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  • Street Fighter:
    • Karin Kanzuki, Sakura Kasugano's rich bitch Ojou rival from Street Fighter Alpha 3, was originally created for a Sakura-centric tie-in manga, Sakura Ganbaru! by Masahiko Nakahira.
    • Gouken, Ryu and Ken's sensei, was originally a character in a Street Fighter II tie-in manga by Masaomi Kanzaki. The character was later adapted in the video games' canon in the original Street Fighter Alpha before making a full-fledge appearance as a fighter in Street Fighter IV.
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    • There's also Evil Ryu (from Masahiko Nakahira's Street Fighter Alpha manga) and Shadaloo Cammy (who first appeared in the inter-company crossover game X-Men vs. Street Fighter).
    • Violent Ken originated in SVC Chaos as an homage to Sennou Ken from Street Fighter II: The Animated Movie. Violent Ken officially joined the Street Fighter canon in Ultra Street Fighter II: The Final Challengers for the Nintendo Switch.
    • Maki is a triple canon immigrant, being one of the many new characters introduced in Final Fight 2 (where she was a Distaff Counterpart / Suspiciously Similar Substitute of Guy from the previous game), only to be immediately forgotten. And then Masahiko Nakahira brought her back to the limelight in Sakura Ganbaru!, causing Capcom to suddenly remember her and putting her in Capcom vs. SNK 2 before she was eventually featured in the portable versions of Street Fighter Alpha 3 along with Eagle and Yun.
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    • Mecha Zangief first appeared in the Marvel vs. Capcom games as a secret character. In Super Street Fighter IV, he returns as an alternate skin for Zangief.
    • Sagat's ending in Super Street Fighter IV shows that he has befriended a local Thai youth named Chit, as well as the boy's younger sister and a village monk. All three characters come from the Street Fighter III: Ryu Final manga.
    • Ingrid started out as a character for the cancelled Capcom inter-series crossover game Capcom Fighting All-Stars. She'd, however, make the jump into its "spiritual successor" Capcom Fighting Evolution, and later ported into the PSP version of Street Fighter Alpha 3. It was later confirmed that Ingrid is indeed part of the Street Fighter series.
    • While Decapre did show up in Alpha that was a palette swap to give some level of difference between the dolls. UDON was the one that gave her more of a backstory which Capcom ran with.
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    • With Street Fighter V, Capcom has imported many characters and other elements that appeared in other media to the canon of the main series like the Monitor Cyborgs from the Street Fighter II: Animated Movie and the Bison Troopers from Street Fighter: The Movie.
  • J.D. Morrison from Devil May Cry: The Animated Series makes his first official appearance in the canon of the games in Devil May Cry 5, albeit with a Race Lift. Patty Lowell, also from the anime series, has a brief cameo where she calls up Dante and invites him to her eighteenth birthday party.
  • The Fatal Fury OVAs featured a new love interest for Terry named Lilly McGuire. Lilly would later appear in the background of the Mexico stage in The King of Fighters '94.
  • Super Mario Bros.:
    • Super Mario Bros. 2, originally a Dolled-Up Installment based on the game Doki Doki Panic, contributed to the series in many ways: several monsters from the game have gone on to be included in later Mario games. These include Shy Guys, Bob-ombs, Pokeys, Snifits, Ninjis and Birdo, as well as a race of mice creatures similar to the boss Mouser. Peach's hovering ability also comes from this game, as well as her ability to pull out vegetables in Super Smash Bros..
    • The Koopa Bros. of Paper Mario fame originally appeared in the Japan-exclusive manga Super Mario-kun.
    • The Koopalings in Super Mario Bros. 3 were originally unnamed in Japan, but the English localization gave them names. These would eventually become their official Japanese names in Super Mario World.
  • Donkey Kong Country
  • Mr. Game & Watch originally took various forms throughout the Game & Watch handhelds, hardly ever looking the same twice. Then Super Smash Bros. Melee, needing one form to represent the franchise, gave him one to fill all functions modeled after the civilians in Fire. This was later adopted into canon as his regular form in Game & Watch Gallery 4, released a year later.
  • There are quite a few examples from the Mass Effect series:
    • Technically, even Captain Anderson and Saren are examples of this; they're the main characters of Mass Effect: Revelation, the prequel novel released before Mass Effect.
    • Jacob Taylor and Miranda Lawson first appeared as the protagonists of Mass Effect Galaxy before becoming party members in Mass Effect 2. In Jacob's case, he's probably one of the few video game characters to go from being a Player Character in one game to just a party member in a later one. Miranda herself had another appearance in Mass Effect: Redemption before Mass Effect 2 came out.
    • The Illusive Man first appeared in the novel Mass Effect: Ascension, a year and a half before his main series debut in Mass Effect 2.
    • Feron, Liara's drell companion in the comic Mass Effect: Redemption, returns as a character in Mass Effect 2's "Lair of the Shadow Broker" DLC. In fact, the whole mission revolves around rescuing him from the Shadow Broker. The fact that Liara becomes the Shadow Broker at the end is kind of an unintentional consequence of the whole thing.
    • Kai Leng, Recurring Boss in Mass Effect 3, first appeared in the novels Mass Effect: Retribution and Mass Effect: Deception.
    • Dr. Eva Coré from Mass Effect 3 seems like an example of this at first. Eva Coré is one of Jack Harper's (a.k.a. the Illusive Man) companions in the comic book Mass Effect Evolution, which takes place 20 years before the series proper. However, Eva dies at the end of the comic. For anyone who's read Evolution, the fact that one of the scientists on the Mars research facility has her name should be the first clue that something is very wrong with this woman. She turns out to be a Fem Bot mole created by the Illusive Man to sabotage the facility.
    • Kahlee Sanders was a main character in all four Mass Effect novels (Revelation, Ascension, Retribution, and Deception) before becoming a minor NPC in Mass Effect 3.
  • From Mortal Kombat, the character Quan Chi apeared first in the animated adaptation to later make his game debut in Mortal Kombat Mythologies: Sub-Zero, and eventually made his way into the main series with Mortal Kombat 4. Additionally, the concept of "Order vs. Chaos" was first used in the Comic-Book Adaptation, years before the inclusion of the Order and Chaos Realms and its representative characters in Deception.
  • Silent Hill: Homecoming does this with the art style, architecture, and specific locations from the non-canonical Silent Hill movie.
  • Sonic the Hedgehog:
    • Amy Rose and Charmy Bee are both canon immigrants. Both first appeared in a comic series in Shogaku Yonensei, published in Japan in 1992. While elements such as Nikki transforming into Sonic and being bullied by a lizard called Anton were left firmly in the comic, Eimy (Nikki's girlfriend in the comics, ironically) was picked up and debuted officially in Sonic the Hedgehog CD (also ironic in the fact that she was labeled Princess Sally in the American manual anyway), while Charmy (one of Nikki's friends) was used as one of the characters in Knuckles' Chaotix (even more irony in the fact that Sonic didn't have any appearance in that game aside from appearing in the good ending credits, thus didn't interact with him). Their backgrounds were, naturally, radically altered as a result.
    • In Sonic the Hedgehog: The Movie, Sonic and Metal Sonic rushing headlong into each other was awesome enough to reappear in the end of Sonic and Blaze's fight in Sonic Rush.
    • In the Sonic Sat AM and Sonic Underground television series, there were robot characters called SWATbots. These robots were added into the RPG, Sonic Chronicles: The Dark Brotherhood, as a reference.
    • Likewise in Sonic Chronicles, Procurator Shade and the Nocturnus Tribe Echidnas share everything except their names with Julie-Su and the Dark Legion from the American Archie Sonic comics continuity - making them canon immigrants under false passports.
    • In Sonic Unleashed and Sonic and the Black Knight, Sonic can be seen eating chili dogs, something Sega picked up from the '90s cartoons. In Unleashed, eating chili dogs will actually give you some XP.
    • The concept of Eggman and robotic buddies that's happened in at least two adaptations, has made it into the games with Cubot and Orbot. Some of the robots that Eggman made in AoStH and/or the early Archie comics also appear in his own puzzle spin-off, Dr. Robotnik's Mean Bean Machine.
    • Eggman's name was localized outside of Japan as "Dr. Robotnik", which it remained through The '90s. In Sonic Adventure, Sega attempted to wean everyone onto the original Japanese name by making "Dr. Eggman" an In-Series Nickname insult but one that he was somehow fine with come Sonic Adventure 2, casually referring to himself as "Dr. Eggman" (and has ever since). However his original name also remains canon thanks to Adventure 2 as his grandfather is named Dr. Gerald Robotnik.
    • The rings around Shadow's wrists have obviously been there since Sonic Adventure 2, but the idea of them inhibiting his power was introduced in Sonic X.
  • Nasuverse:
    • Originally, Word of God stated that it was extremely improbable for two people with the Mystic Eyes of Death Perception; hence Shiki Ryogi and Shiki Tohno had to exist in a separate Alternate Continuity. However, Shiki Ryogi has just been announced as being in Melty Blood. In this case though, the immigration is quite literal.
    • The Studio DEEN anime adaptation of Fate/stay night showed Archer strengthening his twin swords "Kanshou" and "Bakuya" into larger, stronger versions, termed "Overedge". This is not an ability he ever displayed or was suggested to possess in the Visual Novel, but Nasu thought it was cool and the "Overedge" ability was made into a standard part of Archer's repertoire in all future incarnations of the franchise.
  • Resident Evil:
  • Similarly, the transformation effect in the film Silent Hill was used for subsequent games in the series.
  • The Super Robot Wars series is loaded with these, ranging from the Mazinkaiser in Super Robot Wars F Final to the Great Zeorymer in Super Robot Wars Judgment and the Final Dancougar in Super Robot Wars Alpha 3 (the latter two having only existed on concept/paper prior to the games). Then there's whole stitch about Elzam von Branstein and Ratsel Feinschmeker: Elzam was introduced in Super Robot Wars Original Generation, but he appears in Alpha 2 as Ratsel, then subsequently back as Ratsel in the sequel Original Generation 2, where he gets his Ace Custom Aussenseiter, which then reappears in the last Alpha game. Elzam was loosely mentioned first in the obscure Super Robot Spirits and in the back-story of Alpha. It isn't until Original Generation that he appeared in full.
  • While the appearances of Monolith Soft's Namco × Capcom Original Generation in Super Robot Wars OG Saga: Endless Frontier came off as a simple guest starring, their reappearance in the sequel Endless Frontier EXCEED may very well serve as the continuation of their story, suggesting that Monolith is willing to transfer their characters into the Super Robot Wars series in order to keep using them.
  • Pokémon:
    • A few characters from the Pokémon anime cameoed in the Yellow version, notably Team Rocket's Jessie and James (who show up to fight you a few times). Jessie & James later reappear in Pokémon Let's Go, Pikachu! and Let's Go, Eevee!.
    • In the game’s canon Red’s first and treasured Pokemon is one of Bulbasaur, Charmander, or Squirtle, with the numerous official artwork from Japan at the time of the first generation pairing him with Bulbasaur and more recent adaptations pairing him with Charmander. When the Pokemon franchise started becoming a giant and Pikachu became the face of it, however, the game’s universe also gave its own version of the Pikachu and Trainer bond that became famous in the anime with Ash and his Pikachu starting with Pokemon Yellow, since then Red also has a special bond with a Pikachu of his own, namely treated as the second Pokemon he got after Bulbasaur.
    • Some of the main series games' downloadable content has included renditions of anime specific Pokemon such as Ash's Pikachu and Team Rocket's Meowth, usually with the moves, items and stats refined according to their depiction. In Sun and Moon, they actually included Ash's Greninja this way, down to the moveset note  and exclusive Super Mode.
    • A gameplay immigrant was the "dash button"; it originally debuted in the second game adaptation of the trading card game before moving over to the third generation, and has been in the main games since.
    • In Pokémon Pinball, Ecruteak and Cianwood City's music from Pokémon GSC was originally the Blue Field theme. Plus, the "Catch 'Em" theme in said field was originally the 1st Japanese opening theme of the anime, "Aim to Be a Pokémon Master".
    • The font used in the American logo was later used in the Japanese theme park PokePark, and eventually would be used for the Japanese box art for PokéPark Wii and its sequel.
    • The Pokémon TCG introduced many new elements:
      • Some newly-introduced moves would become fully fledged game moves in new generations, such as Flail and Rain Dance.
      • Abilities first appeared in the card game as "Pokémon Powers" and later "Poké-Powers/Bodies" before becoming a mechanic in Ruby/Sapphire. Strangely, it took eight years for the card game to also start using the term.
      • Artwork for some items such as the original Potion would be canonized in FireRed/LeafGreen.
  • Most of Pac-Man's supporting cast — Ms. Pac-Man, Pac-Man Jr., Baby Pac-Man, and Professor Pac-Man — were all originally from unauthorized Midway sequels to the arcade game.
  • Kirby:
    • Originally Meta Knight's two sidekicks were Axe Knight and Mace Knight, but in the anime Meta Knight is assisted by Sword and Blade Knight. Likely because of this, in Kirby Super Star Ultra, Meta Knight has Sword and Blade as helpers when playable. It helps that Blade Knight is already a helper.
    • The design of King Dedede's castle from the anime series was used in Kirby: Squeak Squad, Kirby's Epic Yarn, and Kirby Mass Attack.
    • Likewise, the Battleship Halberd's design from the anime appeared in Squeak Squad, however Super Smash Bros. Brawl came out and the Halberd's design from that game was used instead in Super Star Ultra and has been the default design since.
    • The Water ability from the anime has also appeared in Kirby's Return to Dream Land and Kirby Star Allies.
    • Also, Kirby started saying "Poyo" in the anime, this has been transferred into Kirby's Epic Yarn, Kirby Mass Attack, Kirby's Return to Dream Land, Kirby and the Rainbow Curse, and Brawl's Subspace Emissary mode. He also says it in other games through the Mike ability.
    • A good amount of anime characters make their first game appearances in Kirby Mass Attack's subgames, including (but not limited to) Escargoon, the sword-wielding Waddle Doo, Customer Service, Max Flexer, and Chef Shiitake. Additionally, the Demon Beast Octacon appears as one of Adeleine's paintings in Kirby Star Allies.
    • The spear-carrying Waddle Dees from the anime made an appearance in Kirby: Canvas Curse and Kirby Super Star Ultra, and newer installments have turned the Bandana Waddle Dee from Kirby Super Star into a Composite Character by having him wield a spear.
    • In some later games, Meta Knight wraps his cape around himself when he's not using it, a nod to the anime.
  • The GBA port of Breath of Fire I gives names to three nameless Guest Star Party Members, with two of them (Sieg and Rai) taken straight from an early manga adaptation of the game, Princess of The Wings.
  • In Dead Space, the Divet Autopistol from the first game is revealed to have been left behind by the characters in its prequel sequel.
  • Konami decided to link their popular Castlevania series to the famous Bram Stoker novel Dracula, so when they designed Castlevania: Bloodlines, instead of starring a Belmont, it featured a member of a related branch family who had emigrated to America — the Morrises. John Morris (the member in question) is the son of the novel's Quincey Morris.
  • Unintentional, but Lamp Oil, which first appears as an item in both Link: The Faces of Evil and Zelda: The Wand of Gamelon becomes a real item in The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess.
  • Quite a few things that have originated in Super Smash Bros. have found their way into its originating franchises:
    • Captain Falcon's Falcon Punch makes an appearance in the F-Zero: GP Legend anime.
    • The Green Missile and the Egg Roll are both utilized by Luigi and Yoshi in later Mario sports games. Peach using her hips as an offense in Mario Kart: Double Dash!! is another example. The Whirling Fortress was also never used by Bowser before Melee, whereas he does similar moves rather often now.
    • Metroid Prime was the first Metroid game to include homing missiles, a year after Samus used them in Melee.
    • The Fountain of Dreams stage, based on the eponymous Fountain of Dreams from Kirby's Adventure, sported a colorful redesign and orchestral reprise of the "Gourmet Race" track original to Melee, both of which were later incorporated into the Fountain of Dreams in Kirby: Nightmare in Dreamland a year later.
    • Kirby actually fought Master Hand and Crazy Hand in Kirby & the Amazing Mirror. Inhaling them gave him a reduced version of his Melee moveset.
    • Dedede's Jet Hammer may have been the inspiration for his tricked-out mallet in The Revenge of the King in Kirby Super Star Ultra. Also, the Halberd model from Brawl was reused for the Meta Knight's Revenge cutscenes in the same game.
    • Meta Knight's Final Smash, Galaxia Darkness, reappears as one of his special abilities in the "Meta Knightmare Returns" mode in Kirby: Planet Robobot.
    • Kid Icarus: Uprising features the re-imagined versions of Pit and Palutena that debuted in Brawl. It also utilizes one of Pit's alternate colors to create a new character in Dark Pit, who eventually became his own seperate character in Smash Bros. 3DS/Wii U.
    • In Pokémon Sun and Moon, Mewtwo's signature move Psystrike is changed from a technicolor blast of psychic particles into a large sphere of dark energy hurled at its opponents, which is in line with its depiction in Super Smash Bros. for Wii U/3DS.
  • The American Commercial for the first Golden Sun game infamously had absolutely nothing to do with the game itself, save for featuring fantastic elements. It involves an opera house's pit orchestra fighting off a horde of gargoyles, and then taking down a dragon that took the form of a chandelier. Very cool, but clearly more about the hardware than the game, and only barely even that. And then Golden Sun: Dark Dawn came around, and introduced a new summon named Crystallux. According to the legend, he was a dragon that so loved the music in the Belinsk opera house that he turned himself into a chandelier, so that he could live in the opera house and hear the music whenever he wished. Yes. It's the exact same dragon. He even tries to help you fight off some particularly nasty monsters when the opera house gets attacked. Thankfully, he doesn't get killed like he does in the commercial. Rather, the woman who was the heroine in the commercial is ironically the one who bites it.
  • Pitfall II: The Lost Caverns features Pitfall Harry's niece Rhonda, and their cowardly pet mountain lion Quickclaw, who were both originally created for animated segments from Saturday Supercade.
  • Although it took until the end of the trilogy, Gears of War 3 brings in a large selection of characters from the Expanded Universe, such Jace Stratton, Samantha Bryne and Bernadette Mataki into the playable campaign. All of them previously existed in the comics and novelizations. In a variation, Michael Barrack, who first appeared and was Killed Off for Real in the novels, will be available as future Downloadable Content. Surprisingly, Alex Brand from the graphic novels has no planned appearance, much to some fans' disappointment.
  • Halo has done this more and more as its games and Expanded Universe have become more integrated:
    • Dr. Catherine Halsey, who made her first in-game appearance in 2010's Halo: Reach before going on to have a major role in the Reclaimer Saga, had already been playing a major role in the Expanded Universe since her debut in the 2001 novel Halo: The Fall of Reach.
    • Several other major EU elements introduced in The Fall of Reach have made their way into the games, including: Orbital Drop Shock Troopers (ODSTs), who first appear in-game in Halo 2 and would eventually star in their own game; The Office of Naval Intelligence (ONI), which got a one-line reference in Halo 3 before playing a more important role in the plots of the later games; Covenant Engineers, who first show up in-game in Halo Wars, but got a starring role (and redesign) in ODST; and Linda-058, Kelly-087, and Fred-104, who are all playable in Halo 5: Guardians.
    • The SPARTAN-III program was introduced in the novel Halo: Ghosts of Onyx, which was published about a year before the release of Halo 3. In Reach, all but one member of Noble Team, including the player character, are SPARTAN-IIIs.
    • The Big Bad of Halo 4's Spartan Ops co-op campaign, Jul 'Mdama, first appeared as one of the main characters in the novels Halo: Glasslands and Halo: The Thursday War.
    • With the exception of Edward Bucknote , the other members of Fireteam Osiris (introduced in Halo 5: Guardians) come from the expanded universe; Jameson Locke debuted in Halo: Nightfall, Holly Tanaka debuted in Halo: Escalation, and Olympia Vale debuted in Halo: Hunters in the Dark.
  • Howard Blackwood, a character from the comic Silent Hill: Past Life appears in Silent Hill: Downpour.
  • Several characters introduced in StarCraft II came from novels, including Crown Prince Valerian Mengsk (the Dark Templar trilogy), Tychus Findlay (Heaven's Devils), Matt Horner (Queen of Blades), November Annabella "Nova" Terra (Starcraft: Ghost: Nova).
  • Warcraft:
    • Dave "Fargo" Kosak made two Warcraft-based webcomics starring a Dwarf named Flintlocke, aptly titled Flintlocke's Guide to Azeroth and Flintlocke Vs. The Horde. When Kosak was later hired as Lead Quest Designer for World of Warcraft, Flintlocke and several other characters from the comics were put in the game as minor NPCs.
    • A few characters original to Hearthstone: Heroes of Warcraft managed to sneak into World of Warcraft. Sir Finley Mrrgglton would be the first Hearthstone-original character to be added, and a few others like Morgl the Oracle and Skycap'n Kragg would also make appearances. Another thing to note is the Tortollans, a race of turtle humanoids, would make an appearance as a full-fledged race in Battle for Azeroth.
    • The Dragon Aspects themselves are Canon Immigrants. They were first developed by Richard Knaak in Day of the Dragon, and later formally adopted into the canon by Blizzard through the WarCraft III manual.
    • Queen Taria of Stormwind (King Varian's mother) was invented for the film, having never been named in the games; she still hasn't actually appeared in the games due to being dead, but World of Warcraft: Chronicle officially added her to the main canon.
  • Almost every Original Generation hero created for Heroes of the Storm ends up back in their home game.
    • Warcraft: Lunara and Brightwing both appeared in the Dreamgrove in Legion, with Brightwing acting as a follower for Restoration Druids and Lunara just being a cameo. Lunara would also end up as an alternate Druid hero in Hearthstone. Murky is an odd example, since he's based on an old companion pet, but is still explicitly a different character. The other Murky ended up as the center for a quest chain in Highmountain, albeit with a completely different backstory. Also, some abilities made their way from this game into WoW, notably Zul'jin's version of Regeneration becoming a Zandalari Troll racial.
    • StarCraft: A number of Co-op Missions feature original characters, including Sgt. Hammer and Lt. Morales. Probius appears in an Easter Egg if you're playing as Fenix, although as a Purifier probe instead of a normal one. The most direct is Tychus, who takes most of his physical appearance from Heroes and brings along Blaze as his special firebat.
  • The North American box art for Mega Man is notorious for its depiction of a middle-aged man in a blue and yellow rubber suit that looks nothing like but is nonetheless supposed to represent Mega Man. Oh, and he wields a pistol rather than having an arm cannon. Subsequent box art depictions would look more similar to Mega Man's actual appearance (the arm cannon, for example, being only introduced in the Mega Man 3 box art), until finally the North American/PAL and Japanese appearances of the character would be the same. Jump to more than twenty years later: the weird version of Mega Man who appeared on the North American box art for the first game was announced as a playable character ("Bad Box Art Mega Man") in the cancelled Mega Man Universe. Later, Mega Man would appear as a playable character in Street Fighter X Tekken, but as a twenty years older (and notably pudgier) version of the middle aged man from the North American box art.
  • Persona 4
  • Ninja Gaiden and Dead or Alive has this for the ninja characters. First, of course, was Ryu Hayabusa showing up in Dead or Alive. The Ninja Gaiden revival games would feature DoA's Ayane and Kasumi a few times. In Dead or Alive 5 Ultimate, NG 's Momiji and Rachel are playable fighters.
  • Jeff Wayne's War of the Worlds, which is inspired by both H.G Wells' novel and the Rock Opera of the same name, became a canon immigrant when said rock opera was re-imagined for a live stage show. The background film for the music features the game's model of the Martian Flying Machine, and also a "prologue" set on Mars taken from one of the game's intro movies (the audio from the intro movie is used unedited in the original, but is re-dubbed with new dialogue in the "New Generation" Updated Re-release).
  • In the Star Fox series, Krystal has been Fox McCloud's love interest for the last several games, however she began life as one of two main characters in the unreleased N64 game Dinosaur Planet from Rare, and she was originally envisioned as a blue cat rather than a blue fox. The other main character was her brother Saber, who bore a passing resemblance to Fox. Upon seeing the game during development, Shigeru Miyamoto noticed the resemblance and suggested that the game be turned into a Star Fox spinoff. The game was eventually moved to the GameCube and was retooled into Star Fox Adventures. One of the changes in this development was that Krystal underwent a redesign— now she was a fox, as well as being older and sexier.
  • Four (possibly five) characters from the MySims series have made it into the main The Sims games: Vincent Skullfinder was an NPC ghost in The Sims 3, while Morcubus made a cameo as part of a camp fire scary story (hence the "possibly five"). Then The Sims 4 included Summer, Liberty and Travis in a playable household, too.
  • A.B.A.'s first appearance was in the Guilty Gear spinoff game Guilty Gear Isuka. It wasn't until XX Slash that she made an appearance in a main series game, and though she technically had a story in Isuka (revolving around finding a new body for her weapon/lover Paracelsus,) Isuka itself had no story at all. It wasn't until XX Accent Core Plus that her storyline was actually explored.
  • Johnny "Five-Aces", the protagonist of the infamous Zybourne Clock project, managed to find his way into two other projects with Something Awful members on them. He appeared in Exit Fate as a playable character, and as part of an easter egg in Fallout: New Vegas. More recently, he's one of the unlockable pilots in Brigador, with non-standard mechanics that don't fully line up with the usual pattern.
  • Blaster Master was one of several NES games to have a Worlds of Power novelization by Scholastic. The book added a girl named Eve, a Human Alien who was the original owner of the Sophia III. Eve became the mother of Jason's children in Blasting Again, and Blaster Master Zero reworked the original game's plot to include Eve.
  • Fake Crash, Crash's weird look-alike from the Crash Bandicoot series, first appeared in Japanese commercials for Crash Bandicoot 2: Cortex Strikes Back (which Naughty Dog had minimal involvement in) before making several cameos in later games.
    • Penta Penguin, one of the secret characters in Crash Team Racing, first appeared as a character in the Crash Bandicoot manga series Dansu! De Jump! Na Daibouken. N. Sane Trilogy also names Penta as the penguin Dingodile picks on at the start of his boss fight in Crash Bandicoot 3: Warped (and who starts jumping on him when he’s defeated).
  • Many The Elder Scrolls devs and former devs, especially Michael Kirkbride, have written a number of "Obscure Texts" from an in-universe perspective which flesh out many of the details of the Elder Scrolls universe. The texts themselves are generally treated as, at the very least, Loose Canon by the fandom, and the Unreliable Canon nature of the series allows them to fit right in without being disruptive to what is shown in the games themselves. In Skyrim, a number of characters and elements first mentioned in the Obscure Texts were brought up in-game. To note:
  • Five Nights at Freddy's:
  • Nisa and Gust-chan, Moe Anthropomorphisms of Nippon Ichi Software and Gust Corporation respectively, originally appeared as DLC guest characters in the Neptunia series when NIS America had the publishing rights (In the case of the latter, they lost the rights when Koei Tecmo acquired them). When Idea Factory did a soft Continuity Reboot of Neptunia and opened its own international branch to publish the games themselves, they were both excluded from the new continuity. Nisa still makes occasional appearances in the later Disgaea games, while Gust-chan would later be added to Nelke and the Legendary Alchemists: Ateliers of the New World as part of an update.
  • The Ikemen Sengoku otome mobile game started out with eleven romanceable guys, but the game's stage and anime adaptations added an extra guy in the form of chaos-stirring pirate Motonari Mouri and the PS Vita port added two other romanceable guys in the form of Shingen's distant relative Yoshimoto Imagawa and Nobunaga's page Ranmaru Mori. After a while, the original game added these three guys to its roster too, revising the prologue and Sasuke's route to introduce them.

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