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    Andalites in general 

  • Alternate Animal Affection: Well, alien rather than animal. Since they don't have mouths, Andalites kiss with their hands, particularly their palms.
  • Armies Are Evil: The Andalite military is overloaded with Colonel Kilgore and General Ripper types, and enforces brutal honor codes on its troops while promoting a "warrior pride" ideal that institutionalizes xenophobia, sexism, and ableism. Andalite civilians from the final book are noted to lack the "arrogant Andalite" characterization that has become a stereotype, and the Electorate generally seems to mean well. Individual soldiers, such as Elfangor and the commander in Book #18 are often decent men, but the army as a whole is not good people.
  • Beware My Stinger Tail: Downplayed in the case of Andalite females, who have shorter, blunter tail blades than Andalite males, "more like scalpels than scythes". But you do not want to get in the way of any Andalite tail blades, they're all too good at chopping heads off, as Visser Three often likes to demonstrate.
  • Claustrophobia: A side effect of evolving from herd animals who live on open grasslands, occasionally used against them. Andalite spaceships include a large "Dome" area that mimics their natural habitat in order to mitigate this.
  • Fantastic Racism: And Fantastic Sexism, and Fantastic Ableism, and... Look, the Andalites are not very enlightened about these sorts of things for a higher-tech species, though they at least seem to have gotten over racism towards other kinds of Andalite.
  • No Mouth: Andalites instead have three vertical slits that serves as a nose, and either osmose nutrients through their hooves or outright eat through them.
  • Our Centaurs Are Different: Four hooved legs, scorpion tail, thin upper body, No Mouth.
  • Telepathic Spacemen: Having no mouth, they have to do this.
  • Wide-Eyed Idealist: When Tobias morphs an Andalite for the first time, he's flabbergasted to realize that the strongest of their natural instincts is optimism. Ax, who was somewhat amused and apparently waiting for it, explains that a lot of Andalite culture is about learning to temper that optimism. It is this instinct for optimism and working to make the best of things that restores hope to the jaded Ellimist partway through The Ellimist Chronicles.

    Prince Elfangor-Sirinial-Shamtul 

Prince Elfangor-Sirinial-Shamtul

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/anelfangor_6039.gif
Debut: Animorphs #1: The Invasion (1996)

You are one in a legion of great warriors. Valiant Andalites who have died for freedom. Your lineage is courage and bravery. If you live, you carry our torch. A burden carried by many. A singular honor. . . .



An Andalite general, military genius and war hero, Elfangor was made a household name for his contributions to the Andalite-Yeerk war effort. Though this was not generally known amongst his own people, he spent a great deal of time on Earth permanently morphed as a human; a sort of self-imposed exile after a miscalculation led to the infestation of his superior officer, Alloran. His longstanding and well-known subsequent rivalry with Visser Three ended with his death at the hands of the latter after a battle in Earth's orbit, though not before he was able to give the morphing power to Jake and his friends.
  • The Ace: Amazing fighter pilot, clever strategist, great personal combatant, and, in an army of brutal honor codes and ingrained prejudices, a genuinely kind, caring, compassionate person to andalite and non-andalite alike, without discrimination.
  • Always Someone Better: From Ax's perspective.
  • Aloof Big Brother: Wasn't around for much of Ax's childhood, as he was making a name for himself in the war.
  • Animorphism: He has morphing power, but didn't use it as often as the Animorphs. This inexperience with it may have been what allowed his death, as the more experienced Animorphs frequently healed from worse injuries than his.
  • Back from the Dead: Subverted twice. In an alternate Yeerk-controlled future, Jake is surprised to run into Elfangor, but it turns out to be Tobias as a nothlit in Ax's decade-older body. The second time, during Tobias' torture by Taylor, he hears Elfangor's voice in his head and starts seeing his memories somehow passed down genetically.
  • Been There, Shaped History: In the third half of The Andalite Chronicles, he mentions giving some programming tips to his human friends Bill and Steve.
  • Big Brother Mentor: To Ax
  • Broken Pedestal: Elfangor's reputation precedes him, even after death, and it's initially believed by everyone that Elfangor was the perfect warrior and, from Jake's perspective, the perfect leader, someone to emulate. It becomes apparent, though, that his reputation is the result of misplaced idolization and Andalite propaganda, and that, like the kids, he made mistakes while doing the best he could. He was however an exceptional Badass and a War Hero, Visser One later states that no other singular Andalite hurt the Yeerks as much as he did. His name has practically become a curse word to the Yeerks. Jake is particularly crushed to find out what Elfangor was really like behind all the propaganda and hero worshio:
    Jake: It's all your fault! I used to see you as a hero, Elfangor. A leader. But the truth is you just couldn't see another way out! You sentenced us to hardship and pain and suffering. We were just kids! You made us question every value we had ever learned! You had no right to heap that weight on us, huge and impossible. You used us!
  • Cruel and Unusual Death / Eaten Alive: Visser Three doesn't just kill him, but morphs into an Antarean Bogg and eats him.
  • Disappeared Dad: To Tobias
  • Do Not Go Gentle: While mortally wounded and facing Visser Three, Elfangor dies on his feet, striking at the Visser with his tail blade even as the Visser morphs into an Antarean Bogg and devours him.
  • Early Installment Weirdness: During his first appearance he talks as if he is unfamiliar with human culture and sees Visser Three only as a dangerous Yeerk leader. As seen in The Andalite Chronicles, he in fact spent years as a human and is very familiar with Esplin 9466.
  • Going Native: With humans in The Andalite Chronicles.
  • Heartbroken Badass: After the Ellimist removes him from his life and family on earth and returns him to the war.
  • Heroic Sacrifice: Gave up his human life to return to his people and save them from a Yeerk ambush.
  • Honor Before Reason: In The Andalite Chronicles. Thanks to Arbron's influence he does lighten up a bit.
  • Humans Through Alien Eyes: In The Andalite Chronicles.
  • I Am Dying Please Take My Macguffin: He starts off the series by handing the morphing cube to the kids.
  • In the Blood: Going Native on earth seems to run in Elfangor and Ax's family
  • Interspecies Romance: With Loren in the backstory. Almost immediately after meeting this strange bipedal alien he's fascinated and delighted by her, and this just never stops.
  • Like Father, Like Son: He fights the Yeerks, becomes a nothlit at one point, has this reversed by the Ellimist, falls in loves with a spirited blonde Action Girl… His son Tobias later follows in his footsteps.
  • Luke, I Am Your Father: Tobias is actually his son.
  • Maybe Magic, Maybe Mundane: He appears in a vision to Tobias in The Illusion where he soothes his son's pain with a tail blade on his forehead and encourages him to carry on with the quote detailed above. When Tobias tells Ax about this, he tells his nephew that his experience is eerily reminiscent of an ancient Andalite belief called Utzum, which postulated that certain genetic memories could be passed through DNA by Andalite medicine men which would be seen in an Andalite's dying moments to ease their passage. It's never made clear whether this is the case, or whether Elfangor was reaching out to Tobias from the beyond in some more tangible way, or if it really was just a feverish hallucination brought on by Taylor's torture.
  • My God, What Have I Done?: After he kills a bunch of Hork-Bajir in battle and then again when he realizes he's responsible for Alloran being infested.
  • My Species Doth Protest Too Much: Andalites have a tendency to be hierarchical and xenophobic, convinced in their own superiority and not caring all that much about alien lives. Elfangor delights in humans and human culture. He defies a superior's order to kill helpless enemies, without agonizing over questioning authority the way Ax later does, and decides Andalites can't be trusted with the Time Matrix. At the end of his life he breaks the law of Seerow's Kindness and also sends the kids courage and tells them that the Hork-Bajir are good people to be pitied for their enslavement.
  • Nice Job Breaking It, Hero!: Accidentally helped the then Sub-Visser Seven hijack Alloran's body.
  • Names to Run Away from Really Fast: The Yeerks come to know him as "Beast Elfangor."
  • One-Shot Character: His only present-day appearance is in The Invasion, but he does get an entire Chronicles book dedicated to his past in The Andalite Chronicles, and hallucinations/visions of him crop up in both The Illusion and The Familiar, which may or may not classify him for Recurring Character status.
  • Papa Wolf: Fights to protect the son he never met.
  • Posthumous Character: His actions created the Animorphs, motivated his younger brother, and served as a light to the Andalites and threat to the Yeerks even after his death.
  • Pursued Protagonist: The future Visser Three chases him down relentless throughout The Andalite Chronicles, and ultimately up to his death.
  • Rebuilt Pedestal: Despite everything, some of the Animorphs, including Ax and Tobias, ultimately come to accept that, while Elfangor wasn't a perfect, flawless paragon, he was still a good and heroic person who made the galaxy a better place.
  • Shapeshifter Mode Lock: Eventually reversed by the Ellimist (who, ironically, later did the same for Elfangor's son).
  • Starcrossed Lovers: With Loren. He dies without her ever remembering him.
  • Straight Man and Wise Guy: He's the Straight Man to Arbron's and Loren's wise guy
  • Sue Donym: While on Earth, he takes the name of Alan Fangor.
  • Super Empowering: He gave the Animorphs their powers.
  • Taught by Experience: His first scene in The Andalite Chronicles consists of him training to tailfight and doing poorly against an old instructor. In actual battle he turns out to be a natural with his tail.
  • Take Up My Sword: Asks the kids to.
  • Warrior Prince: Literally. In Andalite culture, 'Prince' is a military rank and not a title.
  • Wide-Eyed Idealist: At the beginning of The Andalite Chronicles.
  • Worthy Opponent: It's revealed in The Pretender that Visser Three eventually came to regard him this way.
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     War-Prince Alloran-Semitur-Corass 

War-Prince Alloran-Semitur-Corass

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/anvisserthree_6172.gif
Debut: Animorphs #1: The Invasion (1996, as Visser Three's host), Animorphs #8: The Alien (1997, first full appearance)

I will forever be Alloran, Butcher of the Hork-Bajir. Alloran, the only Andalite to ever be taken alive by Yeerks. But disgraced, even despised, for whatever I am worth, I am yours to command.



Visser Three's host, and formerly Elfangor's commanding officer. Perhaps the best example of the ruthless mentality of the Andalite military, Alloran was infamous even before becoming the only Andalite to ever be taken by a Yeerk. Shunned and hated by even his own people, he becomes more humble and pacifistic during his time as Visser Three's slave.
  • Animorphism: Alloran has a whole host of horrific morphs at his command thanks to the Visser.
  • The Atoner: After he's freed, the sheer melancholy as he flatly states that he'll have to live with what he's done and being forever known as the only Andalite ever taken as a Controller makes it very likely he'll become one of these.
  • Break the Haughty: Years of enslavement by one of the most evil Yeerks ever to live, watching himself forced to commit atrocity after atrocity and living with the shame of being the only Andalite ever made into a controller pretty much beat all the pride and arrogance out of him forever, and at least some of the Fantastic Racism.
  • Cynical Mentor: To Elfangor and Arbron in The Andalite Chronicles.
  • Death Seeker: In The Alien he begs Ax to kill him.
  • Destructive Savior: Aldrea lampshades it. "Will you save the Hork-Bajir by destroying them?"
  • Fate Worse than Death: He's a Controller for nearly twenty-five years. Even worse, he's got Visser Three controlling him, one of the most evil Yeerks of them all.
  • General Ripper: In The Hork-Bajir Chronicles. He tried to wipe out the Hork-Bajir once he realized they couldn't be saved from the Yeerks. By The Andalite Chronicles he has less authority, but still seeks to kill helpless opponents.
  • Genius Bruiser: Downplayed. There are smarter characters, there are stronger characters, but he's both smart and dangerous. Even aside from his tailblade and willingness to fight dirty, he's got a lot of horrible morphs, and The Beginning proves that he can think very quickly even when concussed.
  • Heel–Face Turn: When the Andalites threaten to destroy Earth in order to contain the Yeerks, and Ax is told he is too low-ranking to challenge the officer's decision, the recently freed Alloran takes up the challenge for him. The Andalite officers promptly reconsider, thus sparing earth. Not bad for an ex-General Ripper.
  • Hidden Depths: He makes some strangely poetic turns of phrase and designed his own Cool Ship, suggesting he's more than the General Ripper he first appears to be.
  • I Call It "Vera": He calls his beautifully-designed personal ship the Jahar, after his wife.
  • I Cannot Self-Terminate: See Death Seeker above. After begging Ax to kill him he tried to turn his tail on himself, but was too weak from being envenomated.
  • It Never Gets Any Easier: After leading Elfangor and Arbron into their first battle, the first time they kill anyone, he curbs his impatience at their shock and tells them yes, it's hard, and it never gets easy.
  • Motive Rant: He gives Elfangor one in The Andalite Chronicles, regarding having to cross lines to beat the yeerks and defending his use of a quantum virus against the hork bajir.
  • One-Man Army: He still has all of the morphs he acquired while infested by Visser Three. You want to throw down with him? Be our guest.
  • Pet the Dog: With Arbron and Loren at various points in the Andalite Chronicles, showing that he's not all bad deep down, and adding pathos to that horrible moment when it's revealed Visser Three is within him.
  • Proud Warrior Race Guy: Though he's more vicious about it than many. In the final book, after escaping the enslavement of Visser One, Alloran has been humbled but retains enough edge to prove a cunning and deadly effective ally, both in combat and in Andalite politics.
  • Recurring Character: As Visser Three's host, one could call Alloran arguably a main character of the series, though the number of times we see him free of Esplin's influence can be counted on one hand. He is first met in The Alien, when the Animorphs force Esplin to momentarily abandon his body and we realize how broken he is in the present day. From there he features in both The Andalite Chronicles (as a main character) and The Hork-Bajir Chronicles (as a secondary character later in the book), both of which detail his past and explain how he got to where he is today. Finally he is freed of Esplin in the last book of the series, The Beginning.
  • Redemption Earns Life: Well, life and freedom from an alien Puppeteer Parasite in his case.
  • The Scapegoat: By The Andalite Chronicles he's been disgraced as the Butcher of Hork-Bajir, responsible for the Quantum Virus, in a way that suggests he went rogue and was the sole responsible party. He even tries to justify its use in a rant partway through the book, surprising Elfangor and implying a cover-up. But it's clear from The Hork-Bajir Chronicles that development of the virus was an effort made by many Andalites in tandem and may have been officially sanctioned, that he supervised the project but was not actually responsible for the release of the virus. Given that Andalite forces later attempt similar tactics - his brother tries to use a new Quantum Virus, the fleet plans to raze Earth - it seems like he should fit right in.
  • Synthetic Plague: In The Hork-Bajir Chronicles this is his secret weapon.
  • Used to Be a Sweet Kid: No, really. From the short description he sounded almost like Arbron or Marco - the captain who was an aristh with him says he was gentle and funny.
  • Warrior Prince: Literally. In Andalite culture, 'Prince' is a military rank and not a title.
  • Well-Intentioned Extremist: Thought that exterminating the Hork-Bajir was the only way to save the galaxy from the Yeerks, as it would deny them their most useful and dangerous host bodies. The worst part is, he might have been right.

     Arbron 

Arbron

Debut: The Andalite Chronicles (1997)

Aristh...I mean, Warrior Arbron is a casualty of war.



One of Elfangor's fellow cadets from his days with Alloran. Gets trapped in Taxxon morph partway through The Andalite Chronicles.
  • And I Must Scream: Trapped in Taxxon morph.
  • Animorphism: It doesn't end well for him.
  • Back for the Finale: First appears in The Andalite Chronicles (which is set before the series and was released early on in the series), then reappears in the second-to-last book, The Answer.
  • Big Creepy-Crawlies: Trapped in Taxxon morph.
  • Dark Is Not Evil: A pretty striking example. He's trapped as a giant, cannibalistic centipede. He's one of the good guys.
  • Deadpan Snarker: A rarity among the Andalites.
  • Dropped a Bridge on Him: Survives a couple of decades as a Taxxon, which in itself is pretty bloody awesome, and turns up to fight on Earth in the series finale. Then after the war, he gets shot and killed by poachers. Go figure. Although Cassie's narration implies that this may have been more Driven to Suicide or No Place for Me There, since Arbron's role as protector as the Taxxons is ended by that point, as all Taxxons have morphed into giant snakes to escaped their Horror Hunger.
  • Enemy Mine: In The Answer he returns, having allied himself with Tom of all people.
  • Extreme Omnivore: Taxxons can eat and digest pretty much anything.
  • Fire-Forged Friends: With Elfangor.
  • First-Name Basis: Arbron is the only Andalite character whose full name is never revealed.
  • Foil: To Elfangor; he'll crack jokes and is pretty easygoing, in contrast to Elfangor's more serious nature.
  • Going Native: Although he retains his sense of morality.
  • Hive Mind: He joins forces with the Living Hive, a kind of Taxxon queen.
  • Horror Hunger: When in Taxxon morph.
  • La Résistance: Joins, of all things, the Taxxon resistance in order to get back at the Yeerks.
  • No One Gets Left Behind: Elfangor tries desperately to get him to come along with he and Alloran when they leave the Taxxon planet. Arbron refuses.
  • Only One Name: Unlike every other Andalite, we never learn Arbon's full name. He probably has one since three names is Andalite convention, but as far as readers ever know he's just... Arbron.
  • Pet the Dog: Alloran's promotion of him is pretty touching.
  • Recurring Character: After looking like a One-Shot Character for most of the series, he made a surprise reappearance in The Answer and got a token namedrop in the final book of the series, The Beginning.
  • Shapeshifter Mode Lock: Trapped as a Taxxon. Even after the good Taxxons on Earth become anaconda nothlits, there's no hope for him to join them because he already is a nothlit.
  • Unexpected Character: Let's face it, no one was really expecting him to return in the finale the way he did.

     Prince Seerow 

Prince Seerow

Debut: Animorphs #8: The Alien (1997, mentioned), The Hork-Bajir Chronicles (1998, full appearance)

The Yeerks were so fascinating. Highly intelligent, yet so limited physically. It's as if the Hork-Bajir are the exact opposite: physically impressive. Mentally . . . well, simple.



An Andalite Prince who led expeditions to other planets. Once a highly revered leader, he became forever known as a fool after he gave space faring technology to the newly discovered Yeerks. His disastrous actions led to the Andalite Navy passing the law of Seerow's Kindness.
  • Extreme Doormat: By the time he and his family arrive on the Hork-Bajir world he has become this, passively enduring the open contempt and insults his fellow Andalites heap upon him. And heap it they do.
  • The Farmer and the Viper: In hindsight, giving advanced weapons and ships to a species that parasitically takes over hosts wasn't all that great an idea.
  • Gone Horribly Wrong: All he wanted was for all species to travel through the stars together. Instead he unwittingly unleashed the parasitic Yeerk Empire upon the galaxy.
  • Happily Married: Seerow is a married Andalite, and while his wife is never named, the fact that she stuck by him after his disgrace and doesn't resent him the way his children do speaks volumes about her personality. For his part, he's affectionate with her, and as they are both scientists at heart they share common interests.
  • Heroic B So D: He's a broken man by the time of the main body of The Hork-Bajir Chronicles and never really recovers before his death.
  • Nice Job Breaking It, Hero!: And as a result, he became known as the shame of the Andalite people.
  • Not Quite the Right Thing: Starts off the Yeerk-Andalite war. However decades later Cassie tries the same thing, and thanks to everyone being a bit older and wiser, Seerow's hopes actually become a reality.
    • What Cassie does is give the Yeerks morphing. If Seerow had done that, they might not have even considered parasitic conquest, since they would not have needed to infest other sentient beings. Perhaps, cruel irony, he didn't even have access to it at the time, or simply didn't think of it, given how new and novel the morphing tech is in The Hork-Bajir Chronicles.
  • One-Shot Character: Despite his name being infrequently mentioned in the series itself, Prince Seerow's only appearance is in The Hork-Bajir Chronicles.
  • Posthumous Character: His actions kicked off almost all the plot, and the law bearing his name becomes increasingly relevant in regards to the Animorphs, who were illegally given their powers. Sadly, though, he's been dead for some thirty odd years by the time we're "introduced" to him.
  • Prime Directive: The Law of Seerow's Kindness states no Andalite should give their advanced technology to less advanced species. Because that went horribly wrong when tech was given to the Yeerks.
  • Too Good for This Sinful Earth: He's an anomaly in the Andalite military, being an officer with a generous and idealistic personality, and while he's not completely pure (he does have a smidgen of the classic Andalite arrogance in regards to less intellectual race, as seen by his disinterest in the Hork-Bajir), the Yeerks are largely right when they call him "the one good Andalite". At the least, he's one of a rare handful of them who isn't a Jerkass.
  • Your Approval Fills Me with Shame: The Yeerks consider him "the one good Andalite." Their actions indirectly lead to his death and turn his daughter into a rebel thorn in their side for years.

     Aldrea-Iskillion-Falan 

Aldrea-Iskillion-Falan

Debut: The Hork-Bajir Chronicles (1998)

No, I won't help you to understand. But I will help you kill Yeerks. That, I will do. I will help you kill them. And kill them. And kill them! And kill them all!



The daughter of the infamous Prince Seerow and heroine of the Hork-Bajir Chronicles. She makes a guest reappearance in The Prophecy.
  • Action Girl: Big time. She and Dak are the leaders of the Hork-Bajir resistance.
  • Animorphism: Notably, the tech is new and novel in her time.
  • Back from the Dead: In The Prophecy, sort of.
  • Break the Cutie: In the first fifty pages of The Hork-Bajir Chronicles she loses her pride, her home and her entire family.
  • Bratty Teenage Daughter: At first, she treats her own father like crap, just like the other andalites, and isn't at all happy about having to live out in the space-boonies with a bunch of dimwitted primitives. She grows as a person as the novel progresses.
  • Dead Man Writing: During The Prophecy, when she occasionally narrates from Cassie's body.
  • Embarrassing Nickname: Her peers on the Andalite world nickname her 'Seerow's Unkindness'.
  • Entitled Bitch: She comes across like this in her treatment of Dak Hamee.
  • Extraordinarily Empowered Girl: She's a morpher at the time when the morphing technology was still brand new.
  • Fling a Light into the Future: Between her family, her Virtual Ghost, and a few well-placed weapons caches, Aldrea, despite her death, contributes to the eventual salvation of her adopted race.
  • Friend or Foe: A lot of her time in The Prophecy is spent with the Animorphs wondering if she's on their side or just using them. By the end of the book, she invokes this trope to manipulate Toby into going back to Earth where her people need her, rather than staying on the hork-bajir homeworld to try to lead the resistance there.
  • Going Native: A major theme of The Hork-Bajir Chronicles, as she grows increasingly disgusted with her own race's ruthless treatment of others and her own entitled attitude, culminating in willingly embracing Shapeshifter Mode Lock and choosing to live in the reduced-lifespan body of a hork-bajir with the man she loves. During The Prophecy she demands to be referred to as a Hork-Bajir rather than an andalite, and even seems to have fully adopted the hork-bajir religion as her own.
  • Guest-Star Party Member: In The Prophecy, where her Virtual Ghost inhabits Cassie's body for most of the novel, the two of them switching control and narration duties from chapter to chapter.
  • Heel Realization: At the end of The Hork-Bajir Chronicles, she realizes that she's been mistreating and using Dak for her own ends, and... well, read a few tropes down.
  • Identity Impersonator: She acquires and impersonates Alloran to get access to his database.
  • Interspecies Romance: Eventually falls in love with Dak, and, after permanently becoming a female Hork-Bajir, they manage to have a family, despite the slow death of their race and their world. Her descendants are the first two free Hork-Bajir in generations.
  • Posthumous Character: When we are first introduced to her in The Hork-Bajir Chronicles she has been dead for some thirty years. Despite this, she appears once more in The Prophecy thanks to the Arn's ixcilia procedure.
  • Revenge Before Reason: Fixates more on hurting the Yeerks than protecting the Hork-Bajir, pushing them to greater violence. Dak is uncomfortably aware of this.
  • Roaring Rampage of Revenge: While Dak is fighting the Yeerks to defend his people, Aldrea fights them for revenge for the murders of her father, mother, and brother. In particular the rebellion's attack on the first Hork-Bajir Yeerk pool is this, as Aldrea's Battlecry illustrates:
    Dak Hamee: (ordering the Arn monsters to attack, he looks at Aldrea meaningfully) Kill.
    Aldrea: (doesn't even look at Dak, staring straight at the Yeerks) For my mother. For my brother. For my father, Prince Seerow. KILL!
  • Shapeshifter Mode Lock: At the end of The Hork-Bajir Chronicles she willingly allows herself to be trapped in Hork-Bajir morph.
  • Sharing a Body: With Cassie in The Prophecy.

     Estrid-Corill-Darrath 

Estrid-Corill-Darrath

Debut: Animorphs #38: The Arrival (2000)

Estrid, you are beautiful, you are brilliant. But I really do not think I like you very much.



A young Andalite prodigy and member of Unit 0, Estrid is presented as one of the first female arisths. She is assigned to the unit by Arbat and maintains a close relationship with him. In truth she is his student, the mastermind behind a deadly new weapon. She briefly serves as Ax's love interest.
  • The Ace: Deconstructed - Estrid has many of the traits of a classical Mary Sue, being a brilliant and beautiful prodigy who's also an expert tail fighter and one of the only two estreen in the series. She is presented as one of the first female arisths in a culture where women are typically shoehorned into supporting roles and does basically whatever she pleases. Yet in spite of all this, the book slowly reveals her gaping character flaws - she's impulsive, undisciplined, self-centered and arrogant, with many of the same traits Ax had when he first joined the Animorphs. This is reflected in Ax's view of her - while he is initially smitten by her beauty, as he comes to know her his passion cools, and in the Yeerk Pool he ultimately rejects her altogether. This is a huge turning point in his character and it wouldn't be possible without Estrid there to personify his former values.
  • Animorphism: A human girl, and a rabbit.
  • Badass Family: Presented to explain her more blatant Mary Sue traits. Her mother is a 'morph dancer' and her brother is Ajaht-Litsom-Esth, the highest scoring exhibition tail fighter on the Andalite planet.
  • Body Horror: Subverted - Estrid is an estreen like Cassie, except even more skilled. She is the only morphing character seen to morph real clothes rather than just spandex.
  • Child Prodigy: As a prodigy who was both young and a female, she was snubbed and scorned during her time at the Andalite University of Advanced Scientific Theory.
  • Feet of Clay: When she goes to the Yeerk Pool she quickly loses her composure and panics. This leads to the above quote from Ax.
  • Genius Sweet Tooth: She's as much of a Big Eater as Ax.
  • Heel Realization: After Arbat reveals his plan, she has a change of heart and helps the Animorphs stop him.
  • Impossible Genius: She invents a virus that's even more deadly than the Quantum virus completely by accident.
  • Intelligence Equals Isolation: Her backstory, as briefly explained to Ax.
  • Love Interest: Briefly serves as Ax's.
  • Mad Scientist's Beautiful Daughter: At one point Ax believes her to be this to Arbat.
  • Not So Above It All: She scorns the Animorphs for their (staged) breakdown, but when she has to go to to the Yeerk Pool she freaks out.
  • One-Shot Character: Appears only in The Arrival.
  • Redemption Earns Life: Despite not changing much in terms of her personality, she does eventually realize what she was doing was wrong and does try to help the Animorphs. For this, she is allowed to survive the Yeerk Pool and is last seen leaving Earth with Gonrod.
  • The Squadette: She was the only female member of the Andalite squad, though she wasn't actually a true soldier.
  • Synthetic Plague: She more or less accidentally creates Quantum Virus 2.0.
  • Well-Intentioned Extremist: Wants to destroy the Yeerks, which would certainly make the galaxy better. If she winds up destroying humanity in the process, so be it.
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     Commander Gonrod-Isfall-Sonilli 

Commander Gonrod-Isfall-Sonilli

Debut: Animorphs #38: The Arrival (2000)

I command here. Am I clear on that?



The commander of the Andalite task force Unit 0, Gonrod is a counterpoint to the usual Andalite officer - while full of bluster and arrogance, he doesn't have a lot of competence to back it up. He's eventually revealed to be little more than an Unwitting Pawn of his ostensible subordinate Arbat, recruited to serve as an expendable pilot.
  • Ace Pilot: And how! Even Ax is forced to note that for all his failings as a commander, Gonrod is a truly excellent pilot.
  • A-Team Firing: In contrast to the sharpshooters Aloth and Arbat, Gonrod is a mediocre marksman at best. The one time he's seen with a shredder, he's firing wildly into a crowd of Hork-Bajir.
  • Boxed Crook: He was serving a sentence in military prison for cowardice under fire. Taking this mission meant clearing his record.
  • The Cavalry: Tobias talks him into being this, giving the Animorphs and Estrid a way out of the Yeerk Pool.
  • Decoy Leader: Appears to be the leader of the Andalite task force, but Arbat is in charge of the real mission.
  • Dirty Coward: He lies somewhere between this and Lovable Coward. While clearly not a sympathetic character, Gonrod is far from a monster.
  • Misfit Mobilization Moment: When he's relieved of command and confined to quarters by Arbat, Tobias finds him and talks him into flying their ship into the Yeerk Pool.
  • The Neidermeyer: At first.
  • Nervous Wreck: Ax notes that Gonrod is 'extraordinarily ill at ease for a commander'. It's the first real hint that he's not the one calling the shots.
  • One-Shot Character: Appears only in The Arrival.
  • Paper Tiger: He presents himself in his first appearance as the usual forceful Andalite commander, but Jake is able to force him to cooperate fairly easily by having Cassie and Marco morph snakes to immobilize Arbat and Aloth. That's the first hint of his Paper Tiger nature, and once attacking the Yeerk Pool enters discussion it becomes very clear that Gonrod is a long way off from the confident commander he's pretending to be.
  • Redemption Earns Life: Like Estrid, his aid of the Animorphs earns him an escape from the Yeerk Pool and a trip back home, though with his mission a failure it is likely he returned to prison.
  • Tears of Fear: The idea of attacking the Yeerk pool scares him so much his thought-speech is described as 'tearful'.

     Aloth-Attamil-Gahar 

Aloth-Attamil-Gahar

Debut: Animorphs #38: The Arrival (2000)

You want to know the secrets? You want to know who we are? I will tell you, little Aximili.



An Andalite sniper and member of Unit 0. As the team's sharpshooter, Aloth is tasked with the assassination of Visser Three. Jaded and cynical, Aloth wears his grim position as an assassin lightly. Like Gonrod, he is an Unwitting Pawn of Arbat, recruited to be little more than expendable muscle.
  • Badass Normal: There is no indication that Aloth has the ability to morph. It doesn't stop him from being incredibly effective.
  • Boxed Crook: He was serving a life sentence in military prison for selling the organs of his fallen comrades.
  • The Brute: A curious example - while Aloth's experienced and definitely intelligent, his main role on the team is sheer muscle, and Ax even refers to him once as 'a thug'.
  • Cold Sniper: He lies somewhere between this and Friendly Sniper. While definitely ruthless, Aloth is largely open and amicable to his teammates.
  • Combat Pragmatist: Even by the standards of the unsentimental Andalites he's pragmatic. Unfortunately, his pragmatism is such that he is willing to break laws if he considers it pragmatic to do so, leading him to harvest organs from fallen soldiers for his own profit.
  • Deadpan Snarker: He gets quite a few choice lines. The guy's almost like an Andalite Marco.
  • The Gunslinger: Lacking the morphing power (or being incompatible with it), he primarily uses firearms in battle.
  • Hidden Depths: Despite being considered little more than dumb muscle, Aloth has a few moments of surprising insight, and while his opinion of the Andalite military is jaded, his observations are pretty much spot-on.
  • Improbable Aiming Skills: Estrid notes that Aloth is a top sniper who scored the highest target impact rate in the history of the academy.
  • Jaded Washout: Has a deeply cynical outlook on the Andalites, but is largely right.
  • Jerk Jock: Like most Andalite warriors, he has an insolent personality towards those who aren't warriors. In particular he is disdainful of Arbat, though he also looks down on Gonrod for being a coward.
  • Lock-and-Load Montage: He gets one in Chapter 19, gearing up for the assassination attempt on Visser Three.
  • One-Shot Character: Appears only in The Arrival.
  • Organ Theft: While on the front lines, Aloth harvested the organs of his fallen comrades and sold them on the black market.
  • Pretty Little Headshots: When he is killed, he's shot 'cleanly through the head'. Justified, since shredders are ray guns.
  • Professional Killer: Played with - he's the designated assassin of Visser Three, but he was never meant to succeed in his mission.
  • The Quiet One: He present this façade to outsiders, but around comrades he shows his true colors as a Deadpan Snarker.
  • Sociopathic Soldier: A mild example, as he harvested organs from the enemies he felled in battle, reasoning that the dead had no use for them and that he deserved some additional compensation for his work. As the Andalite forces have strict laws against the selling of organs, he was sentenced to life imprisonment.
  • Villain Respect: Despite being ultimately a bad guy, or at the least not a good one, he still has virtues, one of which is a warrior's respect for other warriors. In particular he respects Elfangor intensely, telling Ax he had trained under his older brother for a little while and that he could tell Elfangor had "seen things".
  • Why Don't You Just Shoot Him?: Magnificently averted. He is one of the few characters to try just shooting Visser Three - and if not for Arbat's sabotage, he'd have succeeded too.

     Intelligence Advisor Arbat-Elivat-Estoni 

Intelligence Advisor Arbat-Elivat-Estoni

Debut: Animorphs #38: The Arrival (2000)

The people must be led by the few who are willing to make the very hard choices. The people are happy in their ignorance. But we in the Apex Level cannot allow ourselves to be sentimental.



An Apex Level Intelligence Advisor and the elder brother of Alloran-Semitur-Corass. Veteran of over twenty conflicts, Arbat is assigned to the Andalite task force Unit 0, ostensibly tasked with the assassination of Visser Three. The true mission of Unit 0, known only to Arbat himself, is to unleash a deadly new biological weapon against the Yeerks.
  • Animorphism: Though he mostly uses it to become human.
  • Anti-Villain: His goal could potentially save Earth...
  • Badass Bookworm: It turns out he was a professor, not a warrior. However, he then proves the badass part by shooting a target the size of a coin behind him while it's flying.
    The disc flamed. It was not an impossible shot. I might have made it.
    With practice.
    But it was an impressive shot nevertheless.
    <One does not rise to Apex Level without some basic skills.>
  • Chekhov's Gunman: When first introduced, he's just one of the crew, and not even a very prominent member of the crew at that (Gonrod and Estrid seem to be the ones calling the shots). In truth, he's not only The Man Behind the Man to the crew, but is also hatching a scheme which could alter the course of the entire Yeerk/Andalite conflict.
  • Broken Pedestal: To Estrid. He was once her mentor, but ultimately he disgusts even her.
  • Cain and Abel: Him and Alloran. He's the Abel, Alloran's the Cain.
  • Cruel and Unusual Death. Maybe.
  • Eaten Alive: By Taxxons.
  • The Chessmaster: Being at the Apex Level, this sort of comes with the job description, Notably, the only character in the story who knows his plans is Estrid, and even she's being manipulated by him to a degree.
  • Improbable Aiming Skills: Not as much as Aloth, but Arbat is still an excellent shot. When he wants to be.
  • Left Hanging: He's last seen Left for Dead by the heroes, wounded and facing an army of Taxxons.
  • Knight Templar: Possibly as a result of his brother's enslavement.
  • The Leader: Type I, though he uses Gonrod as a decoy leader.
  • The Man Behind the Man: Of Unit 0.
  • Minored in Ass-Kicking: Despite being an aging professor, Arbat is a sharpshooter with the morphing power, putting him on par with the Animorphs.
  • Motive Rant: He gives one to Ax after his scheme's uncovered. It's notable for making the normally-unflappable Ax want to tail whip him.
  • Not So Different: Him and Alloran.
  • One-Shot Character: Appears only in The Arrival.
  • The Professor: His cover story to his crew is that he's a retired professor of technological history. Of course, he's anything but retired, though it's anyone's guess if he was actually a professor, though given his patient personality, it's likely.
  • Renaissance Man: Master planner and tactician, sharpshooter, morpher, probable history professor... the guy wears a lot of hats, and wears them well.
  • The Strategist: Apex Level Intelligence is the highest level of advisory to the Andalite War Council. They plot. They plan. And they know everything.
  • The Stoic: As his quote above demonstrates, he considers himself to be this, and is more than willing to commit acts the common human (or Andalite) would call atrocities if he believes it's for The Needs of the Many
  • Synthetic Plague: He plans to wipe out the Yeerks using one. Sound familiar?
  • Well-Intentioned Extremist: His plan is almost sure to cripple the Yeerks, but may doom humanity as well.
  • Utopia Justifies the Means: See Estrid above.
  • Villain of the Week: And an extremely successful one. In the one book he appears in he nicely upstages Visser Three as the biggest threat to the cast.
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