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    E 
  • The Eagle (2011) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $19,490,041 (domestic), $36,054,706 (worldwide).
  • Early Man (2018) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $8,267,544 (domestic), $46.3 million (worldwide). Despite good reviews (81% Certified Fresh by Rotten Tomatoes), Aardman's stop-motion caveman comedy was utterly demolished by the juggernaut that was Black Panther. It doesn't help the film suffered from Invisible Advertising after its release.
  • Earth Girls Are Easy (1989) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $3,916,303. This sci-fi musical had a hard time finding an interested studio and it faced financial difficulties during production. It died in a limited release, but it would later become a Cult Classic, largely due to Jim Carrey's later fame.
  • Eastern Promises (2007) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $17,266,000 (domestic), $56,106,607 (worldwide). An Acclaimed Flop that netted Viggo Mortensen his first Oscar nomination.
  • Ed (1996) — Budget, $24 million. Box office, $6,280,000. This movie and Dunston Checks In dealt damage to the idea of having monkeys in starring roles in the movies. It also dealt strikeouts of several sorts to the top players in the movie's production; producer Bill Finnegan never produced another original theatrical film, screenwriter David Evans did not get another credit for the rest of the 90's and his future writing jobs are on Direct-to-Video films, and director Bill Couturie did not work another movie for 5 years and has only directed documentaries since.
  • Eddie (1996) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $31,387,164. One of the movies that year, along with the infamous Theodore Rex, that derailed Whoopi Goldberg's cinematic career, but she has moved on to other avenues such as The View.
  • Eddie the Eagle (2016) — Budget, $23 million. Box office, $15,789,389 (domestic), $46,152,800 (worldwide). The critics liked this sports drama but that wasn't enough to keep it from placing 6th on opening weekend. It did much better in its native U.K.
  • Ed Wood (1994) — Budget, $18 million. Box office, $5.9 million. This was the first film directed by acclaimed director Tim Burton to not do well at the box office. It's also the very last movie released while Jeffrey Katzenberg was still on distributor Disney's lot; he left the lot and ended his involvement with the studio the next day. The film did win an Oscar though (Best Supporting Actor for Martin Landau's performance as Bela Lugosi).
  • EdTV (1999) — Budget, $80 million. Box office, $35,319,689. This was compared unfavorably to the previous year's The Truman Show despite it actually being a remake of the 1994 Canadian film Louis 19, King of the Airwaves. It's now regarded more favorably once Reality TV became prevalent.
  • Edge of Darkness (2010) — Budget, $80 million. Box office, $43,313,890 (domestic), $81,124,129 (worldwide). Mel Gibson attempted a comeback with this film after his infamous DUI years prior, but it opened to mixed reviews. Gibson would have to wait until 2016 before he could try to get back into the top of the Hollywood pantheon, but he did play a Big Bad in The Expendables 3 in the meantime.
  • The Edge of Seventeen (2016) — Budget, $9 million. Box office, $14,431,633 (domestic). It opened against Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them and later Moana, but it did get great reviews, and it earned lead star Hailee Steinfeld a Golden Globe nomination.
  • Edge of Tomorrow (2014) — Budget, $178 million. Box office, $100,206,256 (domestic), $369,206,256 (worldwide). Despite great reviews, it couldn't withstand competition from The Fault in Our Stars, which won the weekend. The poor marketing and unappealing title also played a role in it flopping stateside; the latter problem may have played a part in the film being remarketed as Live Die Repeat: Edge of Tomorrow once it reached video. Still, the international take was enough to get a sequel, Live Die Repeat and Repeat, greenlit.
  • Edison Force (2006) — Budget, $37 million. Box office, $4,143,414. This film tested poorly and subsequently went straight to DVD in a number of territories despite its A-List cast (Morgan Freeman, LL Cool J, Justin Timberlake and Kevin Spacey).
  • The Education Of Charlie Banks (2007-2009) — Budget, $5 million. Box office, $15,078. This movie from Fred Durst only got a limited release two years after it premiered at Tribeca, and then was expelled from the theater circuit to the DVD market.
  • Eight Crazy Nights (2002) — Budget, $34 million. Box office, $23.8 million. This is the only animated film that Adam Sandler and his production company Happy Madison have made, and its terrible reception due to excessive Toilet Humor was one of the multiple blows to 2D animation that killed the tradition until The Princess and the Frog in 2009. Sandler would not get involved with another animated project until the Hotel Transylvania movies in the New 10's, which were also distributed by Sony/Columbia. He would eventually dip back into the animation pool when he announced a new project in 2016.
  • Eight Legged Freaks (2002) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $17,322,606 (domestic), $45,867,333 (worldwide). This B-movie homage poisoned director Ellory Elkayem's and writer Jesse Alexander's careers, as it's the only cinematic job they've had. Elkayem and Alexander never wrote another screenplay, and Elkayem has only done TV movies and a Direct-to-Video film since and Alexander has focused on a prolific television career since. It would later find an audience on home video.
  • Electric Dreams (1984) — Budget, $5.5 million. Box office, $2,193,612. The film debut of music video director Steve Barron (of "Take on Me", "Money for Nothing", and "Billie Jean" fame). It opened at number 14 despite opening at 920 locations,note  and barely lasted to the next week. It also received a mixed critical reception, but later became something of a Cult Classic, thanks in part to it's soundtrack, which proved much more popular than the actual movie, especially Phil Oakey's "Together in Electric Dreams".
  • Elektra (2005) — Budget, $43 million. Box office, $24,409,722 (domestic), $56,681,556 (worldwide). This, along with Catwoman, kept the superheroine genre barren for over a decade, and ended the Daredevil Marvel movie series after just two films, becoming an Old Shame for Jennifer Garner in the process and impaling director Rob Bowman's cinematic career as well. Film copyright holders Fox subsequently found themselves unable to reboot the series before the rights reverted to Disney/Marvel, who rebooted it themselves as a Netflix show.
  • Eleni (1985) — Budget, $7 million. Box office, $305,000. This hurt star Kate Nelligan's American film career a bit, as her next high-billing role was Fatal Instinct eight years later.
  • El Americano The Movie (2016) — Budget. $4 million. Box office, $331,349. The first Animated film produced by Mexico and the United States started production in January 2011 and it didn't see release until exactly five years later. This caused some controversy in Mexico over its family-unfriendly content, which initially got it a B rating from the RTC before it was downgraded to an AA. The end result debuted far, far below expectations at the box-office and it went straight-to-video in the US.
  • Elizabeth: The Golden Age (2007) — Budget, $55 million. Box office, $16,383,509 (domestic), $74,237,563 (worldwide). This sequel to 1998's Elizabeth fell short of its predecessor's critical and financial acclaim, though Cate Blanchett earned an Oscar nomination.
  • Elizabethtown (2005) — Budget, $45 million. Box office, $26,850,426 (domestic), $52,034,889 (worldwide). This fiasco set back Cameron Crowe's career by six years, though time has been kinder to it. It's probably most infamous now for helping spawn the term "Manic Pixie Dream Girl" in relation to Kirsten Dunst's character.
  • Ella Enchanted (2004) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $27,388,767. Director Tommy O'Haver hasn't been able to get another one of his films into theaters after this. However, it would later become Vindicated by Cable due to endless repeats on Disney Channel (it's telling how out of all the Miramax titles they sold to Filmyard Holdings, Disney still holds the television rights to this particular film).
  • Elvira, Mistress of the Dark (1988) — Budget, $7.5 million. Box office, $5,596,267. There wouldn't be another Elvira movie until 2001, and it blacked out director and Saturday Night Live producer James Signorelli's film career as well.
  • Elysium (2013) — Budget, $115 million. Box office, $93,050,117 (domestic), $286,140,700 (worldwide). This was seen as a Tough Act to Follow for Neill Blomkamp's directorial debut, District 9, and even he felt it could've been better.
  • The Emperor's New Groove (2000) — Budget, $100 million. Box office, $89,302,687 (domestic), $169,327,687 (worldwide). This Disney Animated Classic had one of the most infamous production histories in the history of the studio; it was meant to be another musical like in the Disney Renaissance, but Disney executives ordered it turned into a buddy comedy. The film met Development Hell and prompted CEO Michael Eisner to confront the makers and say, "You are this close to being cancelled!" Said Development Hell jettisoned all of Sting's involvement apart from two songs, which Sting and the animators were dismayed at, and the whole thing got a documentary on the film's production titled The Sweatbox. In the end, the final version underperformed a bit at the box office, but got great reviews and was quickly vindicated by video/DVD sales, leading to a small franchise. This is unfortunately the last time director Mark Dindal, who was still reeling from Cats Don't Dance, could enjoy the spotlight; his next Disney film, Chicken Little, was widely panned despite doing well at the box office, and was the finishing blow to Dindal's career.
  • Empire Records (1995) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $303,841. After forcing director Alan Moyle to cut out over 40 minutes and several characters, Warner Bros. severely slashed the amount of theaters playing the film and gave it no ads after a poor test screening with a Latino audience (maybe because all the characters were white, as was the music they listened to?). It was despised by critics, but audiences loved it and it became a Cult Classic thanks to cable airings.
  • The End of the Affair (1999) — Budget, $23 million. Box office, $10,827,816.
  • The End Of Violence (1997) — Budget, $5 million. Box office, $386,673. It was derided by critics as an incoherent, dreary mess, but its cinematography was praised. Director Wim Wenders bounced back with Buena Vista Social Club.
  • Ender's Game (2013) — Budget, $110 million. Box office, $61,737,191 (domestic), $125,537,191 (worldwide). The film suffered from poor marketing that couldn't really make clear if the film was targeted to kids or adults. It also had the misfortune of being the adaptation of a novel by noted Heteronormative Crusader Orson Scott Card, during a time when gay rights were a hot issue; some civil rights groups urged a boycott of the film solely on these grounds.
  • Endless Love (2014) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $34.7 million. This remake of the 1981 film and second film version of Scott Spencer's novel was hated by critics and the author even more than the original.
  • Enemy at the Gates (2001) — Budget, $68-85 million. Box office, $51,401,758 (domestic), $96,976,270 (worldwide). The one film writer Alain Godard attempted to executive produce. The film was also heavily criticized in countries making up the former Soviet Union and Germany for how their portrayal in this WWII film was, which led to director Jean-Jacques Annaud stating he would not present another film at Berlinale after it was booed there.
  • Enemy Mine (1985) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $12,303,411. Director Wolfgang Petersen did not direct another film for the rest of the 80's, and writer Ed Khmara didn't write another screenplay until 1993.
  • Envy (2004) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $14,581,765. This was shoved into The Shelf of Movie Languishment for two years due to lousy test screenings and it would have gone Direct-to-Video in the US if not for Jack Black's success in School of Rock. Neither Black, Ben Stiller or DreamWorks are proud of the film. It went straight to DVD in Europe.
  • Equilibrium (2002) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $5,359,645. Its limited release and mixed to negative reviews didn't do it any favors. Kurt Wimmer did one more film, Ultraviolet, before he abandoned the director's chair.
  • Ernest Rides Again (1993) — Budget, $7 million. Box office, $1.4 million. Was the last Ernest movie released theatrically.
  • Escape from L.A. (1996) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $25,477,365. Part of a string of directing career-ending bombs for John Carpenter, and it's the only film Kurt Russell, who worked with Carpenter on Big Trouble in Little China, has attempted to produce or write. The film also received a semi-Shout-Out/Take That! from Duke Nukem 3D.
  • Escape from Tomorrow (2013) — Budget, $650,000. Box office, $171,962. An attempt at free publicity and recognition by secretly filming this movie in Disney's American theme parks fell apart when the Mouse House wised on to the attempt to invoke the Streisand Effect and ignored the film outright; as a result, it fell out of the limelight instead.
  • Escape Plan (2013) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $25,132,228 (domestic), $137,324,564 (worldwide). Part of a bad year for Sylvester Stallone, though it did get the best reviews of his output (beating the Rottentomatoes score for Bullet to the Head by 2%).
  • Eulogy (2004) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $75,076. It was only out in 22 theaters and was laid to rest two weeks later.
  • Eurotrip (2004) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $20,796,847. This teen comedy got sent back from theaters after six weeks. Director Jeff Schaffer stuck to TV for five years after this, barring a co-writing credit on Shark Tale, until Brüno.
  • Evan Almighty (2007) — Budget, $175 million. Box office, $100,462,298 (domestic), $173,418,781 (worldwide). Torpedoed the careers of director Tom Shadyac and writer Steve Oedekerk (Shadyac backed out of Hollywood, only sticking to writing documentaries, while Oedekerk moved to children's programming), and crushed any ideas of continuing the "Almighty" film series after two movies.
  • Eve of Destruction (1991) — Budget, $13 million. Box office, $5,451,119. This Terminator/Frankenstein clone was the final theatrical film for director Duncan Gibbins before his death two years later. The film didn't do Gregory Hines' career any favors, and Dutch actress Renee Soutendijk, who played the titular Eve and her creator, never made another Hollywood film.
  • Even Cowgirls Get the Blues (1994) — Budget, $8 million. Box office, $1,708,873. This was delayed out of 1993 thanks to a bad reception at the Toronto Film Festival, and could have derailed Uma Thurman's career completely had it not been for Pulp Fiction months later. Director/writer/producer Gus Van Sant would not write another screenplay for 9 years.
  • The Evening Star (1996) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $12,767,815. An attempt at a sequel to Terms of Endearment, which instead contracted a bad case of Sequelitis. This sickness stricken the careers of director/writer Robert Harling, producer Polly Platt, and co-writer Larry McMurtry; the latter would somewhat recover with Brokeback Mountain in 2005, but the others did not, as Harling only wrote one more critically panned film before effectively disappearing from Hollywood, and Platt never took another non-executive producer role for another film in her life. This was also one of the last times co-producer and Paramount/Disney vet and former co-worker to Michael Eisner and Jeffrey Katzenberg, David Kirkpatrick, dealt with Paramount; a fight he had with one of their executives ultimately derailed his mainstream career.
  • Event Horizon (1997) — Budget, $60 million. Box office, $26,673,242. Director Paul W.S. Anderson withdrew from Mortal Kombat: Annihilation to do this movie (although both MKA and Event Horizon were critically panned anyway). Both Event Horizon and Soldier led to Anderson entering a hiatus in cinematic directing until the first Resident Evil movie in 2002. This movie also sucked co-writer Philip Eisner's cinematic career into a black hole right as it started. He didn't write another movie for 5 years and didn't write another theatrical movie for 11 (said theatrical film is his only other full-length film credit).
  • An Everlasting Piece (2000) — Budget, $14 million. Box office, $75,228. It's an understandable gross considering the film topped out at eight theaters. Producer Jerome O'Connor filed a lawsuit against Dreamworks for its poor distribution, which was dropped a decade later.
  • Everybody Wants Some!!! (2016) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $3,400,278. Despite near-universal acclaim and a big name director, the film failed to expand outside limited release due to poor performance. It also kicked off a Trauma Conga Line for Paramount that year, culminating in Viacom president Philippe Dauman getting the boot after a decade with the company.
  • Everybody Wins (1990) — Budget, $16 million. Box office, $1,372,350. It would turn out to be the final film Karel Reisz ever directed.
  • Everybody's All-American (1988) — Budget, $22 million. Box office, $12,638,294. Taylor Hackford didn't direct another film until 1993's Blood In Blood Out. This is also Tom Rickman's penultimate feature film screenplay to date, the last being 2000's Bless the Child.
  • Everybody's Fine (2009) — Budget, $21 million. Box office, $16,443,609. It wasn't fine for this remake of the 1990 Italian film: it closed after three weeks and went straight-to-DVD in Brazil, Russia and Japan. Director Kirk Jones waited three years to make his next film.
  • Everyone Says I Love You (1996) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $9,759,200. One of Woody Allen's more successful flops, with Roger Ebert considering it one of his best.
  • Everyone's Hero (2006) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $16,627,188. The one theatrical film that visual effects artist Colin Brady and Superman actor Christopher Reeve attempted to direct together (it's also the last film from Reeve and wife Dana, who died during production), with the other director, Dan St. Pierre, managing to stay alive, but barely (his next major directing job for a movie that was a wide-release was Legends of Oz: Dorothy's Return in 2014). Everyone's Hero also struck out the cinematic writing careers of writers Robert Kurtz, Jeff Hand, and Howard Jonas.
  • Evil Angelsnote  (1988) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $6.9 million. This was a critical smash which added to Meryl Streep's tally of Oscar nominations. It never expanded beyond 334 theaters.
  • Evolution (2001) — Budget, $80 million. Box office, $38,345,494 (domestic), $98,376,292 (worldwide). The Rotten Tomatoes consensus accused director Ivan Reitman of attempting to remake Ghostbusters, and several critics panned it for its liberal usage of Toilet Humour and Squick regarding the enemy aliens. It got an animated continuation that same year, but said show ran for only one season. Reitman would not direct his next cinematic movie for 5 years.
  • Excess Baggage (1997) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $14.5 million. Was supposed to be the first in a line of movies produced by Alicia Silverstone, but the movie's poor box office made it her only production credit. Both this film and the infamous Batman & Robin led to a quick end to Silverstone's stardom.
  • Excessive Force (1993) — Budget, $13 million. Box office, $1,152,117. This got a Direct-to-Video sequel despite its financial and critical takedown.
  • Exit to Eden (1994) — Budget, $25-30 million. Box office, $6,841,570. This film version of Anne Rice's novel was lambasted by critics for its clumsily inserted subplot with a pair of Canon Foreigner cops played by Dan Aykroyd and Rosie O'Donnell (who both regretted making it) and for being an unfunny, unsexy sex comedy.
  • Exodus: Gods and Kings (2014) — Budget, $140 million. Box office, $65,014,513 (domestic), $267,281,036 (worldwide). It drew controversy for its action-oriented take on the Biblical story of Moses and for its whitewashed cast of Egyptian characters. This was another critical and financial dud for Ridley Scott, but he immediately bounced back with The Martian.
  • Exorcist: The Beginning (2004) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $41 million (domestic), $78 million (worldwide). This prequel to The Exorcist was born out of Executive Meddling after an unsatisfactory response to Paul Schrader's relatively bloodless Dominion: Prequel to the Exorcist. The end result was eviscerated by critics and series creator William Peter Blatty for its overemphasis on gore and its prequelitis. Schrader's version was released the following year...
  • The Expendables 3 (2014) — Budget, $90 million. Box office, $39,322,544 (domestic), $206,172,544 (worldwide). Unfortunately, the film got leaked online several weeks before release, which prompted a lawsuit against several piracy websites from Lionsgate. In addition to that and bad reviews, everyone in the U.S. was waiting in line for Guardians of the Galaxy and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (2014). Despite all this, and thanks to its foreign gross, a fourth installment in the Sylvester Stallone series is said to be in the works.
  • The Experts (1989) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $169,203. Paramount dumped this in 100 theaters after putting it on The Shelf of Movie Languishment for two years. The film led to John Travolta and Kelly Preston's Romance on the Set and eventual marriage.
  • Explorers (1985) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $9,873,044. It was originally scheduled for late-August but Paramount rushed it to early July when it wasn't even finished. Its new release date buried it under the box-office smash Back to the Future. It was properly edited for its home video release and it has since become a Cult Classic.
  • Exposed (1983) — Budget, $18 million. Box office, $1,352,083.
  • The Express (2008) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $9,808,124. This sports biopic fumbled in theaters after four weeks despite pretty good reviews from critics. Director Gary Fleder's film career was benched for five years until Homefront and screenwriter Charles Leavitt wouldn't write another film until Seventh Son.
  • Existenz (1999) — Budget, $31 million Canadian Dollars/$15 million U.S. Dollars. Box office, $2,856,712. This had the unfortunate timing to come out after the similarly themed The Matrix. Its limited release of only 256 theaters didn't help but it got generally good reviews.
  • Extraordinary Measures (2010) — Budget, $31 million. Box office, $15,134,293. This is the first film produced by CBS Films, which still exists, though in a somewhat reduced operation. One of two 2010 bombs that caused Brendan Fraser's career to outright flatline after Looney Tunes: Back in Action put it in the hospital for the decade prior to it. Director Tom Vaughan's career found itself plummeting to Development Hell after this movie, writer Robert Nelson Jacobs has not created another screenplay, and this, along with Cowboys & Aliens, was a major blow to Harrison Ford's career, though he eventually bounced back when he returned to Star Wars for The Force Awakens.
  • Extreme Measures (1996) — Budget, $38 million. Box office, $17,380,126. It debuted in second place behind second-week champ The First Wives Club but flat-lined soon after.
  • Extreme Ops (2002) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $10,959,475. This sent director Christian Duguay to TV work for five years.
  • Extreme Prejudice (1987) — Budget, $22 million. Box office, $11,307,844. John Milius conceived this western drama in 1976 but it wasn't until the mid-80s that production began with Walter Hill directing. Tri-Star tried to rush the film to a Christmas 1986 release, but the filmmakers resisted. The end result was liked a lot by critics, but it fell flat after opening at number two behind The Secret of My Success.
  • Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close (2011) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $31,847,881 (domestic), $55,247,881 (worldwide). Its story of an autistic boy dealing with his father's death in 9/11 was derided by critics as heavy-handed Oscar Bait and a major case of Too Soon. That didn't stop it from getting an Oscar nomination for Best Picture.note 
  • Eye Of The Beholder (1999) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $17,589,705. It was the first film to ever receive an "F" on Cinemascore. Director Stephan Elliot wouldn't direct again for 8 years.
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    F 
  • Factory Girl (2006) — Budget, $7 million. Box office, $3,572,632. This film put a major dent in director George Hickenlooper's career and was the beginning of Hayden Christensen's drought in roles since the George Lucas-produced Star Wars movies had come to an end, and he had earned Razzies and snark for his portrayal of Anakin Skywalker/Darth Vader for the last two movies before Disney seized control (Christensen was also intentionally minimizing his career after making a few investments).
  • Fair Game (1995) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $11,534,477. Shot Cindy Crawford's acting career dead before it had a chance, and put a sizable dent in William Baldwin's own acting career. It was such a bomb that some of the crew (including director Andrew Sipes) never worked on another movie again.
  • Fair Game (2010) — Budget, $22 million. Box office, $9,540,691 (domestic), $24,188,922 (worldwide). This drama based on the Plame Affair was rated favorably by critics but its widest release was in 436 theaters.
  • Faithful (1996) — Budget, $13 million. Box office, $2,101,580. Ended up being director Paul Mazursky's final theatrical film, as he continued on to do TV movies and documentaries until his passing in 2014. Was one of several films in that period that put a dent into co-star Chazz Palminteri's career as well, as he mostly did independent movies and small roles afterwards, rarely appearing in the top billing of theatrical releases again.
  • The Fall of the Roman Empire (1964) — Budget, $19 million. Box office, $4.75 million. Comparisons with contemporary Roman epic Cleopatra are inevitable, although Fall had a substantially less Troubled Production and was much more well-received by critics. Audiences, however, had lost interest in sword and sandal epics following Cleopatra (and, unlike Cleopatra, Fall has largely faded into obscurity since its initial release in 1964). Producer Samuel Bronston and his studio went broke when this film failed. It was also among a series of flops for Paramount Pictures that ended Barney Balaban's 28-year run as studio president.
  • Fallen (1998) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $25,232,289. Fortunately for director Gregory Hoblit, his next film was Frequency.
  • The Fan (1981) — Budget, $9 million. Box office, $3,082,096. Director Ed Bianchi didn't direct another theatrical film for another decade.
  • The Fan (1996) — Budget, $55 million. Box office, $18,626,419. The first film produced by Mandalay Entertainment was the second and final film written by Robert "Phoef" Sutton, who works in TV now.
  • Fanboys (2009) — Budget, $8 million. Box office, $960,828. This sat on The Shelf of Movie Languishment for nearly three years as The Weinstein Company grew cold feet over the cancer subplot. It was ultimately given a very limited release where it died a quiet death.
  • Fandango (1985) — Budget, $4 million. Box office, $91,666. This was Kevin Reynolds's directorial debut, the film debut of Suzy Amis and Kevin Costner's lead acting debut. It was also the first film by Amblin Entertainment to not credit Steven Spielberg. It died in a limited release but was Vindicated by History.
  • Fantasia (1940) — Budget, $2,280,000. Box office, $361,800 (original theatrical release tally only). The outbreak of World War II plus the cost of movie theaters having to install Disney's new "Fantasound" technology to properly show Fantasia hurt this film badly, and, along with Pinocchio and Bambi's initial disappointing releases and a bitter strike from animators, defeated the dream of turning Fantasia into a concert/animation film series for decades and resulted in Walt Disney having to make package films for the remainder of the 40s until Cinderella brought animation back to mainstream. It's also one of a handful of RKO Pictures-distributed flops in the early 40's that dealt damage to the studio. Fantasia has since been considered one of Walt's best, along with Pinocchio and Bambi.
    • Fantasia 2000 (2000) — Budget, $80 million. Box office, $60,655,420 (domestic), $90,874,570 (worldwide). It was announced around the same time as the Walt Disney Classics VHS release of Fantasia and the premiere of Beauty and the Beast, and was a massive production that took 9 years to finish. Disney released the movie to celebrate the new millennium. The reasons for the low gross was Executive Producer Roy Disney's decision to release the film only in IMAX format, amongst other marketing moves such as building a temporary IMAX theater that cost $4,000,000 and having the show's orchestra tour the country. The IMAX-only showings severely reduced the potential box office gross due to the format still being in relative infancy, having less than 100 theaters in North America at the time. It became the highest grossing IMAX feature up to that point and helped further development of the format, plus it was received well from critics, but it still lost money due to this decision, even after it was released in regular theaters in the summer. The overall box office underperformance ended the dream of Fantasia becoming a concert film series a second time, with a planned third film canceled and several shorts meant for it instead being released on the Platinum Edition DVDs of The Lion King and The Little Mermaid. All major features released in IMAX by Hollywood now have regular theater showings released simultaneously with the IMAX release.
  • The Fantasticks (2000) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $49,666. This film adaptation of the classic musical was completed in 1995, but withheld until 2000, when it became a critical and commercial bomb. This is the last theatrical movie with Michael Ritchie's name on it to be released before his death in 2001.
  • Fant4stic (2015) — Budget, $155 million (not counting marketing costs), $200 million (counting them). Box office, $56,117,548 (domestic), $167,397,693 (worldwide). Fans and copyright holder Disney/Marvel were already annoyed at Fox's ill-fated attempt to hold on to the Fantastic Four franchise despite the middling performances of the 2005 film and its sequel. The movie's Troubled Production that saw director Josh Trank exhibit bad behavior that cost him a Star Wars directing job, Marvel Comics seemingly doing everything in their power not to promote it (and this is a company that put Howard the Duck on their website and not this) and the evisceration by critics, fans, and moviegoers led this to be the worst-performing superhero-based movie since The Green Hornet. It didn't even win on its opening weekend, losing to Mission: Impossible – Rogue Nation, which premiered a week prior. The next hit came when this movie's nuclear failure managed to morph Fox's entire fiscal year into a severe financial loss, crushing their plans for a sequel and derailing Trank's career, turning his name into instant Snark Bait as a latter-day Michael Cimino. As if adding insult to injury, Fox's next Marvel movie, Deadpool, utterly demolished expectations, earning back its ~$60 million budget thirteen times over, making this movie's entire lifetime's gross earnings in its opening weekend (that film was rated R and therefore somewhat out of Disney's comfort zone, but in contrast to Fant4stic, they did not have a problem with creating merchandise for that film or allowing Marvel executives to praise it). As for other members of the crew, all four "Fantastics" in the movie regard this as an Old Shame, with at least one of them plus the film's villain actor seeing career difficulties. The creation of the movie and its bombing lead to Marvel to deep freeze the Fantastic Four franchise until 2018 with the re-release of their comic and re-placing them back in video games months later.
  • Fantastic Mr. Fox (2009) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $21,002,919 (domestic), $46,471,023 (worldwide). Part of a string of box office flops based off of the library of Roald Dahl (all of these movies are acclaimed flops). This was Wes Anderson's animated debut, and he waited nine years for his next one, Isle of Dogs.
  • Far Cry (2008) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $700,000. This Uwe Boll film was actually distributed by two major Hollywood studios instead of being a small project (Touchstone Pictures distributed it in North America while Fox distributed it in Boll's home country of Germany, where it was heavily edited). This case of Video-Game Movies Suck is one of the last truly mature projects Disney agreed to distribute before studio chief Dick Cook was asked to leave by CEO Bob Iger when they bought Marvel the next year and changed their film strategy. Ubisoft is planning another Far Cry movie, but it is not known if Uwe Boll will be a part of it, as all of the infamous director's films past this point are small-scale productions, plus by this point, the gaming companies did not let Boll anywhere near their properties; all the video game movies he did inflicted heavy damage on the franchises they came from (Boll attempted to get the Warcraft directing job, but Blizzard, expecting an Uwe Boll-helmed Warcraft movie to be a Franchise Killer for Warcraft itself, laid into him for applying. Boll also wanted to do a Metal Gear Solid film, which got an equally negative reception from creator Hideo Kojima).
  • Farewell To The King (1989) — Budget, $16 million. Box office, $2,420,917. One of two films during this time, the other being Flight of the Intruder, that grounded the directing career of John Milius, but he's still a major Hollywood player.
  • Fascination (2005) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $16,670. This film was dumped into limited release to fulfill a contractual obligation with MGM and the film’s producers that the studio inherited from Orion Pictures.
  • The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift (2006) — Budget, $85 million. Box office, $62,514,415 (domestic), $158,468,292 (worldwide). While this installment in the Fast and the Furious franchise did need international gross to break even, it didn't slow the series down at all.
    • The Fate of the Furious (2017) — Budget, $250 million. Box office, $225,764,765 (domestic), $1,235,761,498 (worldwide). If ever there was a shining example of Germans Love David Hasselhoff, this would be it; despite it technically being a flop in the US, the massive foreign grosses mean the franchise's future looks bright as ever.
  • Faster (2010) — Budget, $24 million. Box office, $23,240,020 (domestic), $35,626,958 (worldwide). This one caused co-producer Tony Gayton's cinematic career to skid right off the highway; he moved to television and created Hell on Wheels.
  • Fat Man and Little Boy (1989) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $3,563,162. This dramatization of the development of the atomic bomb got a mixed reception for its historical liberties and its casting of Paul Newman and Dwight Schultz. This started the gradual downfall of director Roland Joffe.
  • Fatal Instinct (1993) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $7,839,327. This parody film was eviscerated by critics and faded out of theaters pretty quickly. It went Direct-to-Video in the UK after its disatrous run in North America. This was the penultimate film directed by Carl Reiner.
  • Father Figures (2017) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $17,501,244 (domestic), $25,601,244 (worldwide). This critically reviled comedy was placed on The Shelf of Movie Languishment for over a year, retitled the film from the more provocative Bastards and was sent to die in a packed holiday season.
  • Fathers' Day (1997) — Budget, $85 million. Box office, $35,681,080. Outside of a voiceover role in Pixar's A Bug's Life, Seinfeld star Julia-Louis Dreyfus wouldn't return to the big screen until The New 10's.
  • The Favor (1994) — Budget, $13 million. Box office, $3 million. Originally set for a 1991 release by Orion, but after they went bankrupt that year it sat on a shelf before getting a sudden release in 1994. It had a decent opening week but fizzled out due to poor promotion, and dropped off the charts later that month.
  • Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas (1998) — Budget, $18.5 million. Box office, $10.6 million. This movie put Monty Python alumnus Terry Gilliam's cinematic career in the hole until 2005, and was one of two 1998 films that derailed co-writer Tod Davies's cinematic screenwriting career indefinitely. Fear and Loathing In Las Vegas, however, became a Cult Classic when it was released on DVD.
  • Fear Dot Com (2002) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $18,902,905. Disconnected director William Malone's cinematic career until 2008, and after that movie, his Hollywood career remained offline.
  • Fearless (1993) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $6,995,302. This only appeared in six theaters on its opening weekend and opened its widest at 749 theaters a few weeks later. Still, critics gave it glowing reviews and Rosie Perez got an Oscar nomination for Best Supporting Actress. Director Peter Weir wouldn't make another film until The Truman Show five years later.
  • Felicia's Journey (1999) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $824,295.
  • Femme Fatale (2002) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $16.8 million. It had mixed reviews, though prominent critics like Roger Ebert praised it highly.
  • Felix the Cat: The Movie (1988) — Budget, $9 million. Box office, $1,964,253. The film had the misfortune of being unreleased in the United States until 1991, and got a very limited release. This movie's failure, possibly along with the introduction of Spiritual Successor Sonic the Hedgehog in 1991, sent Felix into a niche and eventually to DreamWorks Animation's DreamWorks Classics/Classic Media portfolio.
  • Ferdinand (2017) — Budget, $111 million. Box office, $84,410,380 (domestic), $296,069,199 (worldwide). This film version of the classic Munro Leaf book was well-liked by critics, but for whatever reason Fox decided to release it on the same day as The Last Jedi, which proceeded to demolish Ferdinand at the box office domestically for the first weeks of its release. However, the film saw decent legs without major competition from other animated children's films throughout the rest of the holiday season, and it saw good business overseas.
  • Fever Pitch (1985) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $618,847. This was the last movie that Richard Brooks directed before he died in 1992.
  • Fierce Creatures (1997) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $9,381,260. This is the last story that Monty Python alumnus John Cleese would write until The Croods in 2013. Co-writer Iain Johnstone, on the other hand, didn't write another fictional movie at all.
  • The Fifth Estate (2013) — Budget, $28 million. Box office, $8,555,008. This had the worst opening for a wide release that year. The critics cited the film for its slow script and direction, while the controversial nature of its subject (the founding of Wikileaks) drove quite a few moviegoers away.
  • The Fifth Wave (2016) — Budget, $38 million. Box office, $34,294,936 (domestic), $106,484,451 (worldwide). The film version of the YA novel was ripped apart by critics for being a Cliché Storm no different than other sci-fi YA works but viewer response was much higher.
  • Fight Club (1999) — Budget, $63 million. Box office, $37,030,102 (domestic), $100,853,753 (worldwide). At the time of its release, the film was ravaged by critics for its messages, dark humor, and violence, and was K.O'ed at the box office. Fox owner Rupert Murdoch never forgave executive Bill Mechanic for greenlighting this film, and was rumored to be one of the reasons why Mechanic was fired from the studio. Thankfully, the film managed to become a huge Cult Classic, being voted as one of the greatest movies of all time in multiple magazine polls, and one of David Fincher's best films.
  • The Fighting Temptations (2003) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $32,750,821. This eventually knocked out the career of director Jonathan Lynn along with the careers of the movie's producers, and was one of a handful of bad steps for Cuba Gooding Jr..
  • Filth and Wisdom (2008) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $354,628. Madonna's directorial debut and the first film of her production company, Semtex Films. It had a very limited release and a simultaneous release on VOD.
  • Final Analysis (1992) — Budget, $32 million. Box office, $28,590,665. One of a few flops in the early 90's that melted the A-list career of Kim Basinger.
  • Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within (2001) — Budget, $135-167 million. Box office, $85,131,830. This film's failure led to the collapse of Square Pictures after only one film and delayed the merger of Squaresoft with Enix; the latter company was hesitant at merging with a company that had just lost a large amount of money in a high-profile manner. As a result of the film's flopping, it halted the idea of Animated Actress character Aki Ross (who was voiced by Ming-Na Wen) appearing in other movies right out of the gates. This film is also cited as the reason why the movie's director and the creator of the Final Fantasy series, Hironobu Sakaguchi, resigned from the firm and ended his involvement with the franchise, moving to Hawaii and starting the development studio Mistwalker (this film also wounded the careers of its writers; this is also one of at least two instances on this list where the main brain behind the games was unable to direct a film based off the series and saw his career get impaled; the other is Origin Systems' Chris Roberts and the Wing Commander movie). Square has not enjoyed the level of dominance it once had prior to this film's release.
  • Find Me Guilty (2006) — Budget, $13 million. Box office, $2,636,637. The penultimate film of Sidney Lumet's career was based on the story of mobster Jackie DiNorscio. It was an Acclaimed Flop, with much of the praise going to Vin Diesel's performance as DiNorscio.
  • The Finest Hours (2016) — Budget, $70-80 million. Box office, $52,099,090. This was originally meant to open the previous October, but Disney ended up dumping the film on the same day as Kung Fu Panda 3, which got considerably better reviews overall to the mixed ones The Finest Hours got (this was also the day Fifty Shades of Black opened and The Force Awakens was still playing). It was subsequently scuttled at the box office and cost Disney $75 million for the error (though they would rebound with Zootopia in time).
  • Finian's Rainbow (1968) — Budget, $3.5 million. Box office, $11.6 million. Domestic rentals, $5.1 million. Francis Ford Coppola's film version of the Harburg and Saidy musical was his first studio film. Unfortunately, it came out at a time when musicals declined in popularity, not helped by the roadshow release inadvertently matting out the dancers' feet when it converted it from 35mm to 70mm. This marked Fred Astaire's last musical. One positive was that Coppola met George Lucas when the latter worked as his production assistant.
  • Fire and Ice (1983) — Budget, $1.2 million. Box office, $760,883. This is a Ralph Bakshi film, so unsurprisingly, it became a Cult Classic.
  • Fire Birds (1990) — Budget, $22 million. Box office, $14,760,451. This movie caused director David Green's directing career to go down in flames for 10 years.
  • Fire Down Below (1997) — Budget, $60 million. Box office, $16,228,448. Steven Seagal's contract with Warner Bros. went up in smoke when this movie did. Director Félix Enríquez Alcalá went back to television where he's had steady work since.
  • Fired Up (2009) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $18,599,102. The directorial debut of Will Gluck was kicked out of theaters after seven weeks. Gluck found better luck the next year with Easy A.
  • Firestorm (1998) — Budget, $19 million. Box office, $8,165,212. This firefighting drama starring NFL star Howie Long was the only new release on opening week and it was curbstomped by a slew of longstanding holdovers. Between this and the same year's The Patriot, veteran cinematographer Dean Semler never got into the director's chair again.
  • Firewall (2006) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $48,751,189 (domestic), $82,751,189 (worldwide). One of several consecutive busts that decade for Harrison Ford, though he broke his unlucky streak a few years later with Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull.
  • First Daughter (2004) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $10,592,180. This was released the same year as Chasing Liberty, both romantic comedies about the rebellious daughter of the US President. It promptly flopped in theaters but did slightly better on home video.
  • First Knight (1995) — Budget, $75 million. Box office, $37,600,435 (domestic), $127,600,435 (worldwide). This Demythication of King Arthur is the second film directed solo by Jerry Zucker. It received mixed reviews, with many critics citing the film for miscasting Richard Gere as Sir Lancelot. Zucker directed one more film, Rat Race, before he stuck to producing.
  • First Love, Last Rites (1998) — Budget, $300,000. Box office, $42,953. This adaptation of Ian McEwan's short story had a limited release and a mixed critical reception. Its soundtrack was much better received.
  • First Man (2018) — Budget, $59 million. Box office, $44,936,545 (domestic), $100,546,153 (worldwide). Damien Chazelle's biopic of Neil Armstrong ran into controversy for not depicting Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin raise the flag on the moon. While critics loved the film, it was stranded in space as audiences preferred holdovers Venom and A Star Is Born.
  • The First $20 Million Is Always the Hardest (2002) — Budget, $17 million. Box office, $5,491 (OUUUCCCCHHH!!!) Confirmed Volcano's liquidation of Mick Jackson's cinematic career; he didn't take another directing job on a movie released in the cinema circuit for 14 years. This is one of the biggest bombs in history percentage-wise, alongside Don Bluth's A Troll In Central Park; it was only released in two theaters, and the writer of the book it's based on, Po Bronson, never dealt with Hollywood again, though he became a columnist for Time online. Thankfully for co-writer Jon Favreau, his career only went up from here.
  • Five Corners (1987) — Budget, $5.5 million. Box office, $969,205. This was John Patrick Shanley's first screenplay, but it was released after his Oscar-winning smash Moonstruck. Critics still liked it.
  • Five Days One Summer (1982) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $199,078. This was the last film Fred Zinnemann ever directed before his death in 1997. This was also the only theatrical film produced by Cable and Wireless Finance.
  • The Five-Year Engagement (2012) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $28,835,528 (domestic), $53,909,751 (worldwide). This Judd Apatow produced comedy debuted at number five and fell flat once TheAvengers opened the following weekend. This did no favors for Jason Segel's career, and aside from the critical reception to his performance in The End Of The Tour, he has wound up making little-seen independent films.
  • The 5000 Fingers of Dr. T (1953) — Budget, $2.75 million. Box office, $1 million. A combination of the film's trouble production and horrible critical and financial reception scared Seuss out of the film industry for life (though he did later have some success in television).
  • Flags of Our Fathers (2006) — Budget, $90 million. Box office, $65,900,249. This was released a few months ahead of a companion film, Letters from Iwo Jima. While this film faltered at the box office, Iwo Jima did not. That wasn't enough to save co-writer William Broyles's career (he moved to New Mexico), but the other major players in both movies stayed alive.
  • Flakes (2007) — Box office, $778. No, that's not a typo. Flakes was only open in one theater, and closed after nine days. Unsurprisingly, this is director Michael Lehmann's final theatrical work.
  • Flash Gordon (1980) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $27,107,960 (domestic), at least $50 million (worldwide). It was a hit internationally and fared very well with critics, but plans for a film trilogy never went through after performing just OK in the United States box office. Became a Cult Classic and future film villains, including Aladdin's Jafar, were based off this movie's Big Bad. A remake is on the Hollywood docket.
  • Flash of Genius (2008) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $4,802,953. This biopic of Robert Kearns, the inventor of the windshield wiper, was ran off the road after three weeks in theaters. Marc Abraham, who made his directorial debut here, stuck to producing until he returned to the director's chair for I Saw The Light.
  • Flatliners (2017) — Budget, $19 million. Box office, $16,883,115 (domestic), $44,449,372 (worldwide). Universal panning from film critics has helped this movie remake live up to its title at the box office.
  • Flawless (1999) — Budget, $27 million. Box office, $4,485,485. Critics gave this dramedy mixed reviews, though they singled out Philip Seymour Hoffman for praise.
  • Fled (1996) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $17,193,231. Writer Preston A. Whitmore II didn't write for another film for four years. It didn't help that it was released during the smash success of Independence Day.
  • Flesh+Blood (1985) — Budget, $6.5 million. Box office, $100,000 (domestic). This was the last time screenwriter Gerard Soeteman worked with director Paul Verhoeven for 20 years; while Verhoeven moved on to Hollywood and did RoboCop (1987), Soeteman stayed low-key.
  • Flesh and Bone (1993) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $9,709,451. The second and final film directed by Steve Kloves, who went back to screenwriting beginning with 2000's Wonder Boys.
  • Flight of the Intruder (1991) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $14,587,732. One of two films during this time, the other being Farewell to the King, that grounded the directing career of John Milius, but he's still a major Hollywood player.
  • The Flight of the Phoenix (1965) — Budget, $3.8-5.3 million. Box office, $3 million (rentals). This first adaptation of the Elleston Trevor novel flopped at the box office despite respectful reviews. It's since become a Cult Classic.
    • The Flight of the Phoenix (2004) — Budget, $45 million. Box office, $34,586,264. Unlike the original, this was a financial and critical flop.
  • The Flintstones in Viva Rock Vegas (2000) — Budget, $83 million. Box office, $59,468,275. Had the misfortune of going through Development Hell that resulted in the original film's cast leaving and the crew having to restart from scratch. Releasing it at a time when Hanna-Barbera cartoons had long lost the public's interest didn't help anything. The only theatrical film based on a Hanna-Barbera property released since then (excepting Scooby-Doo and its sequel, the franchise itself being perhaps the sole Hanna-Barbera franchise that hasn't gone out of mainstream vogue of 2010's) is the Live-Action Adaptation of Yogi Bear, though Warner Bros. has plans for a cinematic Hanna-Barbera 2D animated Shared Universe in 2018 starting with (who else?) Scooby-Doo. As for the crew members of Viva Rock Vegas, the film bankrupted the cinematic careers of co-writers Jim Cash and Jack Epps. Jr (the last film to credit them had a screenplay from before 2000), and it and Josie and the Pussycats wounded the careers of the other two writers, Deborah Kaplan and Harry Elfont.
  • Flipped (2010) — Budget, $13.5 million. Box office, $1,755,212. Its poor showing in its limited release made Warner Bros. abruptly cancel plans to go wider. It only topped out at 442 theaters.
  • The Flock (2007) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $7,119,846. This film was sent straight to video in North America. Did some pretty severe damage to the careers of co-producer Elie Samaha and director Andrew Lau, the latter of whom has virtually stuck to Chinese movies since.
  • The Flowers Of War (2012) — Budget, $94 million. Box office, $311,434 (domestic), $97,311,434 (worldwide). This was given a limited release in the US so it could qualify for the Oscars (which left it with no nominations). It was far more successful in its native China, grossing $95 million there.
  • Flushed Away (2006) — Budget, $149 million. Box office, $64,488,856 (domestic), $176,319,242. This movie flushed $109 million of DreamWorks Animation's money down the toilet and permanently drowned their partnership with Aardman Animations, who were becoming displeased with DWA by this point.
  • Flyboys (2006) — Budget, $60 million. Box office, $17,834,865. Director Tony Bill and co-screenwriter David S. Ward have not been involved with another theatrical film since. Producer Dean Devlin would also have no film credits until 2013.
  • Fly Me to the Moon (2008) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $13,816,982 (domestic), $41,721,414 (worldwide). This debuted as a 4-D attraction in various theme parks the previous year. Critics and audiences found it So Okay, It's Average while its Uncanny Valley character designs may have turned off others.
  • Foodfight! (2012) — Budget, $45 million (others say $65 million). Box office, $73,706. Its decade-long Development Hell (which included someone stealing the discs with completed animation and footage), and controversies over its rampant product placements doomed the film from the beginning; it was mostly released Direct-to-Video, and one of the production companies behind it, Threshold Entertainment, who mostly does theme park attractions, has yet to announce another cinematic project (it also more or less spoiled the theatrical careers of producer/director Lawrence Kasanoff and writer Sean Catherine Derek, the former of whom hadn't really worked since producing Mortal Kombat: Annihilation).
  • For Keeps (1988) — Budget, unknown. Box office, $17,514,554. This Molly Ringwald film, directed by John G. Avildsen, experienced a very Troubled Production. It was one of four films released between 1987 and 1990 that utterly destroyed Ringwald's promising future as a leading lady, the other three being The Pick-up Artist, Fresh Horses, and Betsy's Wedding. Critics cried foul over its melodramatic handling of the issue of teen pregnancy and clichéd plot.
  • For Love or Money (1993) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $11,146,270. This was evicted from theaters after four weeks.
  • For Love Of The Game (1999) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $46.1 million. This film version of Michael Shaara's final novel was given a mixed reception from critics, many of whom accused the film of being more interested in baseball than telling a believable love story note . It opened at number two at the box office before it fell flat in later weeks. It also became notorious for Kevin Costner's public feud with Universal and director Sam Raimi over the final cut.
  • For Richer or Poorer (1997) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $32,748,995. One of two 1997 films that smashed the cinematic directing career of Bryan Spicer; McHale's Navy is the other.
  • For the Boys (1991) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $23,202,444. It didn't help that the whole world was waiting in line to see Beauty and the Beast that same day.
  • The Forbidden Dance (1990) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $1.8 million. Came out on the same week as another dance film, Lambada, which completely took this one's attention. The failure killed off plans for a franchise based off this movie, and it ended up being the only theatrical film that Sawmill Productions worked on.
  • Forces of Nature (1999) — Budget, $75 million. Box office, $52,888,180 (domestic), $93,888,180 (worldwide).
  • The Founder (2017) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $24,036,928. This biopic of McDonald's founder Ray Kroc received great reviews from critics, especially for Michael Keaton's performance as Kroc, but suffered from a glut of competitors on its wide opening weekendnote .
  • The Fountain (2006) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $15,978,422. This surreal existential drama from Darren Aronofsky divided critics and audiences upon its release but it became a Cult Classic down the line.
  • The Four Feathers (2002) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $29,882,645. This adaptation of A.E.W. Mason's classic novel got a mixed reception from critics, many of whom called out the film for its lack of energy. Director Shekhar Kapur didn't direct again for five years.
  • Four Horsemen Of The Apocalypse (1962) — Budget, $7.1 million. Box office, $4.1 million. By modern inflation rates, that's over $22 million in losses. This film's failure was part of what caused MGM's financial issues in the early sixties, and what eventually led to an overhaul in staff, including then-president Joseph Vogel getting replaced by Robert O'Brien.
  • Four Rooms (1995) — Budget, $4 million. Box office, $4,257,354. An Anthology Film based on some of Roald Dahl's adult short stories. Unlike some other adaptations of Dahl's works, the critics weren't on its side.
  • The Fourth War (1990) — Budget, $14.5 million. Box office, $1,305,887. The last screenplay by Kenneth Ross and one of the last films by Cannon. This was shipped out of theaters after two weeks.
  • Foxfire (1996) — Budget, unknown. Box office, $269,300. Its widest release was in 218 theaters.
  • Frankenhooker (1990) - Budget, $2.5 million. Box office, $205,000. The movie suffered due to not being able to secure an R rating in time, thus many theaters refusing to hold it. This is director Frank Henenlotters last theatrical film to date, as well as the final theatrical release by Shapiro-Glickenhaus Entertainment.
  • Frankenstein Unbound (1990) — Budget, $11.5 million. Box office, $334,748. Roger Corman's final film as a director; he's had steady work as a producer since.
  • Frankenweenie (2012) — Budget, $39 million. Box office, $35,291,068 (domestic), $81,491,068 (worldwide). This Tim Burton stop-motion remake of his 1984 short opened a week after the much family-friendlier Hotel Transylvania.
  • Frankie And Johnny Are Married (2003) — Budget, unknown. Box office, $22,900. No that's not a typo, the film played in only four theaters over five weekends. The third and final strike for Michael Pressman's film directing career though he remains in demand for television work.
  • Freaks (1932) — Budget, $316,000-$350,000. Box office, Unknown. This controversial pre-Hays Code horror film recorded a loss of $164,000, but that's just the tip of the iceberg. The film's plot and then-notorious characters, who were deformed and led by a character who intended on murder, caused audiences to storm out of screenings and got this film banned from theaters before it could complete its cinematic run; this is the only MGM film to be ripped out of theaters; the studio disowned the film shortly thereafter, selling the rights to exploitation producer Dwain Esper, though MGM bought back the film in the early 1960s. This mess disemboweled the career of director Tod Browning, turned the movie into an Old Shame for one of its actors, Angelo Rossitto, led to the original cut of the film being presumably missing, and got MGM sued by a woman who claimed the movie made her miscarry. Eventually became a Cult Classic and the current edited version now sports a 93 on Rotten Tomatoes.
  • Freaked (1993) — Budget, $12 million. Box office, $29,296. Alex Winter and Tom Stern's directorial debuts was this absurdist sci-fi comedy. A regime change at Fox occurred during post-production and the new executives slashed the budget, then pulled the film from national release after poor test screenings and slashed the advertising budget. The end result debuted in two theaters and didn't last long in theaters.
  • Freaks of Nature (2015) — Budget, $33 million. Box office, $70,958. This vampire/zombie/alien mashup horror comedy was originally supposed to come out in January 2015 under the Genius Bonus title of Kitchen Sink , but then was delayed to September... but it didn't get a trailer (under it's current name) until October, and only 2 weeks before being dumped in a mere 107 theaters with Invisible Advertising and disappearing another 2 weeks later.
  • Fred Claus (2007) — Budget, $100 million. Box office, $97,838,349. Co-writer Jessie Nelson had to wait ten years for another one of her scripts to be made into a film. Ironically, that script is the sequel to Enchanted, which came out during the same holiday season as Fred Claus and ultimately trounced the latter film at the box office.
  • Freddie as F.R.O.7 (1992) — Budget, unknown. Box office, $1,119,368. It had the worst per-theater average for an animated movie (only grossing $501,230 at 1,257 sites) until Delgo came out. A sequel was in pre-production but was immediately cancelled after the film bombed. The film was later reedited and retitled Freddie the Frog for its American VHS release in 1995, but did its reputation no favors. Director/writer/producer Jon Acevski has no other credits besides this movie.
  • Freddy Got Fingered (2001) — Budget, $14 million. Box office, $14,254,993 (domestic), $14,333,252 (worldwide). This infamous film was ruthlessly panned by critics for its take on comedy scenes. The film itself was edited down to get an R rating, and Ebert & Roeper's comments basically said that it STILL should have received an NC-17 despite the edits (Ebert accused the MPAA of being "morally adrift" and added the movie to his most hated film list later). Freddy Got Fingered murdered Tom Green and Derek Harvie's theatrical careers before they could get started. The film DID sell well on DVD, however.
  • Free Birds (2013) — Budget, $55 million. Box office, $55,750,480 (domestic), $110,150,480 (worldwide). While the first fully animated outing from Reel FX Creative Studios barely broke even domestically, basing a movie around a holiday most familiar to Americans (i.e. Thanksgiving) didn't translate into big profits in the more lucrative worldwide market, and didn't translate into big reviews either, with only a 19% score on Rotten Tomatoes. While producer/screenplay writer Scott Mosier continues to see major work, most recently the 2018 adaptation of How the Grinch Stole Christmas! simple titled The Grinch, Director/co-writer Jimmy Hayward (Horton Hears a Who!, Jonah Hex) hasn't been seen in the director's chair since. Reel FX would go on to animate the much better received The Book of Life one year later.
  • Free Fire (2017) — Budget, $7 million. Box office, $3,793,754. This action comedy debuted far, far below expectations to finish at number 17 at the box office behind several new releases. Part of a bad year for executive producer Martin Scorsese, with Good Time and The Snowman coming later to flop.
  • Free State of Jones (2016) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $25,035,950. One of the victims of what Roger Friedman's Showbiz 411 website is calling the "Summer Bomb Buster", being released in the wake of a multitude of failed high-budget tentpoles; this one was overshadowed by Finding Dory, The Conjuring 2, Independence Day: Resurgence, The BFG, and The Legend of Tarzan (the latter three of which also underperformed).
  • Free Willy 3: The Rescue (1997) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $3.4 million. This film effectively put the Free Willy franchise on ice for 13 years; the next film, Escape from Pirate's Cove (2010) went Direct-to-Video before putting the franchise on hold again. It was also part of a rather disastrous summer slate for Warner Bros.
  • Freedomland (2006) — Budget, $37.7 million. Box office, $14,655,626. This movie's failure imprisoned mega-producer Joe Roth's directing career; he's stuck to being a producer since and has not directed another theatrical film.
  • Freejack (1992) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $17,129,026. This Cyber Punk thriller was hit with Executive Meddling and extensive reshoots which led to a product which was trashed by critics and ignored by audiences.
  • Freeway (1996) — Budget, $3 million. Box office, $295,493. This dark comedy was adored by critics but it died with Invisible Advertising in a limited release spanning nine theaters. It's since become a Cult Classic which spawned a Direct-to-Video sequel.
  • Fresh Horses (1988) — Budget, $14 million. Box office, $6,640,346. One of a handful of 1988/1989 films that caused the Weintraub Entertainment Group to implode right out of the gates, and one of the movies that ended Coca-Cola's control over Columbia and caused their merger with Tristar and Sony. It was also part of a string of critical and commercial failures (Betsy's Wedding, For Keeps, and The Pick-Up Artist) that terminated Molly Ringwald's credibility as a leading lady.
  • Friend Request (2017) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $3,759,078 (domestic). This was released well over a year after it debuted in Germany. It was eviscerated by critics and it had the worst debut for a film playing at 2,500+ theaters.
  • The Frighteners (1996) — Budget, $26 million. Box office, $16,759,216 (domestic), $29,359,216 (worldwide). Executive Meddling rushed this film to a July release date, which got it vaporized by Independence Day and the Summer Olympics. This was Michael J. Fox's last leading role in a live-action film before he semi-retired due to Parkinson's Disease. Peter Jackson rebounded with The Lord of the Rings beginning in 2001.
  • Fright Night (2011) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $18,302,607 (domestic), $41,002,607 (worldwide). The critics liked this remake of the 1985 horror film even if not to the extent of the original. Its late-August release, Invisible Advertising and that it was Not Screened for Critics screwed it over significantly.
  • From Justin to Kelly (2003) — Budget, $12 million. Box office, $4.9 million. Aside from just about killing Justin Guarini's reputation, the film's failure ensured the impossibility of future American Idol movies.
  • From the Hip (1987) — Budget, $14 million. Box office, $9,518,342. The first film written by David E. Kelley, who waited nine years to write another. Bob Clark waited another three years before his next film, the similarly ill-fated Loose Cannons. This was one of several busts that broke distributor DEG.
  • From Paris with Love (2010) — Budget, $52 million. Box office, $24,077,427 (domestic), $52,826,594 (worldwide). Director Pierre Morrel waited five years before his next film, The Gunman.
  • Frozen Assets (1992) — Budget, Unknown, but... Box office, $376,008 (domestic). This comedy about a man who gets tricked into running a sperm bank was universally despised by critics, including Siskel & Ebert, and it was a major embarrassment for distributor RKO Pictures. They stuck around as a production company and only tried distributing a film ten years later.
  • Full Of It (2007) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $486,722. It only got to 15 theaters and was expelled after one week. It was shown later that year on ABC Family as Big Liar on Campus.
  • Fun Size (2012) — Budget, $14 million. Box office, $10.9 million. The lowest-grossing movie released by Nickelodeon so far.
  • The Funeral (1996) — Budget, $12.5 million. Box office, $1,306,233. It never went past 70 theaters but the critics liked it quite a bit.
  • Funny About Love (1990) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $8,141,292. This was both the penultimate film directed by Leonard Nimoy and the penultimate film for Gene Wilder.
  • Funny Games (2008) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $7,938,872. An English Shot-for-Shot Remake of Michel Haneke's own Austrian thriller. The Rottentomatoes consensus summed up the film as "a sadistic exercise in chastising the audience" and it was viewed less favorably by critics than the first film.
  • Funny People (2009) — Budget, $75 million. Box office, $71,585,235. Critics generally liked the film but they called it out for its excessive length. This cemented Adam Sandler's typecasting as a comedic actor and the only serious roles he would take after this were in independent films. Universal chairman Marc Smuger would be out of a job a few months later due to this and other flops under his watch.
  • Fur: An Imaginary Portrait of Diane Arbus (2006) — Budget, $16.8 million. Box office, $2,505,841. Director Steven Shainberg's career faded to black until 2016's Rupture. Its extremely limited release and its critical drubbing didn't help either.
  • Furry Vengeance (2010) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $17,630,465 (domestic), $36,236,710 (worldwide). This is one of two 2010 bombs that caused Brendan Fraser's career to outright flatline after Looney Tunes: Back in Action put it in the hospital for the decade prior to it. It also turned director Roger Kumble's career into roadkill and proved to be a major setback for producer Robert Simonds.

    G 
  • G-Force (2009) — Budget, $150 million. Box office, $119,436,770 (domestic), $292,817,841 (worldwide). The first and only film by visual effects artist Hoyt Yeatman was deemed by critics as a So Okay, It's Average Cliché Storm.
  • Gamer (2009) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $40,828,540. This Neveldine/Taylor thriller got generally poor reviews, many of which derided the film for its Darkness-Induced Audience Apathy, glorification of the violence it tried to satirize, and excessive criticisms against its prospective audience.
  • Gangster Squad (2013) — Budget, $60 million. Box office, $46,000,903 (domestic), $105,200,903 (worldwide). This movie was meant to be released in 2012, but the Aurora, Colorado shootings at the Cinemark Century theater during The Dark Knight Rises led to it being pushed back. The movie also played the Hollywood History card with crime boss Mickey Cohen's life (including him being arrested for murder; he was only arrested on felony tax evasion a la Al Capone). This version of the man was also a You Have Failed Me Sadist along Ernst Stavro Blofeld lines who commits some gruesome executions that were hard to deal with after Aurora, which even reshoots did not deal with. Producer Dan Lin's future theatrical films, with one exception, deal exclusively with the Lego franchise, writer Will Beall would not get another screen credit until the future Aquaman movie in the DC Extended Universe, and Ruben Fleischer wouldn't direct another film for five years until Venom.
  • The Garbage Pail Kids Movie (1987) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $1,576,615. It grossed a paltry $661,512 dollars for its opening weekend, and parental protests over the film's Refuge in Vulgarity after it received a PG rating led to it being pulled from theaters within weeks of its release. The notorious film became an instant Old Shame for both the creator of the source material, Mark Newgarden, and prolific voice actor Jim Cummings, who voiced several of the titular kids, and trashed the careers of songwriter/actor Anthony Newley and director Rod Amateau, as Newley never appeared in another theatrically released film, and Amateau only worked on one more film, 1988's Sunset, before disappearing from the entertainment industry completely. The movie also killed mainstream interest in the trading card game that the film was based on until ex-Disney CEO Michael Eisner, who is now the copyright holder of said card game, announced a reboot in 2012, only to cancel it in 2013. This was one of several bombs that helped dismantle its distributor, Atlantic Releasing Corporation.
  • Gardens of Stone (1987) — Budget, $13 million. Box office, $5,262,047. Francis Ford Coppola's Vietnam drama had its widest release at only 612 theatres. This was also the last film Coppola's son Gian-Carlo was working on before he was killed in a motorboat accident.
  • Garfield: A Tail of Two Kitties (2006) — Budget, $60 million. Box office, $28,426,747 (domestic), $141,702,264 (worldwide). Sent the live-action movies based off of the iconic comic strip to the vet to be euthanized after two films, with a third movie that does not have continuity with the first two being a CGI cartoon and one-sixth of the budget being released the next year. After that, all future Garfield movies went Direct-to-Video. Both films became an Old Shame to the actor who voiced the feline, Bill Murray note , and it was a theatrical Star-Derailing Role for Breckin Meyer, who played Garfield's owner, as his future movies are not high-profile (Meyer is not any fonder of the movies than Murray is, making fun of himself for it on Robot Chicken).
  • A Gathering of Eagles (1963) — Budget $3,346,500. Box office, $2,500,000. Not even Rock Hudson could save this film about a bomber wing of the Strategic Air Command (responsible for nuclear bomb armed B-52 bombers at the time). The makers misjudged the changing perception of the US military and the potential use of nuclear weapons in the early 1960s - later '60s anti-war and anti-nuclear weapon films such as Dr. Strangelove and Fail Safe would get a far better response critically and commercially.
  • Gentlemen Broncos (2009) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $118,192. It was mauled so badly by critics that Fox Searchlight only gave it a limited release topping 18 theaters. Jared Hess didn't direct another film until 2015's Don Verdean.
  • Georgia Rule (2007) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $19,103,072 (domestic), $24,991,167 (worldwide). This film and I Know Who Killed Me later that year marked the downfall of Lindsay Lohan's acting career, and her prima donna behavior (which led to the producer writing an open letter criticizing her work performance), did her no favors, either.
  • Geostorm (2017) — Budget, $120 million. Box office, $33,700,160 (domestic), $212,900,160 (worldwide). Dean Devlin's directorial debut began filming on October 20th, 2014, but disastrous test results led to extensive re-shoots and rewrites which pushed the film's release date to exactly three years later. The end result was widely mocked by critics as a Disaster Movie Cliché Storm and it crashed and burned once its first box office results came in.
  • Geronimo An American Legend (1993) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $18,635,620. Director Walter Hill had some misgivings about how this movie turned out, and it dented his career along with Neil Canton and writer John Milius. Hill blamed the film's failure on a rival made-for-TV Geronimo biopic that aired on TNT around the same time.
  • Gerry (2002) — Budget, $3.5 million. Box office, head's up, $254,683. This movie was a failed attempt at making a movie solely by Writing by the Seat of Your Pants, with Wikipedia noting it had a slow pace and unvarying set pieces. This helped derail Casey Affleck's career for several years.
  • Get Carter (2000) — Budget, $63.6 million. Box office, $19,412,993. A botched remake of the 1971 film. Director Stephen Kay didn't direct again for 5 years, and it was a critical setback to the careers of the producer brothers Canton.
  • Get On Up (2014) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $30,703,100 (domestic), $33,470,997 (worldwide). This James Brown biopic was an Acclaimed Flop, and critics particularly acclaimed Chadwick Boseman's performance as Brown, but was overshadowed by Guardians of the Galaxy on its opening weekend. Ironically, Boseman would later find greater success as Black Panther in the Marvel Cinematic Universe.
  • Get Rich or Die Tryin (2005) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $30,985,352 (domestic), $46,442,528 (worldwide). 50 Cent's film debut was a semi-autobiographical film similar to 8 Mile. This was universally panned by critics for being a formulaic biopic and audiences generally ignored it. This was the screenwriting debut of Terence Winter, who hated the film for rewriting his script beyond recognition, and he stayed away from the big screen until The Wolf of Wall Street.
  • Getaway (2013) — Budget, $18 million. Box office, $10,501,938. This is the third and most recent film on director Courtney Solomon's resume, and he has no directing credits past this point. Production company Dark Castle's business ended up in the dark; they didn't have any credits for 4 years until Suburbicon... which also bombed.
  • The Getaway (1994) — Budget, $37 million. Box office, $16,096,974 (domestic), $30,057,974 (worldwide). A remake of the 1972 crime drama from director Sam Peckinpah and starring Steve McQueen and Ali MacGraw, the 1994 version starred then real life married couple Alec Baldwin and Kim Basinger. While the remake did get some buzz if not out and out controversy over some steamy sex scenes between Baldwin and Basinger (for which film critic Leonard Maltin called uncomfortably "voyeuristic"), it like their previous collaboration together, 1991's The Marrying Man, failed to connect with both critics and audiences. It currently has only a 33% score on Rotten Tomatoes. In an April 1997 interview with Movieline magazine, Basinger blamed the movie's box office failure on the fact that it opened around the same time as Ace Ventura: Pet Detective and a snow storm on much of the east coast. This and a string of other post-Batman (1989) duds as well as the stressful toll of her legal and financial problems and the subsequent birth of her and Baldwin's daughter caused Basinger (after appearing later that year in Robert Altman's Ready to Wear, which also failed to recoup its budget) to go on a three year sabbatical from Hollywood.
  • Getting Even with Dad (1994) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $18,869,594. Coming out the same weekend as The Lion King didn't help either. Along with Richie Rich and The Pagemaster, one of three Macaulay Culkin films that performed poorly at the box office that year. He did not appear in another feature film until 2003. This and the very negative critical reception to two other 1994 films from co-writer Jim Jennewein, The Flintstones (which was a financial success) and Major League II, led to Jennewein never writing another film, and this movie led producer Katie Jacobs to focus on television instead.
  • Gettysburg (1993) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $10,769,960. Ted Turner financed this Civil War biopic, which was originally intended as a television miniseries. The film played in only 248 theaters and was successful in the theaters that did play it despite its massive length (four hours and 14 minutes, plus intermission), but never exited limited release. It recouped its budget from video and television sales.
    • Gods and Generals (2003) — Budget, $56 million. Box office, $12,923,936. This prequel to Gettysburg was labeled a terminally ill case of "prequelitis" from critics, and it dealt a great deal of damage to Maxwell and the producers. Maxwell would not direct another movie for 10 years, and Ted Turner Pictures went out of business after just one film.
  • Ghostbusters (2016) — Budget, $144 million (production only). Box office, $128,350,574 (domestic), $229,147,509 (worldwide). Despite a rather vocal part of movie fandom who detested the Gender Flip premise and a passionate Ghostbusters fanbase who objected to a reboot of a beloved property, the film seemed to have a solid domestic run, much better than a lot of property revivals at the time. However, that money only looks good in a vacuum; between an exorbitant budget and a weak worldwide take, the movie fell far short of breaking even, putting plans of a Ghostbusters universe — including spin-offs, TV, and animated features — seemingly on hold. A second sequel to the original movie was later announced three years later, with the movie taking place after Ghostbusters II. Part of a string of failures for Melissa McCarthy. Director Paul Feig rebounded with his next film, A Simple Favor.
  • Ghost Dad (1990) — Budget, $18 million. Box office, $25,421,633. Fresh off Leonard Part 6, apparently Bill Cosby decided to give the big screen one more try...in a movie where he plays a widower who apparently dies, realizes he hadn't arranged for life insurance for his kids and tries to close a deal to secure money to provide for them. The movie would get disastrous reviews, end any hope of Cosby having a film career and marked the final directing job for Sidney Poitier.
  • Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance (2012) — Budget, $57 million. Box office, $51,774,002 (domestic), $132,563,930 (worldwide). While it was able to somewhat recuperate its budget, its worldwide gross is less than half of what the first Ghost Rider movie made worldwide. Because of the movie's failure, the film rights for Ghost Rider were regained by Marvel, who rebooted the character for the Marvel Cinematic Universe in Season 4 of Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.; this sent the Marvel Knights label to Hades after only two releases, the other being Punisher: War Zone, whose title character's film rights too reverted to Marvel.
  • Ghost in the Shell (2017) — Budget, $110 million (not counting marketing costs). Box office, $40,563,557 (domestic), $169,801,921 (worldwide). This adaptation of both Masamune Shirow's manga and Mamoru Oshii's film based on the manga got average reviews that praised its visuals, but noted its lack of substance and philosophical technobabble from the original film. The movie faced controversy in Western countries for its Race Lift casting choices note  while moviegoers didn't have issues with this in Asia. Fans of the original anime series/movie were even more ticked off when the ending became well known for revealing that Major was actually an Asian woman in a Caucasian body, which didn't help the film's case of whitewashing. To add insult to injury, it didn't even reach first, being beat out by DreamWorks Animation's The Boss Baby, which ended up dethroning the live-action adaptation of Beauty and the Beast, and only outdoing Power Rangers and Kong: Skull Island. Even the international box office was not able to save this film, particularly in China due to the film being released a week before The Fate of the Furious, which overran it upon its release and became the fifth biggest grossing film in the country.
  • Ghost Town (2008) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $13,252,641 (domestic), $29,843,245 (worldwide). The critics liked it quite a bit in spite of the lackluster reception.
  • Ghosts of Mars (2001) — Budget, $28 million. Box office, $14,010,832. The film was sent to Mars by critics, and it knifed the career of John Carpenter after a decade-long string of flops; he did not direct another movie until 2010.
  • Ghosts of Mississippi (1996) — Budget, $36 million. Box office, $13,323,411. Rob Reiner took a 3-year hiatus before his next film premiered, the longest time between releases of his movies up to that point. As far as producers go, Nicholas Paleologos and Frederick Zollo didn't produce another film for a full decade, while Andrew Scheinman's producing career was sent up the river and did not come back until 2014. Also one of the movies that year, along with the infamous Theodore Rex, the highest budget film to be sent Direct-to-Video, that derailed Whoopi Goldberg's cinematic career, but she has moved on to other avenues such as The View.
  • Ghost World (2001) — Budget, $7 million. Box office, $6,217,849 (domestic), $8,764,007 (worldwide). This movie became an Acclaimed Flop, but it also became the sole writing credit for director Terry Zwigoff.
  • Gigli (2003) — Budget, $54–74 million. Box office, $7,266,209. Suffered from Executive Meddling that shifted the focus from the crime-comedy elements to the "Bennifer" romance; it also derailed their movie careers for a while along with derailing their relationship AND director Martin Brest's career. The film's theatrical run saw two major drops in gross and screens (81% and 97%, respectively), before the plug was pulled on the cinematic run at the end of the third week.
  • G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra (2009) — Budget, $175 million. Box office, $150,201,498 (domestic), $302,469,017 (worldwide). Became an Old Shame to Channing Tatum, who had to take part in this film as the character of Duke due to a picture deal he had with Paramount. His hatred for this film's script didn't prevent him from reprising the role in the sequel, G.I. Joe: Retaliation, but his character gets killed off for real early in that film.
  • The Gingerbread Man (1998) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $1,677,131. This legal thriller based on a discarded John Grisham novel tested poorly in an initial screening. So Polygram took it out of Robert Altman's hands and re-edited; their version tested even worse. Altman's version was given pretty decent reviews.
  • Giorgino (1994) — Budget, €12 million (and that's just an estimate in euros; the film apparently cost 80 million francs!). Box office: the exact intake is unknown, but only 60,000 people saw the film during its release, and it only made back 1% of its budget. This was famed singer Mylene Farmer's first and only attempt at branching out into film; she would only do voice work for Arthur and the Invisibles and its sequels ever since, and after the failure of this film she left France to take a break in the United States. Director Laurent Boutonnat, the songwriting partner of Farmer who also directed many of her music videos, wouldn't direct another full-length film until 2007.
  • Girl 6 (1996) — Budget, $12 million. Box office, $4,939,939. This was the first film by Spike Lee that he did not write the script for (which was done by Suzan-Lori Parks). Critics didn't think highly of it back then but it's now got a bit of a cult following. Its soundtrack of exclusively Prince tracks helped make it memorable.
  • The Girl in the Spider's Web (2018) — Budget, $43 million. Box office, $35,127,108. This sequel to David Fincher's The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo was a failed attempt to reboot Steig Larsson's novel series. The critics didn't care for it, though they liked Claire Foy as Lisbeth Salander.
  • Girl, Interrupted (1999) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $28,912,646 (domestic), $48,350,205 (worldwide). Though Angelina Jolie won an Oscar for this movie, the writers weren't nearly as lucky. One of them, James Mangold (who is also the director and one of the producers), only wrote two more movies before sticking with the director and producer job, another, Anna Hamilton Phelan, didn't have another screen credit for 10 years, and the third, playwright Lisa Loomer, withdrew from Hollywood and stuck with plays altogether.
  • The Girl Next Door (2004) — Budget, $21 million. Box office, $14,589,444 (domestic), $30,411,183 (worldwide). This Sex Comedy received mixed reviews from critics, many of whom derided Fox for marketing it to teens. Lackluster advertising that made it look more appealing to younger teenage girls rather then the older teen/young adult males the film was aimed at also didn't help. It did find an audience via DVD and cable airings, though.
  • Gladiator (1992) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $9,223,441.
  • The Glass House (2001) — Budget, $22 million. Box office, $18,150,259 (domestic), $23,619,609 (worldwide). Opening it three days after the September 11th attacks certainly didn't help its prospects, plus September was already one of the Dump Months. It did sell well enough on home video to spawn a direct-to-video sequel.
  • Glengarry Glen Ross (1992) — Budget, $12.5 million. Box office, $10.7 million (domestic). The film version of David Mamet's play was a critical smash which only topped out at 418 theaters.
  • The Glimmer Man (1996) — Budget, $45 million. Box office, $20,351,264. This debuted at number two behind three-week champ The First Wives Club but quickly lost its luster.
  • Glitter (2001) — Budget, $22 million. Box office, $5,271,666. This film's failure, along with that of the accompanying soundtrack album, sent Mariah Carey's career into recession for several years. Being released the weekend after 9/11 (in what was already a traditionally poor month) couldn't have helped either.
  • Gloria (1999) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $4,197,729. Sidney Lumet wouldn't direct another theatrical film until Find Me Guilty in 2006. This was also George C. Scott's final theatrical film.
  • Go Now (1998) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $25,695. Did not get out of a limited release in the States and Britain, and ultimately became a TV movie.
  • Goal! (2005) — Budget, $33 million. Box office, $27.6 million. Got mixed reviews and earned director Danny Cannon a red card for theatrical releases; he's stayed in a successful television career since. It's also one of the last flops from Disney, who distributed this thru Touchstone, that led to CEO Michael Eisner getting ejected from the company by the fall. This film's financial failure didn't stop a trilogy from being made, but the third installment in this trilogy went Direct-to-Video.
  • GoBots: Battle of the Rock Lords (1986) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $1,338,264. Along with an animated series, GoBots attempted to cash in on the success of the Transformers toy line and adaptations. It didn't go over so well as Battle of the Rock Lords led to the end of GoBots.
  • Gods and Monsters (1998) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $6,451,628 (domestic). It destroyed the cinematic careers of co-producers Gregg Fienberg and Paul Colichman despite being an Acclaimed Flop and getting several Academy Award nominations. Fienberg stayed in TV and Colichman did not work another movie for 9 years.
  • God's Not Dead: A Light in Darkness (2018) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $5.7 million (domestic to date). The 2018 film, the third in Pure Flix's God's Not Dead franchise, found itself announcing a release date of March 30, 2018 (Good Friday) but was in large part dismissed as a "a cash grab and not a movie promoting a Christian message anymore" on Pure Flix's part while competing for the Evangelical Christian film-goer market with two other films appealing to Pure Flix's base that had been released over the previous two weeks: the Erwin Brothers directed/Lionsgate Biopic I Can Only Imaginenote ; which proved a Sleeper Hit with over $80 million at the box office on a $7 million budget and the Affirm Films/Sony Pictures release Paul, Apostle of Christ (which proved a modest hit, making over $18 million on a $5 million budget). By contrast, the third film in the God's Not Dead series has so far made a grand total of just over $5 millionnote , worse than the opening weekend box office totals of its two predecessors while continuing a string of diminishing returns for films in the seriesnote .
  • Gods of Egypt (2016) — Budget, $140 million (not counting marketing costs), approx. $170 million (counting them). Box office, $31,153,464 (domestic), $150,680,864 (worldwide). The film received damning reviews on release (the Rotten Tomatoes critic consensus reads, "Look on Gods of Egypt, ye filmgoers, and despair! Nothing beside remains. Round the decay of this colossal wreck, boundless and bare. The lone and level sands stretch far away. (Apologies to Shelley.)" It currently has a 16% with critics on the site. This prompted a backlash from the director of the film, Alex Proyas. It had a poor first week against Deadpool (2016), and the next week saw the release of a second Gerard Butler film, London Has Fallen (which also didn't fare very well with critics), and Disney's Zootopia, the latter of which mauled both movies at the box office. It remains to be seen if the failure of both Gods of Egypt and London Has Fallen will send Butler's career to the Underworld (the movie's already become an Old Shame to cast member Chadwick Boseman).
  • Godsend (2004) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $14,379,751 (domestic), $30,114,487 (worldwide). Director Nick Hamm's theatrical career was cast off the silver screen until 2011's Killing Bono after this sci-fi thriller was mauled by critics and audiences.
  • Godzilla 1985 (1985) — Budget, $2 million (not counting marketing costs), $3.2 million (counting them). Box office, $4,116,395. With the exception of the disowned 1998 American film, Godzilla wouldn't return to American theaters until Godzilla 2000 in 2000.
  • Going All the Way (1997) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $113,069. This is the last time novelist Dan Wakefield attempted to write a screenplay.
  • Going the Distance (2010) — Budget, $32 million. Box office, $17,804,299 (domestic), $42,052,757 (worldwide). Director Nanette Burstein and writer Geoff LaTulippe have not tried another theatrical film after this movie.
  • Gold (2016) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $11.5 million. The Weinstein Company shifted this from a wide Christmas day release to a limited day before New Year's release to position it for awards consideration. Its mixed reviews dulled its awards luster pretty quickly.
  • The Golden Bowl (2001) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $5,753,678. This Merchant-Ivory adaptation of the Henry James novel debuted at the 2000 Cannes Film Festival, where it was poorly received. When the original distributor, Miramax, asked the filmmakers to recut the film, Merchant-Ivory took the film to Lionsgate, who gave it a limited US release of 117 theaters. Critics also gave it a mixed reception.
  • The Golden Child (1986) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $79,817,937. Yes, distributor Paramount DID consider this a box office disappointment for the same reasons as Harlem Nights (see below): it made nowhere near as much money as the previous film to star Eddie Murphy, Beverly Hills Cop. Paramount was also having trouble with losing studio bosses Michael Eisner and Jeffrey Katzenberg to Walt Disney Productions, and The Golden Child, in contrast to this movie's original director John Carpenter's eventual take on Fantasy China, Big Trouble In Little China (which has three major actors from this film), was badly panned by critics. Murphy has also more or less disowned this film.
  • The Golden Compass (2007) — Budget, $180 million. Box office, $70 million (domestic), $372,234,864 (internationally). Unfortunately, New Line Cinema had sold off the international distribution rights in order to raise enough money for the film's production, meaning that they only got the domestic gross, and never saw a penny of the international box office. As a result, New Line was absorbed into Warner Bros. soon after. Plans for the remainder of the book series eventually disappeared, leaving this film's ending to become an unintentional perpetual Cliffhanger and turning the whole experience into an Old Shame for director Chris Weitz thanks to Executive Meddling.
  • Gone Fishin' (1997) — Budget, $53 million. Box office, $19,736,932. A tremendously Troubled Production, the movie suffered various delays, confused marketing (Disney couldn't entirely figure out whether to market it to older kids or adults), and a stuntwoman's death during filming. Disney sent it out to die against The Lost World: Jurassic Park, and director Christopher Cain didn't work on another theatrical film until his most recent project, September Dawn, ten years later.
  • Gone in 60 Seconds (2000) — Budget, $103.3 million (not counting marketing costs), $170.7 million (counting them). Box office, $101,648,571 (domestic), $237,202,299 (worldwide). Disney took a roughly $90 million loss on the film, but it did better on home video.
  • The Good Dinosaur (2015) — Budget, $175 million. Box office, $123,087,120 (domestic), $332,207,671 (worldwide). This Pixar film suffered from rampant micromanagement at Disney. The story went through dozens of rewrites, film staff departures, and eventually the entire voice cast got replaced after all of their parts had been recorded. The film was dumped for the Thanksgiving weekend, opening at a weak $39 million and behind The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 2, then any chance of the film making a profit domestically was dashed with the release of The Force Awakens just a month later, making it Pixar's first-ever box office bomb in its history (Cars 2 also failed to make back its budget domestically but was saved by the international box office; the basic concept of this film had also been done twice before, with Steven Spielberg/Don Bluth's The Land Before Time in 1988 and Disney's own Dinosaur film in 2000).
  • The Good German (2006) — Budget, $32 million. Box office, $5,914,908. Steven Soderbergh's film version of Joseph Kanon's novel was deliberately produced in the style of a 1940's film. Critics called out the film for its style-over-substance approach and it became a casualty of the crowded holiday season.
  • A Good Man In Africa (1994) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $2,308,390. Writer William Boyd didn't write another screenplay for 5 years, and the film's production turned it into an Old Shame for director Bruce Beresford, who had a considerable amount of disdain for it and considers it the worst project he's been involved with.
  • The Good Mother (1988) — Budget, $14 million. Box office, $4,764,606. The first of a series of bombs note  that zapped Leonard Nimoy's directorial career.
  • The Good Shepherd (2006) — Budget, $90 million. Box office, $59,952,835 (domestic), $99,480,480 (worldwide). The second and final film directed by Robert De Niro.
  • The Good Thief (2003) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $6,460,758. A well-regarded film that never made it past 222 theaters.
  • Good Times (1967) — Budget, $1,115,000. Box office, $600,000 (rentals, domestic), $800,000 (worldwide). This was sold to distributor Columbia prior to showtime, which earned producer Steve Broidy a profit despite being a failure. ABC wasn't so lucky to the tune of $1,050,000.
  • A Good Year (2006) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $7,459,300 (domestic), $42,064,105 (worldwide). Ridley Scott reteamed with his Gladiator star Russell Crowe for this romantic comedy based on a Peter Mayle novel. It was generally panned by critics, who didn't think Scott nor Crowe were well-suited for the material. Scott and Crowe had better luck the next year with American Gangster.
  • Goodbye Charlie (1964) — Budget, $3.5 million. Box office, $3.7 million (domestic rentals). The film version of George Axelrod's play (also filmed as Switch in 1991) marked Pat Boone's final film under his seven-year contract with Fox.
  • Goodbye Lover (1999) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $1,940,299. Roland Joffe's first film since the fiasco of The Scarlet Letter was mostly shot in 1996 and had reshoots done two years later after a poorly-received screening at Cannes. The modified film still got poor reviews and saw release in 865 theaters. All but 165 of them dropped it by its third week and it was in 216 theaters for its fourth and final week. This was the only film to be produced by New Regency subsidiary Regency Vision.
  • Goosebumps 2: Haunted Halloween (2018) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $46,700,633 (domestic), $93,320,380 (worldwide). The sequel to 2015's Goosebumps (based on the series of books of the same name) failed to make the big numbers of its predecessor, and averaged a 47% rating on Rotten Tomatoes compared to 76% of the first. It seems unlikely that another sequel is being planned.
  • Gotti (2018) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $2.4 million. This is the second biopic of mobster John Gotti, and it was critically panned. It is one of the few films with a 0% rating on Rotten Tomatoes, and this sparked backlash from the film's marketing, which accused critics of conspiring against the film.
  • Goyas Ghosts (2006) — Budget, $51 million. Box office, $9,448,082. This is the final film that Milos Forman directed or wrote before his death in 2018.
  • Grace of Monaco (2014) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $26 million. Its US theatrical release was scrapped due to disputes with director Olivier Dahan and the Weinstein Company and it premiered straight-to-cable there. It also didn't help that the critics and Princess Grace's family overwhelmingly disliked the film in any form. The tepid reception has likely stalled Dahan's career.
  • Grace of My Heart (1996) — Budget, $5 million. Box office, $660,313. This had to confront Tom Hanks's directoral debut, That Thing You Do!, which, like Grace Of My Heart, focused on the early to mid 60's pop music scene. Director Allison Anders took a 3 year hiatus from writing and directing.
  • Gracie (2007) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $3,826,568. This is documentary director Davis Guggenheim's last scripted film as of 2018.
  • Grandma's Boy (2006) — Budget, $5 million. Box office, $6.6 million. Immediately sentenced director Nicholaus Goossen to the C-list. He only directed another Happy Madison film in 2009, didn't work for another 5 years, and has stuck to television and shorts since.
  • Grandview, U.S.A. (1984) — Budget, $5 million. Box office, $4,743,119. This went straight out of theaters after two weeks and it wouldn't see a DVD release until 2011.
  • Graffiti Bridge (1990) — Budget, $7 million. Box office, $4.2 million. The film killed off any hope of Prince appearing on the big screen ever again. Also probably one of the turning points which became the foundation for Prince's feud with Warner Bros. in the mid-90s.
  • Grease 2 (1982) — Budget, $11.3 million. Box office, $15.1 million. The film's failure killed off plans for a third movie, and it became a major Old Shame for lead actress Michelle Pfeiffer, who claims she "hates it with a vengeance". It was also a major blow to Maxwell Caulfield's movie career.
  • The Great Raid (2005) — Budget, $80 million. Box office, $10,769,311. This led to the writer duo of Carlo Bernard and Doug Miro not writing another film for 4 years.
  • The Great Wall (2017) — Budget, $150 million. Box office, $45,157,105 (domestic), $331,957,105 (worldwide). This historical fantasy film set in Ancient China is the first major movie produced by the US and China. It was Overshadowed by Controversy over the casting of Matt Damon as the lead, even though his character was specifically written as a foreigner and the alleged Mighty Whitey aspects weren't as severe as feared. It did great business in China (even if film-goers there regarded it as So Okay, It's Average), who didn't object to the casting, but it wasn't enough to save it in the US.
  • The Greatest Story Ever Told (1965) — Budget, $21 million. Box office, less than $8 million by 1983, $15,473,333 (current total). This film's flopping, due in no small part to a long length and criticism over its distracting celebrity cameos (including a legendary example of miscasting with John Wayne as the Centurion), discouraged any more biblical epics for a while, and it sadly sent the careers of producer/director George Stevens and actress Dorothy McGuire to Hell. McGurie's career took a hiatus for six years, and Stevens only made one more film in 1970.
  • Greed (1924) — Budget, $665,603. Box office, $274,827. Erich von Stroheim's adaptation of the novel McTeague was shot as an eight-hour movie but MGM cut it down against his will to two-and-a-half hours. This initially released version was panned by critics and audiences and was disowned by Stroheim. The original cut and the edited footage is now lost and its four-hour restoration was made with still photos to fill the gaps. This has been Vindicated by History as Stroheim's all-time masterpiece.
  • Greedy (1994) — Budget, $23 million. Box office, $13,137,484. This was the last film Kirk Douglas made before his stroke the next year which impaired his ability to speak.
  • Green Lantern (2011) — Budget, $225 million (plus another $100 million for marketing). Box office, $219,851,172. Warner Bros. wanted this to be their big new superhero trilogy, but combined with generally negative reviews and poor box office numbers, this appears to be a Stillborn Franchise (though there are still plans to have Green Lantern in the Justice League franchise). It also hasn't discouraged star Ryan Reynolds from taking the role of another comic book character, Deadpool, five years later, which was a project he had personally been involved with for years and included him making a Take That! to Green Lantern). It also sent director Martin Campbell's career into a pit for years; he has mostly focused on TV, and it would be four years before he got attached to another cinematic project, when he was tapped for the Jackie Chan/Pierce Brosnan project The Foreigner. (Campbell's the man responsible for Brosnan's Grand Premiere James Bond film, GoldenEye, along with Daniel Craig's Grand Premiere Bond film, Casino Royale (2006).)
  • Green Zone (2010) — Budget, $100 million. Box office, $94,882,549. One of several films centered on The War On Terror to flop at the box office. It opened at number two behind Alice in Wonderland (2010) and quickly fell through. Its spiraling budget played a role in getting Universal chairman Marc Smuger and a few other executives fired.
  • Grey Owl (1999) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $632,617. (Wow.) This biopic about the titular environmental activist was never released theatrically in the U.S. and its reception in the UK was bad enough to set Richard Attenborough's directing career back eight years. The semi-final film to date to involve Allied Filmmakers.
  • Greystoke: The Legend of Tarzan, Lord of the Apes (1984) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $45.9 million. It received mixed-to-positive reviews for its Truer to the Text take on Tarzan, but its underperformance led to a sequel getting scrapped. It already faced Creator Backlash from screenwriter Robert Towne, who was so dissatisfied with the changes made to his script that he substituted his name with that of his dog, P.H. Vazak, who ended up getting nominated for an Oscar. The movie is also notorious for having Glenn Close redub all of leading lady Andie MacDowell's dialogue. It was also the last film for Sir Ralph Richardson, who died before the film was released, who also got an Oscar nomination for his performance.
  • Gridlock'd (1997) — Budget, $5 million. Box office, $5,571,205. One of the last two films Tupac Shakur starred in, being released after he was murdered in Las Vegas the year before. Director Vondie Curtis-Hall did not direct another major film for 4 years, and co-producer Paul Webster didn't take a non-executive producer role on a movie for 3.
  • Grind (2003) — Budget, $6 million. Box office, $5,141,166. This skateboarding comedy was panned by critics for its one-note characters and low-brow humor (though audience reception was much better) and skated away from theaters after five weeks.
  • Grindhouse (2007) — Budget, $67 million. Box office, $25,422,088. A rare film in that it was outperformed by its spinoffs.
  • Grudge Match (2013) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $29,807,260 (domestic), $44,907,260 (worldwide). This was part of a brutal year for Sylvester Stallone and the worst received of his output by critics. It also didn't fare well in a particularly crowded holiday season.
  • The Guardian (1990) — Budget, $10-20 million estimated. Box office, $17 million. Director William Friedkin disowned this movie. It also killed Jenny Seagrove's career as a lead in American films, as everything she's done since has been British films.
  • The Guilt Trip (2012) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $37,134,215 (domestic), $41,863,726 (worldwide). Critics felt that the talents of Seth Rogen and Barbra Streisand were wasted; the latter had the "honor" of a Razzie nomination for Worst Actress.
  • Guilty by Suspicion (1991) — Budget, $13 million. Box office, $9,480,198. This film about the Hollywood blacklist got some negative publicity once screenwriter Abraham Polonsky (himself a blacklist victim) disowned the film in the press due to Executive Meddling. (The lead character, played by Robert De Niro, was written as a Communist in the script and was rewritten to be a moderate liberal in the finished product.)
  • Gulliver's Travels (2010) — Budget, $112 million. Box office, $42,779,261 (domestic), $237,382,724 (worldwide). This flop really put a dent in Jack Black's mainstream career. Director Rob Letterman fell off the radar until 2015, when he and Black reunited with the more successful Goosebumps.
  • Gumby: The Movie (1995) — Budget, $2.8 million. Box office, $57,100. The cinematic adaptation of The Gumby Show never escaped a limited release when it was squashed by critics, and it subsequently squashed helmer Art Clokey's career and future new Gumby material as well; the series has remained visible due to reruns, but attempts to revive the franchise with new shows fell victim to Development Hell.
  • The Gun In Betty Lous Handbag (1992) — Budget, $13 million. Box office, $3,721,911. This satire about a bored housewife who lets herself take the rap for a murder was despised by critics and ignored by audiences. Allan Moyle waited three years to direct his next film, Empire Records, which also floundered at the box office.
  • The Gunman (2015) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $10,664,749. This was universally panned by critics and was shot down after six weeks in theaters.
  • Guy (1997) — Budget, Unknown, but... Box office, just $4,134. This was in one theater and was gone after nine days. It did no favors for Gramercy Pictures.
  • A Guy Thing (2003) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $17,432,163. The second and last feature film directed by Chris Koch, who's stuck to TV work ever since.

    H 
  • Hackers (1995) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $7,563,728. It was panned by critics at the time for its dumb plot and its unconvincing portrayal of hackers. It still became a Cult Classic.
  • Hair (1979) — Budget, $11 million. Box office, $15,284,643. The film version of the counterculture rock musical received glowing reviews but not from the original creators, who felt the filmmakers missed the point of their work. While audiences ignored it back then, it's Vindicated by History now.
  • Half Past Dead (2002) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $19,233,280. Yet another deadly whack to Steven Seagal's fading career, and the most severe one yet. Seagal would not star in another major movie until 2010's Machete, and Half Past Dead's failure sentenced the sequel, which did not feature Steven Seagal, to Direct-to-DVD. Director Don Michael Paul's next movie came in 2006, and he's been stuck with sequels and TV movies after that film.
  • Hamlet (1996) — Budget, $18 million. Box office, $4,739,189. Kenneth Branagh's four-hour, unabridged adaptation of the Shakespeare play only had a limited release, though a shorter cut was also given a wider release. It was still an Acclaimed Flop.
  • The Hand (1981) — Budget, $5.5 million. Box office, $2,447,576. This was Oliver Stone's first major studio film as director; he wouldn't direct again until 1986's Salvador.
  • The Handmaid's Tale (1990) — Budget, $13 million. Box office, $4,960,385. The film version of Margaret Atwood's novel fell flat due to a limited release and unenthusiastic reviews. It fell further into obscurity after the highly-successful Hulu series debuted.
  • Hands of Stone (2016) — Budget, $24 million. Box office, $5 million. This biopic of boxer Roberto Duran got a fifteen-minute standing ovation at the Cannes Film Festival, but it opened to mixed reviews and poor results when it opened in August at the end of the big summer bomb-buster of '16.
  • Hanging Up (2000) — Budget, $60 million. Box office, $51,880,044. The film served as Walter Matthau's last feature, as he died a few months after its release, and director Nora Ephron didn't work another film for 5 years.
  • Hannibal Rising (2007) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $27,670,986 (domestic), $82.2 million (worldwide). This prequel for Hannibal Lecter axed the franchise after its rancid critical and financial reception. The franchise was revived by an NBC series in 2013.
  • The Happiest Millionaire (1967) — Budget and Box office, $5 million. Would have lost money for marketing expenses. This is the final movie Walt Disney was personally involved in.
  • Happily Ever After (1990, 1993) — Budget, Unknown, but there was a $10 million marketing campaign included from distributor 1st National Film Corp. Box office, $3,229,382. This project was created to try to keep Filmation afloat (they went out of business shortly before its release), and when they attempted to create a direct sequel to Walt Disney's Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs along with Pinocchio without Disney's approval, the Mouse House immediately descended on them with a lawsuit, forcing them to change things to put distance between it and Disney. The film opened in France in 1990, but the legal hotfoot kept it out of American cinemas until 1993, when 1st National released it around the same time as the last theatrical Snow White reissue before that film's VHS premiere. Happily Ever After was blasted by critics and bombed, becoming the last straw that bankrupted 1st National; this movie was dropped from the radar right afterwards.
  • Happily N'Ever After (2007) — Budget, $47 million. Box office, $38,085,778. Coming off the heels of other "Fractured Fairy Tale" movies such as the Shrek franchise, this film was dumped on by critics (it has one of THE lowest Rotten Tomatoes scores for any animated film), who accused it of being a ripoff. This film's failure put an animation curse on production company Vanguard Animation and Lionsgate that really hasn't gone away, with Norm of the North being Lionsgate's latest animated implosion, and sent a sequel to this specific movie Direct-to-Video (producer John H. Williams, who is part of both this and the Shrek series, has still fared well).
  • Happiness (1998) — Budget, $3 million. Box office, $2,807,390. This film never escaped a limited release, although it probably wouldn't have done better in a wider release either given its difficult subject matter. This hasn't dented the independent filmmaker Todd Solondz much.
  • Happy Feet Two (2011) — Budget, $135 million. Box office, $64,006,466 (domestic), $150,406,466 (worldwide). This lost Warner Bros. $40 million, and director George Miller closed down his Dr. D studio two years after this film's failure. The movie's failure also convinced Miller to refocus on his bigger Mad Max project and stop with family movies. Happy Feet 2's box office failure would put the franchise on ice.
  • The Happytime Murders (2018) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $26,506,452. The Jim Henson Company's first major venture into R-rated material was critically trashed for being a one-note "Dirty Muppets" joke and died against Crazy Rich Asians, which was in its second weekend. Part of a string of commercial failures for Melissa McCarthy.
  • Hard Eight (1997) — Budget, $3 million. Box office, $222,559. Paul Thomas Anderson's directorial debut and his first of many films to underperform despite high marks from critics. Its limited release and Executive Meddling did it no favors.
  • Hard Rain (1998) — Budget, $70 million. Box office, $19,870,567. Director Mikael Solomon's last film to get a theatrical release.
  • Harlem Nights (1989) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $60,864,870 (domestic), $95,900,000 (worldwide). This was a technically profitable, but Paramount still considered it a box office disappointment due to the movie only grossing half the money Eddie Murphy's previous films made, though it opened at #1 at the box office against Disney's The Little Mermaid, which ultimately outgrossed Harlem Nights. In a grim addition, several theaters in Detroit and California became settings for a few shootings note  that resulted in the AMC theater chain banning any further Harlem Nights showings and a riot to erupt in Richmond following the shooting death of Marcel Thompson, 27, when that showing was canned. This whole mess knocked Eddie Murphy into the B list of stars until The Nutty Professor in 1996.
  • Harley Davidson and the Marlboro Man (1991) — Budget, $23 million. Box office, $7,018,525. This became a Cult Classic later on. Mickey Rourke however treats the film as "Old Shame", admitting that he only did the movie for the money.
  • Harry Brown (2010) — Budget, $7.3 million. Box office, $1,818,681 (domestic), $10,329,747 (worldwide). Its widest release in the US was in 67 theaters. The critics generally liked it but director Daniel Barber waited five years before his next film.
  • Harry & Son (1984) — Budget, $16 million. Box office, $4,864,980. Paul Newman didn't assume a producer's role for another 20 years. The film's commercial failure, plus some medical issues, did no favors to the career of Robby Benson; instead he became known for being the voice of the Beast in Disney's Beauty and the Beast 7 years later.
  • Hart's War (2002) — Budget, $70 million. Box office, $33,076,815. This was part of a bad year for MGM, being released the week after the remake of ''Rollerball'. The producers blamed the failure on MGM advertising it as an action film instead of the courtroom drama that it was. Director Gregory Hoblit wouldn't make another film for five years. Jonathan Brandis hoped to save his career with this film but his part was mostly shipped off to the cutting room floor. It's likely his frustration over this contributed to his suicide the next year.
  • The Hateful 8 (2015) — Budget, $44 million. Box office, $54,117,416 (domestic), $155,760,117 (worldwide). The film was already doomed, being released in the same overcrowded holiday season as Star Wars: The Force Awakens and The Revenant (the latter of which both took the top spot of its opening weekend in wide release at the box office and beat dethroned the former in said weekend at the box office), even leading Tarantino accusing Disney of "forcing the film out of the opening spot" but that was the least of the film's worries. The film opened in limited release on the same weekend as The Force Awakens and in 70mm film to boot, until then said to be a dead format (the next big 70mm release, Dunkirk, handled its release more tactfully). The 70mm cut was longer, which meant that those unable to see it in that format felt like they were missing out. What din't help either was that its screener copy leaked to the internet on the same weekend. The film itself was generally well received by critics but proved to be divisive, due to pacing that was slow even by Tarantino standards (It's 3 hours long and largely takes place in a single log cabin) and a grim tone that verged on Darkness-Induced Audience Apathy.
  • The Hate U Give (2018) — Budget, $23 million (plus a marketing budget of around $30 million). Box office, $34.9 million. This adaptation of Angie Thomas' YA novel received near-universal acclaim from critics, but was ignored by most audiences (though it did get an "A+" rating on CinemaScore), likely because of competition from more higher-profile October releases, like Venom, A Star is Born, and Halloween, and 20th Century Fox not knowing how to properly market the film with its heavy racial subject matter. This was of the last films produced by the studio's Fox 2000 division before their new owner shut down the label, and its follow-up, On the Come Up, moved development to Paramount as a result.
  • Haunted Honeymoon (1986) — Budget, $13 million, Box office, $8,033,397. This was Gilda Radner's final film role before her death in 1989, and it started the short string of movies that led to the complete crash of her husband Gene Wilder's film career (it's also the last time he took the director's megaphone).
  • The Haunted Mansion (2003) — Budget, $90 million. Box office, $75,847,266 (domestic), $182,290,266 (worldwide). One of a handful of failed theme park attractions-to-movie adaptations from The Walt Disney Company, and part of a bad streak for star Eddie Murphy. This was offset by Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl earlier that year, but it's still the prelude to a brutal series of bombs for Disney in 2004 that, along with revolts from shareholders and Pixar, ultimately derailed boss Michael Eisner's career with the firm. A remake is supposedly being worked on. Director Rob Minkoff, one of the co-directors of The Lion King, didn't direct again until Jackie Chan's The Forbidden Kingdom 5 years later, and co-producer Don Hahn, who also produced The Lion King and Beauty and the Beast, stuck to shorts and documentaries for Disney until Frankenweenie in 2012.
  • Havana (1990) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $9,243,140. This film's failure served as the final collaboration between star Robert Redford and director Sydney Pollack.
  • Haywire (2012) — Budget, $23 million. Box office, $18,942,396 (domestic), $33,372,606 (worldwide). Apart from The Company You Keep, this film shorted out the cinematic career of writer Lem Dobbs for 5 years.
  • He Got Game (1998) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $21,567,853. Disney sold off the foreign rights to the film prior to its release in an effort to recoup some of its budget.
  • Head (1968)— Budget, $750,000. Box office, unknown but almost certainly under $100,000 note . The Monkees try their hand at the big screen. The combination of the band being considered past their prime after their TV series was canceled, plus the bizarre Mind Screw of a film that director Bob Rafelson and co-writer Jack Nicholson put together led to Columbia Pictures burying the movie. It played in a handful of big city theaters at the end of 1968, went on the drive-in circuit after that, and was forgotten afterwards, but became a Cult Classic in The '80s when The Monkees experienced a resurgence in popularity.
  • Head in the Clouds (2004) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $3,510,605. This film sent John Duigan's directing career to Heaven for 8 years.
  • Head of State (2003) — Budget, $35.2 million. Box office, $38,620,484. This Chris Rock vehicle came out shortly after the Iraq War began and people ended up staying home to watch the news than go to the movies. Ali LeRoi hasn't produced a film since.
  • Heart and Souls (1993) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $16,581,714.
  • Heartbeeps (1981) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $2.1 million. The film's failure killed any chances of Andy Kaufman doing a Tony Clifton movie. Heartbeeps, along with the financial underscores of Pennies from Heaven and Annie, junked Bernadette Peters's movie career as well. She wouldn't be in another movie until 1989.
  • Heartbreak Hotel (1988) — Budget, $13 million. Box office, $5.5 million. Even with 18 Again! released the same year, this movie about a teenager kidnapping Elvis Presley was a Star-Derailing Role for Charlie Schlatter, who mostly became a voice actor within 10 years. It also arguably ended Tuesday Weld's career as a leading actress, as almost all her roles since have been smaller or at least secondary.
  • The Heartbreak Kid (2007) — Budget, $60 million. Box office, $36,787,257 (domestic), $127,766,650 (worldwide). It would be 4 years before the brothers Farrelly, who directed the movie, and Leslie Dixon, one of the writers, would have another screen credit.
  • Heartbreakers (2001) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $57,756,408. Despite this, the TV rights ended up being sold for $10 million.
  • Hearts in Atlantis (2001) — Budget, $31 million. Box office, $30,919,415. This film falling just over $80,000 short of its original budget and getting exactly 50/50 reviews from critics sunk director Scott Hicks's career for 6 years, and is the second-to-last film written by William Goldman until the 2010's.
  • Heat (1986) — Budget, $17 million. Box office, $2,793,214. The first film version of William Goldman's novel of the same name. The film went through five directors, star Burt Reynolds feuded with one of them, Dick Richards, who was later injured after falling from a crane. Richards and Jerry Jameson were the two credited directors on the film; Richards never worked in Hollywood again but Jameson found steady work on TV. Goldman, who also wrote the screenplay, was displeased with the results.
  • Heathers (1989) — Budget, $2 million. Box office, $1,108,462. This was expelled from theaters after five weeks, but it was acclaimed by critics and became a Cult Classic once it hit home video.
  • Heaven & Earth (1993) — Budget, $33 million. Box office, $5,864,949. Oliver Stone's third film in his Vietnam trilogy was the least liked by critics. Its limited release of 781 theaters didn't help either.
  • Heaven's Gate (1980) — Budget, $44 million. Box office, $3,484,331. This film's failure led to the bankruptcy of United Artists, the ruination of director Michael Cimino's career, the derailment of Kris Kristofferson as a leading man, and (along with other flops) the end of the auteur period in Hollywood, and became a byword for box office disasters. The film's Troubled Production was heavily publicized, but the critical thrashing in its New York premiere, and finally, United Artists pulling the film at Cimino's request to re-edit it was largely considered the catalyst that kept audiences away.
  • Heavens Prisoners (1996) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $5,009,305. This sent screenwriter Harley Fenton's career to Heaven for a few years.
  • Heist (2001) — Budget, $39 million. Box office, $28,510,652. While it didn't set the box office on fire, it generated a whopping $72 million in rentals on home video.
  • Heist (2015) — Budget, $22 million. Box office, $50,136. Got a handful of poisonous reviews and only got a limited release in theaters, otherwise coming directly to video-on-demand.
  • Held Up (1999) — Budget, $8 million. Box office, $4,705,631. Apart from a movie called Good Advice, director Steve Rash's cinematic career was held up in Hollywood Hell until 2012.
  • Hellboy (2004) — Budget, $66 million. Box office, $59,623,958 (domestic), $99,318,987 (worldwide). An Acclaimed Flop that managed to have a large following, to the point where a sequel was released four years later.
    • Hellboy II: The Golden Army (2008) — Budget, $85 million. Box office, $75,986,503 (domestic), $160,388,063 (worldwide). While it made more money than the previous movie, and received better reviews, it still managed to not make back its budget. Another sequel was planned, though Guillermo del Toro wanting to work on other films first, caused star Ron Perlman to actively campaign and fight to make it happen, though the project was later scrapped and a Continuity Reboot without the involvement of the two was produced as...
    • Hellboy (2019) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $19.7 million (domestic), $30 million (worldwide). This reboot of Hellboy was eviscerated by critics for its messy script, Mood Whiplash and over-reliance on gore. The following weekend saw it drop between 68 to 73%, and then dropped 91% in it's third, which happened to be the same weekend Avengers: Endgame came out.
  • Hell's Kitchen (1999) — Budget, $6 million. Box office, $11,710. This only played in two theaters. Angelina Jolie fared much better that year with Girl, Interrupted.
  • Hello, Dolly! (1969) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $26 million (rentals), $33.2 million (box office total). The adaptation of the play cost the film's backers $10 million and, despite faring well at the Academy Awards, signaled the beginning of the end for the live-action musical. The film's financial failure and the critical panning of Gene Kelly's next film The Cheyenne Social Club were crippling blows to Kelly, who never directed another theatrical film after 1970, and it was part of a string of bombs that crushed the relationship and Fox careers of Darryl Zanuck and son Richard, though Richard became a producer, and led to Fox entering troubled waters until the premiere Star Wars film. Hello Dolly's reputation was eventually revived when two major songs from it and a few clips were used as key set pieces in Pixar's masterpiece WALL•E 40 years later (both of the songs used are also used in the Disney Theme Parks).
  • Hello Mary Lou: Prom Night II (1987) — Budget, $2 million (estimated). Box office, $2,683,519. Was more of a hit on home video, where it actually turned a profit. Resulted in the next two entries in the Prom Night franchise going Direct-to-Video. Producer Peter Simpson blames this film's failure on the last-minute decision to make it an In Name Only sequel to Prom Night (1980).
  • Her Cardboard Lover (1942) — Budget, $979,000. Box office, $973,000. Recorded loss, $348,000. The third film version of Jacques Deval's play (after The Cardboard Lover and The Passionate Plumber) was Norma Shearer's final film.
  • Here On Earth (2000) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $10,873,148. Screenwriter Michael Seitzman didn't write another film until North Country, while director Mark Piznarki mainly stuck to TV since this film.
  • Hero (1992) — Budget, $42 million. Box office, $19,507,345 (domestic), $66,507,345 (worldwide). This lost Columbia Pictures $25.6 million.
  • Hesher (2010) — Budget, $7 million. Box office, $382,946. The first and only feature film by short film director Spencer Susser played at 42 theaters.
  • He Said, She Said (1991) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $9,804,775. Director Ken Kwapis waited five years before his next film, Dunston Checks In, after this romantic comedy was ripped by critics and shunned by audiences. His wife and co-director, Marisa Silver, only had a few TV credits after this.
  • Hey Arnold! The Movie — Budget, $3 million (not counting marketing costs), $16 million (counting them). Box office, $13,728,902 (domestic), $15,249,308 (worldwide). The film's poor performance led to Paramount cancelling a sequel that would have served as the Grand Finale for the Hey Arnold! series, leaving the show to end on a cliffhanger that wouldn't be resolved until a one-off special 13 years after the show ended.
  • Hidalgo (2004) — Budget, $40 million (not counting marketing costs), $100 million (counting them). Box office, $67,303,450 (domestic), $108,103,450 (worldwide). One of a handful of flops in 2004 that ultimately helped end Disney CEO Michael Eisner's long run at the company, and a rather bad setback to the career of director Joe Johnston. It would be six years before Johnston's next film, The Wolfman, which would also bomb, but he would fully bounce back in 2011 with Captain America: The First Avenger, a Spiritual Successor to his earlier film The Rocketeer.
  • High Crimes (2002) — Budget, $42 million. Box office, $41,543,917 (domestic), $63,781,810 (worldwide). This second pairing of Morgan Freeman and Ashley Judd failed to duplicate the success of their previous outing, Kiss the Girls.
  • High Heels And Low Lifes (2001) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $228,194. This was booted out of US theaters after three weeks. Director Mel Smith made his final film two years later.
  • High Spirits (1988) — Budget, $15.5 million. Box office, $8,578,231. Hit co-star Peter O’Toole hard, as afterwards he rarely appeared in anymore American-produced theatrical films.
  • Highlander (1986) — Budget, $19 million. Box office, $12.9 million. This movie became a Cult Classic in Europe, which led to...
    • Highlander II: The Quickening (1991) — Budget, $30 million (not counting marketing costs), $34 million (counting them). Box office, $15,556,340. A notorious critical and commercial flop, noted especially for its Troubled Production and Executive Meddling (the film's director walked out of the premiere 15 minutes in, and one of the writers, Brian Clemens, didn't work on another cinematic movie). This didn't stop a third film from being made, which was...
      • Highlander III: The Sorcerer note  (1994) — Budget, $26,000,000. Box Office, $12,308,080. This installment DID get a better reception, but not by much (it also led to director Andy Morahan remaining with his career in music videos). The series continued 6 years later with...
      • Highlander: Endgame (2000) — Budget, $15-$25 million. Box office, $15,843,608. After this movie (which was Not Screened for Critics after the previous two became critical punching bags that had to be retconned), the fifth installment, Highlander: The Source, which came out in 2007, never saw the inside of a cinema, instead premiering on the Sci-Fi Channel. This is the one time director Doug Aarniokoski has attempted to direct a theatrical film with a considerable budget. He's stayed in television since apart from Nurse 3D.
  • The Hitcher (1986) — Budget: $6 million. Box office: $5,844,868. Most critics accused this thriller of being too sadistic and exploitational, but it eventually became a Cult Classic over time.
  • Hitman: Agent 47 (2015) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $22.5 million (domestic), $82.3 million (worldwide). A case of Video-Game Movies Suck and "remakitis", and a failed attempt by Fox to try to offset any radiation from the nuclear fallout of Fant4stic's critical and financial implosion in the domestic market (Fox did not do themselves any favors by rehiring the writer of the other Hitman movie, Skip Woods, to write this one). It did fare better overseas, though. Skip Woods, meanwhile, has yet to make another film.
  • The Hoax (2007) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $11,772,461. This was an Acclaimed Flop but its release was rather limited, starting from 235 theaters and topping at 1,069. One person not pleased with the film was Clifford Irving, who wrote the book it was based on, which chronicled his infamous fake biography of Howard Hughes, who lambasted the film for its historical liberties.
  • Hocus Pocus (1993) — Budget, $28 million. Box office, $39.5 million. This Disney Halloween fantasy comedy was released in July (likely to avoid self-competition with Disney's other Halloween movie), where it was slammed by critics and unable to compete with the ongoing box-office juggernaut Jurassic Park. It was Vindicated by Cable and is now a Cult Classic.
  • Hoffa (1992) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $29,302,121. This Bio Pic of Teamster Boss Jimmy Hoffa divided critics, particularly over Jack Nicholson's performance in the title role (which got him nominated for a Golden Globe and a Razzie).
  • Holiday Affair (1949) — Budget and box office unknown. Projected loss, $300,000. Robert Mitchum was cast as the romantic lead in this failed attempt to change his image after being busted for marijuana possession, but the studio soon realized that the incident only solidified his bad-boy status to the public. Audiences stayed away at the time of its release but it has since become a minor Christmas classic thanks to Turner Classic Movies.
  • Hollywoodland (2006) — Budget, $28 million. Box office, $16,803,753. This movie got good reviews, but director Allen Coulter didn't direct another theatrical film for 4 years and stuck to television.
  • Hollywood Ending (2002) — Budget, $16 million. Box office, $14,569,744. There was no Hollywood ending for Woody Allen when this bomb rolled into theaters; after it and Anything Else the next year, he would not do a movie where he took acting, producing AND directing credits again until 2012, though he remained in business during this time.
  • Hollywood Homicide (2003) — Budget, $75 million. Box office, $51,142,659. This sent director Ron Shelton's career to the slammer for fourteen years until he returned to direct and produce Just Getting Started.
  • Holmes & Watson (2018) — Budget, $42 million. Box office, $30.3 million (domestic), $39 million (worldwide). This parody of Sherlock Holmes starring Will Ferrell and John C. Reilly was panned by critics once they were able to see it, and there were many reports of audiences walking out of screenings of the film before the 30-minute mark. The film's already-toxic reputation wasn't helped by allegations that Sony tried and failed to unload this film onto Netflix when they realized it would bomb. Steve Coogan and Reilly have since rebounded (at least critically) with Stan & Ollie, a biopic about Laurel and Hardy that has received critical acclaim.
  • A Hologram For The King (2016) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $7,744,096. A limited release of 523 theaters made this Tom Hanks's lowest grossing film in 31 years.
  • Hols: Prince of the Sun (1968) — Budget, 140,000,000 million yen (around $1.4 million) Box office, unknown. The first collaboration between Studio Ghibli co-founders Isao Takahata (in his directorial debut) and Hayao Miyazaki (the scene designer and chief animator) suffered one of the worst Troubled Productions in anime history and was yanked from theaters after ten days. Toei Animation demoted everyone who worked on it and told Takahata he would never direct another film with them again. The film became a hit with students and artists and has since been Vindicated by History. Takahata, meanwhile, left Toei with Miyazaki in 1971, and the rest is history...
  • Holy Man (1998) — Budget, $60 million. Box office, $12,069,719. The start of several career-zapping busts for director Stephen Herek. Eddie Murphy isn't proud of it either.
  • Holy Matrimony (1994) — Budget, $16 million. Box office, $713,234. Joseph Gordon-Levitt's film debut was also Leonard Nimoy's final film as director.
  • Homefront (2013) — Budget, $22 million. Box office, $20,158,898 (domestic), $43,058,898 (worldwide). Director Gary Fleder's first film in five years and currently his last. Part of a bad year for Sylvester Stallone, who wrote the screenplay. It didn't help that it came out the same day as Frozen.
  • Home Alone 3 (1997) — Budget, $32 million. Box office, $30,882,515 (domestic), $79,082,515 (worldwide). The third installment in the theatrical Home Alone trilogy had zero connection to the other two with Kevin McCallister and Harry and Marv, and did not feature Macaulay Culkin since he bolted from Hollywood. note  This third film, much like the also reviled Halloween 3, uses a new plotline with a stolen computer chip and new characters). This unaffiliated take didn't fare any better with critics not named Roger Ebert than the other films and got a weaker reception from audiences, putting a serious dent in John Hughes's career; Hughes only executive produced two more movies before his death. Two more Home Alone movies were Made-for-TV with the first returning to Kevin McCallister, but they still used different actors, though Culkin would reprise the role of Kevin in an internet skit for the original film's 25th anniversary.
  • Home Fries (1998) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $10,513,979 (domestic). Director Dean Parisot did rebound with Galaxy Quest two years later, though, which starred one of this film's stars, Daryl Mitchell.
  • Home Movies (1980) — Budget, $400,000. Box office, $89,134. Apparently, it only got a theatrical release in New York City and a few European countries like Italy. This was conceived by director Brian De Palma as a training exercise for students at his film course in Sarah Lawrence College.
  • A Home Of Our Own (1993) — Budget, $12 million. Box office, $1,677,807. Director Tony Bill would only do TV movies until 2006.
  • Home on the Range (2004) — Budget, $110 million. Box office, $103,951,461. One of a handful of flops in 2004 that ultimately helped end Disney CEO Michael Eisner's long run at the company, and this one is considered by many to be the finishing blow for the post-Golden Age era called The Renaissance Age of Animation, as Disney abandoned its traditional animation department after the film failed, opening the floodgates to The Millennium Age of Animation where CGI animated media began taking over the mainstream. It also impounded the careers of director Will Finn and John Sanford; Finn mostly stuck to Direct-to-Video media and didn't direct again until 2013, and Sanford didn't appear again at all until DreamWorks' second Dragons cartoon in 2015.
  • The Home Teachers (2004) — Budget, $425,000. Box office, $203,917. The niche success Halestorm Entertainment had with their LDS comedies began to dwindle when this film flopped in theaters. While DVD sales pulled it out of the red, spectators began to grow weary of this type of self-referential and slap-sticky religious comedy.
  • Homegrown (1998) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $77,910. Stephen Gyllenhaal's directing career was put under house arrest for 14 years.
  • Honest (2000) — Budget, £3 million. Box office, £111,309. This crime film and thinly-veiled vehicle for the girl group All Saints never escaped a limited release, nor did it see wide distribution outside of the United Kingdom. It was widely panned by British film critics, who deemed it at release one of the worst films of all time, and its highly edgy and adult content meant younger fans of the group were pretty much off-limits.
  • The Honeymooners (2005) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $13,183,426. This was seen as a pointless remake of a classic series, though Roger Ebert was one of the few critics who liked it. In any case, it kept director John Schultz off the big screen for four years.
  • Honky Tonk Freeway (1981) — Budget, $24 million. Box office, $2,004,742. This movie was ejected from theaters after only one week. Accusations of stereotyping of American culture and the revelation that the film was funded through a tax avoidance scheme, courtesy of the executive producer, didn't seem to help matters. Many also agree that the film began the erosion of music label EMI's film studio, though some argue that Can't Stop the Music played an earlier role as well.
  • Hoodlum (1997) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $23,461,013. Director Bill Duke didn't do another theatrically released film for 10 years.
  • Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil (2011) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $16,960,968. Essentially the last nail in the "Fractured Fairy Tale" trend's coffin; even DreamWorks Animation had toned it down for the fourth Shrek film that came out the year before, and its spinoff, Puss in Boots, which also saw its debut in 2011, took a more action-oriented angle. The "Fractured Fairy Tale" trend was replaced by a combination of 90s-esque Animated Musical films and more action-oriented animated movies. The film having gone through Development Hell (or rather, distribution hell) that saw it released six years after the original certainly didn't do it any favors, either.
  • Hoot (2006) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $8,224,998. According to Box Office Mojo, this movie has the worst opening weekend for any film opening in over 3,000 theaters.
  • Hope and Glory (1987) — Budget, $9.3 million. Box office, $10 million. This was highly praised by critics and it earned five Oscar nominations. But this was one of several Columbia Pictures films acquired by outgoing president David Puttnam that the studio left in limited release. The studio took a $105 million write-off due to the failure of Puttnam's slate. This was also overshadowed by the release of Steven Spielberg's Empire of the Sun, based on a novel which, like Hope and Glory, is a semi-autobiographical account of a British boy's experiences during World War II.
  • The Horse In The Gray Flannel Suit (1968) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $3.3 million. The final feature film for actor Fred Clark, who died a few months before it was released.
  • The Host (2013) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $26,627,201 (domestic), $63,327,201 (worldwide). The decline in popularity of the author's best known work, Twilight, likely contributed to this film adaptation's poor performance at the box office.
  • Hostage (2005) — Budget, $65 million. Box office, $34,639,939 (domestic), $77,944,725 (worldwide). This Bruce Willis film was one of his worst openings for an action film since Last Man Standing.
  • Hostiles (2017) — Budget, $39 million. Box office, $31.7 million.
  • Hot Pursuit (2015) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $34,580,201 (domestic), $51,680,201 (worldwide). Lost more than $12,000,000. It opened far, far behind Avengers: Age of Ultron, which was on its second weekend, despite opening at number two ($13 million vs the latter's $77 million).
  • Hot Rod (2007) — Budget, $25.3 million. Box office, $14.3 million. The film debuts of Andy Samberg, Jorma Taccone and director Akiva Schaffer of the The Lonely Island. The film received mixed reviews for its script and humor, something the filmmakers predicted, and it fell by the wayside at the box office. It later became a Cult Classic.
  • The Hot Spot (1990) — Budget, $13 million. Box office, $1,293,976. Charles Williams adapted his own novel Hell Hath No Fury into a screenplay in 1962, but it wasn't until years later that Dennis Hopper revived the project into this film. This ended up being the penultimate film of Hopper's directorial career. It died in a limited release topping 365 theaters even though critics liked it.
  • Hot To Trot (1988) — Budget, $9 million. Box office, $6,436,211. Director Michael Dinner's first and final major movie (he's stuck to television since with one exception), a theatrical Star-Derailing Role for noted comedian Bobcat Goldthwait (it also became an Old Shame for him when he got a copy of the script in 2011), and a severe halter to entertainment featuring talking horses.
  • Hot Tub Time Machine 2 (2015) — Budget, $14 million. Box office, $13,081,651. This case of Sequelitis has likely drained out the Hot Tub Time Machine movies after two pictures.
  • Hotel (2001) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $29,813. In addition to mixed reviews, this film opened in theaters the day after the 9/11 attacks that destroyed the World Trade Center and about 3,000 lives took place (one of the buildings destroyed at the Trade Center was ironically a Marriott hotel that was Tower #3, making the timing more uncomfortable). This all began the downward trend of Leaving Las Vegas director Mike Figgis's career.
  • Hotel Artemis (2018) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $10,969,598. Part of a string of flops for financially-troubled distributor Global Road.
  • The Hottie & the Nottie (2008) — Budget, $9,000,000. Box office, $27,696 (domestic), $1,596,232 (worldwide). A stillborn attempt to make Paris Hilton a movie star. It also derailed the careers of a lot of its staff, one of whom, Greg Wilson, got caught in a Serial Numbers Filed Off incident on America's Got Talent years later in a botched attempt to get back to the A list.
  • Hounddog (2006) — Budget, $5 million. Box office, $131,961. The film was intended to be a break into more adult material for star Dakota Fanning; its failure delayed this by a couple of years. Most notable for the controversy over a rape scene involving Fanning's character, and the subsequent dismissal by critics of said scene as being pure Narm.
  • The House (2017) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $25,584,504 (domestic), $33,384,504 (worldwide). Its opening weekend was the worst debut for Will Ferrell's career as a lead actor.
  • House of Cards (1993) — Budget, $9.9 million. Box office, $322,871. This was filmed in 1991 but was shelved for two years after 20th Century Fox dropped the distribution rights, leading Miramax to pick it up. One of several career-derailing busts for Kathleen Turner and was also one of the films that prompted Italian film company Penta to get out of the Hollywood industry.
  • House Of D (2005) — Budget, $6,000,000. Box office, $388,532. This is the only time David Duchovny attempted to direct and write.
  • House of the Dead (2003) — Budget, $12 million. Box office, $10,249,719 (domestic), $13,818,181 (worldwide). This was infamous director Uwe Boll's first major American video game film, and he, to the surprise of many a person, hates this movie and its screenplay, considering it to be the worst film he's done; the sequel, which went straight to cable, brought back the person who wrote that screenplay but Boll did not get involved at all with that film (said screenwriter, Mark Altman, never got involved with another film that wasn't low-budget or Direct-to-Video). It put a bit of a dent in Sega's endeavors outside the video game market (they wouldn't be serious about another movie based off one of their games until the second half of The New 10's where they inked a deal with Sony for films starring their mascot character Sonic the Hedgehog) and it's also the third-to-last movie from producer/distributor Artisan Entertainment before they were swallowed by Lionsgate.
  • The House of the Devil (2009) — Budget, $900,000. Box office, $101,215. Despite acclaim from critics and horror fans.
  • The House Of The Spirits (1994) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $6,265,311. The film version of Isabel Allende's novel was derided by critics for, among other reasons, casting mainly white actors as Latino characters and its episodic structure failing to translate on film.
  • The House of Yes (1997) — Budget, $1,500,000. Box office, $626,057. Producer Robert Berger's cinematic career is virtually nonexistent past this film.
  • The House On Carroll Street (1988) — Budget, $14 million. Box office, $459,824. Ending up being the second worst box office results of a major film in 1988. The last theatrical film by screenwriter Walter Bernstein, who stuck to TV work, with his last credit being the creator of the 2011 British miniseries Hidden.
  • House of Wax (2005) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $32,064,800 (domestic), $68,766,121 (worldwide). This extremely loose remake of the 1953 film earned notoriety as the film debut of Paris Hilton.
  • How Do You Know (2010) — Budget, $120 million ($100 million net after tax rebates). Box office, $48,668,907. The film served as a Star-Derailing Role for Jack Nicholson, as he never appeared in another film after 2010 and he would officially retire from acting in 2017, though he later signed on for an American remake of ''Toni Erdmann'' soon after. It also dealt serious damage to producer Paula Weinstein, who did not produce another film for 4 years, and James L. Brooks, while still being a producer, has not directed another movie after this one, plus production company Gracie Films (the company behind The Simpsons) did not put out another theatrical film for 6 years.
  • How I Got Into College (1989) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $1,642,239.
  • How to Lose Friends and Alienate People (2008) — Budget, $28 million. Box office, $19,151,797. This film version of Toby Young's memoir opened at number one in the UK but it fell apart soon after. Its US release saw it debut at number 19 and it went downhill from there. The critics gave it mixed to negative reviews.
  • Howard the Duck (1986) — Budget, $37 million. Box office, $16,295,774 (domestic), $37,962,774 (worldwide). Allegedly, two Universal executives, Frank Price and Sidney Sheinberg, got into a fistfight while arguing over who was to blame for greenlighting the film; both of them deny this. Price's resignation, meanwhile, has been directly attributed to this same movie with the headline ""Duck" Cooks Price's Goose" (Price would resurface at his other major home, Columbia, a little while later). It is also a Career Killer for husband-and-wife team Willard Huyck and Gloria Katz (they bolted to Hawaii), a major setback to the careers of several of its stars (including Tim Robbins of The Shawshank Redemption & Mystic River fame, who got a Razzie nom, though he rebounded with Bull Durham), and is one of the few productions George Lucas has ever admitted regret over (this is one of two 1986 films that delivered a setback to his career, with Jim Henson's Labyrinth being the other). Also, a Squick scene with exposed duck breasts early in the movie (which was nicknamed "DuckTits" by The Nostalgia Critic) and a second with the titular character and a human woman almost having sex led to some backlash due to the film having a PG rating; both it and The Garbage Pail Kids Movie (a film NC actor Doug Walker also despised) led to further enforcement of the PG-13 rating. And to top it off, this notorious film, along with legal issues from Disney concerning Howard's physical resemblance to Donald Duck, kicked Howard into the bottom bracket of Marvel's comic book superstars for the next 30 years in addition to starting Marvel's movie business off on the wrong foot. Thankfully, a combination of a buyout by Disney after they traded dominant positions with DC in the 2000's (meaning no more legal snags between the two ducks), a cameo in Guardians of the Galaxy, a new Howard comic series, and Fant4stic taking the "most infamous movie with Marvel's name on it" title away may mean a turnaround for the duck at last.
  • Hudson Hawk (1991) — Budget, $65 million. Box office, $17,218,080. Numerous reports on the film's Troubled Production place the blame on Bruce Willis letting his ego run rampant, causing multiple re-shoots and editing wars. This was the final standalone Tristar Pictures film before they were merged with Columbia.
  • The Hudsucker Proxy (1994) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $2,816,518. The lowest grossing film of The Coen Brothers. It received mixed reviews and a very limited release but it's now a Cult Classic.
  • Hugo (2011) — Budget, $156 million (not counting marketing costs), $190 million (counting them). Box office, $73,864,507 (domestic), $185,770,160 (worldwide). This was adored by critics, was nominated for 11 Oscars and won five, but suffered from a poor marketing campaign, an unusually limited release and major competition during the Thanksgiving holidays.
  • Hulk (2003) — Budget, $137 million. Box office, $132,177,234 (domestic), $245,360,480 (worldwide). While it debuted to a massive $62 million on its opening weekend domestically, it dropped a legendary 70% on its second weekend due to very poor word-of-mouth, ultimately falling short of its production budget domestically.
    • The Incredible Hulk (2008) — Budget $150 million. Box office, $134,806,913 (domestic), $263,427,551 (worldwide). While the film was slightly better-received than the previous version, it still received a lukewarm reception overall from fans, critics, and audiences, and it failed to make back its budget domestically, the only film in the Marvel Cinematic Universe to have that distinction. It resulted in the Hulk, played by Edward Norton in this film, being recast with Mark Ruffalo for future Marvel films after a falling-out between Norton and Marvel, and relegated to a supporting role because Disney purchased Marvel as a whole the year after this film's release and Disney's Arch-Enemy Universal retains distribution rights for solo Hulk films due to a Grandfather Clause deriving from these two films (the Hulk only appears in team-ups in later Marvel films, which is Disney's way of getting the character past Universal). After this and Punisher: War Zone, producer Gale Anne Hurd has not produced another cinematic movie, and writer Zak Penn didn't do another film until he did the Hulk's next film appearance, The Avengers.
  • The Human Centipede 3 (Final Sequence) (2015) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $14,562. Any ideas of more sequences in the Human Centipede movie series are unlikely after this attempt.
  • Human Nature (2002) — Budget, $6 million. Box office, $705,308. Michel Gondry's directorial debut and his first collaboration with writer Charlie Kaufman. Critics compared it unfavorably to Kaufman's Being John Malkovich and it ended its limited release of 224 theaters after four weeks. Gondry's next film would fate much better with critics.
  • The Human Stain (2003) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $24,863,804. Robert Benton directed only one other film after this adaptation of a Philip Roth novel was greeted with a lukewarm response by critics and audiences.
  • The Hunger (1983) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $5,979,292. This is the only feature film screenplay credited to one Ivan Davis. (He has only written three other films, all made for TV, and no credits after 1987.)
  • The Hunted (1995) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $6,609,661. J.F. Lawton didn't direct another film for 13 years.
  • The Hunted (2003) — Budget, $55 million. Box office, $45,496,534. This was dismissed as a Cliché Storm action thriller that played like a low-quality version of First Blood. Director William Friedkin did two more films after this.
  • Hunter Killer (2018) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $15,767,460 (domestic). This experienced a protracted Development Hell, with much of the trouble due to production company Relativity's bankruptcy. It was subsequently dumped with Invisible Advertising and was trampled by its lackluster reviews and holdover Halloween.
  • The Hunters (1958) — Budget, $2,440,000. Box office, $2.1 million. This movie killed off Dick Powelll's directing career, though he remained an executive until he died from cancer that he may have received from filming The Conqueror a few years earlier. He also ended his relationship with Fox.
  • The Hunting Party (2007) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $7,644,409. Its widest release was in 329 theaters.
  • Hurlyburly (1998) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $1,798,862. This is the last feature film Anthony Drazan has directed to date. (He's mostly done television work since then.)
  • The Hurricane Heist (2018) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $6,115,825 (domestic). The film was swept away from most theaters after two weeks.
  • Hush (1998) — Budget, $21 million. Box office, $13,583,690. The film was held from release after poor test screenings, which led to disastrous reshoots featuring Gwyneth Paltrow in a bad wig. The only feature film written and directed by Jonathan Darby, and an Old Shame for Jessica Lange.

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