battle Couple variety, interwoven with a whopping great dose of Courtly Love.
  • The Leader: A classic combination of Charismatic and Headstrong (he's working on the Headstrong part).
  • Leave Him to Me: Says this to his friends when encountering Daken - for the second time - in HYDRA's main base.
  • Let's Get Dangerous!: Usually, Harry's default in a fight is a combination of fire and standard telekinetic blasts, while keeping up a casual stream of conversation, snark, and if Carol is present, totally-not-flirting. However, when matters get serious (usually around the point where he gets really angry), his voice will get cold, calm, and somehow dead (if he speaks at all), what he does say will most likely be either a "World of Cardboard" Speech or a Breaking Speech, and he will discard his usual morals and cut straight to the most efficient method of destroying his opponent, whether that is Mind Rape or straight up decapitation.
    • There's also the small matter of, from Ghosts of the Past onwards, the smell of wood-smoke. It appears when Harry's on the edge of his Rage Breaking Point and means the Dark Phoenix is on the point of emerging.
  • Like Father, Unlike Son: Played With.
  • Like Parent, Like Child: His courage, nobility and arch-protectiveness of his friends are reminiscent of his father, though his blazing temper, compassion, skill with fire and Phoenix connection tend to remind most very strongly of his mother, even down to specific mannerisms.
  • Likes Older Women: He tends to be attracted to older and, ah, better endowed women, such as Darcy, Betsy Braddock, and technically speaking Carol (the technically part being that she's about a year older than him, at most).
  • Locked into Strangeness: See Skunk Stripe.
  • Locked Out of the Loop:
    • Less so than canon, as Thor doesn't really see much point in keeping his son uninformed, and Doctor Strange tends to add information when needed (though this is variable, with Harry at one point snarking in Ghosts that "Doctor Strange operates on a need to know basis: as in, he's the person who needs to know").
    • However, Harry is much more inclined to pull this on Ron and Hermione in Ghosts, albeit for fairly understandable reasons: it's indicated that given the choice, he would do this with most of his friends, but the others tend to be involved in whatever insanity has gone/is going down; he wants to preserve Ron and Hermione's relative innocence (being very aware of the psychic wear and tear his adventures cause); as he points out, a lot of the secrets he's learned aren't necessarily his to share; and after Forever Red in particular, he's not particularly willing to open up about just what has happened.
  • Ludicrous Gibs: Develops both the ability and willingness to do this in Ghosts of the Past.
  • Made of Iron: Already fairly tough, he becomes this by Ghosts of the Past, developing Super Soldier Plus levels of durability.
  • Magic Enhancement: Undergoes this twice, though it's temporary on both occasions, when visiting Asgard for the first time and in chapter 59 when the Genius Loci of the Mountain gives him and a few others a Plot-Relevant Age-Up.
  • Magic Knight: During the first book, he learns how to fight hand-to-hand from the Avengers and Sean Cassidy, though he's just a talented amateur and a Squishy Wizard (if a powerful one). Tutelage from Bucky, Uhtred, Fandral, and Thor in Ghosts, plus figuring out how to use his telekinesis to enhance his strength, speed, and durability, leads to him graduating into this trope by chapter 28. The fact that he's got hand to hand and knife-fighting skills similar to the Winter Soldier, thanks to his time as the Red Son, but those memories are (at first) locked away, to call on also helps.
  • Magnetic Hero: Partly natural, partly caused by Wanda's blessing.
  • Making a Splash: Learns a bit in Ghosts under Strange's tutelage, but he doesn't like it very much.
  • Male Gaze: Mostly downplayed and consciously resisted on his part, but he is a Hormone-Addled Teenager.
  • Master of Illusion: He has a remarkable knack for this - enough to, in chapter 33 of Ghosts, successfully fool Dracula by impersonating the Dark Phoenix. His uncle is Loki, after all.
  • The Matchmaker: Plays this for Lex and Sue in chapter 39 of Child of the Storm, and again for Ginny and Diana in Ghosts of the Past. It's a sign both that he's a Nice Guy, and that he's got a nascent gift as a manipulator.
  • Menacing Stroll: Sometimes in the sequel, usually manifesting as a predatory stalking movement when he's expecting trouble - one that tends to make people very aware that he is not entirely human.
  • Messianic Archetype: Zig-Zags the trope. Throughout Child of the Storm he's generally the sweet All-Loving Hero of canon, willing to save those who scorn him, and ultimately saves the world by rejecting The Final Temptation. However, in Ghosts, the traumatic experiences and PTSD pile up, and he risks veering into Dark Messiah territory. As of chapter 35 of the latter, he seems to be inclining back towards playing it straight, becoming The Anti-Nihilist.
  • Messiah Creep: Over the story, he undergoes this, even more than canon - though with the flip side that he could yet become a Dark Messiah and during Ghosts is something of an Apocalypse Maiden. He's not particularly happy about it, though as Jesus points out, he can either front up to it, or run from it - and the latter never works in the long term.
  • Messy Hair: As per usual.
  • Metaphorgotten: He sometimes loses track of what he's saying, with amusing results. It's also generally a good sign that he's in a good mood - if he's cold and precise, start running.
  • Mind over Manners: Is extremely scrupulous about this and initially squeamish about using anything more than passive telepathy (picking up projected thoughts), partly because of privacy, partly because of what Riddle's Diary did to Ginny, and partly because he's absolutely terrified (and not entirely without reason) that he could start on a slippery slope. By Ghosts, however, he will violate it if he deems it necessary, though it's still his Godzilla Threshold - though he has absolutely no compunction about using it on vampires.
  • Mind over Matter: Develops this following chapter 60. It quickly becomes his default power, to the point where it's occasionally noted that his teachers have to remind him to use magic rather than telekinesis, and in Ghosts, particularly after tuition from Magneto, he's absolutely lethal with it.
  • Mind Rape: He's capable of this, but violently objects to it, and in the later parts of book 1 he's terrified of using his telepathy at all for fear of accidentally inflicting this. By Ghosts, however, he's willing (if reluctant) to resort to it if his loved ones are in danger - as Hermione says when correcting Ron, it's something that he won't do. That's not the same as saying that he can't.
    • This happens to him at the hands of the Red Room. He is much, much touchier about it afterwards.
  • Modest Royalty: Very much so - he tends to get embarrassed if people even bring up his rank, and even more embarrassed about songs being sung about his deeds.
  • Momma's Boy: Is very close to both his grandmother and his godmother, and is noted to respond best to women for reasons that have very little to do with being a Hormone-Addled Teenager. In chapters 78 through 80, he pretty much constantly clings to his temporarily returned mother, and he's very close to his godmother, Wanda.
  • Morality Chain Beyond the Grave: Luna, invoked by Thor in the 'she wouldn't want this' way when Harry attempts to use his telepathy to torment the Ravenclaws he blames for Luna's death.
  • Motor Mouth: A lot of the time he's relatively quiet, but when he does get going, it's usually quite hard to get him to stop, with Maddie in particular being rather startled by it. Particularly if he's about to do something spectacular.
  • Nerves of Steel: After everything he's been through, very little actually fazes him, short of his loved ones being threatened.
  • Nice Guy: Vies with Chronic Hero Syndrome for the position of his defining trait, veering at points into All-Loving Hero, though it takes a bit of a backseat to Good Is Not Nice in Ghosts, after the Forever Red arc.
  • Nigh-Invulnerability: Of the Divine Protection kind, extending on at least one occasion to Resurrective Immortality. He's also heading towards the Made of Diamond kind due to his (very slowly) developing Super Toughness.
  • Ninja Pirate Zombie Robot: A Half-Asgardian Wizard who is also related to one of the most powerful telepaths in existence, is a conduit for the Phoenix Force, is distantly related to the House of El, was (for a time) a cyborg through the Transmode Virus as well as a murderous brainwashed agent of the Red Room.
  • Noiseless Walker: By the second book, he's mastered the art of moving in complete silence, when he wants to - something usually accompanied by a predatory stalking movement that reminds whoever's watching that while half of him is human, the other half is definitely not.
  • Non-Idle Rich: Along with Royals Who Actually Do Something, what with Thor essentially giving him control of the Potter vault, which is revealed to total around £1.5 billion, he's probably the second richest character in the cast after Tony Stark. It mostly just embarrasses him, and save when he's trying to help friends, he practically never talks about it.
  • Not So Different: Aside from the canon examples of Voldemort and Snape, Harry's noted to be worryingly like pre Heel–Face Turn Magneto when he gets in a real rage. Oddly enough, though, this applies most to Doctor Strange a.k.a. Taliesin. Let's break it down:
    • They come from roughly the same part of Britain (West England/South Wales). Their families were killed as part of a genocidal campaign. Both were set adrift in a small basket in the hopes they'd be taken in and loved. Both are Tall, Dark, and Handsome, with distinctive streaks of white in black hair, and both have startlingly coloured eyes. They both began as powerful wizards with odd powers, routinely defeat beings far more powerful than they are, and were touched by an inadvertently summoned cosmic power (respectively, the Phoenix and the Time Stone) that drastically altered their fate.
    • Moreover, after Forever Red, Harry starts to act more and more like Strange while under the tutelage of the man himself, becoming an increasingly secretive and solitary Mood-Swinger and Broken Ace, holding friends at arms length, and using his reputation as a weapon. He's even developing something like Strange's signature Grin of Audacity. This was hinted at way back in Book 1, with Harry's In-Universe fondness for Doctor Who, and Strange bitterly lampshading his resemblance to the Doctor (all previous comparisons/hints of his involvement having been Played for Laughs). It is also not meant to be a good thing, with Strange himself explicitly stating in chapter 39 that he's trying to guide Harry away from it.
    • All these similarities led to solid speculation that Strange actually was Harry from the far future, carrying out a Stable Time Loop. Word of God has Jossed this, but also remarked there was an element of truth in it - Strange being Harry was actually the fic's original plan.
    • In addition, Harry is very like Magneto, something noted, with a certain amount of concern, by many characters, including Magneto himself: both had a Dark and Troubled Past (though Magneto's was far worse), were gifted/cursed with truly immense powers as a teen which interested Sinister, among others, and found Hogwarts to be a safe haven. In addition, both have incredible amounts of suppressed rage, both are ruthlessly creative with their powers, and are capable of slipping into a Tranquil Fury that scares everyone with a brain, especially when they see people tormenting others. Not only that, but both are closely tied to Xavier (Erik's oldest frenemy, and one of Harry's mentors), who helped them understand and embrace their powers, and to Wanda (Harry's godmother, and Erik's daughter). Mercifully, Harry mellows out and they end up bonding, in a good way.
  • Not So Similar: However, unlike Strange, he actively seeks out friends and family, and has very little in the way of grandiose ambitions, whether for himself or a cause. Likewise, while Strange's sense of drama is pretty much a constant, and he only tends to go cold and calm when he's either being very serious or in a very bad mood, Harry tends to only go in for major dramatics when under serious stress or in a very bad mood. This is an Invoked Trope by Strange, who states to Gorakhnath that he's intentionally ensuring that Harry does not turn out too much like him.
  • Ominous Walk: Pulls this on a helpless Dudley, a vampire, in chapter 32, just before he's about to decapitate him. It underlines the power dynamic, and that he's indulging his darker side.
  • O.O.C. Is Serious Business: The end of chapter 74, most of chapter 75, then the end of Forever Red when he's about to go Dark Phoenix, and when a vampire Blob!Dudley almost kills Uhtred in Bloody Hell demonstrate this. The general gist is that if he's angry and he's gone all calm and quiet then he's probably been pushed too far and running won't help unless you can get a long way away very quickly.
    • More generally, his personality shift following the Forever Red arc is meant to show that something is very, very wrong.
    • On a lighter note, after his First Kiss with Carol, he actually starts acting his age instead of like a Shell-Shocked Veteran. His fellow students are both surprised and, frankly, deeply relieved by this - as Seamus Finnegan points out, it makes him much easier to live with.
  • Other Me Annoys Me: Averted. While he bickers with 'Nathan' in chapter 41 of Ghosts, the two broadly get along well.
  • Passive-Aggressive Kombat: Uses this to steadily wind up Carol's father after the other man rubs him up the wrong way.
  • Pay Evil unto Evil: He's got a taste for it. Case in point: what he does to Dudley in Chapter 32 of Ghosts. Namely, ripping out the other's voicebox, cutting off his arms, before decapitating him, while giving him a cold, savage lecture. It's well-deserved, and arguably a far quicker and more merciful death than Dudley, a vampire and a monster even before he was turned, deserved. But still... yeesh.
  • Personality Powers: Harry's preferred element is fire. Doesn't particularly enjoy the cold and wet? Check. Impulsive? Big fat check. Assertive? After some Character Development, absolutely.
  • Person of Mass Destruction: As the HYDRA troops find out in chapter 70 of Child of the Storm. Unfortunately, Daken can take everything he dishes out. In their first match up, anyway. The second, once Harry ditched the Idiot Ball, not so much.
  • Physical God: One day, obviously, as shown during a temporary Plot-Relevant Age-Up. Also to an even greater extent as the Dark Phoenix.
  • Pillars of Moral Character: Initially. He's unfailingly polite, respectful and kind to the dismissed and downtrodden, caring even (perhaps especially) when others don't. Furthermore, he'll take up their cause without blinking twice. However, this fades as he loses his innocence in the latter half of Book 1, and the first half of Ghosts, as his darker side becomes more prominent and his idealism is tarnished, and a brutal Trauma Conga Line leaves him with a horrible case of PTSD. Even after his recovery, he becomes more ruthless and practical, developing into a Consummate Liar, talented manipulator, and someone with a truly frightening capacity for viciousness when loved ones/friends are threatened or harmed. However, his core morals - and vast capacity for kindness and compassion - remain intact, and indeed, are eventually enhanced (or made more nuanced) by his experiences.
  • Pinball Protagonist: Spends most of Child of the Storm as this, being only 13 and unlike the more Hogwarts based mysteries in canon, wrapped up in a conflict of far greater scope than he can really get a hold of, which means that he ends up bouncing around and unsure of which way is up. Towards the end of Child of the Storm and the start of Ghosts, he becomes much more proactive.
  • Playing with Fire: it's his signature, like his namesake, from around chapter 50 onwards, to the point of When All You Have Is a Hammer.... Even after he expands his repertoire in the second book, fire is still usually his preferred option. As is noted, it makes him a little bit predictable.
  • Politeness Judo: Demonstrates that he's very capable of this in chapter 6 of Ghosts of the Past, with Alison later observing in relation to that incident that he's been learning from Natasha... so long as his Berserk Button isn't pushed.
  • Poor Communication Kills: He has a recurring tendency to make plans up on the spot or alter them on the fly, then fail to inform friends and family. While this unpredictability makes him a massive headache for villains to deal with, it is at least as much of a problem for the good guys - and it's even been known to play Spanner in the Works for his own plans.
    • This tendency is implied to be why Bucky, when serving as his bodyguard/mentor in Ghosts, has been given a wrist-strap based teleporter linked to Harry, so he can catch up almost instantly if (when) his charge goes AWOL.
  • Pop-Cultured Badass: Is an avowed Doctor Who fan and his plan for dealing with Gravemoss in chapter 76 comes straight from Buffy the Vampire Slayer (though as he admits, it's not a very good plan, and Hermione's disbelief at the latter is expressed in the sequel).
    • In the latter case, it's mentioned that he watched it at Mrs Figg's when living with the Dursleys and spent years wishing for a Buffy of his own to come save him. Which, in hindsight, probably explains a lot about his taste in women.
    • He also quotes Dark Willow to chilling effect, when turning a speechifying vampire to Ludicrous Gibs.
    Bored now.
  • Power Glows: Frequently. It appears more and more when he uses his psychic powers, and usually when he's winding up to do something big.
  • Power High: Briefly, in chapter 33 of Ghosts thanks to a supercharge from Jean and Maddie. He manages to keep it on a leash, mostly - and when he does seem to go Laughing Mad, that just adds to his pretence that he's the Dark Phoenix.
  • Power Incontinence: Early flare-ups aside, mainly between chapters 50 and 70, until his Super Strength stabilises at 'just under Super Soldier and growing' and he's persuaded to get lessons about his Psychic Powers. After that, if he breaks something, he usually means it.
  • The Power of Love: As per canon - though here, it conferred a fragment of the Phoenix on him as a defence mechanism. It also breaks the vicious cycle of the Dark Phoenix, calming him down.
  • Power of Trust: Bucky notes in chapter 25 of Ghosts that he's very good at using this to encourage the better natures of even people who didn't actually know that they had better natures, and encourages him to retain that trait, without being naive.
  • Power Strain Black Out: In chapter 59, and chapter 2 of Ghosts of the Past - though in the latter case, he comes to shortly after.
  • Pretty Boy: He is this at the moment, to his surprise. Will still have elements of this as a Tall, Dark, and Handsome adult, from certain angles.
  • Prince Charming: Mostly of the Adorkable variety, especially when Carol's around. Betsy Braddock even name-drops the trope.
  • Pro Human Trans Human: Occasional frustrations notwithstanding, he's very pro human. However, it could very easily go the other way...
  • Protagonist Title: He is the titular Child of the Storm.
  • Psychic-Assisted Suicide: Is easily capable of this at the extreme end of his abilities and it's one of the many reasons he's very wary of using his telepathy. In chapter 74, he nearly forces the leader of a HYDRA assault force to do this when finally pushed too far.
  • Psychic Powers: Born with vast potential for them, thanks to his mother being related to the Grey family. Until chapter 63, however, they're latent and prone to Power Incontinence. However, he rapidly masters them thereafter, which in chapter 74, he demonstrates to terrifying effect. By Ghosts, he's an almost fully fledged Omega Class psychic and as the Red Son, helped the Red Room take over about half a continent in a fortnight. In chapter 30, at a real stretch, he can telepathically reach across the Atlantic (via his connection to Carol) in his sleep. He also remarks that he's got the power to create his own Asteroid M - he just doesn't know the fine points of how. This puts him in a whole different weight class to most other psychics, which Betsy (herself a strong Alpha Class psychic) comments on. Even partially trained, he's capable of the following:
    • Astral Projection: First seen in chapter 45, performed accidentally, in his sleep. He doesn't do it again (after Forever Red, he doesn't like the idea of leaving his body) until chapter 30 of Ghosts of the Past, when he projects himself through his connection to Carol and despite his limitations, manifests an astral form capable of going hand-to-hand with a Grey Court Master Vampire. Gorakhnath later notes that this was both impressive, considering, and that it was like watching a child juggle hand-grenades.
    • Telepathy: Appears in the first chapter, though he's unaware of it, and doesn't really start using it in earnest until after chapter 60. He uses Touch Telepathy when he wants to be particularly precise. Despite his initial reluctance to learn, by Ghosts he's fairly skilled, forcing Voldemort first to use hostages, then to cut and run in two separate psychic duels. In the latter case, he didn't even get out of second gear. However, he makes very clear that he only knows the smallest fraction of what he can do with it.
    • Mind over Matter: Appears after chapter 60 and along with fire magic, becomes his default power. In chapter 8 of Ghosts of the Past he adapts it to provide tactile telekinesis and de facto Super Strength - which in chapter 42, he casually remarks would allow him to arm-wrestle the Hulk and, while he would lose, still keep his arm.
    • The Empath: Related to his telepathy, though he's far less sensitive than Diana.
    • Flight: Demonstrates it when aged up in chapters 59 and 60, and then regularly from chapter 75 onwards.
  • Psychic Radar: Though as Jean-Paul notes in Ghosts, it's not always totally reliable. Magneto helps him expand this to sense other energies, and even objects, using a variant of his telekinesis.
  • Psychotic Smirk: Occasionally develops one, though only when in a very bad mood - or when he's becoming the Dark Phoenix, and has thus gone off the deep end. It's described as being eerily reminiscent of Doctor Strange.
  • Rage Breaking Point: In chapter 74, Thor being shot serves as this to Harry, who comes very close to snapping completely and going full Magneto.
    • In Ghosts of the Past, regaining the memories of the Red Son has the same effect. Except that this time, he goes full Dark Phoenix.
  • Raging Stiffie: Occasionally alluded to, more in later chapters of the first book. As the A/N's point out, Harry is a teenage boy, after all, and surrounded by a lot of extraordinarily attractive women - this was inevitable.
  • Rags to Royalty: Very literally, and it is patently obvious that he's having trouble adjusting.
  • Rapid-Fire Fisticuffs: When he's briefly aged up and his Berserk Button has been thoroughly pressed, he unleashes a series of punches so fast that they generate their own sonic booms.
  • Raven Hair, Ivory Skin: More so in later chapters than earlier on, as he gets Progressively Prettier (justified by a better diet, expert Asgardian medical treatment and a growth spurt), verging on Tall, Dark, and Handsome.
  • Really Royalty Reveal: At the start of the fic.
  • "Reason You Suck" Speech: Develops a knack for handing out these by Ghosts. Unleashes two blistering ones towards the Avengers, Wanda, Xavier, and pretty much everyone in sight in chapter 14 after the Red Son incident, just as he snaps and goes Dark Phoenix, then another in chapter 15 at his father for much the same reason.
  • Reforged Blade: His sword undergoes this at the end of chapter 33 when Dracula uses it to skewer him through the shoulder, bathing it in Harry's unusually potent blood, and then as a lightning conductor, after Harry had just shoved a massive amount of power through it, before Strange completes the job with some deft enchantments. The result is a sword with a habit of glowing, a faintly golden-red sheen in the right light, and a sense of power about it. Loki warns that if someone other than Harry tries to pick it up without permission, it might bite. At this point, no one's entirely sure what it does (though Loki suspects that it's now a Holy Hand Grenade and compares it to the original Excalibur, in both forging and capabilities). Harry winds up naming it Curtana, at which point it develops an inscription, likely courtesy of Strange.
    For Justice, take me up. In Mercy, cast me away. I am Curtana. Wield me wisely.
  • Resurrective Immortality: Chapter 71 amply displays the Phoenix's willingness to resurrect him, but no one's exactly sure how far that goes.
  • Royal Blood: See Blue Blood.
  • Royalty Superpower: Along with the rest of the Asgardian Royal Family, though it's not immediately apparent.
  • Rugged Scar: Played straight and subverted with the scars he gets from Daken stabbing him in the heart - it fills the standard criteria being a claw mark, but its placement means that it's not usually visible and he avoids showing it off.
  • Scars Are Forever: His famous lightning bolt scar. Daken's claws also leave a permanent mark, as might Dracula's stabbing him in the shoulder and a vampire bite on his wrist.
  • Screw the Rules, I'm Doing What's Right!: Harry tends to have a very dim view of rules, especially when they get in the way of helping or protecting someone.
  • Secret Keeper: Becomes this in Ghosts: being both smart and trustworthy, he tends to both discover and be entrusted with secrets. For Carol, in regards to her being Steve's great-granddaughter; for Clark (before they met in person) after deducing his identity through Jean-Paul's secretive visits to Kansas and Smallville's weirdness; Dumbledore, who entrusts him with the details of his own Dark and Troubled Past; and Bucky, regarding his past as the Winter Soldier/faked death. The latter leads to him unwillingly having to play Truth Twister to deceive Ron who was on the warpath, having (correctly) been led to believe that the Soldier was still alive. He also deduces that Hermione's heritage, but promises Wanda that he'll keep it to himself for the moment, only telling Carol because she picked up on it through their link (something he warned Wanda would happen).
  • Seen It All: After all he's been through, by chapter 20 or so of Ghosts, he's pretty much totally unfazed by whatever comes his way. Occasionally, however, some things are absurd enough to stun even him.
  • Sensor Character: As his telepathy develops into a Psychic Radar - though it's not always reliable, as Jean-Paul points out in chapter 7 of Ghosts of the Past.
    • After Forever Red, Magneto starts training him in depth on the subject, not just in relation to his telepathic senses, but in terms of a sort of telekinetic radar, sensing matter and energy he can't see. He uses it several times, and by the First Task, he's capable of (crudely) adapting the technique for magical use (though he notes that psychometry is more Maddie's thing).
  • Shell-Shocked Veteran: Starts displaying the symptoms of textbook PTSD towards the end of Child of the Storm, then more and more as time goes by - at first to a relatively limited extent after HYDRA's attack on Hogwarts, Luna's death, and his own brief death, then to a much, much greater extent after the Forever Red arc in Ghosts. He's recovering, aided by having an actual therapist, but it's a slow process.
  • She Is Not My Girlfriend: All but quotes this trope, annoyed, in respect to Diana. Subverted in that Sirius and Tony are just suggesting that she is to tease him. More frequently has to deal with assumptions of this kind about him and Carol, which have a much stronger basis, to the point where it becomes a Running Gag. This vanishes when they get together and have The Big Damn Kiss in chapter 46 of Ghosts.
  • Shipper on Deck: When he notices that Diana and Ginny have mutual crushes, he encourages it. He also serves as one for Ron and Hermione, contemplating locking them in a room together until they get over their Belligerent Sexual Tension, and teasing them about it.
  • Shock and Awe: Develops a gift for this, to absolutely no one's surprise - it's pretty close to fire, and of course, it's In the Blood.
  • Skunk Stripe: In chapter 78 following his being possessed by Chthon, he develops a thick lock of white hair at the front of his head, much to his surprise. Mostly, it just attracts odd looks/serves as a reminder of what he's been through, but in chapter 39 of Ghosts it takes on additional significance when it's revealed that Krum saw memories of the Red Son in a Pensieve, and despite a mask and goggles, the Skunk Stripe and raw power meant that he put two and two together when saw Harry at close quarters.
  • Sleep Cute: He is semi-frequently involved in this with friends and family, especially Thor, Wanda, Jean, and particularly in Ghosts of the Past, Carol Danvers.
  • Smarter Than You Look: As Jean-Paul observes, his impulsiveness means few people realise just how clever he really is. He's highly observant, and per canon, he's good at deduction, deducing Hermione's heritage and Clark Kent's identity and location. The latter, he got merely from Jean-Paul's having been in Kansas, his reticence on the subject, and Smallville's weirdness - though Clark being an Identical Stranger helped narrow it down.
  • Snark-to-Snark Combat: Does this with most of his friends and adopted family, most especially Sirius, Tony, Diana, Hermione, and Carol. In the latter case, it's often combined with Casual Danger Dialogue and Flirting Under Fire.
  • Socially Awkward Hero: At first, as per canon. Some mentoring, encouragement, and generally increased confidence mean that he's less awkward... though still frequently Adorkable.
  • Soul Fragment: Used to have a piece of Voldemort's in him, though per Word of God, his brief death and resurrection via the Phoenix burnt it out.
  • Soul Jar: Previously was one to Voldemort, unwittingly on both counts. His brief death and resurrection removed the Soul Fragment.
  • Spanner in the Works: He specialises in this, much to Lucius' annoyance.
    • It's not exclusively a problem for the bad guys either, as shown in Ghosts - Harry's tendency to go off and do things on his own schedule (without telling anyone else) can be extremely problematic for the good guys too, even putting a hole in his own plans.
  • Squishy Wizard: To begin with, though he gets steadily less squishy as time goes on - by the time Ghosts of the Past starts up, he's Made of Iron and operating on Super Soldier level. However, this is still pretty squishy in comparison with the scale of his powers and the level his enemies are operating on.
  • Stepford Snarker: Develops into this at first as a defence mechanism, from his natural snarky tendencies, and George later notes that 'understated sarcasm' is his 'coping mechanism of choice'.
  • Stock Superpowers:
  • Strong, but Unskilled: He's a ludicrously powerful psychic, but while he's talented and learning fast, he's very, very raw, meaning Weak, but Skilled psychics can run rings around him, such as Voldemort before Harry forces him into a contest of raw power, and the Talented, but Trained Maddie Pryor squashes him like a bug when he's caught off-guard.
    • However, he's rather good at using what he does know, being able to send Voldemort running when he can't rely on hostages/batteries, and engages Maddie/Rachel on moderately even footing once he knows what he's dealing with and prolongs the fight for his own ends. Furthermore, after Forever Red, he's being tutored by, among others, Doctor Strange and Magneto. Even with this tutoring, however, he's no match for Dracula's skill, experience, and sheer power, as the Vampire Monarch brutally demonstrates. After this, he starts shading into into Talented, but Trained.
  • Stubborn Hair: As per usual. Carol enjoys ruffling it.
  • Submissive Badass: While the selection of people he will obey without question is small to begin with and only gets smaller over time, it's most apparent with Carol, for whom he is The Champion (though she's been known to flip the script).
  • Supernatural Gold Eyes: His eyes occasionally glow/flash gold. It's generally a bad sign, as it usually signifies either a bad mood or him winding up for something big.
  • Superpowered Evil Side: While not strictly more powerful than he is, Harry has a dark side that Carol characterises as the result of his repressing all the horrible experiences that should have driven him mad or dark, resulting in something that isn't quite another personality, more Harry with his conscience switched off. As a result, when this side of him is in charge, he tends to use his skills and powers far more ruthlessly and effectively. Additionally, if you ever see him wearing the colours of the Dark Phoenix and his eyes glowing white, you'll want to start running to the next galaxy. Or even the one beyond that.
    • Carol explicitly states later on in Ghosts that neither is some kind of super-powerful split personality that's going to take him over, despite his implication to Ron and Hermione that the combination of the two as the Dark Phoenix is one, and calls him out for masochistically letting them think so, pointing out that it only ever gets out if he chooses to let it out. After, he tacitly agrees with her when discussing his two 'inner demons' - the Red Son and the Dark Phoenix.
  • Superpower Lottery: By chapter 70, he's won big time.
  • Super Power Melt Down: Everyone (particularly him) is initially worried that he'll lose control of his powers and go into one that, while it's not lethal to him, will probably be lethal to everyone around him. This abates somewhat after chapter 65 or so... then after the altered second prophecy and the start of Ghosts, the worry returns, specifically that he'll go Dark Phoenix. This worry is profoundly justified.
  • Super Soldier: The Red Room think that he's the key to the next generation of these, confirmed by chapter 7 of Ghosts of the Past. He eventually more or less becomes one, going from human Squishy Wizard to Person of Mass Destruction and as the Red Son, the heir apparent to the Winter Soldier.
  • Suppressed Rage: Considering his childhood, it's unsurprising that he has an absolute shedload of this, which he locked away for obvious reasons. This is a strategy he's suggested to have followed with just about all his other negative emotions, too. Unfortunately, as Carol notes, it's festered into a rather frightening dark side, one that he refers to as one of his 'inner demons', and fuels the Dark Phoenix.
  • Talented, but Trained: He starts shading into this in Ghosts, particularly around Bloody Hell (chapter 28 onwards). Before this, he's already an Omega-class psychic, and he's been trained by Betsy Braddock and the Red Room (and even before the latter, he's capable of going up against Maddie, who's stronger than he is, far more skilled, and far more experienced, and fighting fairly evenly), also swapping tricks with Jean. He's got similar raw power with his magic, as he occasionally reminds people, which he learns at Hogwarts, as well as from Loki. Later, he gets advanced training in his powers from Doctor Strange, Magneto, and Gorakhnath. That said, the likes of Charles Xavier, who're relatively Weak, but Skilled, can still kick the psychic crap out of him.
  • Tall, Dark, and Handsome: He doesn't start out as such (Carol notes that he was short and "cute in a Hobbity sort of way" when they first met), but... see Hunk. He grows into it.
  • Technician vs. Performer: He's most definitely a Performer - he makes his strategies up on the fly and a defining trait of said strategies is that they're Crazy Enough to Work.
  • Teens Are Short: Starts out as this, a Tiny School Boy, but by chapter 59, he's done considerable catching up. By Ghosts, he's around Carol's height - 5'10.''
  • Terror Hero: Develops into The Dreaded towards at the start of Ghosts, thanks to his extraordinary exploits, fears that he'll become the Dark Phoenix again, and a PTSD-induced Hair-Trigger Temper. Dracula notes that he scares serious supernatural heavyweights, and that as one professional to another, he respects that. That doesn't mean he shares that fear, however. Harry doesn't like it very much, and he tries to ameliorate it after a Cedric Diggory inspired Jerkass Realization. However, he's also willing to use it when it suits him, becoming The Intimidator after Forever Red, throwing in a little of The Master of Illusion too when faking a Phoenix manifestation with Jean and Maddie to scare Dracula. It even works when he's in disguise, as Clark notes uneasily in chapter 56 of Ghosts, when a disguised Harry effortlessly scares a barman with limited magical talent into coughing up vital information with little more than words (implying he's involved with the White Council) and physical contact, which brings their respective auras into contact - and gives the barman a sense of what he's dealing with.
  • There Was a Door: Harry has a tendency to make dramatic entrances, as is lampshaded in Ghosts. His lofty response is that it "makes an impression."
  • Thinking Up Portals: Via a Sling Ring in Ghosts.
  • Throwing Your Sword Always Works: It does, at least once, when he throws it into a training dummy and is sufficient to impress watching Asgardians. However, he did have to magically sharpen it first and was noticeably relieved when it did work - he quite clearly expected to fail. And, you know, demigod. And latent Omega Class telekinetic.
  • Thou Shalt Not Kill: Keeps/is kept to this, particularly after chapter 70, partly because he's psychologically unstable enough as it is from PTSD and Survivor's Guilt without adding more fuel to the fire. This is a large part of why his time as the Red Son left him so furious that he was willing to become the Dark Phoenix.
  • Took a Level in Badass: He takes several.
    • By chapter 34 of Child of the Storm, he's throwing swords into targets and saving Fire-Forged Friends from the Disir with an Indy Ploy, and by chapter 59, he's capable of one-shotting reasonably powerful monsters under highly adverse conditions.
    • By chapter 70, he's a One-Man Army capable of almost singlehandedly crushing a heavily armed HYDRA attack force full of trained Agents and combat wizards primarily concerned with killing him and only lost because he lost his temper and grabbed the Idiot Ball. In chapter 74, he's capable of stopping 'hundreds, thousands' of bullets in mid-air with no effort, before effortlessly disarming a HYDRA attack force and nearly forcing the leader, who took a child hostage, to commit suicide. Very shortly after, during the Final Battle of Book 1 (chapters 76-78) he grinds Daken into paste, telekinetically rips out Gravemoss' heart and blasts him several miles away (in combination with Carol's Green Lantern Ring), uses two skyscraper sized zombie giants' remains as a vast and disgusting cannonball against HYDRA's Dreadnought and caps it by, with his mother and father's help, winning in a Battle in the Center of the Mind against Chthon, kicking him out of the material world and with his mother and grandfather's help, fixing all the mess caused by Chthon's entrance.
    • By chapter 53 of Ghosts, he's capable of:
      • Matching far more skilled and experienced psychics, such as Voldemort and Maddie Pryor in mental duels and winning all but one outright, and achieving a draw and a tactical victory in the latter.
      • Adapting his Psychic Powers to simulate Flying Brick powers - on the fly, while carrying a broken arm. This impresses both Sinister and Maddie Pryor, both older and far more skilled psychics, the latter (who is also more powerful) admitting that she never even considered using her powers like that. Similarly, she's later dumbfounded when they duel and he instantly copies her move of infusing lightning with psychic power, but with fire instead.
      • Telepathically simulating the aura of the Dark Phoenix well enough to deceive someone who'd encountered the entity in question, performing Astral Projection (untrained) in his sleep across the Atlantic and manifesting an Astral Form capable of going toe to toe with a powerful Grey Court Master, and levitating the Durmstrang ship, which weighs over 6,000 tons and is well out of his line of sight, flying it in figures of eight while inspecting his fingernails. He also speculates - and no one denies - that he has the power (but not the knowledge) to create his own Asteroid M (3/4's the size of Hogwarts) on Earth and lift it into orbit.
      • Related to the above, he's operating at Super Soldier Plus levels after Forever Red, and becomes a more than competent Magic Knight thanks to a mixture of Red Son memories and Asgardian enhanced muscle memory combined with tuition from the Avengers, Bucky, and Fandral. The latter leads to him having the edge on Uhtred - a noted prodigy - with a sword by chapter 50 (though it's noted as not being Uhtred's favoured weapon). It also helps make him a very competent ballroom dancer.
      • Significant magical sensitivity, and rounded magical skills (i.e. he no longer simply resorts to Kill It with Fire), demonstrating competence with other elements, talent at illusion magic, and mastery of the Sling Ring. He can also focus on multiple spells at once.
      • With some help from MI13 and Thor, as well as a set of armour from Tony (which explicitly has no weapons systems beyond Harry himself), he takes on and defeats an Elder Wyrm in a duel during the First Task. This involves surviving orbital re-entry, the conditions of the Earth's core (albeit with difficulty) and the upper atmosphere, before winning a brutal Free-Fall Fight. And a mere few weeks later, he tops this off by going mind to mind with Surtur, the original Dark Phoenix, and forcing a draw (and a psychological victory). Even considering that Surtur's power was limited by reaching through time and a scrying bowl to get at Harry, and that Harry is somewhat inoculated to Phoenix fire, this is the force that when similarly limited has still incinerated the bodies and minds of armies of Asgardians.
  • Took a Level in Cynic: Takes a few throughout Child of the Storm, then takes a whopping great one in Ghosts of the Past, following the Forever Red arc, though mitigated when he Took a Level in Idealism after the Bloody Hell arc, developing into The Anti-Nihilist.
    • Played for Laughs in chapter 22 of Ghosts, when his immediate reaction to 'Bach'/Strange's advice to go in, have a big dinner and get some sleep is to assume that something horrible is going to happen the next day.
  • Took a Level in Jerkass/Took a Level in Kindness: Takes the former after the Forever Red arc in Ghosts of the Past leaves him a traumatised wreck with a Hair-Trigger Temper, and takes the latter after he has a Heel Realisation following Cedric Diggory's gentle What the Hell, Hero? in chapter 22. He takes another level in kindness at the end of chapter 26, going out of his way to help someone else rather than being helped for the first time in a while. Even so, however, his baseline is still a bit grumpier than before.
  • Trademark Favourite Food: He has his canonical taste for treacle tart.
  • Tragic Keepsake: His mother's brooch.
  • Tranquil Fury: In chapter 74 of CoS, doing much to evoke Magneto. It reappears in chapter 76, as well as several chapters of Ghosts of the Past, and is generally a good sign that Harry's about to do something scary.
    • He spends a good half of chapter 32 of Ghosts in this state, something typified by his response to one moderately powerful speechifying vampire.
  • Troubling Un Childlike Behaviour: Prone to this more and more as time goes on, particularly in chapter 70 of CoS, and after Forever Red in Ghosts, to the disturbance of McGonagall. Part of this, as he notes to Carol in chapter 34 of Ghosts, is that after all he's been through, he's now somewhat numb to potential threats and more or less unfazed by potential threats - though entirely aware that he's far from invincible, the sheer number of near-death (and actual death) experiences he's undergone mean that he's verging on Seen It All (though there are some things so absurd that they're exceptions to this rule, which are usually Played for Laughs). It's particularly striking when he interacts with Clark - who, powers aside, is a fairly normal teenager - from chapter 54 of Ghosts onwards.
    • All in all, it gets to the point where him actually acting his age in chapter 47 of Ghosts is met with genuine astonishment by his classmates.
  • True Sight: He can and has used this once or twice - though doesn't usually because you never forget what you see.
  • "Uh-Oh" Eyes: The colour his eyes are is an excellent barometer for how much trouble you're in. Green's the baseline, and means you're probably fine. If his eyes are glowing gold for more than, say, 5 seconds, you're in trouble. If they're glowing red, or red-gold, you're kind of screwed. If they're glowing white, there are no words to adequately describe how screwed you are.
  • The Unfettered: Briefly slips into this in chapters 14 and 15 of Ghosts of the Past, when he snaps and becomes the Dark Phoenix. It appears again in chapter 32, briefly, when he dismembers a vampiric Dudley.
  • Unhappy Medium: From time to time, after his telepathic powers come in.
  • Unstoppable Rage: In chapter 70 of CoS, channelling the Tenth Doctor in the process. Daken stops it and then the Phoenix possesses him and promptly goes absolutely berserk.
    • Also in chapters 14 and 15 of Ghosts of the Past when he snaps and becomes the Dark Phoenix.
  • Uptown Guy: Even more so after becoming royalty. It rather bemuses him, considering that he grew up kept in a cupboard and half-starved.
  • Use Your Head: Learns this from Sif, and uses it in chapter 7 of Ghosts of the Past.
  • Unwilling Roboticization: In Ghosts, thanks to Essex's Transmode Virus giving the Red Son a One-Winged Angel form and compounding his resemblance to Cable (or Nate Grey, if one counts his Earth X counterpart). It's temporary, but he's understandably extremely unhappy about it, and in chapter 54, it's shown that he's still got issues over it.
  • Vengeance Feels Empty: He comes to realise that while vengeance feels good in the moment, it tends to feel empty at best after the initial euphoria wears off. This doesn't mean that he stops finding it tempting, however.
  • Vitriolic Best Buds: To an extent with Jean-Paul, and with Carol - though in the latter case it's tempered by really-absolutely-definitely-not-flirting. After his return to Hogwarts in the second book, he goes back to this with Hermione, as well.
  • Warrior Prince: Develops into this in the latter part of Child of the Storm, and properly in Ghosts, like his father.
  • The Watson: Is usually the one to whom various things are explained, though he sometimes does the explaining instead, especially in the sequel.
  • What If God Was One of Us?: Initially, he's primarily The Self-Denouncer, because while he's technically a demigod, he doesn't want/think he should be elevated above others, before evolving into a mixture of The Saviour and The Reluctant Messiah in the sequel - unlike the former, he's reluctant to bear the mantle of Messiah and would really prefer people didn't worship him. Unlike the latter, he believes that With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility (he just doesn't like it very much).
  • Well-Intentioned Extremist: See Young Conqueror. It scares him and everyone else.
  • Weirdness Magnet: Most definitely, which makes the Magnetic Hero thing very useful, especially before most of his powers kick in. He even lampshades it to Hank McCoy in the first book:
    The more powerful I get, actually or just potentially - and mostly just potentially - the more people try and kill me in new and interesting ways. Don't get me wrong, I love having a family and the Avengers. I love being a wizard too. But I could do without the near-death experience every few months.
    • By Ghosts, he's more or less unfazed by it - though annoyed by/bitter about the Doom Magnet aspects.
  • When All You Have Is a Hammer...: He starts as a Guile Hero, but becomes this towards end of the first book, with the power to demolish most opponents outright. As a result, he doesn't develop his offensive repertoire beyond Playing with Fire, energy blasts in general, and some martial arts. Then he goes up against Daken, who has a powerful Healing Factor and the smarts to goad him into grabbing the Idiot Ball. After a very painful Near-Death Experience ( or rather, Actual Death Experience, but the Phoenix/his mother resurrected him and went on a rampage) in chapter 70, he starts engaging his brain again, broadens his skills, evolving into a much more dangerous, highly creative fully-fledged Magic Knight in the sequel. That said, he still tends to default to fire magic or telekinesis, because those two abilities come mostly naturally to him.
  • When He Smiles: He's noted to have an absolutely lovely smile, one that a) makes him look very much like Jean, b) briefly wipes away all the cynicism and suffering, making him look like an ordinary teenager.
  • Wide-Eyed Idealist: Painfully subverted. He starts out as one, and a Knight In Shining Armour to boot, one of whom Godric Gryffindor would be proud. However, he gets steadily more cynical as time goes on, though retains elements of this.... until the Forever Red arc, when the Dulcinea Effect and his Chronic Hero Syndrome finally get the better of him. He eventually settles on something like The Anti-Nihilist.
  • Willfully Weak: He starts off favouring standard fire blasts, telekinetic blasts, or even hand-to-hand combat over more efficient and effective uses of his powers, maintaining a degree of this even in Ghosts after he becomes much more of a Combat Pragmatist. It gets to the point of Obfuscating Stupidity, where some characters (e.g. Ron) think that that's all he can do, because he doesn't use the more... creative potential applications of his powers. More observant characters (Hermione) point out that just because he doesn't use them doesn't mean that he can't. As it happens, he is abundantly aware of what he can do, usually holding back. When he's angry enough to stop playing nice, the results are brief and usually messy.
  • Willing Channeler: Lets the Phoenix/his mother briefly possess him in chapter 58 to protect him by intimidating the hell out of Hera, then again in chapter 76, allowing her to have a brief chat with Chthon and briefly sever his connection to Gravemoss.
    • Then, he does so for far darker purposes in chapter 14 of Ghosts of the Past after finally being pushed too far: he embraces the Phoenix fragment within him to become the Dark Phoenix. The results are not half as pretty as the first couple of times.
  • Wise Beyond Their Years: On better days, by the end of Child of the Storm. Usually ends up walking the line between this and Troubling Unchildlike Behaviour. In Ghosts, it tilts sharply into the latter, before drifting back to the former.
  • The Wise Prince: Seems to be steadily evolving into this trope, cynicism and struggles with his darker side notwithstanding.
  • Worf Had the Flu: The Red Room invoke this trope by forcing him into a Power Limiter so that he can't just beat Dudley into a pulp. Once he figures out a way around it, though, he does so anyway.
    • When Syrus kidnaps Carol, Harry would have blasted him to pieces if not for the fact that he had to project his astral form through her from the other side of the Atlantic.
  • "World of Cardboard" Speech: Delivers a short (and chilling) one in chapter 74.
    I AM LIFE. I AM FIRE. NOW AND FOREVER... I. AM. PHOENIX!
    • Later, while venting to Bucky, Ron, and Hermione, he exclaims that he lives in a "world of glass," though the trope is played with somewhat in that, in this case, he's trying to avoid breaking anything and is discussing how easy it would be for him to break something or someone accidentally.
  • Xanatos Gambit: Comes up with a clever one off the top of his head in chapter 9 of Ghosts of the Past - he's locked into a psychic duel with Maddie/Rachel, and while he's got very little chance of winning, if he does, great. If he doesn't, though, something that's far more likely since she's way stronger and more skilled than he is, he's powerful enough and good enough to prolong the duel and make an awful lot of psychic noise, so the Avengers can home in. It works like a charm (more or less)... right up until his impulsiveness means that he serves as the Spanner in the Works for his own plan.
  • Xanatos Speed Chess: Develops a knack for this by Ghosts - see Xanatos Gambit. Unfortunately, this tied in with his habit of not informing friends and allies of what he's going to do next, and an in-built knack for being the Spanner in the Works, means that he often derails everyone's plans - even his own.
  • Young Conqueror: He has all the hallmarks of this, as noticed by much of the cast. All of them note that while he could be the next Captain America, a hero among heroes, he has the intelligence, charisma, experience of the dark side of humanity and hatred of injustice to become the next Magneto - and potentially considerably more dangerous than the original. Part of his character arc leads to him noticing this in chapter 61 of CoS and rejecting it with a little help from his friends. Offers of We Can Rule Together in the sequel tend to be met with mocking laughter (though by that point, he has related, but different issues).
  • Younger Than They Look: Develops into this, with chapter 57 of CoS noting that he could easily pass for fifteen or sixteen and that he's starting to attract the Female Gaze.
    • Hermione notes by chapter 7 of Ghosts of the Past that he looks closer to 18 than 14 (and acts it, most of the time). The white streak in his fringe helps, as does the fact that his body spent six months working for the Red Room shortly after, meaning that his body aged while his mind didn't.
    • This is discussed in chapter 39 of Ghosts, with both Betsy and Strange noting that for all Harry's maturity and apparent physical ageing, in a number of ways he is still just/barely more than a kid.
  • Your Mind Makes It Real: This happens in Chapter 66 and takes on a whole new meaning when an Omega class psychic is involved.
Top

How well does it match the trope?

Example of:

/

Media sources:

/

Report