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    I 
  • I Could Never Be Your Woman (2007) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $9,569,470. Despite the talents of Amy Heckerling (Clueless, Fast Times at Ridgemont High) and stars Michelle Pfeiffer and Paul Rudd, a last-minute backout from the film's intended theatrical distributor prompted it to go Direct-to-Video in North America.
  • I Don't Know How She Does It (2011) — Budget, $24 million. Box office, $9,662,284 (domestic), $30,551,495 (worldwide). The last film directed to date by Douglas McGrath; he's stuck to playwriting since.
  • I Dreamed of Africa (2000) — Budget, $34 million. Box office, $14,400,327. It posted the third worst opening in over 2,000 theaters when it premiered and Sony dumped it straight to video in the UK. This along with Bless the Child, which was released several months later firmly put Kim Basingernote  where she was prior to her brief career resurrecting Oscar win for L.A. Confidential three years prior. To further add insult to injury, Basinger and company were soon accused of hypocrisy after it emerged that circus elephants were used during the making of I Dreamed of Africa.
  • I, Frankenstein (2014) — Budget, $65 million. Box office, $19,075,290 (domestic), $71,154,592 (worldwide). Based on a graphic novel by Underworld creator Kevin Grevioux, its critical and financial takedown killed a planned crossover with that film series. This also killed off Stuart Beattie's directorial career and consigned him to screenwriting.
  • I Heart Huckabees (2004) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $12,785,432 (domestic), $20,072,172 (worldwide). Got a decent amount of studio hype, but the reviews that deemed it So Okay, It's Average despite its ambitious script helped put a damper on its box office. Thankfully video sales helped get it out of the red a bit.
  • I Know Who Killed Me (2007) — Budget, $12 million. Box office, $9,669,758. This film's failure, the lot of Razzies that came with it, and star Lindsay Lohan's legal and personal troubles that followed firmly turned the teenage queen into a late-night punch-line. It also firmly locked director Chris Sivertson in the C-list of Hollywood filmmakers, killed the career of writer Jeffrey Hammond after just a single film, and producer Frank Mancuso Jr., who was also one of the two figures behind the ill-fated Bowdlerization of Cool World 15 years prior, didn't get a credit on another film for the rest of the decade.
  • I Love Trouble (1994) — Budget, $45 million. Box office, $30,806,194 (domestic), $61,947,267 (worldwide). Its massively Troubled Production gave new meaning to the term Dueling-Stars Movie as Nick Nolte and Julia Roberts truly despised each other and their on-screen chemistry suffered as a result. Their few moments of off-screen collaboration were mutual frustration with director Charles Shyer and producer Nancy Myers overworking them. Unsurprisingly, both of them consider it the biggest Old Shame of their careers. Its indecisive marketing didn't help either. It was also part of a bad year for Nolte, who also had Blue Chips and I'll Do Anything flop earlier.
  • I Love You, Beth Cooper (2009) — Budget, $18 million. Box office, $16,382,538. This Chris Columbus comedy did not do leading man Paul Rust's career any favors.
  • I Saw the Light (2015) — Budget, $13 million. Box office, $1,620,978. Heavy panning from critics and having its release date pushed back helped make this Hank Williams biopic die a quick death at the box office. The failure of this film ended up cancelling a future project by director/producer Marc Abraham, and he's been laying low from the limelight since, only reappearing in a documentary recently.
  • I Spy (2002) — Budget, $70 million. Box office, $50,732,945. One of three flops in 2002 that severely impacted Eddie Murphy's career.
  • I Wanna Hold Your Hand (1978) — Budget, $2.8 million. Box office, $1.9 million. This was Robert Zemeckis's directorial debut and his first collaboration with Steven Spielberg (as well as the first film he executive produced). An Acclaimed Flop.
  • I Want Your Money (2010) — Budget, $400,000. Box office, $433,000. A failed attempt at a conservative view of the fiscal crisis, trying to compare Reaganomics to Obamanomics when Obama hadn't really had that much of a chance to operate as president. It only had a limited run for a week before most theaters dropped it.
  • I'm Not Rappaport (1996) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $26,011. The second and final film from director/writer Herb Gardner was an adaptation of his play; it saw a very limited release.
  • Ice Age 5: Collision Course (2016) — Budget, $105 million. Box office, $64,063,008 (domestic), $407,727,743 (worldwide). While the movie did well overseas, its domestic opening weekend was far from what the movies usually make (usually ranging in the $40 millions). Not only has this sequel gotten even worse reviews than the previous four films, but critics and even fans think that the franchise has overstayed its welcome. This movie may have melted any hopes of a continuation to the Ice Age franchise, not helped by the fact that it came out during the same weekend as Star Trek Beyond, along with competition with animated Sleeper Hit The Secret Life of Pets.
  • The Ice Harvest (2005) — Budget, $14 million. Box office, $10,196,568. This adaptation of the Scott Phillips novel was the penultimate film directed by Harold Ramis. It got a mixed reception from critics and thawed out of theaters after three weeks.
  • Ice Princess (2005) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $27,645,491.
  • The Ice Storm (1997) — Budget, $18 million. Box office, $16 million. Siskel & Ebert praised it highly, with the former calling it the best film of the year, while other critics praised it highly as well. But it never left a limited release.
  • The Identical (2014) — Budget, $16 million (not counting marketing costs), $32 million (counting them). Box office, $2,747,075. This was universally lambasted for its wooden acting, poor production values, tacked on religious elementsnote  and playing its attempt at being a musical biopic parody completely straight. It didn't help that it was released in early September, in the midst of the smash success of Guardians of the Galaxy.
  • Idiocracy (2006) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $495,303. It has been widely speculated that 20th Century Fox deliberately sabotaged the film's release and marketing (giving it a limited release and no advertising), partly because of all the Take Thats the film gives to its parent company's news division, and partly to avoid angering all the companies that had Product Placement in this movie. The film was Vindicated by Cable has since become a Cult Classic.
  • Idle Hands (1999) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $4,152,230. Has been Rodman Flender's last directorial credit on a theatrical film to date. Vivica A Fox's career as a leading actress hindered a bit after this, though fortunately she rebounded the following decade. Critics hated this supernatural stoner comedy but it became a Cult Classic once it hit video.
  • If Looks Could Kill (1991) - Budget, $12 million. Box office, $7.7 million. Meant to be a starring vehicle for Richard Grieco, the film failing ended up killing his chances, as since he's mainly done direct-to-video and TV movies since. The last film that Darren Star wrote the screenplay for.
  • If Lucy Fell (1996) - Budget, $5 million. Box office, $2.4 million. Director Eric Schaeffer wouldn't helm another theatrical film for five years. This has also been the last theatrical film written by Tony Spiridakis.
  • If Only (2004) — Budget, $3 million. Box office, $532,673. After this, a TV movie, and a four-year wait off the grid, helmer Gil Junger has stayed strictly in television.
  • Igby Goes Down (2002) — Budget, $9 million. Box office, $6,919,198. Still got a good critical reception, but director Burr Steers has only directed two more movies to date. Production company Atlantic Streamline would be absorbed by MGM shortly after, and would only have one more film under than brand before being retired.
  • Igor (2008) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $19,528,602 (domestic), $30,747,504 (worldwide). This movie was Exodus Film Group's first movie, as well as its last. This is also the only CGI film distributed by MGM.
  • I'll Be Home for Christmas (1998) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $12,214,338. This derailed Jonathan Taylor-Thomas's chances for a serious film career. This also sent director Arlene Sanford straight to television note  since.
  • Ill Do Anything (1994) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $10,424,645. Part of a bad year for Nick Nolte, who also had Blue Chips and I Love Trouble flop in between. This was intended to be a musical before a bad test screening forced the songs out.
  • Illegally Yours (1988) — Budget, $13 million. Box office, $259,019. Director Peter Bogdanovich was basically strong-armed into directing this by the studio, which he accepted as he was having money issues at the time. This was supposed to come out in July 1987, but a bad test screening (in which half the audience walked out), and the bankruptcy of distributor DEG pushed it back to May 1988, where it died against movies like Beetlejuice and Good Morning, Vietnam. Bogdanovich considers this one of his biggest failures.
  • Imaginaerum (2012) — Budget, $3.7 million. Box office, $190,819. It was only released in Finland, Russia and Malaysia, which certainly didn't help things. It got pretty decent reviews from critics, but anyone who wasn't a fan of Nightwish (since the movie was based on the band's music) didn't have much interest in it.
  • The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus (2009) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $7,689,607 (domestic), $61,808,775 (worldwide). It was hampered by a very limited release, though its per-screen average was very good.
  • Imaginary Crimes (1994) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $89,611.
  • Imagine That (2009) — Budget, $55 million. Box office, $22,985,194. One of several busts for Eddie Murphy in his second Dork Age. He held off his decline with Shrek Forever After and Tower Heist but not for long.
  • Immediate Family (1989) — Budget, $14 million. Box office, $5,932,613. This drama about adoption, directed by Jonathan Kaplan, received mixed reviews, with some criticizing it for being a little too manipulative and saccharine.
  • Immortal Beloved (1994) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $9,914,409. This biopic of Ludwig van Beethoven did well in a limited release. Critic reactions were mixed to positive, with most critics praising Gary Oldman's performance as Beethoven.
  • I'm Not There (2007) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $11.7 million. This sort-of biopic of Bob Dylan was Heath Ledger's final film released in his lifetime.
  • Impostor (2001) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $8,145,541. Critics saw this adaptation of a Philip K. Dick story as a lower-quality version of Blade Runner and its January release date didn't do it any favor with audiences. This was also a Star-Derailing Role for Madeleine Stowe.
  • Incarnate (2016) — Budget, $5 million. Box office, $4.8 million (domestic), $6,341,855 (worldwide). This was exorcised from theaters after four weeks.
  • In Country (1989) — Budget, $18 million. Box office, $3,531,791. It had a limited release, even though the reviews were good and Bruce Willis got a Golden Globe nomination for it.
  • The In Crowd (2000) — Budget, $24 million. Box office, $5,280,035. This teen thriller was universally panned for being an unintentionally funny Cliché Storm. Director Mary Lambert stuck to TV/Direct-to-Video until the documentary 14 Women.
  • In Dreams (1999) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $12 million. Ripped by critics, the films flopping led to director Neil Jordan not working on another American-based production until 2007's The Brave One.
  • The In-Laws (2003) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $26,891,849. This remake of the 1979 film was the second consecutive flop for Michael Douglas following It Runs In The Family and was one of several lifelong busts for production company Franchise Pictures. Italy was the only foreign market that surpassed $1 million and its UK release was cut short after two weeks.
  • In Secret (2013, 2014) — $2 million. Box office, $444,179. Roadside Attractions gave this a paltry release of 266 theaters and withdrew it after two weeks.
  • In the Cut (2003) — Budget, $12 million. Box office, $4,750,602 (domestic), $23,726,793 (worldwide). One of a string of bombs that ultimately did in Meg Ryan's career. It has had better critical reception since its release and the uncut DVD release ended up selling very well thanks to, well, reasons.
  • In the Heart of the Sea (2015) — Budget, $100 million. Box office, $93.9 million. This was originally supposed to be released in March, but it was pushed back to December to get a 3D conversion and increase its awards chances. Its new release date was the week before Star Wars: The Force Awakens, which left it stranded at sea, and its mixed reviews killed its Oscar chances anyway.
  • In the Land of Blood and Honey (2011) — Budget, $13 million. Box office, $303,877 (domestic). Angelina Jolie's narrative directorial debut, following the documentary A Place In Time, never left a limited release. It didn't help that author Josip Knežević sued Jolie for plagiarism of his story, Slamanje duše (though the case was dismissed).
  • In The Mix (2005) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $10,223,896. This is the last theatrical film directed by Ron Underwood, as he's focused nothing but straight-to-DVD and made-for-TV movies ever since. It has also been writer Jacqueline Zambrano's last screenplay credit on a film to date.
  • In the Mouth of Madness (1995) — Budget, $8 million. Box office, $8.9 million. Part of a string of directing career-ending bombs for John Carpenter, and it and Judge Dredd swallowed the writing job of Michael De Luca, who stuck with being an executive at New Line and DreamWorks and Sony until 2010's The Social Network.
  • In the Name of the King (2007) — Budget, $60 million. Box office, $13,097,915. This is the first and only time Uwe Boll tried to direct a movie with a budget that would make the movie a tentpole. Again, it did not stop a film series from entering production, though this first installment's massive failure ensured they would not see the inside of a cineplex, instead going Direct-to-Video.
  • In the Valley of Elah (2007) — Budget, $23 million. Box office, $6,777,741 (domestic), $29,541,790 (worldwide). One of several films based on the Iraq War to flounder at the box office, though the critics liked it and Tommy Lee Jones got an Oscar nomination for it. One of the last films released under the Warner Independent Pictures banner before the brand was shut down the following year.
  • inAPPropriate Comedy (2013) — Budget, unknown. Box office, $228,004. This movie got even worse reviews than Vince Offer's previous movie, The Underground Comedy Movie, and it sunk the careers of Rob Schneider (whose name already marks films he's attached to as theatrical radioactive waste by this point), Lindsay Lohan (who was still reeling from I Know Who Killed Me and her legal drama), and Adrien Brody (though he'd later bounce back with The Grand Budapest Hotel). Offer himself would never direct/write another movie again.
  • Inchon (1982) — Budget, $46 million. Box office, $5,200,986. Controversial religious leader Sun Myung Moon personally financed this notorious Korean War epic, with an all-star cast led by Sir Laurence Olivier as General Douglas MacArthur. (Olivier's reason for his participation for this film is the Trope Namer for Money, Dear Boy.) In 1995, it made the Guinness Book of World Records as "the biggest money-loser in history", later to be surpassed by Cutthroat Island. The film has never been released on home video, though bootleg copies (derived from a telecast on GoodLife TV a defunct Moon-owned cable channel) have surfaced. It also brought down director Terence Young's (the man who directed three of the first four James Bond films) career.
  • The Incredible Burt Wonderstone (2013) — Budget, $30 million. Box Office, $27,437,881. So far, Burt Wonderstone is the first (and last) major film directing effort from Don Scardino.
  • Independence Day: Resurgence (2016) — Budget, $165 million. Box office, $103,144,286 (domestic), $389,681,935 (worldwide). This sequel to the 1996 film did poorly because of the release of Finding Dory (alongside a graveyard of other high-budget tentpoles released in Summer 2016), coming out 20 years after its predecessor, and getting worse reviews from critics and fans, both calling the film out for its lack of the charm that the original movie had. This movie is also part of a lineup of bombs for director Roland Emmerich, including Anonymous, White House Down and Stonewall.
  • The Indian in the Cupboard (1995) — Budget, $45 million. Box office, $35,656,131. The film didn't stand a chance against its summer competition despite respectful reviews. Plans to adapt the remaining books in the series were shelved after its underperformance.
  • The Indian Runner (1991) — Budget, $7 million. Box office, $191,125. Sean Penn did not try to write/produce another film for 4 years, and executive producer and future Breitbart News/Donald Trump staff member Steve Bannon did not get another film credit until the end of the 90's.
  • Inferno (2016) — Budget, $75 million. Box office, $34,343,574 (domestic), $220,021,259 (worldwide). While the previous two adaptations of Dan Brown's Robert Langdon book tetralogy with Tom Hanks were panned heavily by critics, they were financially successful (though Angels & Demons did fall short of its budget domestically). This one managed to be both considered hellspawn by critics AND a Hell-level bomb in the United States, grossing only $15 million there in the last week of the fall season, with Hanks's Sully having come out the month earlier and DreamWorks Animation's Trolls, Disney/Marvel's Doctor Strange (2016), and Hacksaw Ridge kicking off the Thanksgiving/Christmas season the next week (Inferno was pushed back that far to get it away from The Force Awakens). This could result in any plans for the one remaining book in the novel series, The Lost Symbol, being sent to the netherworld.
  • The Infiltrator (2016) — Budget, $28-47.5 million. Box office, $18 million. It got generally good reviews, particularly for Bryan Cranston's performance, but it was buried on opening weekend by holdover smash The Secret Life of Pets and the only other wide release that week, Ghostbusters. Its failure saw distributor Broad Green lay off 6% of its staff and replace its president of distribution.
  • The Informers (2008) — Budget, $18 million. Box office, $382,174. This adaptation of the Bret Easton Ellis short story collection was universally panned for its heavy Darkness-Induced Audience Apathy and was pulled after 3 days.
  • Inherent Vice (2014) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $14,710,975. The first adaptation of any of Thomas Pynchon's works received generally positive reviews from critics, but divided reactions from audiences over its bizarre humor, leading many patrons to walk out.
  • Inherit the Wind (1960) — Budget AND Box office, $2 million (worldwide). Stanley Kramer's film version of the stage play recorded a loss of $1.7 million, but critics then and now loved it.
  • Inkheart (2009) — Budget, $60 million. Box office, $17,303,424 (domestic), $62,450,361 (worldwide). Its release date was pushed back numerous times due to New Line's financial troubles and the film itself testing poorly. It finally came out in January 2009 where it received a mixed reception from critics and apathy from audiences.
  • The Innkeepers (2011) — Budget: $750,000, Gross USA: $77,501.
  • Innocent Blood (1992) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $4,943,279. Critics and audiences at the time didn't know what to make of John Landis' hybrid of vampire horror and Mafia thriller; it still managed to get a cult following on cable.
  • The Insider (1999) — Budget, $68 million. Box office, $60,289,912. This in-spite of being an Acclaimed Flop, particularly for Russell Crowe's performance.
  • Instinct (1999) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $34,105,207. The first film produced by Spyglass Entertainment; critics generally hated it but audiences were more forgiving. Spyglass had better luck a few months later when The Sixth Sense premiered.
  • The International (2009) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $25,450,527 (domestic), $60,161,391 (worldwide). The first of two consecutive flops for Clive Owen, with Duplicity following the next month.
  • Intersection (1994) — Budget, $45 million. Box office, $21.3 million. Director Mark Rydell wouldn't direct another theatrical film for twelve years.
  • The Interview (2014) — Budget, $42-44 million. Box office, $6,105,175 (domestic), $11,305,175 (worldwide). Largely due to almost all cinema chains refusing to show the film following terrorist threats and the massive Sony hack that forced leader Amy Pascal's resignation, the film only played at roughly 300 screens in the US. However, the film was released for digital download and video-on-demand, where it earned close to $40 million. Sony expects to break even on the film, while others speculate they could still lose as much as $30 million on the film due to the high marketing costs and poor box office performance.
  • Into the Blue (2005) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $44,434,439. Its box office sinking didn't prevent a Direct-to-Video sequel from following four years later.
  • Into the Night (1985) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $7,562,164. This John Landis comedy was filmed just as he stood trial for manslaughter for the fatal accident during the filming of his segment on Twilight Zone: The Movie. It's been speculated that the numerous cameos by various filmmakers in the film were a show of support for Landis. These cameos were one of the biggest nuisances for critics, including Roger Ebert, who otherwise gave it a generally mixed reception. Landis had better luck later that year with Spies Like Us.
  • Into the Sun (2005) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $175,563. It only saw a theatrical release in Japan and went Direct-to-Video in the U.S.
  • Intolerable Cruelty (2003) — Budget, $60 million. Box office, $35,327,628 (domestic), $120,217,409 (worldwide). This Romantic Comedy by The Coen Brothers was their first project done for hire. It was Lighter and Softer than their usual fare, which led to a less enthusiastic, though still generally positive, response from critics.
  • Intolerance (1916) — Budget, $2.5 million, Box office, under $100,000. Despite tremendous reviews, this now-classic film went down in history as the first big detonation to hit Hollywood, and was a shock to the nascent industry. It single-handedly sunk D.W. Griffith's production company, Triangle Films, and ruined both his career and his personal life. The film's failure was due in part to its length (over five hours in the original cut), its then innovative techniques (which confused the audiences), and poor timing - it was an anti-war film that came out just as the US population was growing in favor of entering World War I.
  • Invaders From Mars (1986) — Budget, $7 million. Box office, $4.9 million (domestic). Tobe Hooper's remake of the 50's B-Movie suffered from mismanagement from Cannon Films, who were apparently angry the film was much more family-friendly than they were expecting. It didn't help that two different posters gave the film a PG and an R-Rating. This flop helped secure Cannon Films' doom, but it's since become a Cult Classic.
  • The Invasion (2007) — Budget, $80 million. Box office, $40,170,558. This fourth version of Invasion of the Body Snatchers suffered massive Executive Meddling which turned it from a psychological thriller into an incomprehensible action film light on scares. Critics unanimously declared this to be the worst version yet. This dealt a serious blow to director Oliver Hirschbiegel's career until he did 13 Minutes in 2015.
  • The Invisible (2007) — Budget, $30 million (estimated). Box office, $20,578,909 (domestic), $26,810,113 (worldwide). This movie destroyed Disney's Hollywood Pictures label a second time after it was shut down years prior.
  • The Invitation (2015) Budget, $1 million. Box office, $354,835. Despite glowing reviews from critics and audiences alike, a limited release and video-on-demand fate led to dreary box office returns. Despite this, it was able to gain a much bigger audience via positive word-of-mouth when it landed on Netflix.
  • The Iron Giant (1999) — Budget, $70 million. Box office, $31,333,917. Despite exceptional reviews and a 97% Certified Fresh rating on Rotten Tomatoes, The Iron Giant tanked at the box office, and was part of a small series of bombs for Warner Bros. that eventually led to Looney Tunes: Back in Action. Unsurprisingly, it was Vindicated by Cable and home video, and is considered a major step for Brad Bird's career.
  • Irrational Man (2015) — Budget, $11 million. Box office, $4 million (domestic), $27.4 million (worldwide). This Woody Allen film was the last film by his longtime executive producer Jack Rollins who died a month before its release. The end result was received less favorably by critics than Allen's usual works.
  • Ironweed (1987) — Budget, $27 million. Box office, $7,393,346. The second of two pairings of Meryl Streep and Jack Nicholson, who both added to their record Oscar nominations tallies with this Acclaimed Flop. William Kennedy, who wrote the original novel it was based on and wrote the screenplay for this film, hasn't gone back to screenwriting since.
  • Irreversible (2002) — Budget, 4.65 million euros ($4.3 million). Box office, 4.5 million euros ($4.2 million). This controversial film got panned not only for its violent content, which included a 10-minute rape scene, but also because director Gaspar Noé added an infrasound track to the film, which caused several health and comfort problems for viewers and compelled them to walk out of screenings. Noe didn't direct another movie until his dream project, Enter the Void in 2009, which got made in part because of Irreversible's notoriety, which got him noticed by the execs of both films' distributor, Wild Bunch.
  • Ishtar (1987) — Budget, $55 million. Box office, $14,375,181. Its failure, along with that of other films such as The Adventures of Baron Munchausen and Leonard Part 6, led to Coca-Cola leaving the film business, selling off Columbia Pictures to Sony, who also had Tristar Pictures. In addition, the troubled film ensured that director Elaine May would not take another movie credit for nine years, and she hasn't had a directing job since.
  • The Island (1980) — Budget, $22 million. Box office, $15.7 million. Michael Caine despises it so much he refuses to talk about it. Nevertheless, it's become a Cult Classic.
  • The Island (2005) — Budget, $126 million. Box office, $35,818,913 (domestic), $162,949,164 (worldwide). The film was panned for excessive product placement, and it got DreamWorks sued by the makers of the film Parts: The Clonus Horror, who accused the film of committing copyright infringement.
  • The Island of Dr. Moreau (1996) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $27,663,982 (domestic), $49,627,779 (worldwide). This legendarily Troubled Production dealt with two stars acting up in the midst of Creator Breakdown, original director Richard Stanley getting fired and replaced by the extremely difficult John Frankenheimer and horrid weather hitting the set. This is the biggest Old Shame for David Thewlis and Fairuza Balk.
  • Isn't She Great? (2000) — Budget, $44 million. Box office, $3,003,296. The killing blow to the career of director Andrew Bergman, who withdrew from Hollywood as a result. Also dealt damage to Bette Midler's career.
  • It Came from Hollywood (1982) — Budget, $5 million. Box office, $2.6 million. A Clip Show / Affectionate Parody of various B Movies with various comedians providing commentary. It fell by the wayside in theaters but cable TV runs made it a Cult Classic.
  • It Runs in the Family (1994) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $70,396. Bob Clark and Jean Shepherd reunited to try to recreate the magic of A Christmas Story, with a mostly new cast. Originally called A Summer Story, the studio had no faith in it, retitled it, and dumped it in a handful of theaters with almost no hype at all.
  • It's Kind of a Funny Story (2010) — Budget, $8 million. Box office, $6,491,240. The film version of Ned Vizzini's semi-autobiographical novel got generally positive reviews but it only topped out at 757 theaters. Directors Anna Boden and Ryan Fleck waited five years before they made their next movie, Mississippi Grind.
  • It's Pat! (1994) — Budget, $8 million. Box office, $60,822. The reason for the low gross was that the movie only saw release in three cities, and was ripped out of theaters after its opening weekend. It's Pat, along with Stuart Saves His Family, began the Dork Age of movies based off of Saturday Night Live sketches. As an added final bonus, It's Pat was released two days after studio chairman Jeffrey Katzenberg's well publicized and acrimonious firing from Disney, who distributed this film through Touchstone.
  • It's a Wonderful Life (1946) — Budget, $3.18 million. Box office, $3.3 million (original release), $10.8 million (after re-releases). When this film was originally released, it cost RKO Radio Pictures $525,000 and forced director Frank Capra to sell his production company to Paramount. This film is now considered one of Capra's masterpieces (helped by constant reruns at Christmastime) and won a Technical Achievement Oscar.
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    J 
  • Jack Frost (1998) — Budget, $85 million. Box office, $34.5 million (domestic). A Star-Derailing Role for lead Michael Keaton, who was frozen into the B list of movie stars until Birdman in 2014 (he played a dead father reincarnated as a snowman animated by Industrial Light and Magic and Jim Henson's Creature Shop; their animation was criticized by Roger Ebert). This movie was ironically released a year after an icey horror movie with the same name and which also used a live snowman, which didn't help matters. Director Troy Miller's film prospects began freezing overnight thanks to this movie, co-writer Mark Steven Johnson didn't work another movie until Ben Affleck's version of Daredevil in 2003, and it was part of a bad spell for snowman animators Jim Henson's Creature Shop.
  • Jack the Bear (1993) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $5,145,823. Originally set for a late 1991 release, the post-production was delayed due to internal issues (the studio needed to refilm some scenes, which were troublesome as the actors needed were signed on to other movies) and director Marshall Herskovitz and producer Bruce Gilbert clashing how the editing should go. Then set for a late 1992 release, and delayed again, before finally sneaking in to spring of 1993. As a result the movie's promotions were lacking and it debuted during a brutally packed week. After Herskovitz's following film, Dangerous Beauty, also bombed, he stayed away from directing feature films and stuck to producing and working on TV shows.
  • Jack the Giant Slayer (2013) — Budget, $195 million (production alone), $295 million (marketing included). Box office, $65 million (domestic), $197.5 million (worldwide). This movie did horribly enough that Hollywood is reconsidering its trend of Darker and Edgier Fairy Tale Remakes. The success of Disney's film adaptation of Into the Woods, however, may help the genre's chances.
  • Jack and Jill (2011) — Budget, $79 million. Box office, $74,158,157 (domestic), $149,673,788 (worldwide). The infamous film's very poor performance with critics and the American box office, along with its unprecedented sweep at the Razzies (it "won" every single award given out in that ceremony and won 10 total), effectively ended Adam Sandler's run of financially successful films and firmly confirmed the derailing of the viability of having Al Pacino as a major bill on a movie poster. It also derailed the A-list career of Katie Holmes, and no mainstream movies with a single actor playing a male and female role simultaneously have been made since.
  • Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit (2014) — Budget, $60 million. Box office, $50,577,412 (domestic), $135,511,030 (worldwide). A failed attempt to reboot the Jack Ryan series. Getting released in January didn't help either. The titular character has had a much better time on television.
  • The Jacket (2005) — Budget, $29 million. Box office, $21,126,225. Ended up being the only American film to be directed by John Maybury so far.
  • Jade (1995) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $9,851,610. This film and Kiss of Death from earlier that year marked a stillborn attempt to make David Caruso a movie star after suddenly leaving NYPD Blue, and he faded from public view before coming back with CSI: Miami. One of two films that year that thrashed Joe Eszterhas's career, the other being Showgirls, and Burn Hollywood Burn would give him his third and final strike 3 years later.
  • Jakob the Liar (1999) — Budget, $45 million. Box office, $4.9 million. A remake of the 1975 Polish film of the same name starring Robin Williams. It was lambasted by critics for its contrivances and melodrama and was compared unfavorably to the similarly themed Life Is Beautiful.
  • James and the Giant Peach (1996) — Budget, $38 million. Box office, $28,946,127. This did not succeed for Disney and Tim Burton despite critical acclaim and Approval of God from Roald Dahl's widow. As a result, Disney didn't make another stop motion film for 16 years until Burton's own Frankenweenie. This is not the first time a film based off of Dahl's work became an Acclaimed Flop, nor the last, since Disney would sail down this exact same river a second time with Burton's contemporary, Steven Spielberg, 20 years later.
  • Jane Got A Gun (2016) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $1,513,793. This suffered a very Troubled Production due to constant recasts, its original director Lynne Ramsey getting dismissed on the first day of shooting and its production company Relativity Media filing for bankruptcy. The end result was dumped in early January, where it was dismissed by critics and audiences, making it the worst opening of Natalie Portman's career.
  • The January Man (1989) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $4,611,062. This comedic mystery thriller was John Patrick Shanley's first screenplay since his Oscar-winning smash Moonstruck. Critics weren't over the moon for it as Roger Ebert, in particular, called it out for its egregious Mood Whiplash.
  • Jarhead (2005) — Budget, $72 million. Box office, $62,658,220 (domestic), $96.9 million (worldwide). A film about The Gulf War released early into The War on Terror. The advertising which suggested the film was much more action oriented than it was may have been to blame.
  • Jaws: The Revenge (1987) — Budget, $20 million (not counting marketing costs), $23 million (counting them). Box office, $20,763,013 (domestic), $51,881,013 (worldwide). This film finally convinced MCA/Universal executives that the Jaws hype from the seventies had long come to an endnote . It only took two years before Universal and Steven Spielberg made a Take That! to this film in Back to the Future Part II. Actor Lance Guest only appeared in two more movies, Lorraine Gary, the wife of MCA boss Sid Sheinberg, refused to go back in front of a camera, and director Joe Sargent never did another theatrically released film, plus Michael Caine's career took a downturn after appearing in this movie for good pay, which he's never watched back.
  • Jefferson In Paris (1995) — Budget, $14 million. Box office, $2,442,542. This Merchant-Ivory film about Thomas Jefferson had a limited release and lukewarm reviews.
  • Jem and the Holograms (2015) — Budget, $5 million. Box office, $2,333,684 (worldwide). This film did so poorly that Universal pulled it a mere two weeks after release, making it the second film Universal pulled from theaters due to poor performance within just one week. Note that the take listed is global — the overseas take barely cracked six figures. Director Jon M. Chu originally had a proposal put together that was much closer to the original '80s cartoon, but producers Jason Blum and Scooter Braun (yes, the guy who unleashed Justin Bieber onto the world) instead heavily reworked it for "the YouTube generation" while locking series creator Christy Marx out of the creative process entirely (she gets a token Creator Cameo at the end, but that was the extent of her involvement in the film). As a result, the cartoon's fanbase refused to see the film due to it being an In Name Only adaptation, and non-fans refused to see it for being a bland Cliché Storm. The film was released like this, and Twitter quickly filled up with images of empty theaters under the hashtag of "Jempty". Chu, Blum, and Universal wasted no time in declaring Jem to be their Old Shame, and the movie, which should have been a shoe-in with a cheap budget, instead became one of the most notorious busts of 2015 and got reruns of the cartoon pulled from TV. This was also the first project of Hasbro Studios' self-financing Allspark Studios, though this film certainly didn't dent the studio. Chu would later bounce back with the critical and box office success of Crazy Rich Asians.
  • Jennifer Eight (1992) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $11,390,479. It had a modest opening week, but Bram Stoker's Dracula and Home Alone 2 releasing shortly after this film killed any momentum it had; Going straight to video in the UK didn't help either. Bruce Robinson vowed to stay away from the director's chair after this mystery film flopped until The Rum Diary brought him back.
  • Jersey Girl (2004) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $25,268,157 (domestic), $36,098,382 (worldwide). The second film to star Ben Affleck and Jennifer Lopez flatlined in the wake of their disolved relationship and their disastrous first film from the previous summer. Fans of Kevin Smith were turned off by its mainstream approach.
  • Jetsons: The Movie (1990) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $20,305,841. This was intended to be the Grand Finale to the Jetsons cartoon show anyway, and sure enough, outside of a few video games in the next few years, no further attempts to reboot this specific animated Hanna-Barbera franchise have materialized. It was also Mel Blanc's final role, and the movie DID get salvaged somewhat on home video.
  • Jimmy Hollywood (1994) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $3,783,003. This was heavily-panned by critics and immediately fell flat at the box office when it debuted at number 14. It also went straight-to-video overseas, which some say killed any chances of it making a decent profit. Barry Levinson had better luck that year with Disclosure.
  • Jinxed (1982) — Budget, $13.4 million. Box office, $2,869,638. A very Troubled Production, this served as the final film Don Siegel ever directed.
  • Joan of Arc (1948) — Budget, $4,650,506. Box office, $5,768,142. Recorded a loss of $2,480,436. This is the final film directed by The Wizard of Oz/Gone with the Wind director Victor Fleming, who died two months after its release. Writer Maxwell Anderson never wrote another screenplay, and the contemporary reviews from critics such as historian Leonard Maltin have torched the movie for playing the Dawson Casting card with casting Ingrid Bergman as Joan (Bergman was 14 years older than Joan of Arc, who only lived to 19). It also didn't help matters that Bergman's affair with Roberto Rossellini caused such a scandal enough to dissuade people from seeing it.
  • Joe's Apartment (1996) — Budget, $13 million. Box office, $4,619,014. Billed as MTV's first feature film, Joe's Apartment failed to find an audience and disgusted critics with its attempt at featuring "cute" cockroaches (Roger Ebert called this a "really, really bad idea" in his end of the year special with Gene Siskel). The movie's failure led to Warner Bros selling MTV's film distribution rights back to Viacom, which promptly bit them in the ass as MTV's next movie was the financially successful Beavis And Butthead Do America.
  • Joe Somebody (2001) — Budget, $38 million. Box office, $24,516,772. It was knocked-out in one of the busiest holiday seasons ever. The critics didn't like it to begin with.
  • John Carter (2012) — Budget, $250 million (not counting marketing costs), $350 million (counting them). Box office, $73,078,100 (domestic), $284,139,100 (worldwide). Once the movie's dismal American box office numbers came in, Disney anticipated that it would take a $200-million wash on the film; even after the international box office helped to at least partially salvage it, it still went down as one of the biggest flops in history - if the upper figure of a $206 million loss is correct it is the biggest flop ever. Disney fired their studio chairman, Rich Ross, on the heels of this film, a decision that may very well have been justified come The Lone Ranger the following year (Ross, who found himself on the receiving end of John Lasseter's rare nuclear anger for screwing the Andrew Stanton-directed epic, is the only studio chairman since the 1984 management shift to be sacked solely for poor performance; Jeffrey Katzenberg note , Joe Roth, Peter Schneider, and Dick Cook note  had some creative differences with the guard amongst other issues). Marketing executive MT Carney, who helmed John Carter's marketing campaign that was also ripped by Lasseter, also left the company. The film became an Old Shame to Stanton, who also regretted that its failure led Disney to let the rights revert back to the Edgar Rice Burroughs estate and it dashed his plans for a trilogy, though he rebounded with Finding Dory.
  • Johnny Be Good (1988) — Budget, $22 million. Box office, $17,550,399. This is the one and only film directed by Bud S. Smith, who returned to work as an Editor and later became a Producer.
  • Johnny Handsome (1989) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $7,237,794. This film version of the novel The Three Worlds of Johnny Handsome fell by the wayside upon its release but it later became Vindicated by History.
  • Johnny Mnemonic (1995) — Budget, $26 million. Box office, $19,075,720. The first and only feature film directed by Robert Longo. Dolph Lundgren stayed off the big screen until The Expendables fifteen years later.
  • Jonah: A VeggieTales Movie (2002): Budget, $14 million. Box office, $25,615,231. The first theatrically-released VeggieTales film failed to recoup its prints and advertising costs and may have played a hand in production company Big Idea's bankruptcy.
  • Jonah Hex (2010) — Budget, $47 million. Box office, $10,547,117. Too many people thought "It's Short, So It Sucks!," and coming out the same weekend as Toy Story 3 didn't do it any favors either. This is the last film written by the duo of Mark Neveldine and Brian Taylor, and, apart from Free Birds, it would be a while before director Jimmy Hayward would do serious work again, being part of Zootopia and Cars 3 (though after Free Birds itself flopped, it would be his last directing job for now). Finally, this is one of two 2010 films to deliver a serious setback to the career of producer Andrew Lazar.
  • Jonathan Livingston Seagull (1973) — Budget, $1.5 million. Box office, $1.6 million. This adaptation of the Richard Bach novel was one of a handful of films that Roger Ebert walked out of. Other critics who stayed for the whole show lambasted it for its droning philosphy and flat voice cast. It didn't help that the filmmakers were subject to three lawsuits: one from Ovady Julber for ripping off scenes from his film La Mer, another from composer Neil Diamond for cutting too much of his score (which won him a Golden Globe), and another from Bach for straying too much from his novel.
  • Josh and S.A.M. (1993) — Budget, $18 million. Box office, $1,640,220. The only film directed by editor Billy Weber, who went back to that line of work after this film's critical and financial takedown. Producer Martin Brest waited five years before he got involved in another film, Meet Joe Black. It has never been released on a format outside of VHS.
  • Joshua (2002) — Budget, $9 million. Box office, $1,461,635. Its widest release was in 43 theaters.
  • Josie and the Pussycats (2001) — Budget, $39 million. Box office, $14.8 million. Ended up being a huge blow to Rachael Leigh Cook's leading career. This movie also smacked the directing careers of duo Harry Elfont and Deborah Kaplan (who had previously directed the cult teen film Can't Hardly Wait) out of the park, as they've never directed another film, and both Josie and The Flintstones in Viva Rock Vegas also led to Elfont and Kaplan not writing another film until 2004. Josie also killed the cinematic career of Kenneth "Babyface" Edmonds. There wouldn't be any Archie Comics live-action production afterwards until the TV series Riverdale in 2017.
  • Joy (2015) — Budget, $60 million. Box office, $56,451,232 (domestic), $101,134,059 (worldwide). This broke David O. Russell's string of critical and financial successes that started with The Fighter. Its indecisive tone and tough competition (with one in particular) may have contributed to that outcome. It still got Jennifer Lawrence an Oscar nomination.
  • Joy Ride (2001) — Budget, $23 million. Box office, $21,974,919 (domestic), $36,642,838 (worldwide). Critics generally liked this film to begin with, but skidded off the box office road due to a poor marketing campaign. Strong video sales lead to two Direct-to-Video sequels.
  • Jude (1996) — Budget, $7 million. Box office, $409,144. Was an Acclaimed Flop, however, and star Christopher Eccleston notably is still proud of it.
  • The Judge (2014) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $47,119,388 (domestic), $84,419,388 (worldwide).
  • Judge Dredd (1995) — Budget, $90 million. Box office, $34,693,481 (domestic), $113,493,481 (worldwide). Effectively hamstrung any attempts to establish the Judge Dredd franchise in the U.S. It and In The Mouth of Madness swallowed the writing job of Michael De Luca, who stuck with being an executive at New Line and DreamWorks and Sony until 2010's The Social Network. Judge Dredd also was one of a series of critically-derided screenplays credited to Steven E. de Souza, and he would not get his next one for 3 years. The film as a whole and its production became an Old Shame for star Sylvester Stallone and the creator of Dredd, John Wagner, who both felt the movie never attained its potential (Wagner felt Stallone was good for the role, but Stallone got a Razzie nom for it).
  • Judgment Night (1993) — Budget, $21 million. Box office, $12 million. This film stalled in pre-production for so long it would've died had Emilio Estevez not accepted the lead role. While the film flat-lined in theaters, its soundtrack became a Breakaway Pop Hit.
  • Judy Moody and the Not-Bummer Summer (2011) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $15,013,650. The last theatrical film by director John Schultz, whose most recent credit is the 2016 TV remake of Adventures in Babysitting. The critics didn't care for it but it fared better with audiences.
  • Junior (1994) — Budget, $60 million. Box office, $36,763,355 (domestic), $108,431,355 (worldwide). No mainstream movies dealing with human male pregnancy have been made since this attempt, which put a serious dent in Arnold Schwarzenegger's move for more comedic fare.
  • Jupiter Ascending (2015) — Budget, $175 million. Box office, $43,110,000 (domestic), $181,900,000 (worldwide). Could very well be the death knell for the Wachowskis' film careers. Actor Eddie Redmayne, who played the movie's Big Bad and got a Razzie for it, rebounded the next year with The Danish Girl and Fantastic Beasts and Where To Find Them.
  • The Juror (1996) — Budget, $44 million. Box office, $22,754,725. Director Brian Gibson made one more film after this before his death in 2004. This also did no favors for Demi Moore, who won a Razzie for this and her more high-profile bust, Striptease.
  • Jury Duty (1995) — Budget, $21 million. Box office, $17,014,653. A serious blow to director John Fortenberry, writer Neil Tolkin, and star Pauly Shore's careers, and it's the final film to feature Billie Bird.
  • Justice League (2017) — Budget, $300 million (not counting marketing costs, interest expense, and guild fees), $500 million (counting them). Box office, $229,024,295 (domestic), $657,924,295 (worldwide). The film has earned the dubious title of "most successful box office bomb ever." DC and Warner Brothers' attempt to match Marvel's The Avengers was among the most expensive movies ever made,note  so it needed to gross a massive amount just to break even ($750 million at the highest estimate, $650 million at the lowest). It also had enormously high expectations for profit, with it grossing over a billion being seen as a foregone conclusion due to the very disappointing Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice nearly getting to $875 million on its own, and every single one of Marvel's own crossover movies (Avengers, Age of Ultron, and Civil War) grossing from $1.2 to $1.6 billion with less iconic characters. Instead, it opened in a surprisingly competitive season on the release calendarnote  and its opening domestic weekend of $93.8 million, likely due to negative publicity from the aforementioned Batman v Superman and its notoriously troubled production, was only about half of BvS and the lowest of any DCEU film thus far, combined with a lackluster promotional campaign and another critical backlash after a long embargo. Industry analysts are already predicting a $50 to $100 million net loss for Warner Brothers. The film's failure prompted the studio to fire several members of their DC Films branch and remove Zack Snyder as director from any future films, completing their loss of confidence in him after BvS was received so poorly.
  • Just Getting Started (2017) — Budget, $22 million. Box office, $7,634,022. This was the first film that Ron Shelton directed in over a decade since Hollywood Homicide, but unfortunately its critical and commercial performance wasn't an improvement from that film's also poor intake. It was quickly pulled from theaters after just two weeks. This film's failure also ended Broad Green Pictures, which had suffered many flops, particularly their horror hopeful Wish Upon.
  • Just Like Heaven (2005) — Budget, $58 million. Box office, $48,318,130 (domestic), $102,854,431 (worldwide). Reese Witherspoon bounced back a few months later with Walk the Line.
  • Just Looking (2000) — Budget, $3 million. Box office, $39,000. Jason Alexander's last attempt at feature film directing.
  • Just My Luck (2006) — Budget, $28 million. Box office, $17,326,650 (domestic), $38,159,905 (worldwide). This derailed director Donald Petrie's career as his last notable film was My Life In Ruins. It also did no favors for Lindsay Lohan, whose star fell the next year.
  • Just the Ticket (1999) — Budget, $12 million. Box office, $434,404. Yeah, you read that right. Shoved out to theaters during a packed weekend, then pulled almost immediately for video plans. Apparently didn't do too bad in the rental market, however.
  • Just Visiting (2001) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $16,176,732. This Foreign Remake of the French blockbuster Les Visiteurs was filmed in 1999 and was edited significantly for its American release. This was the last film Disney released under their Hollywood Pictures brand for five years.

    K 
  • K19: The Widowmaker (2002) — Budget, $100 million (not counting marketing costs), $135 million (counting them). Box office, $65,716,126. Director Kathryn Bigelow would rebound spectacularly with The Hurt Locker, which made her the first woman to win the Best Director Oscar.
  • KPAX (2001) — Budget, $68 million. Box office, $65 million. This is the final movie Robert Colesberry produced in his life, and writer Charles Leavitt waited 5 years before writing his next film, Blood Diamond.
  • Kafka (1991) — Budget, $11 million. Box office, $1,059,071. Steven Soderbergh's sorta biopic of Franz Kafka was based around the author's body of work. It started a string of flops for Soderbergh that officially ended with Erin Brockovich. It came out around the same time as the similarly surreal Naked Lunch to which it was compared to. It's now a Cult Classic.
  • Kalifornia (1993) — Budget, $8.5 million. Box office, $2,395,231. Got good reviews, but director Dominic Sena saw his cinematic career crash until 2000.
  • Kansas City (1996) — Budget, $19 million. Box office, $1,356,329. Robert Altman's jazz-era ode to his hometown faded in a limited release despite good reviews.
  • Kazaam (1996) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $18,937,262. Effectively fouled up any chance of Shaquille O'Neal branching his career out of basketball after this, his rap album, and the infamous video game Shaq Fu were all released and ripped apart in the mid 90s. Kazaam also landed a critical hit on director Paul Michael Glaser's career (he's Starsky of Starsky & Hutch), as he would not direct or star in anything for the next 5 years, and any and all directing jobs he would hold after his hiatus were on television only.
  • Keanu (2016) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $20.7 million (domestic). This vehicle for comedy duo Key & Peele fared well with critics, though. Jordan Peele fared much better the following year after he directed Get Out.
  • The Keep (1983) — Budget, $6 million. Box office, $4,218,594. The film version of the first novel of The Adversary Cycle suffered Executive Meddling which cut the film by two hours. The end result was lambasted for its incomprehensibility and faded from theaters pretty quickly. It hasn't been released on home video since VHS but it's available for streaming. Director Michael Mann and author F. Paul Wilson aren't happy with it, but it's become a Cult Classic.
  • Keeping Up with the Joneses (2016) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $29,786,594. This movie was meant for that year's April, but it got pushed away from Zootopia and The Jungle Book into the Dump Months past the Summer Bomb Buster. This didn't stop it from being one of the worst reviewed films of the year. The first of Zach Galifianakis' Star-Derailing Roles in 2016. Director Greg Mottola does not have any major theatrical projects up past this movie.
  • Keys to Tulsa (1997) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $57,252. Writer Harley Peyton didn't write for 4 years.
  • Khartoum (1966) — Budget, $6 million. Box office, $3 million (rentals). This was the last film to utilize the Ultra Panavision 70 film format until The Hateful 8 50 years later.
  • The Kid Who Would Be King (2019) — Budget, $59 million. Box office, $23,103,314 (so far). Despite positive reviews, the film ended up bombing on both sides of the Atlantic. Despite 20th Century Fox's hope that the film would be successful in its native UK, it opened there at a measly sixth place on a weekend dominated by The LEGO Movie 2: The Second Part and How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World. This is one of several recent adaptations and reimaginings of the King Arthur legend to flop at the box office, and could be the last for some time.
  • Kill Me Again (1989) — Budget, $4 million. Box office, $283,694. John Dahl's directorial debut; it did better on home video.
  • Killers (2010) — Budget, $75 million. Box office, $47,059,963 (domestic), $98,159,963 (worldwide). Supporting co-star Tom Selleck has not made any theatrical film appearances since then, though he remains a popular television star by reprising his role as the title character in two additional Jesse Stone television movies and playing the lead role in the police procedural Blue Bloods.
  • Killer Elite (2011) — Budget, $70 million. Box office, $56,383,756. It was the debut film from Open Road Films, whose next film, The Grey, became a financial success.
  • The Killer Inside Me (2010) — Budget, $13 million. Box office, $3,977,192. The second film version of Jim Thompson's mystery novel received a simultaneous theatrical and Video-on-Demand release, which limited its takings. Its reception was mixed, with critics calling out its brutal violence, especially towards women.
  • Killer Joe (2011, 2012) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $3,665,069. This movie was only in 75 theaters stateside.
  • Killing Zoe (1994) — Budget, $1.5 million. Box office, $418,961 (domestic). Roger Avary's directorial debut only played in 14 theaters and was given a mixed-to-negative reception by critics. Avary bounced back a few months later when Pulp Fiction (which he co-wrote) came out, and the film itself became a Cult Classic.
  • Kin (2018) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $10 million.
  • The King and I (1999) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $12 million. The film's negative reception due to its Disneyfication of the original musical and subsequent failure did not give any better of an impression to Thailand/Siam than the other adaptations of the book the musical came from (including Anna and the King, which also came out that year), prompted the estates of Rodgers and Hammerstein to permanently mandate that animated adaptations of their works are to be completely forbidden (reportedly, the producers would have been given the rights to Oklahoma! if this film was a success), and relegated Richard Rich to the C-list of animators. It was also released only a week before Doug's 1st Movie, based on the popular TV show, which did slightly better. Both this film and Quest for Camelot banished the career of writer David Seidler from the cinemas until 2010.
  • King Arthur (2004) — Budget, $120 million. Box office, $51,882,244 (domestic), $203,567,857 (worldwide). One of a handful of flops in 2004 that ultimately helped end Disney CEO Michael Eisner's long run at the company. It also prevented any more movies based on the King Arthur mythos from being made, with the next one coming out 13 years later.
  • King Arthur: Legend of the Sword (2017) — Budget, $175 million (not counting marketing costs), $250 million (counting them). Box office, $39,175,066 (domestic), $148,675,066 (worldwide). This movie is projected to lose $150 million. If this prediction is accurate, the film will become the second largest bomb in history.
  • King David (1985) — Budget, $21 million. Box office, $5,111,099. According to the book Disneywar, former Paramount President Michael Eisner, who had become the chairman and CEO of Walt Disney Productions the year prior (and renamed it The Walt Disney Company), criticized this movie's casting of Richard Gere, snarking, "I don't see David in a dress." Gere also earned derision from the Razzies, getting nominated for his role, and director Bruce Beresford admitted Gere was miscast.
  • King Kong Lives (1986) — Budget, $18 million. Box office, $4,711,220. This finished off John Guillermin's directing career in cinema, and was part of a disastrous inaugural year for Dino De Laurentiis' DEG.
  • The King of Comedy (1983) — Budget, $19 million. Box office, $2,536,242. This Martin Scorsese Black Comedy was adored by critics but dismissed by audiences until it hit HBO. It's now considered one of Scorsese's greatest films, as well as one of the greatest films for stars Jerry Lewis and Robert De Niro.
  • King Of The Hill (1993) — Budget, $8 million. Box office, $1,214,231. Was an Acclaimed Flop, but led to producers Albert Berger and Ron Yerxa not doing another non-fiction theatrical film for 5 years.
  • King of New York (1990) — Budget, $5 million (Estimated). Box office, $2.5 million. While the film went on to be a Cult Classic, the film was MASSIVELY criticized on release. It was so bad that at one of the premiere screenings, co-star Laurence Fishburne and writer Nicholas St. John got booed off the stage.
  • King's Ransom (2005) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $4,143,652. This was mauled by critics so badly it left theaters after six weeks. Jeffrey W. Byrd returned to the director's chair for 2012's A Beautiful Soul.
  • The Kingdom (2007) — Budget, $70 million. Box office, $47,536,778 (domestic), $86,658,558 (worldwide). One of several movies centered on The War On Terror to sink at the box office. It opened at number two despite mixed reviews and went down from there.
  • Kingdom of Heaven (2005) — Budget, $130 million. Box office, $47,398,413 (domestic), $211,652,051 (worldwide). Its theatrical version was decimated by Executive Meddling over its length, though it was Vindicated on Video with the 3-hour director's cut.
  • A Kiss Before Dying (1991) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $15,429,177. This got evicted from theaters after 31 days.
  • Kiss Kiss Bang Bang (2005) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $15.8 million. Shane Black's directorial debut didn't set the box office on fire, but the critics loved it and it led Robert Downey Jr. to a Career Resurrection with Iron Man. Black wouldn't make another film until Iron Man 3.
  • Kiss of Death (1995) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $14,942,422. This film and Jade from later that year marked a stillborn attempt to make David Caruso a movie star after suddenly leaving NYPD Blue, and he faded from public view before coming back with CSI: Miami.
  • A Knight's Tale (2001) — Budget, $65 million. Box office, $56,569,702 (domestic), $117,487,473 (worldwide). The film's gleeful Anachronism Stew and Cliché Storm plot led to its mixed-to-positive reception from critics but it's become a Cult Classic with time.
  • Knight and Day (2010) — Budget, $117 million. Box office, $76,423,035 (domestic), $261,930,436 (worldwide). It had the worst opening day for a Tom Cruise film since Far and Away and the worst debut for a Cruise action film since Legend.
  • Knock Knock (2015) — Budget, $3 million. Box office, $36,336. This Eli Roth horror film played at 22 theaters and was gone after two weeks.
  • Knock Off (1998) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $10,319,955. This movie was accused by a few people of being a "Knock-Off" of Rush Hour, which came out a few weeks later. This did not help out Jean-Claude Van Damme or Rob Schneider's careers any. (The latter's association with Adam Sandler kept him in the public eye for a little while.) It is the last American film director Tsui Hark worked on, as he dealt with only Chinese-born movies since.
  • Knucklehead (2010) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $1,000 (domestic), $8,927 (worldwide) (Those are indeed the actual figures). This movie only played in select theaters, and, unsurprisingly, KO'ed wrestler Big Show's film career right out of the gates.
  • Kong: Skull Island (2017) — Budget, $185 million. Box office, $168,052,812 (domestic), $566,652,812 (worldwide). This reboot of King Kong fell short of its production budget in the States, but its overseas figures more than made up for that.
  • Krippendorf's Tribe (1998) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $7,571,115. Director Todd Holland did not direct another feature film for nine years.
  • Krull (1983) — Budget, $27 million (not counting marketing costs), $50 million (counting them). Box office, $16,519,460. Wiped out star Ken Marshall's cinematic career right away, and it's one of a handful of projects around that time that ended writer Stanford Sherman's career.
  • Kubo and the Two Strings (2016) — Budget, $60 million. Box office, $48 million (domestic), $69.9 million (worldwide). Despite glowing reviews from virtually every critic in show business (this has the highest RT score for Laika's films so far), this stop-motion feature was overshadowed by bigger films such as Suicide Squad and Sausage Party (the former got hard knocks from critics, and the latter has its own stories), and was one of the last few films released during 2016's Summer Bomb Buster.
  • Kull the Conqueror (1997) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $6.1 million (domestic), $22 million (worldwide). The script was originally written as a third Conan the Barbarian movie but was remade for Robert E. Howard's earlier barbarian hero when Arnold Schwarzenegger refused to reprise the role. The unfamiliarity of the character may be one factor that damaged its prospects. It ultimately didn't help leading man Kevin Sorbo's career prospects outside of television and low-budget Christian films. This was the last film for director John Nicolella, who died the following year.
  • Kundun (1997) — Budget, $28 million. Box office, $8,684,789. The production of this movie led to China barring director Martin Scorsese, writer Melissa Mathison, and several other crew members from returning to China. It also led to China hindering Disney's distribution of Mulan in the country the next year (Disney distributed Kundun through Touchstone). Mathison did not have another cinematic credit until dealing with the English dubbing of Ghibli's Ponyo on the Cliff by the Sea in 2008 and did not take part in another full project until Disney/Steven Spielberg's The BFG, which ended up being her final work when she died during production.

    L 
  • Labor Day (2013) — Budget, $18 million. Box office, $20,275,812. This and Men, Women and Children put a big dent into the career of Jason Reitman.
  • Labyrinth (1986) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $12,729,917. This film's initial failure demoralized director and Muppet creator/puppeteer Jim Henson; he was never able to direct another film before he suddenly died four years later. Labyrinth quickly became a Cult Classic and its Big Bad, as played by the late David Bowie, directly inspired the Big Bad of Final Fantasy II, who went on to be a major villain in the Dissidia: Final Fantasy sub-series (this didn't stop Labyrinth from being an Old Shame to Bowie, but it was because of his costume; co-star Jennifer Connelly views this movie as a full Old Shame after her performance was criticized). This is also the only film co-written by author Dennis Lee, was one of two post-Monty Python films that derailed Terry Jones' cinematic writing until The New 10's, and was one of two 1986 movies, with Howard the Duck being the other, that delivered a small setback to George Lucas' career.
  • The Ladies Man (2000) — Budget, $24 million. Box office, $13.7 million. Sent Reginald Hudlin's directing career straight to the junkyard; he would direct one more film in 2002, and then never again until 2016 (he remained active as a producer and writer during this hiatus). It's also a Star-and-Writer Derailing Role for Saturday Night Live alumnus Tim Meadows and crushed the Leon Phelps skit from the show.
  • Lady in the Water (2006) — Budget, $70 million. Box office, $42,285,169 (domestic), $72,785,169 (worldwide). One of the factors in M. Night Shyamalan losing his Auteur License (plus his reputation issues led to Disney ending their relationship with him), but he would remain an A-list director until the film adaptation of Avatar: The Last Airbender, which fully turned his name and reputation to mud. Recent films such as fellow bomb After Earth have not helped, but much lower budget films like Split have.
  • Ladybugs (1992) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $14.8 million. Paramount had trouble marketing the film, as it was aimed more at teens; not the typical audience for a Rodney Dangerfield movie. It also came out when Wayne's World and My Cousin Vinny were dominating the box office, both of which stole most of its audience, and the movie disappeared from theaters within two weeks. Director Sidney J. Furie hasn't helmed a theatrical film since.
  • Ladyhawke (1985) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $18.43 million. It had a mixed response, with most critics agreeing that Matthew Broderick was out of place in the film. It's since become a Cult Classic.
  • Land and Freedom (1996) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $228,800. The last film to involve writer Jim Allen.
  • Land of the Lost (2009) — Budget, $142 million. Box office, $69,548,641. A failed attempt to start a cinematic franchise of the Kroft series, and the worst reviewed film to involve Brad Silberling, who directed the film. Silberling has not worked on another theatrical project since. The Krofts also did not do another movie until 2016.
  • Lara Croft Tomb Raider: The Cradle of Life (2003) — Budget, $95 million. Box office, $65,660,196 (domestic), $156,505,388 (worldwide). Paramount Pictures and copyright holder Eidos Interactive blamed this film's failure on the terrible reception of the Tomb Raider video game that was released alongside it, Tomb Raider: The Angel of Darkness, and that game's developer, Core Design. As a result, this daily double not only permanently entombed the Tomb Raider movie series with Angelina Jolie after only two adventures, but began the dominoes to Core going out of business after Eidos revoked their control over the series in response to both failures, which got their boss, Jeremy-Heath Smith, fired. This movie, along with Speed 2: Cruise Control and the critical thrashing of The Haunting (1999), killed off Jan de Bont's moviemaking career, as he wasn't involved in anything until 2012, which premiered a Dutch movie (this makes Cradle of Life the last English-language film de Bont has been involved in).
  • Larger Than Life (1996) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $8,315,693. Notable for being one of the last two film scores by Miles Goodman, who died a few months before it came out.
  • Lars and the Real Girl (2007) — Budget, $12 million. Box office, $11,293,663. The critics adored it but it only had a limited release.
  • Last Action Hero (1993) — Budget, $85 million. Box office, $50 million (domestic), $137.3 million (worldwide). Had the misfortune of being released the weekend after Jurassic Park.
  • The Last Airbender (2010) — Budget: $150 million (not counting a giant marketing budget of $130 million), $280 million (counting the marketing budget). Box office: $131,772,187 (domestic), $319,713,881 (worldwide). This infamously botched live-action adaptation of the Nickelodeon cartoon's first "book" and the controversy of "Racebending" (read, white-washing) a cast that should have been Asian (outside of the Fire Nation villains, who were changed to Indian) ensured M. Night Shyamalan's demotion to the B-list of Hollywood directors and put him in contention as the "new Ed Wood" of the business alongside Uwe Boll; most of the films Shyamalan were associated with for the next 3 years are considered box-office poison (he would began a tentative comeback with Blumhouse and Universal in 2015 and 2017 with The Visit and Split, but both of those movies' budgets are less than $10 million). The intention to create a film trilogy based on the series fizzled out, and the last minute 3D conversion Paramount enforced on the film earned them a special "Worst Eye-Gouging Misuse of 3D" Golden Raspberry Award (amongst other Razzies) and burned the technology's reputation only months after the OTHER Avatar from James Cameron advanced the idea. This movie also incinerated the careers of several of its stars after the casting was criticized as "incorrect", with the actor who played the titular character, Noah Ringer, having zero credits after this and another high-profile bomb, Cowboys & Aliens. The ONLY crew member who wasn't banished from the franchise was Northern Water Tribe Princess Yue's actress, Seychelle Gabriel, who was cast as Asami Sato for the sequel cartoon The Legend of Korra. Gabriel, Prince Zuko actor Dev Patel, series creators Michael Dante DiMartino and Bryan Konieztko, and everyone else involved with the original classic show all want to forget this movie ever happened.
  • The Last Castle (2001) — Budget, $72 million. Box office, $27,642,707. Critics gave this mixed reviews but audiences viewed it more favorably. Director Rod Lurie stayed off the director' chair until 2007's Resurrecting the Champ.
  • Last Dance (1996) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $5,939,449. The only writing credit for producer Stephen Haft, who is credited with the film's story, and the last feature film writing credit Ron Koslow has to date.
  • The Last Days of Disco (1998) — Budget, $8 million. Box office, $3 million. It led to director Whit Stillman's career falling to the low end of the Popularity Polynomial until The New 10's even though it got good reviews.
  • The Last Five Years (2015) — Budget, $2 million. Box office, $145,427. It received a very limited release in theaters and a simultaneous release on VOD.
  • Last Flag Flying (2017) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $980,840. The second commercial flop in a row for director Richard Linklater.
  • Last Holiday (2006) — Budget, $45 million. Box office, $43,343,248.
  • The Last Kiss (2006) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $15,852,401. This stalled the career of Zach Braff, who didn't appear in another film for four years. Tony Goldwyn also stayed off the director's chair for four years, returning to do Conviction.
  • The Last Legion (2007) — Budget, $67 million. Box office, $25,303,038. Director Doug Lefler retired from directing after this movie, his first theatrical film, did poorly with both critics and audiences, later returning to his previous life as a storyboard artist. This film hasn't helped its writers as well; while Jez Butterworth has remained a modestly successful screenwriter, the same can't be said for his brother, Tom, who stuck with writing for TV, only able to write one movie in 2015. This also damaged the careers of screenwriters Peter Rader (who moved on to directing television), and Valerio Manfredi (who had to wait five years before he would write another movie).
  • Last Man Standing (1996) — Budget, $67 million. Box office, $47,267,001. This remake of Yojimbo was the biggest bomb at the time for New Line Cinema and this and two other duds that year led to many firings. Many critics called out the film for its Darkness-Induced Audience Apathy and Bruce Willis's Flat performance. Walter Hill didn't occupy the director's chair until 2000's similarly ill-fated Supernova.
  • The Last Movie (1970) — Budget, unknown. Box office, $1 million.
  • The Last of the Finest (1990) — Budget, $12 million. Box office, $1,531,489. Another movie that contributed to Orion's bankruptcy.
  • Last Rites (1988) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $426,695. This movie attracted controversy for the portrayal of a Christian priest tied to the mafia, and the fallout convinced TV supremo Donald Bellisario to never attempt another theatrical film and stay in TV.
  • The Last Stand (2013) — Budget, $30-45 million. Box office, $12 million (domestic), $48.3 million (worldwide). Arnold Schwarzenegger's first starring role since the end of his tenure as Governor of California. Audiences ignored it in its January release but the critics generally liked it.
  • The Last Temptation of Christ (1988) — Budget, $7 million. Box office, $8.9 million. Martin Scorsese's film version of the Nikos Kazantzakis novel about the life of Christ was heavily protested by Christian groups over its Darker and Edgier take on the story, especially over a scene taken out of context where Jesus is tempted on the cross. Only about 200 theaters screened the film after several theater chains dropped it. It's still banned in Chile, Phillipines and Singapore to this day. The critics still liked it and Scorsese got an Oscar nomination for directing. Many of the same Christian groups that protested it lightened their stance in later years (though others were unwilling to give Scorsese's 2016 historical religious drama Silence a chance because of the earlier film despite there being nothing in it that would offend religious sensibilities). It has since been ranked as one of Scorsese's best.
  • The Last Time I Committed Suicide (1997) — Budget, $4 million. Box office, $46,367. A very poor start to Stephen Kay's directing career.
  • The Last Witch Hunter (2015) — Budget, $70-90 million. Box office, $27,367,660 (domestic), $140,396,650 (worldwide). Director Breck Eisner had to take himself out of the sequel to the Jackie Chan remake of The Karate Kid to work on this film. The plans for a franchise based off The Last Witch Hunter were burned up by it failing with both the box office and critics, and star and producer Vin Diesel's schedule becoming hectic.
  • Lawnmower Man 2: Beyond Cyberspace (1996) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $2,409,225. The first Lawnmower Man movie wasn't all that well received by critics to begin with. This one fared even worse, having a completely different cast. It mowed down the career of director Farhad Mann; Mann didn't work on another theatrical film until 2013.
  • The Law of Enclosures (2001) — Budget, CDN $2 million. Box office, CDN $1,000. This extremely low-gross is due to it playing in one theater. It was an Acclaimed Flop, winning a Genie Award for star Brendan Fletcher and two other nominations, but it never got released on DVD.
  • Laws of Attraction (2004) — Budget, $32-45 million. Box office, $30,016,165. The critics dismissed it as a lower quality version of Adam's Rib. Writer Aline Brosh Mckenna bounced back with The Devil Wears Prada but the other writer, Robert Harling, would have no more film credits after this, and his next significant work was the short-lived series GCB.
  • The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen (2003) — Budget, $78 million. Box office, $66,465,204 (domestic), $179,265,204 (worldwide). Derailed Sean Connery's mainstream career, as he effectively retired after his work here. Heck, this movie pretty much derailed everybody's careers, which guaranteed any ideas for more adventures with this league were not going to happen. The film's production also led to distributor 20th Century Fox getting sued by Larry Cohen and Martin Poll, who accused them of plagiarizing a script of theirs called Cast of Characters; this suit was settled out of court, which was not something League creator Alan Moore approved of.
  • Leatherheads (2008) — Budget, $58 million. Box office, $41,299,492. Its misleading marketing, which made very little mention of its premise about the early days of football, likely led to its takedown.
  • Leave It to Beaver (1997) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $10,925,060. The film version of the classic sitcom was the first and only feature by directed by Andy Cadiff, who's had a steady career in TV before and after it.
  • Leaves Of Grass (2009) — Budget, $9 million. Box office, $1,018,753.
  • Leaving Normal (1992) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $1,514,114.
  • Left Behind (released in 2000/2001) — Budget, $4 million. Box office, $4.2 million. This version was produced at the midpoint of the book series' success but barely broke even; thanks in large part to an unorthodox release strategy in which the film was released on video first, but what really damaged this film was co-author Tim LaHaye not only disowning the film (blasting the poor quality of the films) but eventually suing film producer Cloud Ten Pictures for breach of contract, with the case taking nearly a decade before being settled in 2008. (Two more films in this version were produced covering the 2nd book "Tribulation Force"note  during the period this was being fought in court). Needless to say, it didn't help Kirk Cameron's career out much.
    • The 2nd version (released in 2014) — Budget, $16 million. Box office, $14,019,924 (domestic), $19,682,924 (worldwide). By 2010, Cloud Ten Pictures got a second chance to produce a version of the Left Behind books more to LaHaye's liking; this time with a bigger name cast that was headlined by Nicolas Cage and a bigger (by Christian film standards, at least) budget. Despite being the Creator-Preferred Adaptation of LaHaye and co-author Jerry Jenkins; the movie (much like the original one) eventually barely made its budget back despite poor reviews from secular (and some Christian reviewers). Sequels focusing on the 2nd book are in the planning stages.
  • Legend (1985) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $15,502,112. This movie's production is noteworthy for starting an accidental fire at Pinewood Studios that decimated the famous 007 soundstage and forced a small change in the film's shooting schedule. Directed by Ridley Scott, this is the third auteur-driven film produced by Arnon Milchan between 1984 and 1985 where the director's vision came in conflict with the studio (following Sergio Leone's Once Upon a Time in America and Terry Gilliam's Brazil). Unlike what happened to Leone, however, the film wasn't taken away from Scott's hands, nor did Scott put up a fight with the studio like Gilliam and allowed the studio to make alterations. The film eventually became a Cult Classic, and Scott finally realized his vision with a Director's Cut DVD in 2002.
  • Legend (2015) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $1,872,994 (domestic), $38.7 million (worldwide). This Bio Pic of the gangster Kray twins (both Tom Hardy) got generally good reviews but its U.S. release was only in 107 theaters. Its advertising drew ridicule when one critic's two-star rating was made to look like a five-star one on the film's poster by careful photoshopping.
  • The Legend of Bagger Vance (2000) — Budget, $80 million. Box office, $39,459,427. Robert Redford's drama set in the Depression-era South received underwhelming critical reviews and was rather controversial for Will Smith's Magical Negro character and glossing over the racism of the time period. It was the last of three box-office busts for Matt Damon, following All the Pretty Horses and Titan A.E.. This is the last movie to date to credit Allied Filmmakers, who never really had a hit, with all of their films either being a critical flop or a commercial flop (or both). It was also the final film for Jack Lemmon before his death the following year.
  • Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga'Hoole (2010) — Budget, $80 million. Box office, $55,675,313 (domestic), $140,073,390 (worldwide). This intended first film of the Guardians of Ga'Hoole novels proved to be its only installment. The fans did not care for the changes to the story while critics thought it was So Okay, It's Average.
  • The Legend of Hercules (2014) — Budget, $70 million. Box office, $61,279,452. Part of a string of flops for director Renny Harlin and a Star Deraling Role for Kellan Lutz.
  • The Legend of Johnny Lingo (2003) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $1,690,767. This feature remake of the short film Johnny Lingo likely had a limited release. This is producer Gerald R. Molen's last theatrical film before he began producing Dinesh D'Souza's documentaries.
  • The Legend of the Lone Ranger (1981) — Budget, $18 million. Box office, $12.6 million. The bad reputation of the film's Troubled Production and legal issues put a dent in any possible success. Was supposed to be the big debut of leading actor Klinton Spilsbury, yet it ended up being his only film appearance.
  • The Legend of Tarzan (2016) — Budget, $180 million. Box office, $126.6 million (domestic), $356.7 million (worldwide). This adaptation of Tarzan was cannibalized at the box office by a bunch of other failed tentpoles in 2016's Summer Bomb Buster note  and got some weak reviews from critics. Audiences were more forgiving. Notably, the film didn't bomb nearly as bad as expected, but it still didn't earn the $400 million it would apparently need to break even, according to insiders.
  • The Legend of Zorro (2005) — Budget, $75 million. Box office, $46,464,023 (domestic), $142,400,065 (worldwide). This was the last hurrah for the Zorro movies with Antonio Banderas, being critically derided. No further cinematic adaptations of Zorro have come up since. Director Martin Campbell, however, was saved for a time since his next major film was Daniel Craig's first James Bond film, Casino Royale.
  • Legends of Oz: Dorothy's Return (2014) — Budget, $70 million. Box office, $18,662,027. This was the first time since Home on the Range's critical and financial implosion in 2004 that Will Finn directed a feature film, and this movie's failure could send his career back to prison (along with the directing career of Dan St. Pierre). Production company Summertime Entertainment quietly folded after this film's failure, and it was the first of three busts for distributor Clarius Entertainment. Two sequels and a follow-up TV series were announced to be in the works around the film's wide release, but after flopping with critics and the box office and the shutdown of Summertime, word on all of that happening went into dead silence.
  • Legendary (2010) — Budget, $5 million. Box office, $200,393. This film was only in theaters for one week, and left theaters at the end of said week, taking $4 million in losses with it.
  • The Lego Ninjago Movie (2017) — Budget, $70 million. Box office, $59,281,555 (domestic), $123,081,555 (worldwide). This movie failed to receive the critical and commercial love that The LEGO Movie and The LEGO Batman Movie managed to earn. It notably had a pretty bad opening weekend ($20 million, which is lower than The Emoji Movie's $24 million despite that movie's critical savaging), and did so poorly that it was booted out of theaters after week ten, something unheard of for a wide-release animated film.
  • Leonard Part 6 (1987) — Budget, $24 million. Box office, $4,615,255. Bill Cosby was so disgusted with it that rather than promote it, he implored people to avoid it. They listened, which led to Leonard being beamed out of theaters after just three weeks, and Cosby became the first person to accept a Razzie for their own film (but not the first to accept it at the actual awards show, that "honor" belongs to Paul Verhoeven for Showgirls). The film's implosion, along with the severe financial failures of Ishtar and The Adventures Of Baron Munchausen, led distributor Columbia into a merger with Tristar and both studios leaving Coca-Cola for Sony. Director Paul Weiland, whom Cosby called "inexperienced", didn't direct another theatrical film for 7 years, and he has not made a particularly significant impact on Hollywood after this movie. Cosby, on the other hand, had one more flop on his hands (Ghost Dad) before his movie career was done for good.
  • Let It Ride (1989) — Budget, $18 million. Box office, $4,973,285. Cost director Joe Pytka his major cinematic career until Space Jam in 1996, and writer Nancy Dowd, who had herself credited as Ernest Morton, did not have another visible job in Hollywood.
  • Let Me In (2010) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $12,134,935 (domestic), $24,145,613 (worldwide). This is an Acclaimed Flop, but it still did lead to director Matt Reeves' directing career to be locked out in the cold until Dawn of the Planet of the Apes 4 years later.
  • Let's Get Harry (1986) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $140,980. An Alan Smithee-directed film (the actual director is Stuart Rosenberg, who disowned the project and only directed one more film in 5 years). The film has only been released on VHS and has never been released on DVD or Blu-ray.
  • Letters to God (2010) — Budget, $3 million. Box office, $2,908,893. This was generally panned by critics. It was praised by Christian groups; however, it wasn't enough to bring in the faithful to the box office.
  • The Libertine (2004) — Budget, $22 million. Box office, $10,852,064. This film about the infamous poet John Wilmot debuted at the 2004 Toronto International Film Festival. It made its official theatrical debut on November 25, 2005 in 55 theaters before expanding to 815 theaters about three months later on March 10, 2006. This is the one and only feature film for director Laurence Dunmore, whose only film credit since is the short The Parting Glass.
  • Life (1999) — Budget, $80 million. Box office, $73,345,029. Eddie Murphy's last R-rated film. The film opened strong but failed to make enough of a dent to cover its budget.
  • Life (2017) — Budget, $58 million. Box office, $30,234,022 (domestic), $100,541,806 (worldwide). Critics generally liked it even if they felt it added nothing new to the sci-fi genre. It didn't help that it came out in proximity to the similarly-themed Alien: Covenant, which overperformed it in spades. Its own opening weekend saw it trounced by a tight crowd.
  • Life As A House (2001) — Budget, $27 million. Box office, $23,903,791. Hayden Christensen would get bigger duties when he played Anakin Skywalker in Star Wars Episode II: Attack of the Clones a year later, but writer Mark Andrus wasn't as fortunate.
  • The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou (2004) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $34,808,403. One of a handful of flops in 2004 that ultimately helped end Disney CEO Michael Eisner's long run at the company, and this one also ended Wes Anderson's relationship with Disney as well; the major films he's directed past this were distributed by Fox instead (except for Moonrise Kingdom, which was distributed by Focus Features).
  • The Life Before Her Eyes (2007, 2008) — Budget, $13 million. Box office, $7,248,490. This sent the career of director/producer Vadim Perelman, who did DreamWorks' House of Sand and Fog, into a bottomless pit; he has yet to direct or produce another movie.
  • Life Itself (2018) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $5,067,393 (worldwide). This ensemble film from This Is Us creator Dan Fogelman was shredded by critics for its overwrought melodrama and it suffered the second-worst opening for a wide release film since 1982.
  • The Life of David Gale (2003) — Budget, $38 million. Box office, $19,955,598 (domestic), $38,955,598 (worldwide). The film's critical and commercial failure prompted director Alan Parker to retire from filmmaking, despite a high quality track record before it.
  • Life During Wartime (2010) — Budget, $4.5 million. Box office, $744,816. The critics generally liked it but it only played in 20 theaters.
  • A Life Less Ordinary (1997) — Budget, $12 million. Box office, $4,366,722.
  • Life Or Something Like It (2002) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $16,872,671. This film, and Man of the House, three years later, derailed the A-list career of director Stephen Herek, who has mostly stuck to television and Direct-to-Video films since. Writer Dana Stevens didn't work for another 3 years and didn't get another cinema writing credit for 11.
  • Life Stinks (1991) — Budget, $13 million. Box office, $4,102,526. The film's enormous critical and commercial flop was bad news for star, director, producer, and writer Mel Brooks, whose career took a downturn after this, bottoming out with Dracula: Dead and Loving It.
  • Lifeforce (1985) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $11,603,545. This is one of the films that ultimately did in The Cannon Group.
  • The Light Between Oceans (2016) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $12.5 million (domestic), $24.3 million (worldwide). The last DreamWorks film to be released by Disney's Touchstone Pictures label as part of its five-year deal and no films have been confirmed to be in development from Touchstone, effectively ending the label.note  Also part of a bad string for Michael Fassbender.
  • Light Sleeper (1992) — Budget, $5 million. Box office, $1,050,861. The critics liked it a lot but it only played in 37 theaters.
  • Limbo (1999) — Budget, $8-10 million. Box office, $2,160,710. The first film released and distributed by Screen Gems got mostly good reviews but only a wide release topping 111 theaters. It still got writer/director/producer/editor John Sayles recognition from the National Board of Review for excellence in filmmaking.
  • Limelight (1952) — Budget, $900,000. Box office, $1 million (US box office), $8 million (Worldwide). Its US release was halted by controversy over Charlie Chaplin's alleged Communist sympathies, which led to him being refused re-entry into the US while he was promoting the film in Britain. It got a wide US release twenty years later, which included its first showing in Los Angeles, thus making it eligible for that year's Oscars.note  It's since been Vindicated by History as one of Chaplin's finest films.
  • Lion of the Desert (1981) — Budget, $35 million (estimated). No accurate box office numbers seem to exist, but the revenue could be around $1–1.5 million. The fact that it is a historical epic honoring a Libyan national hero, commissioned and financed by the Muammar Gaddafi dictatorship, results in a very powerful case of Audience-Alienating Premise. This is too bad, because most critics who actually bothered to see it say that it is really good.note 
  • Lions for Lambs (2007) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $15,002,854 (domestic), $63,215,872 (worldwide). This wasn't a great start for the newly relaunched United Artists under the management of Tom Cruise and Paula Wagner.
  • Listen to Me (1989) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $4,299,023 (USA). This is one of the handful of films that brought down producer Jerry Weintraub's independent production company, and the last major film starring Kirk Cameron, who became a born-again Christian around this time and is now doing low-budget religious films for a living. A film about college debate teams, it is notorious for a film of this premise for having a blatant bias, in this case, against abortion.note 
  • Little Black Book (2004) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $22,034,832. Director Nick Hurran did one more theatrical feature before sticking to television.
  • Little Boy (2015) — Budget, $24 million. Box office, $17.4 million. It had a limited release, but what really killed this World War II drama critically was that the initially happy reception of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki's bombings made the film come off as insensitve when it didn't mean it.
  • Little Buddha (1993) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $4,858,139. It opened in France in December 1993, where it was a box office success with other 1 million tickets sold. Its US release the following May consigned it to 139 theaters tops but it got a generally good reception from critics.
  • Little Children (2006) — Budget, $26 million. Box office, $14,821,658. Todd Field's second and final film as director received pretty good reviews but only played at 115 theaters. Its dark demeanor likely drove audiences away. This helped cement Jackie Earle Haley's Career Resurrection.
  • Little Giants (1994) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $19,306,362. Director Duwayne Dunham was regulated to TV movies until 2011. It became a Cult Classic with a few College Football teams.
  • Little Man (2006) — Budget, $64 million. Box office, $58,645,052 (domestic), $101,595,121 (worldwide). It was derided for its blatantly similar plot to the Bugs Bunny cartoon Baby Buggy Bunny and an unfunny one at that. It didn't help that it was released in the midst of the smashing success of Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest. This was the last feature film Keenen Ivory Wayans directed.
  • Little Monsters (1989) — Budget, $7 million. Box office, $793,775. It was financed and originally going to be released by Vestron Pictures, but they went bankrupt before it was released. The rights were promptly thrown over to Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, who responded by dumping the film in only 179 theaters in late August.
  • Little Nemo: Adventures in Slumberland (1989) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $1,368,000. This film only received a limited release in the United States after it escaped Development Hell. It is the biggest Old Shame for Hayao Miyazaki as far as the anime director is concerned.
  • Little Nicky (2000) — Budget, $85 million. Box office, $58,292,295. This rather notorious movie didn't send Adam Sandler or his production company to Hell (it escaped some heat from the cinematic pits by being released the same year as Battlefield Earth), but Steven Brill, who directed and co-wrote the film, still took damage; he didn't write again until 2014. It also didn't help the cast out too much (cast includes Harvey Keitel and Patricia Arquette).
  • Little Nikita (1988) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $1,733,070. One of several Columbia Pictures films greenlit by outgoing president David Puttnam that the studio left out to dry. Its mixed reviews citing its questionable plot didn't help either.
  • A Little Princess (1995) — Budget, $17 million. Box office, $10,015,449. Despite critical acclaim, Warner Bros. barely promoted the movie, and it floundered out during a very competitive month.
  • The Little Vampire (2000) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $27,965,865. Uli Edel's first cinematic movie in 6 years, this movie's failure sent his theatrical career back into the coffin it came from; he only did TV work again outside of a few foreign films and didn't direct another theatrical film until 2015. This also sucked the life out of writer Larry Wilson's career; his co-writer, Karey Kirkpatrick, was saved thanks to his writing relationship with DreamWorks Animation.
  • Live by Night (2017) — Budget, $65 million. Box office, $21,675,886. Resulted in Warner Bros. having to declare a $75 million loss on the film, making it one of the larger bombs of 2016/2017. This wasn't helped by coming out after Disney/Lucasfilm's Rogue One, which was the finishing touch to a $7 billion year for the Mouse House. Live By Night also didn't perform all that well with critics and the failure led to Ben Affleck dropping out of the director's seat for the DC Extended Universe Batman film. Currently holds the record for biggest theater drop during its third weekend, according to Box Office Mojo.
  • Lock Up (1989) — Budget, $24 million. Box office, $22,099,847 (domestic). This sent Sylvester Stallone's production company White Eagle into oblivion after one movie.
  • Lockout (2012) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $14,326,864 (domestic), $32,204,030 (worldwide). It didn't help that John Carpenter successfully sued the makers for plagiarism over similarities to Escape from New York.
  • The Loft (2014) — Budget, $14 million. Box office, $10.1 million. This was meant to be released in theaters by Universal and Dark Castle, but Universal dropped it to Open Road films, and Dark Castle went dark altogether.
  • Logan Lucky (2017) — Budget, $29 million. Box office, $27,780,977 (domestic), $47,400,777 (worldwide). Steven Soderbergh ended his retirement from feature films for this heist comedy. It was a critical smash but it was released at the tail-end of one of the most apathetic summers in years.
  • Lolita (1997) — Budget, $62 million. Box office, $1,071,255. Difficulties in finding a distributor for this controversial film resulted in it opening in Europe before America, and landing on Showtime before hitting theaters, where it became one of the biggest bombs of 1997. It was the last in a series of bombs that subsequently derailed the career of producer/presenter Mario Kassar for 5 years, and director Adrian Lyne also did not direct another film for 5 years, with his next movie being his last.
  • London (2005) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $20,361. It's an understandable gross considering that the film was in a whopping 7 theaters and was booted out after a week. This is the only feature film directed by Hunter Richards, whose next film credit was the 2010 short Awake.
  • London Has Fallen (2016) — Budget, $60 million. Box office, $62.5 million (domestic), $195.7 million (worldwide). This film came out the week after another Gerard Butler film, Gods of Egypt. Both films were heavily panned by critics and got mowed down by Zootopia, with Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice ensuring they would not recover their budgets in the United States. It remains to be seen if this will send Butler's career to the sewers, as despite the weak numbers, he is set to star in a third installment of the Has Fallen series.
  • The Lone Ranger (2013) — Budget, $215–275 million (not counting marketing costs), $380–$450 million (counting them). Box office, $89,302,115 (domestic), $260,502,115 (worldwide). One of the biggest flops of all time, with or without adjusting for inflation, and, along with Cowboys And Aliens, is guilty of dropping the bridge on the fantasy western for the foreseeable future. The film was derided not only for trying the fantasy angle, but also for simply being Pirates of the Caribbean recycled for the old west, and mocked when Jack Sparrow actor Johnny Depp was cast as Indian Tonto, which earned a bit of a backlash from the Native American community. This is part of a string of flops for Depp as well as a Star-Derailing Role for co-star Armie Hammer, who played the titular character. Plus, it has severely burned the careers of superwriter duo Ted Elliott and Terry Rossio (the men who co-wrote the earlier Pirates films, Disney Animation's Aladdin, and the first Shrek film from Lone Ranger copyright holder DreamWorks Animation), as they do not have a theatrical credit past this movie. In addition, Disney ended their long relationship with producer Jerry Bruckheimer after this film, though for other reasons; the only major work with Disney Bruckheimer has past this point is 2017's Dead Men Tell No Tales. Its massive flop (the highest figure on the loss is $193 million) may have vindicated Disney's decision to terminate studio chairman Rich Ross after the failure of John Carter the year prior.
  • The Lonely Guy (1984) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $5,718,573.
  • The Lonely Lady (1983) — Budget, $5 million. Box office, $1,223,000. Virtually every major player in this film save Ray Liotta (it was one of his first roles) saw their careers derailed by its failure. The Lonely Lady is also the last time one of author Harold Robbins's works has been adapted at all.
  • The Long Kiss Goodnight (1996) — Budget, $65 million. Box office, $33,447,612 (domestic), $89,456,761 (worldwide). This is the final major film that Geena Davis and Renny Harlin worked on together, and the fallout from the nuclear catastrophic implosion of Cutthroat Island the year before led to the end of both their professional and personal partnership (they would divorce soon afterwards). Harlin has been a B-list director since, and Davis has had a minimal career in television since. It would also be a decade before co-producer Shane Black took another producer credit on a film.
  • The Longshots (2008) — Budget, $23 million. Box office, $11,767,866. Did some sizable damage to Fred Durst, who has not been a serious movie producer since.
  • Look Who's Talking Now (1993) — Budget, $22 million. Box office, $10,340,263. The third film in the Look Who's Talking series was universally panned for being a cash grab, and suffered stiff competition from The Nightmare Before Christmas.
  • Lookin To Get Out (1982) — Budget, $17 million. Box office, $946,461. Most notable for being Angelina Jolie's debut role (she played the daughter to her real-life father Jon Voight's character).
  • Looney Tunes: Back in Action (2003) — Budget, $80 million. Box office, $68,514,844. The movie's financial failure led WB to think that the Looney Tunes don't have the lasting appeal that they hoped, cancelling the planned Looney Tunes shorts in production and effectively giving the "That's All, Folks!" to Warner Bros. Animation until 2014's The LEGO Movie along with the theatrical career of director Joe Dante (who was already on bad terms with Warner and Universal), and the cinematic career of star Brendan Fraser, who didn't do another studio film for 5 years. In light of this fiasco, the Looney Tunes will probably never get another theatrical film release in the foreseeable future (ironically, it actually got decent critical reception, particularly vis-à-vis the last Tunes movie). This movie, along with failures from Disney and DreamWorks, helped bring down traditional 2D animated films until Disney released The Princess and the Frog in 2009.
  • Loose Cannons (1990) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $5,585,184. It was taken out of theaters after two weeks, during which the critics mauled it to pieces. Dan Aykroyd isn't proud of this film; when footage from the film surfaced in a landfill during a murder investigation, Aykroyd remarked it should have stayed buried.
  • Lord of War (2005) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $24,149,632 (domestic), $72,617,068 (worldwide). It received generally good reviews and a commendation from Amnesty International.
  • Lords of Dogtown (2005) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $13,411,957. The first and only film produced together by Sony Pictures divisions Columbia and Tri-Star. It suffered in comparison to the recent documentary Dogtown and Z-Boys, which was about the same skateboarding team this film depicts.
  • Lorenzo's Oil (1992) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $7,286,388. Despite being critically acclaimed, this film did not fare well at the box office. Director George Miller toned his work down for the next two decades, focusing on family entertainment such as Babe, but would finally return to heavy action and drama with Mad Max: Fury Road in 2015.
  • Loser (2000) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $18.4 million. After this film's disappointing results, director Amy Heckerling took a break from movies until 2007's I Could Never Be Your Woman.
  • The Losers (2010) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $23,591,432 (domestic), $29,379,723 (worldwide). A failed attempt at adapting the comic book of the same name. Any plans for a sequel were quickly shot down.
  • Losin' It (1983) — Budget, $7 million. Box office, $1.2 million. The flopping of this film ended up shuttering Tiberius Film Productions.
  • Losing Isaiah (1995) — Budget, $17 million. Box office, $7.6 million. It received mixed reviews for its heavy-handed melodrama, but Jessica Lange's performance was unanimously praised. Ironically, Lange herself came to regret doing the film.
  • The Loss of Sexual Innocence (1999) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $164,022. Put a setback in the careers of director Mike Figgis and star Julian Sands, though Sands remained very visible going into the 2000's thanks to recurring roles on the Rose Red mini-series and playing two major Big Bads: Valmont in Jackie Chan Adventures, and Vladimir Bierko in 24. Figgis wasn't so lucky after September 11th helped derail his movie Hotel.
  • The Loss of a Teardrop Diamond (2008, 2009) — Budget, $6,500,000. Box office, $119,790. A long lost screenplay by Tennessee Williams was dusted off and filmed for this period melodrama which was reviled by critics and never left limited release. This is the only film for director Jodie Markell, who went back to acting after this. The stars were barely phased by its underperformance.
  • The Lost City of Z (2017) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $17,122,336. Another highly-praised film that never left a limited release.
  • Lost Highway (1997) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $3.7 million. This David Lynch thriller got a mixed reception for its murky plot and never went past a limited release. This marked the final theatrical film for Richard Pryor, Robert Blake and Jack Nance. It became a Cult Classic once it hit home video.
  • Lost Horizon (1973) — Budget, $12 million. Box office, $3 million. This infamous musical remake of the 1937 Frank Capra classic was seen as the final nail in the coffin for the traditional Hollywood musical, with frequent comebacks for the genre popping up ever since. Producer Ross Hunter only worked in television after this movie bombed out, and it didn't do director Charles Jarrott's career any favors, either.
  • The Lost Medallion: The Adventures Of Billy Stone (2013) — Budget, $2.5 million. Box office, $705,854. Its widest release was at 68 theaters.
  • Lost in Space (1998) — Budget, $80 million. Box office, $69,117,629 (domestic), $136,159,423 (worldwide). This update of the classic series ended Titanic's historic 15-week reign at the top of the box office, but declined soon after. It left Friends star Matt LeBlanc's and director Stephen Hopkins's cinematic careers and any ideas of moving forward with further adaptations of the show hopeless.
  • Lost in Yonkers (1993) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $9,285,189.
  • Lost Souls (2000) — Budget, $28 million. Box office, $16,815,253 (domestic), $31,355,910 (worldwide). The directorial debut of cinematographer Janusz Kaminski was placed on The Shelf of Movie Languishment for a year to keep it away from other big horror films. Its final release date put it in competition with the rerelease of The Exorcist.
  • A Lot Like Love (2005) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $21,845,719 (domestic), $42,886,719 (worldwide). Colin Patrick Lynch only wrote a short film after this. This is also the only American film directed by Nigel Cole, who hasn't directed a film outside of his native UK since.
  • Love Affair (1994) — Budget, $60 million. Box office, $18,272,894. A failed remake of the famous romantic movie, which was previously remade as An Affair to Remember. It also served as the final theatrical appearance of Katharine Hepburn.
  • Love Crimes (1992) — Budget, $8,500,000. Box office, $2,287,928. Lizzie Borden only directed one more movie.
  • Love Field (1992) — Budget, $18 million. Box office, $1,014,726. This was finished in 1990 but was held back by Orion Pictures' bankruptcy. Critics didn't really care for it but Michelle Pfeiffer got an Oscar nomination.
  • The Love Guru (2008) — Budget, $62 million. Box office, $40,863,344. Hindus and Indians were outraged at the comedy's portrayal of a "Hindu" guru along with the overabundance of Toilet Humour, which didn't help it at all. The film's failure and triple Razzie wins finished off Mike Myers's career as a leading comedian after the decline starting with the aforementioned The Cat in the Hat, with a cameo in Inglourious Basterds and Shrek Forever After being his only film roles since. This is also the only directing role for writer Marco Schnabel.
  • Love in the Time of Cholera (2007) — Budget, $48 million. Box office, $31,337,584.
  • The Love Letter (1999) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $8,302,478. This had the misfortune of being released the same week as The Phantom Menace. Its widest release was in 817 theaters.
  • Love Ranch (2010) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $137,885. It was only in 11 theaters for 4 weeks. The critics didn't care for it at all.
  • Love Wrecked (2005) — Budget, $11 million. Box office, $3,505,963. Randal Kleiser directed Amanda Bynes in this lighthearted romantic comedy about a teenage girl who holds her celebrity crush hostage on a tropical island. Harvey Weinstein sat on this film for a year before deciding to dump it onto cable TV in the United States sometime in January 2007. It was still released theatrically overseas. Kleiser has not directed another major film since.
  • The Lovely Bones (2009) — Budget, $65 million. Box office, $44,114,232 (domestic), $93,621,340 (worldwide). The film was received poorly for its jarring Mood Whiplash though the performances were praised.
  • Love's Labour's Lost (2000) — Budget, $13 million. Box office, $299,792. Kenneth Branagh's version of the Shakespeare play turned it into a Hollywood musical and its jarring tonal shifts bore the brunt of its mixed to negative reviews. Its limited release did it no favors. Miramax cut its three-picture deal with Branagh early after this bomb and it would be six years before he directed another film (or two, The Magic Flute and As You Like It).
  • Loving (2016) — Budget, $9 million. Box office $7,592,362. Despite universal acclaim and being an awards front-runner.
  • Lucky Number Slevin (2006) — Budget, $27 million. Box office, $22,495,466 (domestic), $56,308,881 (worldwide).
  • Lucky Numbers (2000) — Budget, $63 million. Box office, $10,890,222. Another blast against John Travolta's career in 2000 alongside Battlefield Earth, and director Nora Ephron didn't work another film for 5 years and put the crutch back on writer Adam Resnick, though he did work on another movie 2 years later. This was also the last film appearance of Daryl Mitchell prior to him losing the ability to walk in a motorcycle accident.
  • Lucky You (2007) — Budget, $55 million. Box office, $8,382,477. In fairness, it faced tough competition that opening weekend. Director Curtis Hanson didn't work on another theatrical film until Chasing Mavericks five years later.

    M 
  • Mac and Me (1988) — Budget, unknown. Box office, $6,424,112. The movie failed in cinemas after it ripped off the plot of E.T. in an attempt to cash in on that movie's theatrical reissue and impending VHS release. It also cast a planned sequel into a black hole. Director Stewart Raffill and composer Alan Silvestri were the only major crew members to survive. Finally, the wheelchair scene from this film became the butt of a Running Gag from actor Paul Rudd on avenues such as Conan O'Brien.
  • Macbeth (1971) - Budget, $3.1 million. Box office, $3 million. Roman Polanski's take on the Shakespeare play became notorious for its explicit violence and nudity, allegedly influenced by the murder of his wife, Sharon Tate, during production. This was an early attempt by Playboy at mainstream film production and they took a huge loss with its failure.
  • Macbeth (2015) - Budget, $15-$20 million. Box office, $1,110,707 (domestic), $16,322,067 (worldwide). Part of a bad string for Michael Fassbender.
  • MacGruber (2010) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $9,322,895. Although the movie didn't make back a lot of its money, it would become a Cult Classic years later, getting Alamo Drafthouse style Quote-alongs.
  • Machete Kills (2013) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $15,008,161. Critics cited the film for its Sequelitis and it ended up with one of the worst opening weekends of all time.
  • Machine Gun Preacher (2011) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $3,338,690.
  • Mad About Mambo (2000) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $65,283. One of the movies that led to Gramercy Pictures winding up in the morgue until 2015.
  • Mad City (1997) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $10,541,523. Costa-Gavras's penultimate English language film opened at number six and faded from the spotlight pretty quickly.
  • Mad Dog and Glory (1993) — Budget, $19 million. Box office, $10,688,490. This was held back a year for reshoots at the behest of Universal. It got generally good reviews, though.
  • Mad Dog Time (1996) — Budget, $8 million. Box office, $107,874. This film was notoriously described by Roger Ebert as the first film he had seen that wasn't preferable to staring at a blank wall for the same amount of time. Its overall negative reception whacked actor Larry Bishop's directorial career until 2008's Hellride. It also did no favors for Christopher Jones, who made his first, and final, film appearance since Ryan's Daughter twenty-six years earlier.
  • Mad Money (2008) — Budget, $22 million. Box office, $20,668,843 (domestic), $26,412,163 (worldwide). This is one of the many bombs that derailed Starz' theatrical distribution company, Overture Films. Callie Khouri, best known for scripting Thelma & Louise, hasn't directed a feature film since.
  • Made (2001) — Budget, $5 million. Box office, $5,480,653. This film only had a limited release in the United States and virtually no release elsewhere, plus it was part of a year's slate that put production company Artisan Entertainment on life support; they would rebound the next year before being absorbed by Lionsgate. It did, however, receive good reviews, ensuring director Jon Favreau, who made his debut in that job with this film, would move on to bigger and better things.
  • Made in Heaven (1987) — Budget, $13 million. Box office, $4,572,845.
  • The Magic Flute (2006) — Budget, $27 million. Box office, $1.9 million (worldwide). Kenneth Branagh's film version of the Mozart opera was released direct-to-DVD in the US in 2013, seven years after it limped along in the international box office. European critics gave it generally good reviews.
  • Magic in the Moonlight (2014) — Budget, $16.8 million. Box office, $10,539,326 (domestic), $51,029,361 (worldwide). Critics gave this Woody Allen film mixed reviews though that didn't end his career a bit.
  • The Magnificent Ambersons (1942) — Budget, $1.1 million. Box office, $1 million (domestic rentals). Recorded loss, $620,000. Orson Welles's version of the Booth Tarkington novel was intended to be an easy follow-up to Citizen Kane. Unfortunately, Welles had surrendered his final cut privileges to RKO, who promptly re-edited the film when he was away filming a documentary in Brazil. Over an hour's worth of footage was excised and later destroyed to bring the film down from over two hours to 88 minutes. Bernard Herrmann's score was also re-cut against his will and he promptly took his name off the finished film. Welles's reputation was ran through a shredder and he spent the rest of his life doing smaller budgeted films. Even in its edited state, it ranks with Kane as one of Welles's masterpieces.
  • The Magnificent Seven (2016) — Budget, $90 million. Box office, $93,432,655 (domestic), $160,437,812 (worldwide). This was considered The Mediocre Seven by critics and was pushed back into one of the Dump Months following the 2016 Summer Bomb Buster. Denzel Washington instantly recovered with Fences, co-star Chris Pratt has the lifeline of Guardians of the Galaxy and Jurassic World around him, but other cast and crew members such as writer Nic Pizzolatto may not have the same luck.
  • Magnolia (1999) — Budget, $37 million. Box office, $22,455,976 (domestic), $48,451,803 (worldwide). This received glowing reviews, but its massive length may have hurt it as much as its relatively limited release. Paul Thomas Anderson later admitted he felt the film was overlong.
  • The Majestic (2001) — Budget, $72 million. Box office, $37,317,558. This movie only making half its budget back put The Shawshank Redemption director Frank Darabont's career in lock-up for 6 years, and he's been having career issues since. It also smashed up the general career of Michael Sloane.
  • Major League: Back to the Minors (1998) — Budget, $18 million. Box office, $3,572,443. It killed all the chances of a considered fourth film. It was also a finishing blow to Scott Bakula's career as a leading role in theatrical films, as he hasn't held that billing again since.
  • Mallrats (1995) — Budget, $6.1 million. Box office, $2,454,447. This and the aforementioned Canadian Bacon led to threats by Universal and PolyGram higher-ups to shut down Gramercy Pictures; it soldiered on until 2000.
  • Malone (1987) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $3,060,858. This adaptation of the William P. Wingate novel Shotgun was the only one of the author's works to make it to film. It's also the only English-language screenplay by writer Christopher Frank, who went back to France after this.
  • The Mambo Kings (1992) — Budget, $15.5 million. Box office, $6,742,168.
  • Mame (1974) — Budget, $12 million. Box office, $6.5 million. This musical adaptation of Auntie Mame was lambasted for its woeful miscasting of the then 63-year-old Lucille Ball in the title role. This ended her film career and she returned to TV afterwards. It was also an Old Shame for co-star Bea Arthur, whose then-husband Gene Saks directed the film, though she kept afloat with Maude. Saks, meanwhile, did not direct another film for twelve years until Brighton Beach Memoirs. The tepid reception to this and Hello, Dolly! prompted songwriter Jerry Herman to forbid anymore adaptations of his work without his input.
  • The Man (2005) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $12,382,362. The second-to-last film that Les Mayfield directed and Robert N. Fried produced.
  • A Man Apart (2003) — Budget, $36 million. Box office, $26,736,098 (domestic), $44,350,926 (worldwide). Originally called Diablo, this sat on The Shelf of Movie Languishment for two years due to a trademark infringement lawsuit over Blizzard Entertainment's Diablo. While it was settled in New Line's favor, they changed the title anyway. The end result was panned by critics and greeted apathetically even after debuting at number 3.
  • Man Down (2016) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, Unknown (domestic), $162,000 (worldwide).note  The film made headlines for its box office during its theatrical run in the United Kingdom... wait for it... £7 (roughly $9), the average cost of a cinema ticket, meaning that only one person brought a ticket to see it. This was most likely due to being released in only one venue, the Reel Cinema in Burnley, Lancashire.
  • The Man from U.N.C.L.E. (2015) — Budget, $75 million. Box office, $45,312,930 (domestic), $100,412,930 (worldwide). This film's failure in the domestic market and the box office derailment of The Lone Ranger have a good chance of earning Armie Hammer a demotion to the B-list of actors for a while and a much stronger chance of confining lead Henry Cavill to the Superman role in the DC Extended Universe. Sequels to this film are also unlikely.
  • Mannequin Two: On the Move (1991) — Budget: $13 million. Box office: $3,752,428. This sequel to the 1987 hit opened at #8 in its opening weekend, a far cry from its predecessor's third-place opening. It was also the last film infamous Hollywood mogul David Begelman oversaw before his death in 1995.
  • Man of La Mancha (1972) — Budget, $12 million. Box office, $3.8 million (domestic rentals). The film version of Dale Wasserman's musical based on Don Quixote author Miguel de Cervantes was slammed by critics, particularly for its casting of Peter O'Toole (whose singing was dubbed) and Sophia Loren (who wasn't).
  • Man of Tai Chi (2013) — Budget, $32 million. Box office, $5,400,144. The directorial debut of Keanu Reeves, who so far hasn't planned to step behind the camera again. Critics gave it decent reviews, though.
  • Man of the House (2005) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $21,577,624. This film, along with Life Or Something Like It three years earlier, derailed Stephen Herek's A-list career, and he's mostly stuck to television and Direct-to-Video movies since Man of the House.
  • Man on a Ledge (2012) — Budget, $42 million. Box office, $18,620,000 (domestic), $46,201,189 (worldwide). Lionsgate, which recently bought this film's distributor, Summit Entertainment, offered moviegoers a discounted movie deal for those seeing this movie and the former's One for the Money, which opened on the same day. Both were received poorly by critics and floundered at the box office.
  • Man on the Moon (1999) — Budget, $82 million. Box office, $47,434,430. This was the first film starring Jim Carrey to not have a successful opening weekend. Director Milos Forman would take another hiatus before his final film, Goya's Ghosts.
  • Man To Man (2005) — Budget, 21.7 million Euros. Box office, $3.5 million U.S. Dollars. Writer William Boyd has not written for another film since.
  • The Man Who Killed Don Quixote (2018) — Budget, €16 million. Box office, $1.8 million (international). Terry Gilliam's legendarily Troubled take on Don Quixote spent nearly 30 years in Development Hell, including one failed attempt, before it was finally completed. It faced a lawsuit from former producer Paulo Branco which nearly prevented its release. It was still released across Europe in May 2018, with a US release coming in March 2019.
  • The Man Who Knew Too Little (1997) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $13,717,039. Bill Murray's last leading role in a live-action comedy; his roles in comedies have either been in supporting roles or dramedies.
  • The Man Who Loved Women (1983) — Budget, $19 million. Box office, $10,964,231. Neither audiences nor critics loved Blake Edwards's remake of the French film and it faded out of theaters after seven weeks.
  • The Man Who Wasn't There (2001) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $18,916,623. One of the movies that led to Gramercy Pictures winding up in the morgue until 2015.
  • Man With a Plan (1996) — Budget, $100,000. Box office, $33,402.
  • The Man with One Red Shoe (1985) — Budget, $16 million. Box office, $8,645,411. Began the destruction of the career of director Stan Dragoti; his only two films past this were the critically-hated She's Out of Control and Necessary Roughness.
  • The Man with the Iron Fists (2012) — Budget, $15 million (not counting marketing costs), $20 million (counting them). Box office, $15,634,090 (domestic), $19,721,245 (worldwide). It lost its audience due to its competition, and Universal, who quickly lost confidence with the film, gave it no promotion upon the release date. A sequel WAS made, but it did not feature Russell Crowe and went Direct-To-Blu-ray-And-DVD. Director Robert Fitzgerald Diggs, aka, RZA of the Wu-Tang Clan, did not direct another movie for 5 years, and co-producer Thomas Bliss's cinematic career was knocked out by this film and The Last Exorcism Part II (two of the other producers, Marc Abraham and Eric Newman, have seen some bad projects past this one).
  • The Man with Two Brains (1983) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $10,353,438. The film was later Vindicated by Cable and didn't slow down the careers of Steve Martin and director Carl Reiner one bit.
  • Man-Thing (2005) — Budget, $7.5 million. Box office, $1.1 million. The film suffered numerous changes and budget boosts, which only caused more trouble for the film, and it got shoved into international theaters while only appearing on television in American markets.
  • Man Trouble (1992) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $4,096,030. Director Bob Rafelson's career never fully recovered after this. It was also one of the films that prompted Italian film company Penta to get out of the Hollywood industry.
  • The Manchurian Candidate (2004) — Budget, $80 million. Box office, $65,955,630 (domestic), $96,105,964 (worldwide). Critics liked this remake of the 1962 thriller even if not to the extent of the original. Meryl Streep's performance as Mrs. Iselin was especially praised.
  • Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom (2013) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $8.3 million (domestic), $27.3 million (worldwide). This biopic of Nelson Mandela was released around the same time as the real Mandela died. Despite this, the Weinstein Company opened it in limited release, expanding it to 975 theaters on a particularly crowded Christmas Day and it topped out with another 35. Screenwriter William Nicholson blamed its domestic underperformance on the success of 12 Years a Slave.
  • Mandy (2018) — Budget, $6 million. Box office: $1,214,525.
  • The Mangler (1995) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $1,781,383. Despite its failure, it did sell well enough on home video to make two direct-to-video sequels.
  • Manhattan Murder Mystery (1993) — Budget, $13.5 million. Box office, $11,330,911. Another Acclaimed Flop from Woody Allen.
  • The Manhattan Project (1986) — Budget, $18 million. Box office, $3.9 million. The first film of David Begelman's shortlived Gladden Entertainment. Director Marshall Brickman wouldn't direct another film until the 2001 TV film Sister Mary Explains It All.
  • Manhunter (1986) — Budget, $15 million. Box Office, $8.6 million. This first adaptation of the novel Red Dragon was one of several busts for producer Dino De Laurentiis that ultimately ended his production company DEG. De Laurentiis sold the sequel rights to Orion for a pittance, but when the result was The Silence of the Lambs, the famous film producer returned to the Hannibal Lecter franchise.
  • Maradonia and the Shadow Empire (2016) — Budget: Unknown, but it was expensive enough to get the creators evicted from their house. Box office: Unknown, but can safely be assumed to be tiny, as the film was only showed once in one theater (which the creators had to rent out).
  • Marci X (2003) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $1,675,706. Completed in 2001, Marci X was criticized heavily on release for its dated stereotypes of Jews, blacks and hip-hop culture. Chris Rock, who was offered to play the male lead in this movie, stated he'd "rather have gotten an envelope of anthrax" than read the film's script. This is the final theatrical film from director Richard Benjamin and one of the last films written by Paul Rudnick. The only films Benjamin has directed since are TV movies. Marci X also ended Lisa Kudrow’s brief studio leading lady career.
  • Margaret (2011) — Budget, $14 million. Box office, $623,292. This sat on The Shelf of Movie Languishment for six years due to a extremely lengthy postproduction phase, which resulted in back-and-forth lawsuits between distributor Fox Searchlight and director Kenneth Lonnergan. It limped its way into an extremely limited release and faded away quickly. Lonnergan stuck to the stage after this movie until his Oscar-winner Manchester by the Sea.
  • Marie Antoinette (1938) — Budget, $2.9 million. Box office, $2,133,000. The last film greenlit by Irving G. Thalberg before his death was a vehicle for his wife, Norma Shearer. It was one of MGM's most successful films but it didn't make back its high budget.
  • Marie Antoinette (2006) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $15,962,471 (domestic), $60,917,189 (worldwide). It received mixed reviews for its historical and stylistic liberties. Sofia Coppola stayed off the big screen until 2010's Somewhere.
  • Marmaduke (2010) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $33,644,788 (domestic), $83,761,844 (worldwide). Director Tom Dey's last film to date. It was rushed to DVD two and a half months after its theatrical debut (though it lingered in theaters for a few weeks more).
  • Married To It (1993) — Budget, $14 million. Box office, $2,059,832. One of several films held back by Orion Pictures' bankruptcy; it was intended for an Autumn 1991 release, but the studio shelved it at the last minute. This put a huge dent in the career of director Arthur Hiller and its big name cast.
  • The Marrying Man (1991) — Budget, $26 million. Box office, $12,454,758. Dashed Kim Basinger's hopes of being a singer, and one of a few flops in the early 90's that melted her A-list career. The film was also critically panned and its failure led co-star Alec Baldwin to go on an epic tirade against distributor Disney/Touchstone's boss, Jeffrey Katzenberg, calling him "The Eighth Dwarf, Greedy" for giving the film a small budget (the writer of the movie, Neil Simon, also got heat from Baldwin, who obviously considers The Marrying Man an Old Shame, though the rant against Katzenberg didn't prevent them from working together again at DreamWorks Animation. Katzenberg, for his part, DIDN'T go on a counter-rant against Baldwin). As for director Jerry Rees, he did not direct another full-length theatrical film until 2013. The Marrying Man is perhaps most notorious for its turbulent production, in which stars Baldwin and Basinger made the crew's lives miserable with their on-set nastiness and prima donna attitudes.
  • Mars Attacks! (1996) — Budget, $80-100 million. Box office, $37,771,017 (domestic), $101,371,017 (worldwide). Tim Burton's parody comedy of B alien movies was undermined by coming out only months after Roland Emmerich's alien epic Independence Day, which it got compared to. Burton would take a 3-year break before his next film, Sleepy Hollow. Commitments to Spin City and his Parkinson's Disease also led cast member Michael J. Fox to not appear on camera in another feature film until 2002.
  • Mars Needs Moms (2011) — Budget, $150 million. Box office, $38,992,758. Adjusted for inflation, this movie is one of two finalists for being the biggest animated box office bomb of all time (the other movie is Don Bluth's final film to date, Titan A.E.). On top of that, it's also critically disliked. Its failure caused Disney to shut down ImageMovers Digital, the production company it had formed with Robert Zemeckis (the film's producer) and the production of a Yellow Submarine remake; he would later reopen the studio at Universal. It also vaporized the motion-capture film as well. Director Simon Wells, a veteran of DreamWorks Animation and the Kung Fu Panda series, saw his directing/writing career beamed off to Mars by this film's failure; his only credits past this are as story artist for DWA's KFP and The Croods. Mars Needs Moms also helped derail the main careers of producers Steve Starkey and Jack Rapke, and actor Seth Green has done smaller roles in cinema, but is still very much employed, moving on to other work such as voicing Hamato Leonardo in Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (2012).
  • Marshall (2017) — Budget, $12 million. Box office, $10,051,659 (domestic). This biopic of Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall received strong reviews, particularly for Chadwick Boseman's performance as Marshall, but it never left a limited release.
  • Martian Child (2007) — Budget, $27 million. Box office, $9,351,744. The film version of David Gerrold's novelette and later novel caused considerably backlash for turning its gay protagonist straight. note 
  • Marvins Room (1996) — Budget, $23 million. Box office, $12,803,305. The film version of Scott Mc Pherson's play was liked by critics but its widest release was 1,158 theaters. Director Jerry Zaks stuck to Broadway and TV for twelve years before his next film.
  • Mary of Scotland (1936) — Budget, $864,000. $1,276,000.
  • Mary Reilly (1996) — Budget, $47 million. Box office, $12,379,402. The film had a Troubled Production due to Julia Roberts and John Malkovich's Hostility on the Set, Roberts keeping a personal jet on standby in case she wanted to leave (on the studio's dime), and the ending being rewritten multiple times. The end result was lambasted by critics, particularly for Roberts' inability to sustain an Irish accent. Roberts rebounded the next year with My Best Friend's Wedding.
  • Mary Shelley's Frankenstein (1994) — Budget, $45 million. Box office, $22,006,296 (domestic), $112,006,296 (worldwide). Kenneth Branagh's take on Frankenstein was more faithful than most interpretations of the story, but critics took it apart for its grandiose tone and Mood Whiplash. Its failure made it hard for Branagh to get his Hamlet movie going and he wouldn't return to prominence as a director until Thor.
  • The Master (2012) — Budget, $32 million. Box office, $26,248,232. Protests from the Church of Scientology may have had a part in this film's failure (the main character is an Expy of L. Ron Hubbard).
  • Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World (2003) — Budget, $150 million. Box office, $93,927,920 (domestic), $212,011,111 (worldwide). The poor box office killed the idea of a series of Aubrey-Maturin movies before they even got started. Peter Weir wouldn't make another movie until 2011.
  • Masterminds (2016) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $17,368,022 (domestic), $29,148,224 (worldwide). The second of Zach Galifianakis's Star-Derailing Roles in 2016. It also hasn't really helped the writing trio behind the film out a whole lot.
  • Masters of the Universe (1987) — Budget, $22 million. Box office, $17,336,370. Despite the heavy promotion of this adaptation of He-Man, the film failed, and was one of the movies that eventually did in The Cannon Group. Plans for a sequel were screwed when He-Man copyright holder Mattel hiked their licensing fees, and star Dolph Lundgren was hammered into the B list of film actors and treats the movie as an Old Shame. Finally, it solidified He-Man's status as an 80's cheese symbol, which left the franchise dated by the end of the decade, although a remake is being worked on.
  • Matchstick Men (2003) — Budget, $62 million. Box office, $36,906,460 (domestic), $65,565,672 (worldwide). It was an Acclaimed Flop but it was the start of several consecutive busts for Ridley Scott.
  • Material Girls (2005) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $16,907,725. It sent director Martha Coolidge's career into the second tier of filmmakers.
  • Matilda (1996) — Budget, $36 million. Box office, $33,459,416 (domestic), $62.1 million (worldwide). Part of a string of Acclaimed Flops based off of Roald Dahl's work going back to Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory, and it was released the same year as another Dahl bomb, Disney/Tim Burton's James and the Giant Peach. Matilda fared better overseas and on home video, making it a defining role for child actress Mara Wilson. Still harmed co-star and director Danny Devito's prospects; he only directed two more films after this, the last in 2003.
  • Matinee (1993) — Budget, $13 million. Box office, $9,532,895. It was an Acclaimed Flop however, and it would later do better on television and video.
  • Max Keeble's Big Move (2001) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $18,634,654. This kept director Tim Hill off screen until 2006's Garfield: A Tale of Two Kitties.
  • Max Schmeling (2010) — Budget, $7 million. Box office, $96,456 (Germany). An attempt by director Uwe Boll to cast a real-life boxer rather than an actor for this boxing-themed film imploded when said boxer, Henry Maske, was criticized for his acting (the film was also labeled as being riddled with cliches).
  • Max Steel (2016) — Budget, $10.4 million. Box office, $6,272,403. One of the most heavily panned films of 2016 and ejected from the theater circuit after three weeks, this film has likely liquidated any ideas of a film franchise based off of it and is a serious blow to director Stewart Hendler's career. This is also a serious setback to Mattel's attempt to get into filmmaking.
  • Maximum Overdrive (1986) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $7.4 million. Stephen King vowed to never direct another theatrical film again.
  • Maximum Risk (1996) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $14,502,483 (domestic), $51,702,483 (worldwide). This Jean-Claude Van Damme action thriller, directed by Ringo Lam, debuted at the number one spot, but faltered afterwards.
  • McHale's Navy (1997) — Budget, $42 million. Box office, $4,408,420. One of two 1997 films that smashed the cinematic directing career of Bryan Spicer; For Richer or Poorer is the other. Did no favors to Tom Arnold's career as a leading man.
  • Me and Orson Welles (2009) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $$2,336,172. This was a big hit on the Festival Circuit in 2008 but it couldn't get a proper release date until November 2009. Even then, its limited release was so paltry that it couldn't translate its critical raves for co-star Christian Mc Kay, who played Welles, into an Oscar nomination.
  • The Mechanic (2011) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $29,121,498 (domestic), $62,040,498 (worldwide). Despite the film not doing very well, a sequel was released five years later.
    • Mechanic: Resurrection (2016) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $21,218,403 (domestic), $125,729,635 (worldwide). One of the last casualties of the big summer bomb-buster of '16.
  • The Medallion (2003) — Budget, $41 million. Box office, $34,268,701. A botched attempt on Sony/Tristar/Jackie Chan's part to make a theatrical replica of both The Golden Child and the cartoon series Jackie Chan Adventures (this film actually has Julian Sands, who was part of the Big Bad Duumvirate of JCA's first two seasons before departing the show, as its Big Bad). Director Gordon Chan has yet to direct another movie that can be released in an American cinema (the next film he helmed to surface in the United States was confined to a Direct-to-Video release), and writer Bey Logan got a serious setback to his own career.
  • Medicine Man (1992) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $45 million.
  • Meet Dave (2008) — Budget, $60 million. Box office, $50,650,079. Managed to break the record for largest amount of theaters lost between the second and third weeks, losing 77%. This helped towards the film not even grossing the original budget back. A major slam for Eddie Murphy, director Brian Robbins's next film A Thousand Words was delayed 4 years after IT completed shooting, co-writer Rob Greenberg hasn't returned to the cinemas thus far, and the other writer, Bill Corbett, has stuck with RiffTrax material since.
  • Meet Joe Black (1998) — Budget, $90 million. Box office, $44,619,100 (domestic), $142,940,100 (worldwide). Universal Pictures fired their chairman after this film failed. It didn't help that it came out in a year where Universal had a series of theatrical flops (the only movie the studio released in the calendar year that had any real box office success was Patch Adams, which was still received poorly by critics). Director Martin Brest's next project was the even bigger flop Gigli, which did in his career. The film's box office numbers were slightly boosted by the trailer for The Phantom Menace being attached to prints of this film, which led to Star Wars fans buying tickets to Meet Joe Black just to see the trailer and leave before the movie started.
  • Meet the Deedles (1998) — Budget, $24 million. Box office, $4.3 million. Steve Boyum's directorial debut and the only one of his films to get a theatrical release until Supercross.
  • Meet the Robinsons (2007) — Budget, Undisclosed (figures estimate it at $150-$195 million, including marketing costs). Box office, $97,822,171 (domestic), $169,333,034 (worldwide). This film started production under Michael Eisner and David Stainton, but they were both kicked out and replaced with John Lasseter, who asked for a reworking of about 60% of the film, hence why is was not released in 2006. This did OK with critics (much better than Chicken Little), but director Steve Anderson only directed one other film so far, Winnie-The-Pooh.
  • Megaforce (1982) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $5,675,599. Plans for a sequel were dropped after this movie failed.
  • Memoirs of an Invisible Man (1992) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $14,358,033. This is the first film directed by John Carpenter to have a 1980's/1990's tentpole budget since Big Trouble in Little China. It also happens to be the first of a 9-year streak of bombs that ended his serious directing career. Co-writer Dan Kolsrud had his writing career go "poof" for 5 years until doing Disney's adaptation of George of the Jungle, and the film didn't exactly help the careers of stars Chevy Chase and Daryl Hannah out a whole lot, either. Finally, it's one of three 1992 bombs that set William Goldman's cinematic career back by 5 years.
  • Memories Of Me (1988) — Budget, $12 million. Box office, $3,965,604. Henry Winkler's feature directorial debut; he wouldn't occupy the director's chair until 1993's Cop and a Half.
  • Men, Women & Children (2014) — Budget, $16 million. Box office, $1,705,908. This film was picked apart by critics for being a Narm-filled attempt to tell a movie about how the internet desensitized people, and it got Invisible Advertising and sent the career of director Jason Reitman to a dark place.
  • The Merchant of Venice (2004) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $21,417,725. This Shakespeare adaptation was an Acclaimed Flop that never left a limited release.
  • Mercury Rising (1998) — Budget, $60 million. Box office, $32,935,289 (domestic), $93,107,289 (worldwide). This is the semifinal film from director Harold Becker; he did one more movie, and then retired.
  • The Messenger: The Story of Joan of Arc (1999) — Budget, $60 million. Box office, $14,276,317 (domestic), $66,976,317 (worldwide). This didn't fully burn producer/writer/director Luc Besson's career (it DID burn up writer Andrew Birkin's career), but it did lead to him not taking a director's credit again for 6 years. This film wasn't helped by a stuntman's death right in the first weeks of filming OR Besson divorcing star Milla Jovovich.
  • Metallica Through the Never (2013) — Budget, $18 million. Box office, $7,972,967. This concert film starring the eponymous band only played for a month in limited release, mostly in IMAX theaters. The critical reception was pretty good.
  • Meteor (1979) — Budget, $16 million. Box office, $8,400,000. This film's failure signaled the end of days for American International Pictures; the only movie they and owners Filmways made prior to closing that isn't frowned on is the premiere Mad Max movie.
  • The Meteor Man (1993) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $8,023,147. Compare this to director Robert Townsend's directorial debut, Hollywood Shuffle, which was made for $700,000 and grossed nearly $6 million, a huge proportional profit. While The Meteor Man didn't exactly end or all out ruin Robert Townsend's career as both an actor and director, it most definitely ended his ascent up the Hollywood ladder. Townsend would soon star in the WB sitcom The Parent 'Hood, which lasted for four seasons. It was the critical and box office failure of Townsend's next directed film, 1997's B.A.P.S. (which unlike The Meteor Man, only cost $10,000,000 to make yet only grossed $7,338,279 at the box office) that officially killed his career within studio system. One of the last things he directed was a 2014 Bill Cosby (who is incidentally, in The Meteor Man) stand-up special that Netflix wisely decided to never release.
  • Metro (1997) — Budget, $55 million. Box office, $32,000,301. Critics dismissed this Eddie Murphy action comedy as a So Okay, It's Average Cliché Storm.
  • Metropolis (1927) — Budget, 5,100,000 German Reichsmarks. Box office, 75,000 German Reichsmarks. It was panned by a few critics including H. G. Wells, but has since become one of the most iconic films ever made.
  • Miami Vice (2006) — Budget, $135 million. Box office, $63,450,470 (domestic), $163,794,509 (worldwide). A Darker and Edgier take on the 80s cop series by original series producer Michael Mann. The film suffered a Troubled Production due to hurricanes, star Jamie Foxx's ego, and security issues which rewrote the ending. The end result garnered mixed reviews and fell flat in the box office after opening at number one. It's still one of Mann's most financially successful films, though.
  • Michael Collins (1996) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $11,092,559 (domestic), $28,092,559 (worldwide). This biopic of the Irish revolutionary received pretty good reviews and great box office results in Ireland, but it fell short of its budget overall. Fortunately, director Neil Jordan and the stars didn't see their careers slow down a bit.
  • Mickey (2004) — Budget, $6 million. Box office, less than $300,000. This took down director Hugh Wilson's career.
  • Mickey Blue Eyes (1999) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $33,864,342 (domestic), $54,264,342 (worldwide).
  • Middle Men (2010) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $754,301.
  • Midnight Crossing (1988) — Budget, $5 million. Box office, $1.3 million. This was such a bomb that the producers owed money to the distributors for years to make up for the loss. This was director Roger Holzberg's final credit on a theatrical film, and he didn't work on another feature film for over 20 years. It was also the final film produced by Team Effort studios.
  • Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil (1997) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $25,105,255. The film version of John Berendt's True Crime book got a mixed reception, with critics deriding the film's excessive length but praising the cast and its Southern atmosphere.
  • The Midnight Meat Train (2008) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $3,533,527. Ryuhei Kitamura's American directorial debut was this adaptation of the Clive Barker short story. Unfortunately, it was unceremoniously dumped in 102 Bargain theaters when Lionsgate changed management during production. The critics still liked it, though. Kitamura directed the anthology film Baton the next year, then made his next American feature, and next film overall with No One Lives.
  • Midnight Special (2016) — Budget, $18 million. Box office, $6,212,282. This was highly acclaimed by critics but it never left a limited release.
  • Mighty Aphrodite (1995) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $6,468,498. Another Acclaimed Flop from Woody Allen; this won Mira Sorvino an Oscar for Best Supporting Actress.
  • A Mighty Heart (2007) — Budget, $16 million. Box office, $9,176,787 (domestic), $18,935,657 (worldwide). Based on Marianne Pearl's memoir about the kidnapping and beheading of her husband Daniel, the film received strong reviews for Angelina Jolie's portrayal of Pearl. It also received backlash for casting the Caucasian Jolie as the Dutch/Jewish/Afro-Cuban-Chinese Pearl, even though Pearl herself approved of the casting.
  • Mighty Joe Young (1949) — Budget, $1.8 million. Box office, $1.9 million. Recorded loss, $675,000. This Spiritual Successor to King Kong, produced by the same creative team, was praised for its Academy Award winning visual effects produced by Willis O'Brien and Ray Harryhausen (in his movie debut). Unfortunately, it was one of several, ultimately crippling flops for RKO under Howard Hughes's leadership. This was the final film for writer Ruth Rose. It has since been Vindicated by History.
    • Mighty Joe Young (1998) — Budget, $90 million. Box office, $50,632,037. This film, along with the poor reception of Roland Emmerich's version of Godzilla, sent the giant monster movie genre into remission until the New 10s (the 2005 remake of King Kong didn't end it).
  • The Mighty Macs (2009) — Budget, $7 million. Box office, $1,891,936. This played at the Heartland Film Festival in 2009 before it got a very limited release in 2011. It played itself out after six weeks.
  • Mike's Murder (1984) — Budget, $6.3 million. Box office, $1,059,966. This was filmed in 1982 but was delayed after poor test screenings prompted further edits.
  • The Milagro Beanfield War (1988) — Budget, $22 million. Box office, $13,825,794. Robert Redford's first film as director since Ordinary People received mixed reviews and a limited release but still got an Oscar for Best Original Score.
  • Mile 22 (2018) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $36.1 million (domestic), $66.3 million (worldwide).
  • Milk Money (1994) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $18,137,661. This movie about a pair of adolescents wanting to see a naked hooker was considered very sour milk by critics and is the sole main Hollywood job for writer John Mattson. Mattson only did two Free Willy sequels, and then retreated from Hollywood completely. It also didn't help the career of the actress who played the hooker, Melanie Griffith, out too much.
  • Miller's Crossing (1990) — Budget, $14 million. Box office, $5,080,409. This Coen Brothers crime thriller was one of the most acclaimed films of the year but it never went past a limited release. It found its audience once it hit home video.
  • Million Dollar Mystery (1987) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $989,033 (domestic). The studio, hoping to make a big profit, put together a million dollar prize contest for the film after release. Because it bombed, they ended up losing MORE money due to the contest. This finished off notable 50's director Richard Fleischer's (the man who directed Disney's 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea) career. The movie also saw a stuntman's death during filming, and was hit by Roger Ebert for being no more than a plug-in for Glad trash bags (The Other Wiki also stated the film borrowed the plot from It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World.)
  • A Million Ways to Die in the West (2014) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $43,139,300 (domestic), $87,189,756 (worldwide). It wasn't as well-received as Seth MacFarlane's previous film, Ted, and opening the same day as Maleficent didn't do it any favors, either.
  • Mimic (1997) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $25 million. Guillermo del Toro's first English-language film was this adaptation of a Donald A. Wollheim story. It was not a happy experience as he dealt with constant Executive Meddling from the Weinsteins which demanded excessive reshoots and divergences from the original script. Del Toro disowned the film and swore off working with the Weinsteins ever again. It did however, sell very well on home video to spawn two straight-to-video sequels.
  • Mind Hunters (2005) — Budget, $27 million. Box office, $21,148,829. This premiered in the US a year after it debuted internationally.
  • Miracle At St Anna (2008) — Budget, $45 million. Box office, $9,323,833. This World War II drama faced protests in Italy for depicting a Partisan in league with the Nazis. Director Spike Lee did the film no favors by criticizing Clint Eastwood for not depicting black soldiers in his film, Flags of Our Fathers.
  • Misconduct (2016) — Budget, $11 million. Box office, $2,124,005. This was released simultaneously into theaters and onto VOD.
  • The Misfits (1961) — Budget, $4 million. Box office, $4.1 million (rentals). This John Huston movie suffered from an extremely Troubled Production which saw, among other misfortunes, Marilyn Monroe suffering Creator Breakdown over her collapsing marriage with Arthur Miller (the film's screenwriter) and Clark Gable's poor health. This was the final completed film for both stars; Gable died 12 days after filming wrapped. This was liked by critics even if it didn't recoup its budget.
  • Mishima A Life In Four Chapters (1985) — Budget, $5 million. Box office, $502,758. This biopic of Japanese writer Yukio Mishima directed by Paul Schrader and produced by George Lucas and Francis Ford Coppola was regulated to a limited release. Schrader considers the film his masterpiece as director.
  • Miss Bala (2019) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $15,006,824. This American remake of the 2011 Mexican film only managed to gross back it's relatively low budget right before it left theaters. It also received mostly negative reviews for taking the acclaimed original and turning it into a bland action vehicle for star Gina Rodriguez.
  • The Missing (2003) — Budget, $60 million. Box office, $38,364,277. It received mixed reviews from critics but was praised by Native Americans for its authentic use of Chiricahuan Apache dialect.
  • Missing Link (2019) — Budget, $100 million. Box office, $23,281,812. Despite receiving largely positive reviews from critics, it received the lowest opening gross for a Laika film and part of a nasty string of flops for Annapurna Pictures. This also wasn't a good start for Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer's and Annapurna's distribution unit, United Artists.
  • The Mission (1986) — Budget, £16.5 million. Box office, $17 million. This damaged the prospects of Goldcrest Films along with Absolute Beginners and Revolution. This was an Acclaimed Flop, however.
  • Mission to Mars (2000) — Budget, $90-100 million. Box office, $60,883,407 (domestic), $110,983,407 (worldwide). The first in an ongoing series of career-wrecking bombs for famed director Brian De Palma.
  • Miss March (2009) — Budget, $6 million (estimated). Box office, $4,543,320 (domestic), $48,309 (international), $4,591,629 (worldwide total). This movie resulted in the Fox Atomic label imploding, with their future projects moved to other Fox labels.
  • Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children (2016) — Budget, $110 million. Box office, $87,242,834 (domestic), $296,394,640 (worldwide). The film version of Ransom Riggs's novel fell short of its budget domestically but got by thanks to its international takings. Between its reception and adaptation changes, it's unknown if the novel's sequels will get adapted.
  • Miss Sloane (2016) — Budget, $13 million. Box office, $3,500,605. The third and last of three commercial false starts for EuropaCorp's U.S. film division's beginning in 2016 alone, after Nine Lives and Shut In. Unlike the other two, this one got decent reviews, but all three movies dealt a serious blow to EuropaCorp's business going into 2017.
  • Mixed Nuts (1994) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $6.8 million. A remake of the French comedy Santa Claus Is a Stinker by Nora Ephron and her sister Delia. It was despised by critics, including Roger Ebert, and was shoved out of theaters pretty quickly. The Ephrons had better luck a few years later with Michael.
  • Mobsters (1991) — Budget, $23 million. Box office, $20,246,790. It opened at number two behind Terminator 2: Judgment Day and was shot down immediately. It didn't help that the critics hated it completely.
  • The Mod Squad (1999) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $13,263,993. This and Brokedown Palace derailed Claire Danes's career for a good bit.
  • The Moderns (1988) — Budget, $3.5 million. Box office, $2 million. Nearly ended Linda Fiorentino's career as a leading actress though she rebounded in the next decade.
  • Mohammad, Messenger of God (1976) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $15 million. This historical film about the early days of Islam was seen as an Audience-Alienating Premise in both Hollywood AND the Islamic world. As such, producer-director Moustapha Akkad, himself a Muslim, had a difficult time getting support and he even secured funding from dictator Muammar Qaddafi. Its reputation in America took a massive hit when Islamic militants took 149 hostages in Washington DC and demanded, among other things, the destruction of all copies of this film. Still, Shiite Muslims actually enjoyed the film. Akkad spent most of his career producing the Halloween movies.
  • Molly (1999) — Budget, $21 million. Box office, $17,650. It's an understandable gross considering its release topped out at 12 theaters. According to Leonard Maltin, it debuted as an in-flight movie.
  • The Molly Maguires (1970) — Budget, $11 million. Box office, $2.2 million. The film version of Arthur H. Lewis's novel, based on a real life uprising of Irish-American coal miners, saved its filming location, Ecksley, Pennsylvania, from demolition. The town now stands as a museum. It did no favors for the careers of director Martin Ritt or stars Sean Connery and Richard Harris.
  • Moment by Moment (1978) — Budget, $8 million. Box office, $10,963,824. This romantic drama was lambasted for its dull script and awkwardly mismatched leads, John Travolta and Lily Tomlin. It died a quick death in the box office and has never been officially released on home video. This was the only feature film directed by Jane Wagner, Tomlin's then-domestic partner and later wife, but the movie careers of both Tomlin and Travolta survived.
  • Money for Nothing (1993) — Budget, $11 million. Box office, $1,039,824. This biopic of Joey Coyle, a man who stole a bag of $1 million after it fell of an armored car, was released less than a month after the real Coyle committed suicide. Subsequently, Disney did not expand the film beyond the 449 theaters that opened it.
  • Money Train (1995) — Budget, $68 million. Box office, $35,431,113 (domestic), $77,224,232 (worldwide). In addition to poor reviews, someone robbed a ticket booth with a rubber tube and a flammable liquid at some point after this movie's release, and this was a stunt from the film, which earned it a boycott. This, Return to Paradise, and the critical hatred towards The Good Son all delivered a severe blow to the career of director Joseph Ruben.
  • Monkeybone (2001) — Budget, $75 million. Box office, $7,622,365. The film was significantly changed from its source material, and the resulting film was blasted by critics. Henry Selick wouldn't play producer/director on a full length movie again until 2009 with Coraline, though he did do work with Wes Anderson and LAIKA in the meantime. Co-producer Sam Hamm, on the other hand, has not played producer at all since this movie. It was also a major factor in Bridget Fonda deciding to retire from acting.
  • Monsieur Verdoux (1947) — Budget: $2,000,000. Gross USA: $325,000. Cumulative Worldwide Gross: $1,500,000. The American public in 1947 were not able to stomach Charlie Chaplin's dark comedy. It was later Vindicated by History.
  • Monsignor (1982) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $6.5 million (domestic). This movie's failure put director Frank Perry in a bad spot (the Razzie wins from his previous film Mommie Dearest didn't help).
  • A Monster Calls (2016) — Budget, $43 million. Box office, $3,740,823 (domestic), $43,456,127 (worldwide). It was an Acclaimed Flop, however.
  • Monster House (2006) — Budget, $75 million. Box office, $73,661,010 (domestic), $140,175,006 (worldwide). This did get generally good reviews and an Oscar nomination, but some, even screenwriter Dan Harmon, questioned its suitability for kids.
  • Monster Trucks (2017) — Budget, $125 million. Box office, $64,493,915. Notable for being a foreseen financial failure by Paramount, culminating in a $115 million writedown months before its release. It also played a role in costing Paramount head Brad Grey his job.
  • Monument Ave. (1998) — Budget, $11 million. Box office, $333,760. Its widest release was in 24 theaters.
  • Moon over Parador (1988) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $11,444,204. This debuted at number one but faded away quickly.
  • Moonlight Mile (2002) — Budget, $21 million. Box office, $10,011,050. Brad Silberling's autobiographical film got pretty good reviews but it topped out at 437 theaters.
  • Morgan (2016) — Budget, $8 million. Box office, $3,915,251 (domestic), $8,810,591 (worldwide). The movie had a massive 75% drop between its first and second weekends, and it left all but 99 of its theaters by the end of the third. This is not a good start to the directing career of Ridley Scott's son, Luke Scott.
  • Morgan Stewart's Coming Home (1987) — Budget, $6 million. Box office, $2,136,381. The directors of this film played the Alan Smithee card to put space between them and it. It would be a few years before producer Stephen Friedman produced a new film (and he only produced two more movies before he passed away), but it would be seventeen years before co-writer David N. Titcher wrote another film; his next movie was Jackie Chan's version of Around The World In 80 Days, which was one of the factors that derailed Disney CEO Michael Eisner's career with the firm.
  • Morning Glory (2010) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $31,011,732 (domestic), $60,040,976 (worldwide).
  • Mortal Engines (2018) — Budget: between $100–150 million. Box office: $15,95 million domestic, $83.2 million worldwide. It opened to a pitiful $7.5 million domestically, fifth below Ralph Breaks the Internet, The Grinch, The Mule and Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse, then was hammered further the following week by Aquaman, Mary Poppins Returns and Bumblebee. It's easily the biggest bomb in Peter Jackson's résumé (he served as producer and co-writer), and Universal anticipated a $100-150 million loss when the accounting was done.
  • The Mortal Instruments: City of Bones (2013) — Budget, $60 million. Box office, $31,165,421 (domestic), $90,565,421 (worldwide). Its failure sent plans to adapt the rest of The Mortal Instruments books into oblivion. A planned sequel was scrapped only a week before production was due to begin. It's one of three flops that killed interest in Paranormal YA novel adaptations. The franchise would find new life after being rebooted as a TV series several years later.
  • Mortdecai (2015) — Budget, $60 million. Box office, $7,696,134 (domestic), $47,275,695 (worldwide). The film grossed only $5 million in Week One, plummeted by 90% in Week Two, and very negative reviews from critics and moviegoers convinced Lionsgate to unplug the film's theatrical run after Week Three and before it had any chance of reaching the original budget with help from the international box office. Part of a string of flops for star Johnny Depp, director David Koepp has yet to direct another film, and writer Eric Aronson has yet to write again.
  • The Mosquito Coast (1986) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $14,302,779. This reteaming of Witness director Peter Weir and star Harrison Ford flopped with critics and audiences at the time but it was later Vindicated by History. Weir had better luck with Dead Poets Society a few years later and Ford bounced back with Working Girl. This was the last screen appearance of Butterfly McQueen before her death nine years later.
  • A Most Violent Year (2014) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $6 million. It first saw release in four theaters before going to 818. It IS an Acclaimed Flop, however.
  • Most Wanted (1997) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $11,838,218. Finished off the cinematic career of director David Hogan, who stuck to music videos and a documentary short since. Writer/Star Keenen Ivory Wayans wouldn't write another film until 2004's White Chicks.
  • mother! (2017) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $17,800,004 (domestic), $44,400,272 (worldwide). This received polarized reviews for its Surreal Horror and overwhelming Darkness Induced Apathy, which helped steer it to a rare F rating on Cinemascore. Being released the week after the It remake and the controversy over Jennifer Lawrence's comments stemming from Hurricanes Harvey and Irma likely didn't help.
  • Mother's Boys (1993) — Budget, $8 million. Box office, $874,148. Based on a novel by Bernard Taylor; his works have not been adapted on film since.
  • Motherhood (2009) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $726,354. Easily the biggest bomb of Uma Thurman's career. Particularly notable for its British release, where it's the second-biggest flop of all time. It was shown in only one UK cinema and took £88 on its opening weekend. On its opening night it took £9. That's one ticket.
  • The Mountain Between Us (2017) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $30,348,555 (domestic), $62,587,178 (worldwide).
  • Mountains of the Moon (1990) — Budget, $19 million. Box office, $4,011,793. Part of a string of bombs for director Bob Rafelson.
  • Moving (1988) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $10,815,378. This Richard Pryor comedy debuted at number two behind Good Morning, Vietnam and flatlined immediately, pushed out of theaters after only three weeks. It put a damper into Pryor's career, with this being his final movie as a solo lead, and director Alan Metter only did one more theatrical movie afterwards.
  • Mozart and the Whale (2006) — Budget, $12 million. Box office, $84,444. It only ran in five theaters in Spokane, Washington, where it was made, and faded out after a month.
  • Mr. 3000 (2004) - Budget, $30 million. Box office, $21.8 million. Director Charles Stone III didn't work on another theatrical film for a while, mainly sticking to TV work and music videos, until Lila and Eve eleven years later.
  • Mr. Baseball (1992) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $20,883,046. This struck out after six weeks in theaters. It also bombed in Japan where it was set.
  • Mr. Bug Goes to Town note  (1941) — Budget, $713,511. Box office, $214,000. The film received almost no promotion from Paramount in either its 1941 release, nor its 1946 re-release as Hoppity Goes To Town. The premiere was also delayed by producer Max Fleischer, which led to it opening two days before the Pearl Harbor attacks that ultimately prompted the U.S. to enter World War II. That took the wind out of the film, and led to the Fleischers, who were no longer on speaking terms with each other, losing their studio to Paramount, who renamed it Famous Studios. Copyrights for this film subsequently went all over the place, last being distributed by Fleischer rival Disney internationally.
  • Mr. Jones (1993) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $8,345,845. Re-shoots following poor test screenings and fear of competition from another Richard Gere movie (Sommersby) held this film's release back for a year.
  • Mr. Magoo (1997) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $21.4 million. Disney was forced to pull the movie shortly after release due to pressure from blindness advocates, which subsequently blinded the franchise itself outside of an animated special in 2010 and becoming part of the DreamWorks Classics portfolio. It was a huge blow to director Stanley Tong as well, possibly one of the reasons why he never directed another American film again. It was also an embarrassing blimp on the resume of a then-unknown Jennifer Garner, who is tasked with wearing yellowface here.
  • Mr. Magorium's Wonder Emporium (2007) — Budget, $65 million (not counting marketing costs). Box office, $32,061,555 (domestic), $69,474,661 (worldwide). The first and only feature film by director Zach Helm. He only directed a segment of the documentary 140 and wrote the TV movie Good Canary and nothing else.
  • Mr. Nobody (2009) — Budget, $58 million. Box office, $3,547,209. This surreal Sci-Fi film premiered at the Venice Film Festival in 2009 before debuting across Europe in 2010. Director Jaco Van Dormeal wouldn't participate in another film until he co-wrote 2014's Nicholas on Holiday. Star Jared Leto stuck to documentaries until his 2013 Oscar-winning role in Dallas Buyers Club. The film has become a Cult Classic.
  • Mr. Peabody & Sherman (2014) — Budget, $145 million. Box office, $111,506,430 (domestic), $272,912,430 (worldwide). This is DreamWorks Animation's biggest disappointment since 2003's Sinbad: Legend of the Seven Seas, and helped lead to three DWA heavyweights including founder Jeffrey Katzenberg ending substantial involvement with DreamWorks, as well as getting PDI closed and ending the DWA careers of at least 500 other employees. It, however, didn't stop DWA from making a 2D talkshow-esque spinoff on Netflix the next year.
  • Mr. Saturday Night (1992) — Budget, $43 million. Box office, $13,351,357. Billy Crystal's directorial debut. It received mixed reviews from critics who praised the acting but questioned whether Crystal's character was meant to be likable or not.
  • Mr. Wonderful (1993) — Budget, $13 million. Box office, $3,125,424. The film's two writers, Vicki Polon and Amy Schor, do not have any more writing credits for feature films beyond this one.
  • Mr Wrong (1996) — Budget, $19 million. Box office, $12.3 million. This shot director Nick Castle (the man who played Michael Myers in Halloween) and the writer's careers right in the heart for several years, and was one of the last times producer Marty Katz associated himself with Disney, who distributed this thru Touchstone, before moving his production company to Santa Monica.
  • Mrs. Parker And The Vicious Circle (1994) — Budget, $7 million. Box office, $2,144,667 (domestic). Though it was critically acclaimed. One of the last feature films produced by Mayfair Entertainment.
  • Mrs. Soffel (1984) — Budget, $11 million. Box office, $4,385,312.
  • Mrs. Winterbourne (1996) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $10,082,005. The last film by A&M Films.
  • Mulholland Falls (1996) — Budget, $29 million. Box office, $11,526,099. Screenwriter Pete Dexter didn't write another screenplay until adapting his novel The Paperboy in 2012.
  • Multiplicity (1996) — Budget, $45 million. Box office, $21 million. One of several late summer releases that got crushed under Independence Day. It got mixed reviews from critics and set back director Harold Ramis's career by three years.
  • Mumford (1999) — Budget, $28 million. Box office, $4,555,459. Lawrence Kasdan wouldn't go near Disney again for over a decade, but when he finally did, it was with the Star Wars Sequel Trilogy, which started with The Force Awakens.
  • The Mummy (2017) — Budget, $125-$195 million (not counting marketing costs), $345 million (counting them). Box office, $80,101,125 (domestic), $407,778,013 (worldwide). Like Dracula Untold before it, the film crashed and burned in America, this time suffering from the Wonder Woman surprise juggernaut being a direct competitor and arguably from Tom Cruise's ego and waning star power (the scathing reviews derided it as just another action vehicle for him rather than an action-horror outing focused on the titular monster). While international numbers have been much higher (including the biggest first weekend totals ever in South Korea), it's still far below Universal's hopes for their big entry into the shared universe bandwagon.
  • Munich (2005) — Budget, $70 million. Box office, $47,403,685 (domestic), $130,358,911 (worldwide). Steven Spielberg's film about Israeli agents hunting down the perpetrators of the 1972 Munich Olympic Massacre was Overshadowed by Controversy for equating the agents with "terrorists." Its limited advertising, partially due to its Christmas Rushed nature, did it no favors either.
  • Muppets from Space (1999) — Budget, $24 million. Box office, $22.3 million. It was rushed into theaters by distributor Columbia Pictures, and its financial failure tarnished Jim Henson Productions' film division Jim Henson Pictures along with the subsequent failure of The Adventures of Elmo in Grouchland. Columbia dropped the label and it was only used as an in-name credit for whatever film Henson managed to produced until 2005. In addition, legendary Muppet performer/director Frank Oz has barely been associated with the franchise since. The next 3 Muppet movies were TV movies, and Disney secured the rights to the franchise in 2004 and rebooted the series with The Muppets in 2011.
  • Muppets Most Wanted (2014) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $51,183,113 (domestic), $80,383,290 (worldwide). There have been a number of reasons suggested as to why the film didn't do well, such as tough competition, a string of previous animated family movies likely leaving its audience exhausted, poor timing (part of the film involves Kermit being imprisoned in a Russian gulag; the film came out around the same time as the Ukraine crisis), and an over-reliance on Viral Marketing at the expense of traditional advertisements. While it was well-received, most critics didn't find it as good as the last Muppet movie. After this, the future of the Muppets seems uncertain. A new TV series for ABC premiered the following year, but even that failed to reinvigorate the franchise as ratings took a huge downturn, leading it to be axed after only one season.
  • Murder at 1600 (1997) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $25,804,707.
  • Murder by Numbers (2002) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $31,945,749 (domestic), $56,714,157 (worldwide). Director Barbet Schroeder wouldn't return to the director's chair for five years until Terror's Advocate.
  • Music of the Heart (1999) — Budget, $27 million. Box office, $14,859,394 (domestic). The only time Wes Craven went beyond the horror/thriller genre, other than his segment of Paris, je t'aime. This received glowing reviews and added to Meryl Streep's record Oscar nomination tally.
  • The Musketeer (2001) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $34,585,771. It opened at number one with a paltry $10.3 million and it went down from there. It didn't help that it came out on the first week of September and only a few days before 9/11.
  • Mutiny on the Bounty (1962) — Budget, $19 million. Box office, $13,680,000. This remake of the 1935 Best Picture Oscar winner suffered a massively Troubled Production that sent it overbudget, largely due to the antics of star Marlon Brando. Unsurprisingly, the film's poor reception derailed Brando's career until The Godfather. This was also the last film by veteran director Lewis Milestone, who did a few TV episodes before retiring a few years later. It was still nominated for seven Academy Awards, including Best Picture, but didn't win any.
  • My All-American (2015) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $2,246,000. Much like Disney/Touchstone's Michael Eisner killer The Alamo, most of the few positive reviews for this film came from Texas-based critics (this film was about a University of Texas football player who got cancer with Aaron Eckhart as coach Darrell K. Royal), with the reviews in most of the rest of the country being very negative. Its release is also notable in that original distributor Clarius Entertainment went bellyache before the film hit theaters and they transferred it to newcomer Aviron Pictures just so it wouldn't spend time on the shelf. The box office foul was so great, it took Aviron almost two years to get their game back together and announce more projects.
  • My Favorite Martian (1999) — Budget, $65 million. Box office, $36,850,101. A failed film version of the classic sitcom that zapped the cinematic careers of writers Sherri Stoner and Deanna Oliver, who are both doing well on TV.
  • My Giant (1998) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $8,072,007.
  • My Little Pony: The Movie (1986) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $5,958,456. Hasbro would never reveal the movie's budget but losses from it and The Transformers: The Movie are estimated at $10 million combined. Both films also led to the cancellation of a movie based on Jem then in development. This first movie in the My Little Pony franchise would later become vindicated through home video sales, and it wouldn't be until 2017 (during the fourth generation) that another theatrical outing would get made, with somewhat greater success.
  • My Soul to Take (2010) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $20,976,402. The penultimate film of Wes Craven held the record for the worst opening of a wide release 3D film until GulliversTravels.
  • My Stepmother Is an Alien (1988) — Budget, $26 million. Box office, $13,854,000 (domestic). This sci-fi comedy was originally written as a horror film before the studio interfered. One of a handful of 1988/1989 films that caused the Weintraub Entertainment Group to implode right out of the gates, and one of the movies that ended Coca-Cola's control over Columbia and caused their merger with Tristar and Sony. It was probably a victim of poor timing and too much competition as it opened the same day as Twins and only a week after the releases of The Naked Gun and Scrooged. Thankfully for Dan Aykroyd and Kim Basinger, they had Ghostbusters II and Batman (1989) around the corner, respectively.
  • Myra Breckinridge (1970) — Budget, $5.385 million. Box office, $4 million. This film version of the Gore Vidal satirical novel suffered from a very Troubled Production that resulted in an incoherent exercise in bad taste. This was a Creator Killer for director/co-writer Michael Sarne (whose bizarre behavior on the set contributed to the mess) and a Star-Derailing Role for Raquel Welch and Roger Herren (in his only movie role). It also did no favors for Mae West, who came out of retirement for this, and she made only one other film, the equally despised Sextette, eight years later. The film also used Stock Footage of classic movies for vulgar punchlines, which prompted a lawsuit from Loretta Young to get her clip out and the White House to order a Shirley Temple clip excised since she was a US Ambassador to Ghana. Finally, it was greatly despised by Vidal himself, who blamed the film for causing sales of the book to freeze for a decade. Nevertheless, it became something of a Cult Classic later on.
  • Mystery Alaska (1999) — Budget, $28 million. Box office, $8,898,623. Fortunately for Jay Roach, his next film as director was Meet the Parents. David E. Kelley, who co-wrote this film, wasn't so lucky; he returned to television after this.
  • Mystery Men (1999) — Budget, $65 million. Box office, $33,461,011. Despite some decent reviews, the film flopped, and commercial director Kinka Usher, who made his theatrical debut with this film, never took part in any kind of non-commercial project since.
  • Mystery Science Theater 3000: The Movie (1996) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $1,007,306. Gramercy Pictures threw all their advertising money into Barb Wire, dumping this film in theaters with a limited release and no advertising to speak of. Not helped by the constant Executive Meddling behind the scenes, the show's crew vented their anger at Gramercy throughout the season seven episode The Incredible Melting Man, while cast member Trace Beaulieu left the series soon after due to said meddling. But even then, in its first weekend it had a higher per-theater average than even the number one movie in the country, so just imagine the business it could've done had people known it was out.

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