Follow TV Tropes

Following

Box Office Bomb / C Through D

Go To

Main: Box Office Bomb

Navigation: Numbers Through B | C Through D | E Through H | I Through M | N Through R | S Through T | U Through Z

    open/close all folders 

    C 
  • Cabin Boy (1994) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $3.6 million. This was part of a bad year for Tim Burton, with both Ed Wood and Cabin Boy (which he produced) both flopping at the box office (though the former film was vindicated later). It's also the only movie that writer Adam Resnick directed, and it scorched his movie career. He wouldn't write another cinematic screenplay until 2000. It also didn't do Chris Elliott's movie career any favors, either.
  • Caddyshack II (1988) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $11,798,302. Fell victim to Sequelitis when all the major actors from the original Caddyshack failed to return for this one besides Chevy Chase, who DID return, plus Rodney Dangerfield (who was responsible for the sequel getting made in the first place) dropped out in pre-production due to Executive Meddling. This movie sunk director Allan Arkush's career for 6 years and co-writer Pj Torokvei's for 8, and the other writer, Harold Ramis, didn't write a screenplay that was not attached to an animated or Ghostbusters film until Groundhog Day.
  • The Campaign (2012) — Budget, $95 million. Box office, $86,907,746 (domestic), $104,907,746 (worldwide). This film about two buffoons running for President of the United States failed to attract moviegoers in America during the Presidential Election that year.
  • Canadian Bacon (1995) — Budget, $11 million. Box office, $178,104. Little wonder it's Michael Moore's only theatrical foray outside the documentary genre to date (admittedly, he has done more than almost anyone to make nonfiction films profitable). This and Mallrats led to threats by Universal and PolyGram higher-ups to shut down Gramercy Pictures; it soldiered on until 2000.
  • Cannery Row (1982) — Budget, $11.3 million. Box office, $5,301,539. This film version of the John Steinbeck novel (and its sequel, Sweet Thursday) was the directorial debut of screenwriter David S. Ward. After its lackluster financial reception, Ward stuck to only screenwriting until Major League. It is also known for being the film that caused Raquel Welch to sue MGM for wrongful firing after she was abruptly sacked from it. (She was cast as the female lead, which Debra Winger took over.) Welch won the suit, but she ended up getting blackballed from Hollywood as a result of the lawsuit.
  • Can't Stop the Music (1980) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $2 million. Effectively destroyed the Village People and the directing career of Nancy Walker right away, as well as putting a major setback in Caitlyn Jenner's career and signifying that disco was dead as a mainstream genre. Being released on exactly the same day as The Blues Brothers was not the wisest move. Along with Xanadu, Can't Stop the Music inspired the creation of the Razzies. The man who produced this film, Allan Carr, never recovered from it, delivering a few more critical bombs over the 80's and eventually masterminding the infamous opening number to the 1989 Oscars with Snow White and Rob Lowe; this event was ripped into pieces and bits by critics and brought Snow White supremo Disney down on the Academy and Carr like a load of bricks, crushing him for good at that point.
  • Capitalism: A Love Story (2009) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $14,363,397 (domestic), $17.4 million (worldwide). This got some decent reviews from critics, but it didn't do well enough to make back its budget, and put a severe dent in Michael Moore's career; the controversial documentary director would wait 6 years to release his next movie.
  • Captain America (1990) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $10,173. After completing production, this film was supposed to open in 1990. It did, but only in the United Kingdom, never the U.S.; Columbia/Tristar/Sony eventually had to banish it to a Direct-to-Video release in 1992. This and Howard the Duck kept Marvel in the No. 2 Hollywood position, until DC committed seppuku with Batman & Robin & Steel, and Marvel jumped into the game with Blade towards the end of the decade. The next time Captain America was made for theaters, it was a critical step in the Marvel Cinematic Universe; that Captain America film series is ongoing as of 2016.
  • Captain Corelli's Mandolin (2001) — Budget, $57 million. Box office, $25,543,895 (domestic), $62,112,895 (worldwide). Was a bit of a setback for director John Madden, who didn't get his next directing credit until 2005. Screenwriter Shawn Slovo, meanwhile, didn't get her next credit until 2006.
  • Captain Ron (1992) — Budget, $24 million. Box office, $22,518,097. Director Thom Eberhardt didn't work on another cinematically released movie for 15 years.
  • Captive State (2019) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $7 million.
  • Car 54, Where Are You? (1994) — Budget, $10.7 million. Box office, $1,238,080. This earned a severe backlash from Rosie O'Donnell, who advised people not to rent it. It was also shot in 1990, but edited over the years, which removed the musical numbers.
  • The Care Bears: Adventure in Wonderland (1987) — Budget, $5 million. Box office, $2,608,000 (domestic), $6,000,000 (worldwide). The film's failure began the death of the franchise and caused a fourth film, Care Bears Nutcracker Suite, to air as television special. No more Care Bears movies were made until Journey to Joke-a-lot in 2004 and none were released theatrically until Oopsy Does It in 2007.
  • Carpool (1996) — Budget, $17 million. Box office, $3,325,651. One of the 3 career-halting films with Tom Arnold released that year, and the penultimate major film from long-time director Arthur Hiller. His next movie, Burn Hollywood Burn, which he infamously took the "Alan Smithee" moniker for in a failed attempt to distance himself from the movie, killed both the name and his filmmaking career (he did one movie with Jon Bon Jovi after that, and that's it).
  • Carry On at Your Convenience (1971) — Budget, unknown. Box office, £220,000. This entry in the Carry On series was its first flop. A big factor was its portrayal of the working class as lazy and stupid, which alienated its working class fanbase, who boycotted the film.
  • Case 39 (2010) — Budget, $26 million. Box office, $13,261,851 (domestic), $28,189,979 (worldwide). This movie's domestic premiere was delayed twice before premiering in 2010. It's the most recent American picture from director Christian Alvart, who has mainly focused on German media since. It also marked the end of Renée Zellweger's toplining career.
  • Casino Jack (2010) — Budget, $12.5 million. Box office, $1.1 million. This was the final film from director George Hickenlooper since he died before it opened, and writer Norman Snider hasn't done another movie.
  • Cassandra's Dream (2008) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $973,018 (domestic), $22,658,532 (worldwide). This was not one of Woody Allen's best regarded works, but he kept on going and released Vicky Cristina Barcelona to much greater acclaim later that year.
  • The Castle of Cagliostro (1979) — Budget, 500,000,000 yen ($5 million). Box office, 600,000,000 yen ($6 million). Hayao Miyazaki's made his feature film directorial debut with this Lupin III stand-alone feature, which was dismissed by fans of the anime for its Lighter and Softer approach note  and the general public for Miyazaki's unknown status at the time. The film found an audience with several international screenings, where it influenced future works like The Great Mouse Detective, and when Miyazaki made a name for himself with Studio Ghibli. It has since been Vindicated by History as not only one of Miyazaki's best films, but one of the best films of the Lupin III franchise.
  • Cat People (1982) — Budget, $12.5 million. Box office, $7 million (domestic), $21 million (worldwide).
  • The Cat in the Hat (2003) — Budget, $109 million. Box office, $101,149,285 (domestic), $133,960,541 (worldwide). It began the career derailment of Mike Myers (whose career was further damaged with The Love Guru), pushed production designer Bo Welch away from the director's chair (both he and Myers were legally forced to do this film), and was widely panned by fans and critics for the huge amount of crap that went by. Dr. Seuss' estate responded by banning any further live-action adaptations of his works, which coincidentally got a sequel canceled by default. An animated remake is said to be in the pipeline, originally at Illumination Entertainment, but now Warner Bros.
  • Catch A Fire (2006) — Budget, $14 million. Box office, $4,291,965 (domestic). Got good reviews, but was a critical hit to director Phillip Noyce, producer Robyn Slovo, and screenwriter Shawn Slovo's careers. Noyce did not direct his next film until 2010, Robyn didn't produce her next film until 2011 with Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy, and her sister Shawn did not write her next film until 2013.
  • Catch and Release (2007) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $16,158,487. The only film directed by Susannah Grant, who went back to screenwriting after this. It was delayed by nearly a year.
  • Catch Me If You Can (1989) - Budget, $800,000. Box office, $3,686 (domestic) $7 million (worldwide). The original studio that was going to distribute the film went bankrupt, and it ended up in the hands of MCA, who dumped it into only several theaters with little promotion. As a result, it had the lowest box office of any theatrical film overall in 1989. Thankfully its international success helped keep director Stephen Sommers in the light. This was the only theatrical film produced by Sterling Entertainment.
  • Cattle Annie and Little Britches (1981) — Budget, $5.1 million. Box office, $534,816. This Western was released around the time that the genre was starting to die at the box office. Universal gave up on the film after a disappointing run in the Southwestern United States and only played it in a certain amount of theatres to fulfill contractual obligations.
  • Cats & Dogs: The Revenge of Kitty Galore (2010) — Budget, $85 million. Box office, $43,585,753 (domestic), $112,483,764 (worldwide). The nine-year gap between this sequel and the original movie, the higher budget, it becoming one of the worst reviewed films of 2010, and grossing only half the first film's box office put the Cats and Dogs movies to sleep after two shows. It also euthanized the writing careers of Ron Friedman and partner Steve Bencich, was one of two 2010 films to deal a serious setback to producer Andrew Lazar, and is one of the last movies produced by Polly Johnsen.
  • Cats Don't Dance (1997) — Budget, $32 million. Box office, $3,566,637. It fell through the cracks after Warner Bros. bought Turner just before the movie was released, and proceeded to not promote it at all. Helmer and animator Mark Dindal saw a blowback to his career that has yet to go away, especially with his involvement in Disney's Chicken Little a decade later, which WAS a success but disliked by critics and was the last nail in CEO Michael Eisner's coffin.
  • Catwoman (2004) — Budget, $100 million. Box office, $82,102,379. This film was meant to be a spinoff of Batman Returns, but it suffered through Development Hell that led to it not having anything to do with Batman and not having Michelle Pfeiffer in it. Halle Berry quit the X-Men franchise to take the role of the titular character and be in this film; rumor has it she crawled back to the producers for a part in X-Men 3 for a substantially lower paycheck after Catwoman became one of the biggest critical busts of 2004 and failed to return to the original budget. Berry personally accepted her Razzie, stating "It was just what my career needed." Said career had to fight its way back, plus it managed to convince James Bond copyright holder EON Productions to euthanize a planned spinoff of their latest Bond film Die Another Day, which Berry was supposed to star in (they wound up rebooting the Bond franchise with Casino Royale (2006) anyway). The movie was also a major blow to Big Bad actress Sharon Stone's career, and she followed it up with Basic Instinct 2, which set it back even further. Catwoman, along with Elektra, also kept the superheroine genre barren after films like Supergirl made it that way, and it also ensured director "Pitof" would not helm another major project. Obviously, Berry does not have anything pleasant to say about this film, and neither does early writer and Jackie Chan Adventures/Leverage/The Player co-creator John Rogers; both regard the film as an Old Shame. This was DC's first film since 1997, when they released the similarly-reviled Batman & Robin and Steel, and they would have to wait another year for Batman Begins to regain ground in the entertainment industry and thirteen years for Wonder Woman to take another crack at the superheroine genre.
  • The Cave (2005) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $15,007,991 (domestic), $33,296,457 (worldwide).
  • The Caveman's Valentine (2001) — Budget, $13.5 million. Box office, $687,194. Its release topped out at 59 theaters. Director Kasi Lemmons wouldn't return to the director's chair until 2007's Talk to Me.
  • Cecil B. Demented (2000) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $1,961,544. Part of a 2000/2001 slate that put production company Artisan Entertainment on life support; they would rebound the next year before being absorbed by Lionsgate. John Waters also had to wait 4 years before attempting to write another screenplay.
  • Celebrity (1998) — Budget, $12 million. Box office, $5,078,660. This was not one of Woody Allen's better received films note  but it didn't stop him one bit.
  • Celsius 41.11 (2004) — Budget, $1 million. Box office, $93,000. This film was created by Citizens United in response to Michael Moore's Fahrenheit 9/11, which had been released earlier that year and was part of a major political push against President George W. Bush to prevent his reelection (it ultimately failed at the time, but Bush's reputation took one of the steepest drops for any president in his second term and still became Snark Bait). This doc was also released with two other anti-Michael Moore films, at least one of which was better received. As a result, it burned down the career of documentary director Lionel Chetwynd; he's been a very low-key filmmaker since.
  • Celtic Pride (1996) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $9,255,027. Was a serious blow to the film careers of its stars, Dan Aykroyd, Daniel Stern, and Damon Wayans.
  • Chain Reaction (1996) — Budget, $55 million. Box office, $21,226,204 (domestic), $60,209,334 worldwide. Morgan Freeman would not get another award-caliber role until Million Dollar Baby in 2004.
  • Chairman of the Board (1998) — Budget, $10 million (estimated). Box office, $181,233. This is Carrot Top's only starring theatrical release, and every film directed by Alex Zamm between this and 2014 were Direct-to-Video and Made for TV Movies.
  • The Chamber (1996) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $22,540,359. This John Grisham adaptation was trashed by critics and lasted at least three weeks in theaters. Screenwriter William Goldman and Grisham had nothing nice to say about the film.
  • Changeling (2008) — Budget, $55 million. Box office, $35,739,802 (domestic), $113,020,256 (worldwide). Clint Eastwood's mystery film was an Acclaimed Flop that earned Angelina Jolie an Oscar nomination for Best Actress.
  • A Change Of Seasons (1980) — Budget, $6 million. Box office, $7,270,000 (domestic). The last theatrical film for director Richard Lang, who stuck to TV work for the rest of his career. Noel Black, the director Lang replaced, did one more theatrical film before he too stuck to TV.
  • The Change Up (2011) — Budget, $52 million. Box office, $37,081,475 (domestic), $75,450,437 (worldwide). This and Green Lantern that year did no favors for Ryan Reynolds.
  • The Chaperone (2011) — Budget, $3,000,000. Box office, this is real, $14,400. This movie foiled wrestler Triple H's attempts to break into movies.
  • Chaplin (1992) — Budget, $31 million. Box office, $9.5 million. This is the final project co-writer Bryan Forbes worked on; he retired after this. It's also one of three 1992 bombs that set William Goldman's cinematic career back by 5 years. This did OK with critics and earned Robert Downey Jr. a lot of acclaim, including an Oscar nomination, for portraying Charlie Chaplin.
  • Chappie (2015) — Budget, $49 million. Box office, $31,569,268 (domestic), $101,069,268 (worldwide). Part of a string of 2015 flops for Sony.
  • Charlie Bartlett (2007) — Budget, $12 million. Box office, $5,254,980. This was delayed by six months due to MGM's financial problems and a crowded schedule. Its release was delayed so last minute that ads were still running by the time the old date came about. This was the directorial debut of Jon Poll and his only film until the just announced Responsible Adults.
  • Charlie St Cloud (2010) — Budget, $44 million. Box office, $31,162,545 (domestic), $48,190,704 (worldwide). This sent director Burr Steers's cinematic career into remission for six years. The movie didn't do much to help boost Kim Basinger's post-Oscar career, who essentially appears as Zac Efron's mom in a fleeting, paycheck cameo.
  • Charlotte Gray (2001) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $5.3 million. The movie's failure caused production studio Film 4 to undergo massive changes, laying off most of its staff and replacing their head director.
  • Charlotte's Web (2006) — Budget, $85 million. Box office, $82,985,708 (domestic), $144,877,632 (worldwide) It was still an Acclaimed Flop, with a slightly higher Rotten Tomatoes score than the 1973 Hanna-Barbera version.
  • Charly (2002) – Budget, $950,000. Box office, $814,666.
  • Chasers (1994) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $1,596,687. This was the last feature film directed by Dennis Hopper.
  • Chasing Liberty (2004) — Budget, $23 million. Box office, $12,313,323. This was released the same year as First Daughter, both romantic comedies about the daughter of the US President. This one got slightly better reviews and box office results than its rival.
  • Chasing Mavericks (2012) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $6,003,386. It would be 4 years before director Michael Apted worked on another theatrical film of any kind. This was also Curtis Hanson's last directed film before his death four years later.
  • Che! (1969) — Budget, $5,160,000. Box office, $2.5 million (U.S. rentals). Producer and writers Sy Bartlett and Michael Wilson didn't do any more movies before their deaths at the end of the 70's, and it set late actor Robert Loggia's career back by 5 years.
    • Che (2008 attempt) — Budget, $58 million. Box office, $40.9 million. This interpretation of Che Guevara's life was a two-part double feature, and the two parts together form a 4-hour long movie. While it did eventually turned a profit and got good reviews (even getting star Benicio del Toro the Best Actor award when it premiered at Cannes), in the end, director Steven Soderbergh wishes he had never made this film. Writer Peter Buchman's career wound up in Development Hell, and star Benicio del Toro, who was also a producer, produced only one other movie, The Wolfman, to date.
  • Cheri (2009) — Budget, $23 million. Box office, $9,366,227. This film version of Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette's novel got a mixed reception from critics and topped out at 191 theaters.
  • Child 44 (2015) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $3,324,330. Based on a real life Soviet murder case, this was banned in Russia and its territories likely for presenting its legal system in a poor light. American critics didn't think highly of it either when it opened in a limited release with Invisible Advertising.
  • Children of Men (2006) — Budget, $76 million. Box office, $69,959,751. This was a highly Acclaimed Flop whose limited release tapped out at 1,524 theaters. Fortunately for director/writer Alfonso Cuarón, his next film would have the box office to match its critical acclaim.
  • Chill Factor (1999) — Budget, $34 million. Box office, $11,263,966. This was director Hugh Johnson's only cinematic directoral effort, and the film receiving a sub-zero reception from critics and the box office put his cinematic career on ice until The Chronicles of Riddick, where he returned to being a cinematographer.
  • China Moon (1994) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $3,038,499. Wrapped in 1991, it was one of several films to be pushed back due to Orion Pictures' bankruptcy.
  • A Chinese Ghost Story (1987) — Budget, $5,600,000. Box office, $2,395,120.
  • The Chipmunk Adventure (1987) — Budget, Unknown, but the Samuel Goldwyn Company spent $17 million on the advertising campaign. Box office, $6,804,312. This was the first feature film starring Alvin and the Chipmunks, and the last for 20 years.
  • CHiPs (2017) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $18,600,152 (domestic), $25,500,152 (worldwide). This comedic film version of the 70's TV show was lambasted by critics for relying too much on lowbrow jokes. Its opening weekend saw it smashed by an array of newcomers and holdovers.
  • Chitty Chitty Bang Bang (1968) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $7.5 million (rentals). This adaptation of the novel from Ian Fleming was the last time James Bond supremo Albert R. Broccoli dealt with something other than the Bond franchise, and was the last major film project for director Ken Hughes, who was coming off of being involved with the Bond spoof version of Casino Royale the year prior. The Sherman Brothers didn't deal with anything not related to Disney again for another 4 years.
  • A Chorus Line (1985) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $14,202,899. The film version of the long running musical didn't live up to the one singular sensation of its Broadway counterpart. A few common complaints by critics included awkward staging of the numbers and the Romantic Plot Tumor which turned one of the show's subplots into the main one.
  • A Christmas Carol (2009) — Budget, $175-$200 million. Box office, $137,855,863 (domestic), $325 million (worldwide). Robert Zemeckis's 3D motion-capture version of the Dickens classic received mixed reviews, with many critics calling it out as a case of style over substance.
  • Christmas Carol: The Movie (2001) — Budget, £6 million/$12 million. Box office, $2,436,389. This animated adaption of the classic titular story, despite its All-Star Cast, was generally panned for its poor animation and bizarre storytelling choices. On the other hand, the song Kate Winslet recorded and released for the movie, "What If", was a UK Christmas #1 hit that is far better remembered than the film it came from.
  • Christmas Eve (2015) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $91,302. Despite having big names like Patrick Stewart, Jon Heder, and Larry King as a producer, this movie joined the prestigious 0% club on Rotten Tomatoes and didn't make it to 6-digit gross due to having too many elevator scenes. King's career in movies may be over after this.
  • Christopher Columbus: The Discovery (1992) — Budget, $45 million. Box office, $8,251,071. The Creator Breakdown behind the scenes led to the split of the Salkind directing duo, who never did a film together again.
  • The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian (2008) — Budget, $225 million (not counting marketing costs of $175 million), $400 million (counting them). Box office, $141,621,490 (domestic), $419,651,413 (worldwide). This was the second highest grossing film of the year for Disney behind Pixar's classic WALL•E, but the film not being able to make up the budget in the United States (partly due to OK reviews instead of good ones, partly because it was sandwiched between the starting Marvel Cinematic Universe film Iron Man and Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull), along with it barely exceeding the combined costs overall, still made it a failure. Producer Mark Johnson felt this didn't have the magic of the original 2005 film, and the loss led to a budgetary feud that got Disney to drop the franchise altogether; Walden Media did a Channel Hop to Fox for the third film, which had its budget and marketing reduced considerably and removed Andrew Adamson from the directing chair (he was replaced by The World Is Not Enough director Michael Apted).
    • The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader (2010) — Budget, $155 million (not counting marketing costs), $255 million (counting them). Box office, $104,386,950 (domestic), $415.7 million (worldwide). This one actually got worse reviews than the other two chapters and was rated Rotten on Rotten Tomatoes, plus it took longer for it to reach the $100 million mark in the U.S. Walden managed to lose the franchise outright as a result, though that was more likely due to expiration of their contract with the C.S. Lewis estate. Writing duo Christopher Markus and Stephen McFeely stayed alive thanks to the Captain America films, but the remaining creative minds took serious damage to their careers; Apted didn't work on another fictional movie for 6 years and Adamson seriously reduced his presence following his work on Puss in Boots. The film franchise went into hibernation for years after this, with a fourth film in Development Hell for that duration until a Continuity Reboot was finally announced for Netflix in 2018.
  • The Chronicles of Riddick (2004) — Budget, $105 million. Box office, $57,761,012 (domestic), $115,772,733 (worldwide). Did well on home media, though, but it would be 9 years before another theatrical film featuring Vin Diesel's Riddick (Diesel also would not produce another film until Fast & Furious in 2009). As for director David Twohy, he did not direct or write until 2009.
  • Chu Chu and the Philly Flash (1981) — Budget, $7 million. Box office, $100,000 (rentals). This Carol Burnett/Alan Arkin comedy was the last feature film directed by David Lowell Rich, who was relegated to directing TV movies for the rest of his career. It was also the only theatrical film written by Barbara Dana, who was Arkin's wife at the time.
  • The Chumscrubber (2005) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $351,401. Its domestic release topped out at 28 theaters and fizzled out after two weeks. Its UK release was even worse, as it was pulled after a single weekend with a gross of $185.
  • Church Ball (2006) – Budget, $1,000,000. Box office, $464,991. Despite Halestorm Entertainment's attempts to make this LDS comedy less denominational, this one was the straw that broke the camel's back. Not only would the company's future releases skip the big screen, but their brand of self-referential and slap-sticky comedy went completely out of favor with both Mormon and non-Mormon audiences. The film's failure also provoked a lawsuit.
  • Cimarron (1931) — Budget, $1,433,000. Box office, $1,383,000. It was released in the early years of the Great Depression and it couldn't recoup its high budget for the time. It was a critical smash and it became the first Western to win the Oscar for Best Picture, though modern assessment hasn't been kind, with it frequently appearing on lists of the worst Best Picture winners.
    • Cimarron (1960) — Budget, $5,421,000. Box office, $4,825,000. Unlike the 1931 version, this film wasn't received favorably by contemporary critics or audiences.
  • Cinderella Man (2005) — Budget, $88 million. Box office, $61,649,911 (domestic), $108,539,911 (worldwide). This biopic of boxer Jim Braddock received raves from critics but was lambasted by boxing experts and the family of Max Baer for his Historical Villain Upgrade. It received such a knockout that AMC and Cinemark offered a money-back guarantee to dissatisfied filmgoers who saw the film; it didn't help. The decision to release the film in the summer, a season typically reserved for blockbusters, did it no favors, either.
  • The Circle (2017) — Budget, $18 million. Box office, $20,497,844 (domestic), $40,651,864 (worldwide). Despite the All-Star Cast, the film barely made back its budget, to the point where it was released direct-to-Netflix in the UK. This is also Bill Paxton's final movie, having died from a failed heart surgery three months prior.
  • Cirque du Freak: The Vampire's Assistant (2009) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $39,232,113. This Compressed Adaptation of the first three novels of The Saga of Darren Shan ended up staking the intended film series after one installment.
  • Citizen Kane (1941) — Budget, $839,727. Box office, $1.6 million. The film's lead character as played by Orson Welles was based off of William Randolph Hearst, and said portrayal enraged Hearst. Hearst ultimately banned all of his holdings from even mentioning the film and banned a multitude of movie theaters from showing it both to make the film fail and to avoid the Streisand Effect trope (plus World War II had cut off the European market, which hurt three other RKO Pictures films — Pinocchio, Fantasia, and Bambi, in that order). Hearst's gambit worked, much to Welles and RKO's chagrin, and even though the film earned several Oscar nominations (and one win for its Screenplay), it faded into obscurity for a while until it got a revival in 1956. Citizen Kane is now considered one of the all-time classics of cinema and a prime example of an Acclaimed Flop, alongside the three animated Disney films and It's a Wonderful Life.
  • Citizen Ruth (1996) — Budget, $3 million. Box office, $285,112. Alexander Payne's directorial debut had a very limited release but it was an Acclaimed Flop.
  • City By The Sea (2002) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $29,413,996. Writer Ken Hixon didn't write another screenplay for 8 years.
  • City Hall (1996) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $20,340,204. This was New York politician Kenneth Lipper's first and only screenplay and the first of three films he produced. His co-writer, Nicholas Pileggi, wouldn't write another film until the TV movie Kings of South Beach.
  • City of Ember (2008) — Budget, $55 million. Box office, $17,929,684. Any plans to adapt the original novel's sequels were shut off when this adaptation flopped. Director Gil Kenan wouldn't direct another film until the Poltergeist remake in 2015.
  • City Of Ghosts (2002) — Budget, $17.5 million. Box office, $1.2 million. The first and only feature film written and directed by Matt Dillon.
  • City Of Joy (1992) — Budget, $27 million. Box office, $14,683,921. One of several lifelong busts for Allied Filmmakers; its widest release was in 919 theaters and its reception was mixed. Roland Joffe's next film as director was his career-tainting bust The Scarlet Letter.
  • City Slickers II: The Legend of Curly's Gold (1994) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $43,622,150. This sequel to City Slickers fell short of its predecessor both critically and financially.
  • The City Of Your Final Destination (2010) — Budget, $8.3 million. Box office, $1.4 million. This film was completed by 2007, but did not see general release until 2010. In addition, production company Merchant Ivory's "short-changing" of the cast and crew led to lawsuits against the firm from star Anthony Hopkins and singer Suzy Malick. The film's final implosion made it the final theatrical film for writer Ruth Prawer Jhabvala, who died in 2013, and the last film to credit producer James Ivory until 2017. Merchant Ivory also would not release another film until 2017.
  • A Civil Action (1998) — Budget, $60 million. Box office, $56,709,981.
  • The Claim (2000) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $1.4 million. Its widest release was in 29 theaters.
  • The Clan Of The Cave Bear (1986) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $1,953,732. The film version of Jean M. Auel's novel killed off plans to adapt its sequels with its failure. The second feature film directed by cinematographer Michael Chapman, who would stick to that profession until 1995's The Viking Sagas, his last film as director.
  • Clay Pigeons (1998) — Budget, $8 million. Box office, $1.8 million-2.2 million. Director David Dobkin didn't direct for 5 years.
  • Clean and Sober (1988) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $8,674,093.
  • Clean Slate (1994) — Budget, $18 million. Box office, $7,355,425. This wasn't received well by critics, and it was part of a string of flops that year for Dana Carvey that would help convince him to take a hiatus from the big screen (another factor was raising his family).
  • Cleopatra (1963) — Budget, $44 million. Box office, $57,777,778. This was the highest grossing film of 1963. However, 20th Century Fox only got roughly half the film's box office take (the rest went to the theaters), and since $44 million was an exorbitant price tag in 1963's dollars (equivalent to $325.6 million today), they nearly went bankrupt and had to sell off parts of its huge backlot (which turned the remnants of the sold parts to what became known as Century City). Fox was only saved when Julie Andrews's The Sound of Music became a success. Cleopatra’s Troubled Production (which included production being delayed for months when star Elizabeth Taylor got critically sick) and ultimate failure were among the decisive moments in the Fall of the Studio System, and the film was considered the example of failure for decades afterwards, only turning a profit for the studio in the '90s thanks to VHS and DVD sales. It only took 30 years! Cleopatra would be the last time director and co-writer Joseph Mankiewicz would be associated with Fox, and he only wrote one more film 4 years later, though Mankiewicz would continue to direct until 1972, when he retired (he considered Cleopatra an Old Shame and had tried to get his name off the credits). This is also the last film to involve producer Walter Wanger, who died 5 years later, and killed the Sword & Sandal genre's A-level until DreamWorks and Ridley Scott's Gladiator in 2000.
  • Clifford (1994) — Budget, $19 million. Box office, $7,411,659. This was left on The Shelf of Movie Languishment for nearly three years due to Orion Pictures' bankruptcy problems. The end result was mauled by critics and it embarrassed the writers William Porter and Steven Kampmann so much that they used pseudonyms, Jay Dee Rock and Bobby von Hayes. While Porter hasn't written another film, Kampmann would wait six years before his next script, the TV movie Special Delivery.
  • Clockers (1995) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $13,071,518.
  • Closet Land (1991) — Budget, $4 million. Box office, $259,012. Writer/director Radha Bharadwaj had to wait seven years to make her next film (Basil); she has not done another film since that one.
  • Cloud Atlas (2012) — Budget, $102 million. Box office, $27,108,272 (domestic), $129,787,143 (worldwide). It didn't help that it received criticism from Asians (and Halle Berry) for the decision to have some of the actors, Berry included, play in Yellowface.
  • Club Paradise (1986) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $12,308,521. Harold Ramis didn't direct again until Groundhog Day in 1993.
  • Clue (1985) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $14,643,997. The film later became a Cult Classic, though Hollywood wouldn't attempt another movie based off a (real-life) board game until Battleship. A remake of this film has been lingering in Development Hell for about a decade.
  • Cobb (1994) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $1,007,583. This biopic of baseball player Ty Cobb was based on the now-discredited book by Al Stump. It had a mixed reception from critics and never left a limited release.
  • The Cobbler (2015) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $1.2 million. One of several major busts for Adam Sandler in 2015 alongside Pixels.
  • Code Name: The Cleaner (2007) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $10,337,477. This film's bombing cleaned the clock of director Les Mayfield; he has never directed another movie since. It was also one of the last independent releases of New Line Cinema before The Golden Compass got them swallowed by Warner by the end of the year.
  • Cohen and Tate (1988) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $64,227 (domestic). This was Eric Red's first directing job, and is part of a string of flops for him.
  • Cold Creek Manor (2003) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $29,119,434. This marked the final straw in the career of director Mike Figgis, as he hasn't helmed a mainstream film since.
  • Cold Heaven (1992) — Budget, $4.5 million. Box office, $17,163. Nicolas Roeg's religious thriller was filmed in 1989 but was shelved for a few years due to the bankruptcy of the film's production company. Hemdale subsequently picked up the rights and dumped the film into a very limited release. It has never been released in any digital format.
  • The Cold Light Of Day (2012) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $16.9 million. This finished off the directing career of Mabrouk El Merchi after it crawled away from theaters after four weeks.
  • Cold Pursuit (2019) — Budget, $60 million. Box office, $31,121,970 (domestic so far), $58,197,039 (worldwide so far).
  • Collateral Beauty (2016) — Budget, $36 million. Box office, $31,016,021 (domestic), $88,216,021 (worldwide). This movie got waylaid by Rogue One: A Star Wars Story, its Disney Animation sidekick Moana, and Universal competitor Sing in the American box office, and it also got waylaid by critics in reviews. Controversy over the film's trailers lying about the film didn't help. It is the lowest opening for Will Smith's career. This is not going to help director David Frankel's career, with his next film's release date yet to be determined.
  • Collateral Damage (2002) — Budget, $85 million. Box office, $78,382,433. One of many films pushed back after the 9/11 attacks to avoid implications of Too Soon, mostly due to its terrorism theme. Didn't help its cause.
  • College (2008) — Budget, $7 million. Box office, $6,265,483. The directorial debut of Deb Hagan was given a universal lashing by critics and lurked around in theaters for 10 weeks.
  • Collide (2017) — Budget, $21.5 million. Box office, $4.8 million. According to Box Office Mojo, this movie holds the Medal of Dishonor for biggest theater drop, during its second weekend no less.
  • Colombiana (2011) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $36,665,854 (domestic), $60,965,854 (worldwide). This was a Star-Derailing Role for Zoe Saldana as a leading lady, though she survived overall thanks to Star Trek (2009) and Guardians of the Galaxy.
  • Color of Night (1994) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $19,726,050. There was an exceptional amount of behind-the-scenes drama that engulfed both this movie's production crew and distributor Disney, who released it through Hollywood Pictures. Director Richard Rush and producer Andrew Vajna's headbutting led to Rush suffering a heart attack that left him bedridden for four months. In addition, Color of Night was part of a particularly bad month for Disney (the next week saw the ugly exit of studio chief Jeffrey Katzenberg after he and mentor Michael Eisner had been involved in headbutting themselves along with the release of It's Pat, which got pulled out of theaters immediately).
  • Come See the Paradise (1990) — Budget, $17.5 million. Box office, $947,360. Director Alan Parker rebounded the next year with The Commitments.
  • Commandments (1997) — Budget, $6 million. Box office, $548,567. A heavy critical panning ensured this romantic dramedy would die out in a limited release.
  • The Company (2003) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $6,401,690. Got decent reviews, but that didn't stop Robert Altman taking a 3-year hiatus before what became his last film.
  • Company Business (1991) — Budget, $18 million. Box office, $1,501,785. This Cold War thriller came out during the final months of the Soviet Union's existence. Mikhail Baryshinikov hated the film so much he refused to promote it; between this and the same year's The Cabinet of Dr. Ramirez, he wouldn't take up acting until the final season of Sex and the City. Director/Writer Nicholas Meyer rebounded a few months later with Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country and Gene Hackman did so next year with Unforgiven.
  • Company Man (2000) — Budget, $16 million. Box office, $146,193. Peter Askin's directorial debut; his next credit came seven years later for the documentary Trumbo. His co-director, Douglas McGrath, made Nicholas Nickleby two years later.
  • Communion (1989) — Budget, $5 million (Estimated). Box office, $1.9 million. Based on the controversial book by Whitley Strieber about a strange experience he had, Strieber lambasted the movie as 'making him look crazy'. It is the last theatrical film that director Phillippe Mora has done to date.
  • Conan the Barbarian (2011) — Budget, $90 million. Box office, $48,795,021. Slayed an attempt by Lionsgate to revive the Conan movies for The New 10's; they announced that this film would not be canon and the next one would return to Arnold Schwarzenegger, though that sequel has gone silent. Screenwriting duo Thomas Dean Donnelly and Joshua Oppenheimer have had zero screenplays credited to them since this film, and it dented Jason Momoa's move into cinema before his starring role in Aquaman (2018) resuscitated it.
  • The Concorde... Airport '79 (1979) — Budget, $14 million. Box office, $13 million. Critics and audiences agreed that this fourth film in the Airport series was a laughably bad sequel and its reception grounded the franchise permanently. The Disaster Movie genre was also crippled the following year by Airplane!, which spoofed this franchise.
  • Concussion (2015) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $34,255,169 (domestic), $40,705,403 (worldwide). It did receive good reviews though.
  • The Condemned (2007) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $8,642,858. This film closed after 4 weeks and lost its makers $15,700,000.
  • Condorman (1981) — Budget, $14 million. Box office, $2.5 million (rentals). This superhero/spy spoof tanked with critics and audiences and was a key factor in Disney CEO Ron Miller losing his job a few years later. This was one of two duds that year for director Charles Jarrott, the other being The Amateur, that kept him off screen for five years. Star Michael Crawford stayed afloat with the title role in Barnum, but he wouldn't be in a movie until a voice role in Once Upon a Forest. This has since become a Cult Classic.
  • Confessions of a Dangerous Mind (2002) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $16,007,718 (domestic), $33,013,805 (worldwide). Got pretty good reviews from critics, but George Clooney would wait another 3 years before sitting back in the director's chair, and this is one of the last times game show professional Chuck Barris, who worked with the film that was based on his CIA "autobiography" and is the creator of The Newlywed Game/The Dating Game/The Gong Show, would deal with media not related to novels and print.
  • Confidence (2003) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $12,251,640 (domestic), $23,014,206 (worldwide). It got decent reviews despite the middling box office.
  • Connie And Carla (2004) — Budget, $27 million. Box office, $11,341,016. Critics gave this comedy a mixed reception while audiences were more favorable. It would be five years before Nia Vardalos would write another film.
  • The Conqueror (1956) — Budget, $6 million. Box office, $4.5 million (domestic), $9 million (worldwide). This infamous movie was the straw that broke RKO Pictures' back after spending nearly a decade crumbling under the erratic leadership of Howard Hughes. The film wound up getting mocked for casting John Wayne as Genghis Khan (this film and Wayne's image provide the Image Source for WTH, Casting Agency?). The Conqueror derailed the careers of a handful of Hollywood heavyweights including Hughes, though Wayne wasn't one of those careers, and the filming location, which was downwind of a nuclear test site, may have killed several of the crew including Wayne (most of the people involved with the film died of cancer, which radiation can cause). Hughes, who produced this, quickly bought up all prints of the film for up to $12 million and refused to let them resurface and see the light of day again until after he died, at which point Universal got the film rights; this movie also exacerbated his obsessive-compulsive disorder.
  • Conquest (1937) — Budget, $2,732,000. Box office, $2,141,000. Recorded loss, $1,397,000. This biopic of Countess Marie Walewska, the mistress of Napoleon Bonaparte, was MGM's biggest bomb at the time. This was a Star-Derailing Role for Greta Garbo, who played Walewska, who was labeled "box-office poison" the following year and made only two films before her retirement in 1941.
  • The Conspirator (2011) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $15,478,800. Its widest release was in 849 theaters. Robert Redford directed only one more film after this.
  • The Contender (2000) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $17,872,723 (domestic), $22,361,811 (worldwide). This political drama was released during the 2000 election and was hit with its own scandal when Gary Oldman accused director Rod Lurie of re-editing the film to make his Republican senator character less sympathetic. Nevertheless, the film was critically acclaimed, particularly for the performances of Joan Allen and Jeff Bridges.
  • Cookie's Fortune (1999) – Budget, $10 million. Box office, $10.9 million. This was Chris O'Donnell's first film since Batman & Robin two years earlier. He made two more films before taking a temporary hiatus from the big screen (which had more to do with his new family than anything). It was also another Acclaimed Flop for Robert Altman.
  • Cool as Ice (1991) — Budget, $6 million. Box office, $1.1 million. Was seen as one of the factors of Vanilla Ice's popularity downfall.
  • Cool World (1992) — Budget, $28 million. Box office, $14,110,589. Director Ralph Bakshi was so dismayed by the film's reception and Executive Meddling (which included star Kim Basinger bowdlerizing the movie to show for sick hospital children even though that was not the intention of Bakshi at all) that he eventually retired from filmmaking. Cool World was also one of a few flops in the early 90's that melted the A-list career of Basinger, and film helmer Frank Mancuso's career was downgraded to B-level status ever since. The two men who rewrote the film into what it became without Bakshi's knowledge, Michael Grais and Mark Victor, saw their cinematic careers erased until 2000 rolled in, and they never wrote again. Only Brad Pitt and the veteran cartoon voice actors made it out alive. It would be another quarter-century before another original adult animated movie, Sausage Party, would be made.
  • Cooties (2014) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $55,749 (domestic), $260,542-348,091 (worldwide). Only showed on 29 screens in the U.S. and got a steep 77% drop from its first weekend to its second, as well as a reduction to 20 screens. It was also streamed on-demand right away, and some markets had it go Direct-to-Video.
  • Cop Out (2010) — Budget, $37 million. Box office, $44,875,481 (domestic), $55,439,786 (worldwide). Director Kevin Smith put the blame on the movie's derision on star Bruce Willis a la Hudson Hawk, while praising co-star Tracy Morgan. Smith got a demotion to the B-list of directors when the movie underwhelmed, and the brothers Mark and Robb Cullen, who wrote the movie, would be stuck in Hollywood Limbo until 2016.
  • The Core (2003) — Budget, $60 million. Box office, $31,186,986 (domestic), $73,498,611 (worldwide). Critics joked about this film being extremely implausible in its science. Director Jon Amiel wouldn't helm another movie until the end of the decade, and star Aaron Eckhart views this movie as an Old Shame.
  • The Corruptor (1999) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $24,493,601. Director James Foley waited four years to make his next movie after this action thriller was beaten at the box office after eight weeks.
  • Cosmopolis (2012) — Budget, $20.5 million. Box office, $6.1 million. Its limited release topped out at 65 theaters and ended after seven weeks. The critics still gave it respectful reviews, though.
  • The Cotton Club (1984) — Budget, $58 million. Box office, $25,928,721. Suffered an epically Troubled Production, including the gangland-style execution of a would-be backer and a budget-skyrocketing war of egos between producer Robert Evans and director Francis Ford Coppola, both of whose careers were already in trouble from other box office disappointments.
  • The Counselor (2013) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $16,973,715 (domestic), $71,009,334 (worldwide). The first screenplay by Cormac McCarthy was shredded by critics for its wordiness and its overwhelming Darkness-Induced Audience Apathy. Part of a Dork Age for Ridley Scott, though he's still proud of it.
  • The Country Bears (2002) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $18,012,097. This not only put a dent in Haley Joel Osment's career (he did have the role of Sora in the premiere Kingdom Hearts game that came out alongside this film to offset the damage; that game and Lilo & Stitch were really the only two bright spots for The Walt Disney Company that year), but also led to Christopher Walken to not try for another role in a Disney-branded film until the Jungle Book remake in 2016 (he earned a Razzie nom for this movie). This is also one of a handful of attempts by Disney to turn their theme park attractions into movie franchises; their next one, Pirates of the Caribbean, DID succeed in becoming a franchise but it wasn't enough to save Michael Eisner's fading career at Disney. Don Henley, who provided the singing voice for one of the bears, also mostly steered clear of the movies after being in this one as well, and this was the last theatrical role Galaxy Quest alumni Daryl Mitchell took for a few years (he had been paralyzed from the waist down in a motorcycle accident).
  • Coupe de Ville (1990) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $715,983. Joe Roth didn't direct another film for 11 years, though he had a successful career as a movie producer to fall back on. This was also the first produced script for Mike Binder, who would become a director in his own right.
  • Cover (2007) — Budget, Unknown. However, Box Office, $79,436. This was only in 14 theaters for three weeks.
  • The Cowboy Way (1994) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $20,280,016. Gregg Champion hasn’t directed a feature film since this one. (His next movie went straight to video, and has worked on television afterwards.)
  • Cowboys & Aliens (2011) — Budget, $163 million. Box office, $100,240,551 (domestic), $174,822,325 (worldwide). This failure led the Walt Disney Studios to rethink their investment in their own fantasy/western The Lone Ranger, but despite reports of them cancelling the film due to Cowboys and Aliens failing in theaters, Disney proceeded with production, and The Lone Ranger would bomb even harder than Cowboys and Aliens, sending the science fiction/western genre to Mars. Director Jon Favreau didn't direct another film with a nine-figure budget until he helmed Disney's acclaimed remake of The Jungle Book; co-producer Scott Mitchell Rosenberg, who is a Marvel alumnus and the founder of Malibu Comics and Platinum Studios, has not had his name or Platinum's name attached to any film since thanks to this and Dylan Dog: Dead of Night; and actor Noah Ringer, who had the dishonor of playing Avatar Aang in The Last Airbender, hasn't been a visible actor since.
  • Cradle Will Rock (1999) — Budget, $36 million. Box office, $2,903,404. The film got good reviews, but it still put Tim Robbins' cinematic directing/writing career to sleep. His future directing credits are on TV and he wrote one TV movie 10 years later.
  • Crank: High Voltage (2009) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $13,684,249 (domestic), $34,560,577 (worldwide). There have been talks of a third Crank movie, however.
  • Crash (1996) — Budget, $9 million. Box office, $2 million. The film version of JG Ballard's novel proved as controversial as its source material for its graphic depictions of sex, so much so that some right-wing groups tried to get it banned in the UK (it managed to get banned in only one borough of London). It polarized critics and audiences and its extremely limited release did it no favors.
  • Crazy In Alabama (1999) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $2,005,840. This was the first of two attempts by Spanish sensation Antonio Banderas to create a directing career for himself, and the film starred his then-wife Melanie Griffith. This film's failure ended those dreams right away, and the only other directorial effort from Banderas is a Spanish-only film in 2006. This movie also did serious damage to the career of producer Debra Hill, since she didn't make another movie for 6 years, right before she died.
  • Crazy People (1990) — Budget, $18 million. Box office, $13.2 million. The movie suffered from various setbacks during production, including its two leads walking off as filming started and the studio having the reshoot with two replacements, as well as TWO directors getting replaced. The movie confused a lot of critics and the bizarre promotional material turned off audiences. It's the only film credit to date by director Barry L. Young, and the last film written by Mitch Markowitz.
  • Creation (2009) — Budget, 10 million British Pounds Sterling (roughly $15.5 million). Box office, 341,323 U.S. Dollars (domestic), $896,298 (worldwide). This was the last movie that Jon Amiel directed, but he has fared well on television.
  • Creature (2011) — Budget, $3 million. Box office, $300,000. It was promptly jettisoned from theaters a week later. Producer Sid Sheinberg would wait 4 years before trying another movie.
  • The Crew (2000) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $13,105,853. The last theatrical film directed by Michael Dinner, who maintains steady work in TV as of 2017.
  • Crimewave (1986) — Budget, $3 million. Box office, $5,101. Yes, you read that right. In America the movie was released to theaters in only two states, Alaska and Kansas, in order to obtain quick television rights. Star and co-producer Bruce Campbell likes to say "The movie wasn't released, it escaped."
  • Crimes and Misdemeanors (1989) — Budget, $19 million. Box office, $18,254,702. This movie did succeed in becoming an Acclaimed Flop, so it didn't hurt its helmers' careers much at all.
  • Criminal (2016) — Budget, $31.5 million. Box office, $14,703,497 (domestic), $32,618,497 (worldwide). The film's weak performance with critics and audiences could imprison further ideas of director Ariel Vromen directing further non-documentary features. It's also not good news for the producers, and is the final film written by Douglas Cook, who died the year before, with his partner, David Weisberg, being on the bubble as well.
  • Crimson Peak (2015) — Budget, $55 million. Box office, $31,090,320 (domestic), $74,048,222 (worldwide). This was a victim of Misaimed Marketing as Universal promoted it as a straight horror film instead of the Gothic Romance Guillermo del Toro intended.
  • Cristiada (2012) — Budget, $12 million. Box office, $9,622,846. This iced over director Dean Wright and writer Michael James Love's careers.
  • Critical Care (1997) — Budget, $12 million. Box office, $221,193. Its widest release was 34 theaters.
  • Cronos (1993) — Budget, $2 million. Box office, $621,392. This was Guillermo del Toro's first full-length feature film, and it went through 8 years of Development Hell. It was critically acclaimed, but did not get more than a limited release across 28 screens. del Toro, thankfully, would move on to bigger and better things.
  • Crooked Arrows (2012) — Budget, $13 million. Box office, $1,832,541. Director Steve Rash and writer Brad Riddell's careers have yet to get out of the woods after this.
  • Crossing Over (2009) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $3,529,869.
  • Crossing the Bridge (1992) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $479,676.
  • The Crucible (1996) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $7,343,144. Another Acclaimed Flop.
  • Cry-Baby (1990) — Budget, $12 million. Box office, $8.2 million. Was almost an end to John Waters' directing career (it DID lead to an end to Rachel Talalay's producing career for 7 years; the next film she produced, The Borrowers, finished the job this film started).
  • Cry Freedom (1987) — Budget, $29 million. Box office, $5,899,797. An Acclaimed Flop that never left a limited release.
  • The Crying Game (1992) — Budget, £2.3 million. Box office, £2 million (UK box office), $62.5 million (US Box office). Its failure in the UK was attributed by director Neil Jordan to its sympathetic IRA-member protagonist. US audiences turned out to see the film's major plot twist, thus turning it into a Sleeper Hit.
  • Curdled (1996) — Budget, $2.3 million. Box office, $49,620. This was only in 18 theaters and was evicted after two weeks.
  • A Cure for Wellness (2017) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $26,536,570. Only two weeks into its American release, it almost immediately become the second biggest theater drop in history during its third weekend. The film is the second major career setback in a row for producer/writer/director Gore Verbinski after The Lone Ranger.
  • Curious George (2006) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $58,360,760 (domestic), $69,834,815 (worldwide). Its failure was another blow to traditional animation; however, it was well-reviewed by critics, and became popular with audiences when it hit DVD, enough to later earn two direct-to-DVD sequels and a TV series. Meanwhile, Jack Johnson's "Upside Down" became a Breakaway Pop Hit.
  • The Curse of the Jade Scorpion (2001) — Budget, $33 million. Box office, $18,914,307. Almost killed Woody Allen's career until Match Point, revived it.
  • Curse of the Pink Panther (1983) — Budget, $11 million. Box office, $4,491,986. A failed attempt to continue The Pink Panther series without Peter Sellers, Curse also marked the final film for David Niven. This and Trail of the Pink Panther put the series in remission for ten years.
  • Cursed (2005) — Budget, $38 million. Box office, $29,621,722. This was hit with massive Executive Meddling that forced it to undergo numerous reshoots and rewrites. Director Wes Craven and writer Kevin Williamson considered it their biggest Old Shame and the critics were more than happy to rip it apart once it finally premiered.
  • Cutter's Way (1981) — Budget, $5 million. Box office, $1,729,274. Originally released under the title Cutter and Bone, the film initially played in only seven theaters in New York City and was pulled after a week. United Artists transferred marketing duties to its art-house division, which retitled the film Cutter's Way and re-released it to much better results.
  • Cutthroat Island (1995) — Budget, $98 million. Box office, $18,517,322. This film bankrupted Carolco Pictures for 20 years, derailed Geena Davis' career, her marriage with director Renny Harlin (whose career was also badly damaged), and destroyed the entire swashbuckling adventure genre (and it seems that any pirate movie without the Pirates of the Caribbean name will be destined to fail; Carolco Pictures would be revived in 2015 by producer Alex Bafer, but was quickly shot down again two years later due to legal issues). Composer John Debney actually escaped and it was a Star-Making Role for him. After adjusting for inflation it's the biggest confirmed box office bomb of all time.note 
  • Cyrano de Bergerac (1950) — Budget, $1.1 million. Box office, $1.9 million (Rentals). Recorded Loss: $300,000. Although Jose Ferrer won unanimous praise and an Academy Award for his performance as the title character, the rest of the film was criticized for its low-budget look and less than stellar supporting cast. Producer Stanley Kramer later rebounded with High Noon and the film itself became Vindicated by History once it lapsed into the Public Domain.
Advertisement:

    D 
  • D.O.A. (1988) — Budget, $29 million. Box office, $12 million. The directorial debut of Max Headroom creators Rocky Morton and Annabel Jankel was kept alive by its relatively positive reviews. Their next directorial effort, Super Mario Bros., pulled the plug on their film careers.
  • D-Tox (2002) — Budget, $55 million. Box office, about $12,000 (domestic, and there is no mistake), $6,337,141 (worldwide). This film derailed Sylvester Stallone's film career, which was already damaged by the failures of Get Carter and Driven just a year ago. The film was shelved for a few years, Ron Howard and Brian Grazer took their names off of the film (they were the executive producers), and the test screenings were so bad that Universal decided not to release it. The film was subsequently picked up by DEJ Productions, who gave the film an EXTREMELY limited release before sending it to video (said company was owned by Blockbuster Video).
  • Damnation Alley (1977) — Budget, $17 million. Box office, $4 million. This film adaptation of the Roger Zelzany novel was expected to be Fox's big summer movie but it was delayed to the fall due to extensive post-production. By that point, Fox's actual big summer movie made its mark and Damnation Alley was left in the dust. Its mixed reviews and dismissal by Zelzany himself for straying from the novel didn't help either.
  • Dance Flick (2009) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $25,662,155 (domestic), $31,439,140 (worldwide). This Wayans Family vehicle is the last directing credit to date for Damien Dante Wayans.
  • Dangerous Beauty (1998) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $4,553,271.
  • Dangerous Game (1993) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $23,671 (domestic). It's an understandable gross considering that it played for one week in one theater.
  • Dangerous Ground (1997) — Budget, $28 million. Box office, $5,406,722.
  • A Dangerous Woman (1993) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $1,497,222.
  • Dante's Peak (1997) — Budget, $116 million. Box office, $67,127,760 (domestic), $178,127,760 (worldwide). Buried the screenwriting career of Leslie Bohem for 7 years, by which point the Michael Eisner/John Lee Hancock killer The Alamo buried it for another 7 years. This movie also knocked Terminator vet Linda Hamilton out of the A list.
  • Dark Blue (2002) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $12,150,301. This debuted at the Noir in Festival in 2002 before its general release in February 2003. This and Hollywood Homicide would send director Ron Shelton's career into remission for over a decade.
  • Dark City (1998) — Budget, $27 million. Box office, $14,378,331 (domestic), $27,200,316 (worldwide). Although Roger Ebert called Alex Proyas' sci-fi thriller the best film of the year, most critics gave it OK reviews largely due to its Executive Meddling mandated cuts. It quickly became a Cult Classic and its subsequent director's cut allowed it to become Vindicated by History.
  • The Dark Half (1993) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $10.6 milllion. This George A. Romero adaptation of the Stephen King book was finished in 1991 but was held back by Orion Pictures' bankruptcy.
  • The Dark Tower (2017) — Budget, $60 million. Box office, $50,701,325 (domestic), $111,757,995 (worldwide). After a decade-long Development Hell followed by a Troubled Production, this adaptation of Stephen King's book was released to critical savaging and a weak opening weekend, and its numbers didn't get any stronger. It likely didn't help that it was up against Dunkirk, which had been out for three weeks already.
  • Dark Shadows (2012) — Budget, $150 million. Box office, $79,727,149 (domestic), $245,527,149 (worldwide). Part of a string of flops for star Johnny Depp, and a bad misstep for famed director Tim Burton.
  • Dark Tide (2012) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $432,274. The movie received an extremely limited release before getting dumped to video. The last film that production company Magnet Media Groupnote  has worked on to date.
  • The Darkest Minds (2018) — Budget, $34 million. Box office, $12,695,691 (domestic), $41,142,379 (worldwide so far). This adaptation of Alexandra Bracken's young-adult novel series of the same name was the live-action debut of DreamWorks Animation veteran Jennifer Yuh Nelson (of Kung Fu Panda 2 and 3 fame). Critics dismissed it as a Cliché Storm but the few audience members who saw it were more forgiving.
  • Darling Lili (1970) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $3.25 million. One of a series of flops that sent Paramount Pictures into financial trouble in the early 70s. Director/Writer Blake Edwards was faced with continual Executive Meddling from the studio, who re-edited the film without his input and badly mismanaged the marketing. It didn't help that it came out when movie musicals were on the decline. Edwards and his star/wife Julie Andrews rebounded years later with The Return of the Pink Panther and Victor/Victoria, respectively. Edwards' co-writer William Peter Blatty had the quickest turnaround when he wrote The Exorcist and its subsequent film adaptation. The film was not released on video until 2006, but only in a half-hour shorter Director's Cut.
  • Date with an Angel (1987) — Budget, $8 million. Box office, $1,988,962. This film sent Tom McLoughlin's cinematic writing and directing career to Hell. He didn't get another story credit on another theatrical film for a full decade, and never directed another theatrical film for the rest of the 20th century, sticking with mainly TV movies.
  • The Day (2011) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $20,984. Another limited release by WWE, it lasted only 16 days.
  • Daylight (1996) — Budget, $90 million. Box office, $33,023,469 (domestic), $159,212,469 (worldwide). Director Rob Cohen's next two movies were both TV movies, but he would return to cinema in 2000. This movie and Leslie Bohem's next writing job, Dante's Peak, blacked out his writing career until The Alamo from Touchstone in 2004.
  • The Dead (1987) — Budget, $3.5 million. Box office, $4,370,078. John Huston's final film was this adaptation of a James Joyce short story from Dubliners. This got glowing reviews but never left a limited release. This is the second and last screenplay by Huston's son Tony, who's currently a lawyer.
  • Dead Bang (1989) — Budget, $14.5 million. Box office, $8,125,592. One of the last films produced by Lorimar Productions, which released its last theatrical film the following year, though the company's acquisition by Warner Bros. that same year had more to do with it than anything.
  • Dead Ringers (1988) — Budget, $13 million. Box office, $8,038,508. Put a dent in David Cronenberg's producing career; he didn't take a producer credit again for 8 years. Also a bad start to Norman Snider's career.
  • Dead Silence (2007) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $16,809,076 (domestic), $22,217,407 (worldwide). Co-writer Leigh Whannell regrets making the movie due to apparent Executive Meddling when it came to writing the script. Any plans for a sequel/franchise were shot down. It was also the first of two films directed by James Wan to flop in the same year, followed by Death Sentence.
  • Deadfall (1993) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $18,369. Its gross came from a whopping two theaters. Between this and the same year's Gunfight at Red Dog Corral, it would be six years before Christopher Coppola (brother of star Nicolas Cage) would direct another film.
  • Dead Man Down (2013) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $18,074,539. This WWE-produced thriller was chased out of theaters after six weeks.
  • Deadly Friend (1986) — Budget, $11 million. Box office, $8,988,731. This was shot as a bloodless thriller but Executive Meddling turned it Bloodier and Gorier after a poor test screening. This resulted in a disjointed mess that critics gave a thrashing. Director Wes Craven stayed afloat but writer Bruce Joel Rubin waited four years before his next credit, Ghost.
  • Deal of the Century (1983) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $10,369,481. Paul Brickman’s next writing credit came seven years after this one.
  • Dear God (1996) — Budget, $22 million. Box office, $7,138,523. It debuted at number eight on its opening weekend and its universal panning from critics, including Siskel & Ebert, helped send it further down. Director Garry Marshall waited three years before he made his next films, The Other Sister and Runaway Bride.
  • Death and the Maiden (1994) — Budget, $12 million. Box office, $3,103,716. Roman Polanski's film version of Ariel Doffman's play received great reviews but a limited release which topped out at 572 theaters. Polanski waited five years to make his next film, The Ninth Gate.
  • Death of a Nation (2018) — Budget, $6 million. Box office, $5,870,044. This is the first of Dinesh D'Souza's political documentaries to fall short of its budget. It was heavily panned by critics, getting a 0% approval rating on Rotten Tomatoes and a Metacritic score of 1.
  • Death Race (2008) — Budget, $45 million. Box office, $36,316,032 (domestic), $75,677,515 (worldwide). Its poor box office reception didn't stop two direct-to-DVD sequels from getting made.
  • Death Sentence (2007) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $16,974,459. The second of two films directed by James Wan to flop in the same year, the first was Dead Silence.
  • Death to Smoochy (2002) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $8,382,938. One of two films in the 2002/2003 schedule that killed Danny Devito's directing career after 1996's Matilda wounded it; Duplex is the other movie. This also completely incinerated Adam Resnick's cinematic writing career completely; he's only done a few TV jobs since.
  • DEBS (2004) — Budget, $3.5 million. Box office, $97,446. The film was only released in 45 theaters, and closed after 21 days.
  • Death Wish (2018) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $34,017,028 (domestic), $48,578,407 (worldwide). This remake of the 1974 film was delayed from its planned Thanksgiving 2017 release after the Las Vegas Shooting, only to land two weeks after the Parkland Shooting. Its poor timing bore the brunt of its scathing reception from critics.
  • Death Wish V: The Face of Death (1994) — Budget, $5 million. Box office, $1,702,394. This movie killed off the Death Wish franchise after five installments. This was also Charles Bronson's last theatrical starring role; he only did three Direct-to-Video movies before his retirement from acting in 1999, and his death four years later.
  • Deception (2008) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $17,741,298. This was heavily panned by critics and was promptly buried in the box office once Iron Man opened the next week.
  • Deck the Halls (2006) — Budget, $51 million. Box office, $47,231,070. The film suffered a Troubled Production mainly due to its stars Matthew Broderick, Danny Devito, Kristin Chenoweth and Kristin Davis suffering from some form of Creator Breakdown. The end result was lambasted for its not-so jolly demeanor and crashed and burned at the box office.
  • Deconstructing Harry (1997) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $10,686,841. Another Acclaimed Flop from Woody Allen.
  • The Deep End Of The Ocean (1999) — Budget, $38 million. Box office, $28,121,100. The film version of Jacquelyn Mitchard's novel received mixed reviews from critics. It was the last film directed by Ulu Grosbard before his death in 2012.
  • Deep Rising (1998) — Budget, $45 million. Box office, $11,203,026. The semi-final film from Cinergi Pictures; Disney had already ended their deal with the production company, and Burn Hollywood Burn would finish burning down the label by the end of the year.
  • Deepstar Six (1989) — Budget, $8 million. Box office, $8.1 million. Part of a string of underwater thrillers released in the same year, including The Abyss and Leviathan. Barely making its money back, Tristar was disappointed in the box office results. Talks of a sequel were halted, and this is so far the last theatrical film that Sean S. Cunningham has directed.
  • Deepwater Horizon (2016) — Budget, $156 million (one estimate), $110-120 million (another estimate). Box office, $61,433,527 (domestic), $119,463,870 (worldwide). Despite great reviews from critics, the Deadline press website accused Lionsgate of dropping the ball on marketing this film, which was released past the 2016 Summer Bomb Buster and with a handful of other major fall films such as Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children, The Magnificent Seven, and Sully.
  • Def Jam's How To Be A Player (1997) — Budget, $12 million. Box office, $14 million. One of only two theatrical films music video director Lionel C Martin has directed (and the other is a smaller production), it also put a major dent in Def Jam and co-founder Russell Simmons's move into filmmaking.
  • Defiance (2008) — Budget, $32 million. Box office, $28,644,813 (domestic), $51,155,219 (worldwide).
  • Delgo (2008) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $915,840. No, that's not a typo. It had one of the worst openings ever for a film playing in over 2,000 theaters, earning just $511,920 at 2,160 sites. It's also one of the most critically panned films of 2008 and only spent a single week in theaters before it vanished, and this is after director/writer Marc Adler spent a full decade getting the film through Development Hell. In the end, it's the only credit for Adler and production companies Electric Eye and Fathom Studios.
  • Delirious (1991) — Budget, $18 million. Box office, $5,546,826. The final theatrical film directed by Tom Mankiewicz and his final film credit. He spent the rest of his life in television.
  • Denial (2016) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $4.2 million. Was an Acclaimed Flop, however, with an 81 on Rotten Tomatoes.
  • Descent (2007) — Budget, Unknown. However, box office, $15,233. It's an understandable gross considering the film played in only two theaters and was gone after two weeks. This was director Talia Lugacy's only theatrical film until she began production on 8000 Shots.
  • Desire Me (1947) — Budget, $4,149,000. Box office, $2,576,000. Recorded loss, $2,440,000. The film's Troubled Production saw various directors come and go and none of them took credit for the finished film note .
  • Desperate Hours (1990) — Budget, $18 million. Box office, $2,742,912. A remake of the 1955 Humphrey Bogart classic, this was Michael Cimino's third failed attempt to recover his fame from the fallout of Heaven's Gate.
  • Deterrence (2000) - Budget, $800,000. Box office, $145,000 (domestic). Originally set to be a TV movie, the studios were so impressed they tried a minor theatrical release; It backfired. Ended Sheryl Lee Ralph's theatrical acting career and she's mainly done straight-to-video movies since.
  • Desperate Measures (1998) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $13,806,137. This critically panned thriller was chased out of theaters after three weeks. This contributed to Michael Keaton's career downturn for several years.
  • Detroit (2017) — Budget, $34 million. Box office, $21,096,357. The first film distributed (as opposed to co-produced) by Annapurna Pictures, it was praised by critics but came out at the tail-end of a mostly lackluster summer.
  • Detroit Rock City (1999) — Budget, $16 million. Box office, $4.2 million. While this rock comedy died at the box office after four weeks, it has since become a Cult Classic.
  • Deuces Wild (2002) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $6,282,446. Its universal panning from critics and that it opened the same day as Spider-Man killed it financially. It was rubbed out of theaters after four weeks.
  • The Devil and Max Devlin (1981) — Budget, $7.1-$7.2 million. Box office, $16 million. Disney was forced to write off $4 million when this take-off on the Faust legend failed to perform at the box office. Was part of a string of box-office duds for Bill Cosby and Elliott Gould; though he would rebound on TV with The Cosby Show, the former would wind up destroying his movie career spectacularly within a decade of this film's release thanks to Leonard Part 6 and Ghost Dad.
  • Devil in a Blue Dress (1995) — Budget, $27 million. Box office, $16,140,822. The first and only film appearance of Walter Mosley's detective character Easy Rawlins. It was an Acclaimed Flop, though.
  • Devilman (2004) — Budget, ¥1 billion ($9.4 million). Box office, ¥520 million (approx $5 million). The live-action version of Go Nagai's classic manga received a rancid reception from critics and audiences, primarily for its poor acting from its inexperienced cast, lackluster visual effects, and nonsensical story. This was the final film for director Hiroyuki Nasu, who died the following year. His wife, Machiko Nasu, the film's screenwriter, saw her career slow down soon after.
  • The Devil's Double (2011) — Budget, $19.1 million. Box office, $1,361,512. A biopic of Yatif Yahia, the reluctant Body Double of Saddam Hussein's son Uday. The critics were mixed about it, though they lauded Dominic Cooper's performance as Yatif and Uday, while the film itself lingered in limited release. Director Lee Tamahori waited five years to make another film.
  • The Devil's Own (1997) — Budget, $90 million. Box office, $42,868,348 (domestic), $140,807,547 (worldwide). This served as the final film for director Alan J. Pakula, as he was killed in a car accident the next year after its release.
  • Diabolique (1996) — Budget, $45 million. Box office, $17,100,266. The second of 3 career-zapping bombs for Jeremiah Chechik, and the last film Marvin Worth produced before his death.
  • Diana (2013) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $335,359 (domestic), $21,766,271 (worldwide). In its native UK, this Princess Diana biopic received overwhelmingly negative reviews from critics and just barely broke even; as a result, distributor Entertainment One quietly dumped the film in a few theaters when it was brought over across the pond, before bringing it straight to DVD a mere three months later.
  • Diary of a Wimpy Kid: The Long Haul (2017): Budget, $22 million. Box office, $20,541,739 (domestic), $33,561,079 (worldwide). The negative backlash over this adaptation replacing all of the cast from the previous three films (spawning the #NotMyRodrick meme), combined with the hiatus between the movies (even creator Jeff Kinney stated there wouldn't be more films starring said cast due to the child actors growing older; this resulted in Dog Days being severely rushed), critics panning it far more severely than the original trilogy and competition from Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2, dealt quite the damage to this film's overall performance. The chances of another Wimpy Kid movie are slim to none at this point.
  • Dick (1999) — Budget, $13 million. Box office, $6.3 million. It got pretty good reviews, but this comedy about two girls who get involved in Watergate, suffered from an Uncertain Audience. It got Vindicated by Video and became a Cult Classic.
  • Did You Hear About the Morgans? (2009) — Budget, $58 million. Box office, $29,580,087 (domestic), $85,280,250 (worldwide). This unfortunately got released the same day as Avatar and it was left stranded on Earth. The negative critical reception didn't help either. Director Marc Lawrence wouldn't have another film credit until 2014's The Rewrite.
  • Diggstown (1992) — Budget, $17 million. Box office, $4,836,637. The start of a series of busts that ended the directorial career of Michael Ritchie.
  • The Dilemma (2011) — Budget, $70 million. Box office, $69,721,966. The trailers to this Ron Howard comedy caused controversy due to Vince Vaughn's character's gay joke, especially so since they were released during a rash of suicides by gay teens. While the offending line was excised in later trailers, it remained untouched in the finished film. Vaughn also caused problems by taking control from Howard and forced numerous rewrites. The end result derailed Vaughn's career when it opened to tepid reviews and some of the weakest results of his career. It also didn't help Kevin James' movie career, either.
  • Dirty Dancing: Havana Nights (2004) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $27.7 million. This movie got called out on its attempt to remake the original 80's film. Director Guy Ferland was sent down to the TV stage, and the producers and writers also saw their careers pushed into the background for several years. Finally, it was the penultimate film from Artisan Entertainment prior to being absorbed into Lionsgate (their previous film was Uwe Boll's House of the Dead, and their next and last film was The Punisher (2004))
  • Dirty Love (2005) — Budget, $9 million. Box office, $36,099. This dirtied Jenny McCarthy's cinematic career.
  • A Dirty Shame (2004) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $1,914,166. This very dirty movie's ugly box office returns and mixed reviews was cited by John Waters as to why he hasn't directed again.
  • Dirty Work (1998) — Budget, $13 million. Box office, $10,023,282. Bob Saget didn't direct another film until 2006's Farce of the Penguins, and killed Norm Macdonald's film career before it could get off the ground. This is also known for being the last film of Chris Farley. Fortunately, this movie was Vindicated by Video, and it would later become a Cult Classic.
  • The Disappointments Room (2016) — Budget, $15 million. Box office, $5.6 million. The film living up to its title and them some with critics, Relativity Media having to deal with Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection led to them switching release dates before dumping it at the very end of the 2016 Summer Bomb Buster, and then having a 97.4% drop in box office from week two to week three (beating Gigli's drop and earning a rare snark from The Other Wiki) has a good chance of putting actor Wentworth Miller's writing career in a prison cell and doing serious damage to the careers of the director and producers (director D.J. Caruso has the next XXX film with a returning Vin Diesel to look forward to, though).
  • Disaster Movie (2008) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $14,190,901 (domestic), $31,683,375 (worldwide). Considered to be the movie that started slowing the infamous Seltzer and Friedberg director duo.
  • Disorganized Crime (1989) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $7 million. Director/Writer Jim Kouf waited four years to write another film, Another Stakeout, and another four to direct again.
  • Distant Thunder (1988) — Budget, $8 million. Box office, $156,000. Despite being critically acclaimed, it ended up having the overall worst results of a major movie in 1988. Director Rick Rosenthal wouldn't direct another theatrical film for ten years, and this was the last theatrical movie written by Robert Stitzel.
  • The Divergent Series: Insurgent (2015) — Budget, $110 million. Box office, $130,179,072 (domestic), $297,276,329 (worldwide). While its international returns were enough to keep it from being a complete failure, it still didn't do anywhere near the business its predecessor raked in, was met with indifference even from fans of the franchise, and made journalists curious as to why something so big could seem so irrelevant. Still, this is relatively light, compared to...
  • DOA: Dead or Alive (2006) — Budget, $21 million. Box office, $480,813 (domestic), $7,516,532 (worldwide). This movie only spent 3 weeks in the North American market before succumbing to the Video-Game Movies Suck backlash mixed with Invisible Advertising. It killed the directing career of Corey Yuen and inflicted a near-fatal wound on the writing career of co-writer J.F. Lawton, the latter of whom has written just one other film after this.
  • Doctor Detroit (1983) — Budget $8 million. Box office, $10,375,893. Fortunately for star Dan Aykroyd, his big hit Trading Places came out a month after this dire comedy about a literature professor masquerading as a pimp so he was unaffected. Director Michael Pressman was less fortunate, he was knocked back to television directing for thirteen years.
  • Doctor Dolittle (1967) — Budget, $17 million. Box office, $6.2 million. This was part of a string of musical bombs for 20th Century Fox that killed the live-action musical, the Fox careers of Darryl Zanuck and his son Richard (Richard bounced back as a producer; his father didn't), and put the studio in a financial black hole until Star Wars in 1977 and the move to embrace V/H/S as an alternate viewing method. Rex Harrison sunk his career with his prima donna attitude on the set. A remake with Eddie Murphy eventually surfaced in the 90's.
  • Doctor T And The Women (2000) — Budget, $23 million. Box office, $22,844,291. Part of a 2000/2001 slate that put production company Artisan Entertainment on life support; they would rebound the next year before being absorbed by Lionsgate.
  • Dogfight (1991) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $394,631.
  • Domestic Disturbance (2001) — Budget, $53 million. Box office, $54,249,294. Director Harold Becker has not directed since this movie, and it put a dent in producer Jonathan D. Krane's career that remained until he died in 2016.
  • Domino (2005) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $22,944,502. This dramatization of the life of bounty hunter Domino Harvey saw its release date shuffled around multiple times, including at least once when the real Harvey died that June. The end result got scathing reviews from critics and was greeted apathetically by audiences. Director Tony Scott considered it one of his favorite films while Keira Knightley had better luck that year with Pride & Prejudice (2005).
  • Donnie Darko (2001) — Budget, $6 million. Box office, $1,270,522. The movie flopped thanks to being released a month after 9/11. However, thanks to DVD, the movie gained a cult following, and it kickstarted the career of its director and writer, Richard Kelly.
  • Don't be Afraid of the Dark (2011) — Budget, $25 million. Box office, $24,046,682 (domestic), $39,126,427 (worldwide). The film's release was delayed due to Disney's sale of Miramax.
  • Don't Tell Her It's Me (1990) — Budget, $6.7 million. Box office, $1,171,762. Part of a string of star-derailing roles for Steve Guttenberg and one of the many films that drove Shelley Long back to television after leaving Cheers.
  • Doogal (2006) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $7,417,319 (domestic), $26,691,243 (worldwide). This American dub of The Magic Roundabout series was critically panned for its poor, pop culture filled writing, weak voice acting, and for lacking the charm of the original series. Worst of all, the movie was already dubbed in English, making this version even more unnecessary. This will probably be the last time anyone in America hears about The Magic Roundabout.
  • Doom (2005) — Budget, $60 million. Box office, $55,987,321. A lot of the scorn towards this case of Video-Game Movies Suck was directly connected to the last part of its climax, which attempted to emulate the classic First-Person Shooter (Roger Ebert famously said it was like, "some kid came over and is using your computer and won't let you play note ) When this intended Grand Premiere installment got gunned down by critics and the box office, the planned sequels were cast into the fire.
  • Doomsday (2008) — Budget, $33 million. Box office, $22,211,326.
  • Double Dragon (1994) — Budget, $7.8 million. Box office, $2,341,309. Another case of Video-Game Movies Suck, it also helped put Gramercy Pictures in a bad spot (this would not be the last video game-based movie to do serious damage to Gramercy). This came out before another beat'em up/fighting game-based film from Gramercy co-parent Universal, Jean-Claude Van Damme's Street Fighter, did not help at all (Street Fighter fared well at the box office, but not with critics). It proved to be a Star-Derailing Role for leads Mark Dacascos and Robert Patrick (who mostly stuck to television, and the former plays the Chairman on Food Network's Iron Chef), and knocked off some of the health bars belonging to producers Jane Hamsher and Don Murphy, who did not produce another film for 4 years, director James Yukich, who didn't direct another film for 5 years and otherwise stuck to TV, screenwriters Michael Davis and Peter Gould (the latter eventually moved on to Breaking Bad), and story men Paul Dini and Neal Shusterman (the former has only dealt with animated/comic book/video game material since, and the latter was written for TV and done novels since).
  • Double Team (1997) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $11,438,337. This and Knock Off led to director Tsui Hark remaining in Chinese cinema, and it didn't help out Jean-Claude Van Damme or Dennis Rodman's careers too much, either (both of them earned Razzies for this film).
  • Down with Love (2003) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $20,305,251 (domestic), $39,468,111 (worldwide). It opened in wide release on the same day as The Matrix Reloaded and was promptly buried that summer. Critics gave it a mixed-to-positive reception but time has been kinder to it.
  • Downsizing (2017) — Budget, $68 million. Box office, $52,694,653. Alexander Payne's sci-fi satire debuted to a packed holiday season and came up short. Critics didn't greet this as warmly as his other films, citing the wasted potential of the premise as their biggest concern.
  • Downtown (1990) — Budget, $10 million. Box office, $2,346,150. The movie was released during one of the fiercest seasons in movie history at the time, and suffered from barely any promotion. It almost ended director Richard Benjamin's career, though another movie he did later that year, Mermaids, did well enough to keep him steady.
  • Dr. Jekyll & Ms. Hyde (1995) — Budget, $8 million. Box office, $3,039,634. Robert Shapiro did not produce another movie for 4 years.
  • Dracula: Dead and Loving It (1995) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $10,772,144. Where Life Stinks failed (since that was followed by Robin Hood: Men in Tights, which despite negative reception was a moderate box office success), Dracula: Dead and Loving it succeeded in ending Mel Brooks' movie career after a previous record of accomplishments. He later found success in Broadway, notably stage versions of The Producers and Young Frankenstein.
  • Dracula Untold (2014) — Budget, $70 million. Box office, $56,280,355 (domestic), $217,124,280 (worldwide). Universal wanted this movie to kickstart their new Universal Horror franchise/universe, but poor reviews and audience reception caused the movie to turn into a Stillborn Franchise. Universal would try to start the franchise again with The Mummy three years later, though that film's box office results didn't help, either. This also killed the career of director Gary Shore, who hasn't done anything except for a segment in the poorly received anthology film, Holiday, with this movie being his only feature-length film.
  • Dragonball Evolution (2009) — Budget, $30 million. Box office, $9,362,785 (domestic), $57,497,699 (worldwide). Hated by fans for being an In Name Only adaptation, it killed any chance of a live action film based on the sequel series, Dragon Ball Z. The Dragon Ball franchise rebounded with the release of Dragon Ball Kai and never looked back.
  • Dragonfly (2002) — Budget, $60 million. Box office, $52,323,400. Writer David Seltzer wrote one more film before sticking with television.
  • Dragonslayer (1981) — Budget, $18,000,000 (Estimated). Box office, $14,110,013. The last of two films in Walt Disney Productions' co-production deal with Paramount (following Robert Altman's Popeye); this film had more mature themes that weren't associated with Disney at the time. This film's creation and subsequent failure, along with several other films, would lead to the creation of Touchstone, which had released Splash by the time Paramount executives Michael Eisner and Jeffrey Katzenberg took Disney away from CEO Ron Miller. Dragonslayer is also the semi-final film from co-producer Hal Barwood before he jumped to LucasArts and started working on video games instead, and his final movie would come 4 years after Dragonslayer.
  • Dramatic School (1938) — Budget, $602,000. Box office, $433,000 (domestic), $664,000 (worldwide). Recorded loss, $206,000. This was the last film Luise Rainer made for MGM. She was brought in as a replacement for Greer Garson, who was supposed to make her MGM debut here. She made one more film, Hostages, in 1943, before she stuck to mainly TV for the rest of her life.
  • Dreamcatcher (2003) — Budget, $68 million. Box office, $33,715,436 (domestic), $75,715,436 (worldwide). The film's disappointing take prompted Lawrence Kasdan to spend nine years without taking any more film credits. It also forced superauthor William Goldman (who wrote Marathon Man and The Princess Bride), to withdraw from Hollywood until The New 10's.
  • Dream House (2011) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $38,502,340. Director Jim Sheridan and stars Daniel Craig and Rachel Weisz hated it so much they refused to promote it. The critics agreed with their disdain.
  • Dream Lover (1993) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $256,264. The first and only theatrical film directed by screenwriter Nicholas Kazan, who went back to writing and producing ever since.
  • Drillbit Taylor (2008) — Budget, $35 million. Box office, $32,862,104 (domestic), $49,690,625 (worldwide). This was John Hughes' last screen work before his death in 2009; he was credited with the pseudonym Edmond Dantès.
  • Drive Angry (2011) — Budget, $50 million. Box office, $41,042,583. One of several busts in The New 10's for Nicolas Cage. It also derailed director Patrick Lussier's career, whose next credits note  were co-writing Terminator Genisys and directing an episode of Scream.
  • Driven (2001) — Budget, $72 million. Box office, $54,744,738. This was Sylvester Stallone's first film to open at number one since Cop Land, but he came to regret ever doing it. It also did no favors for director Renny Harlin.
  • Drop Zone (1994) — Budget, $45 million. Box office, $28,735,315. After this film, one of the writers, John Bishop, never wrote another original screenplay (he did do rewrites over the next few years). The other writer, Peter Barsocchini, didn't write another film for 14 years, but he eventually moved on to the High School Musical series. Part of a string of flops for director John Badham.
  • DuckTales the Movie: Treasure of the Lost Lamp (1990) — Budget, Unknown. Box office, $18,100,000. The film's disappointment led to the cancellation of other Disney Afternoon movies in development (except A Goofy Movie). Both this and The Rescuers Down Under later that year also ensured all Disney Renaissance films for the rest of the decade would be musicals; it would be a while before adventure animation came back to the forefront. Ducktales: The Movie is the sole made-for-cinemas film and one of only two cinematic films DC/Warner veteran Alan Burnett worked on; Batman: Mask of the Phantasm was originally meant to go Direct-to-Video.
  • Dudley Do-Right (1999) — Budget, $70 million. Box office, $9,974,410. Its failure along with that of the later released companion film The Adventures of Rocky & Bullwinkle ultimately killed off plans for a Mr. Peabody & Sherman Live-Action Adaptation. That project was later rebooted instead as a CGI adaptation at DreamWorks Animation, and that ended up underperforming as well (although unlike Rocky and Bullwinkle and Dudley Do-Right, it at least made back its budget). This and Blast from the Past also blasted director Hugh Wilson's career into the wall for 5 years, and cast member and Monty Python vet Eric Idle has not appeared in another live-action film in an extended capacity after this and Burn Hollywood Burn.
  • Duets (2000) — Budget, $16 million. Box office, $6,620,242.
  • Duma (2005) — Budget, $12 million. Box office, $994,790. This was a critical darling but it never left a limited release of 42 theaters.
  • Dune (1984) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $30,925,690 (domestic). This adaptation of Frank Herbert's legendary novel was derided by critics for its incomprehensible plot and quickly died at the box-office. Although it is now a Cult Classic, this became an Old Shame to David Lynch and put producer Raffaella De Laurentis in the B-list of producers before she made a comeback with Backdraft.
  • Dungeons & Dragons (2000) — Budget, $45 million. Box office, $33,807,409. Director Courtney Solomon blamed this movie's failure on an outdated script and Executive Meddling from D&D's copyright holders forcing him into the director's chair. This film had sequels, but they were sent straight to the home entertainment field and do not directly continue this film's story. No other attempts to make a cinematic version of the famed RPG have materialized yet. Solomon did return for the first sequel, but he did not direct that one (as a matter of fact, he didn't direct or get another screen credit until 2005, and he's only directed two movies since).
  • Dunston Checks In (1996) — Budget, $16 million. Box office, $9,871,066. Managed to send ideas of making movies with monkeys into the dumpster unless they are gorillas. It and Beautician And The Beast also left director Ken Kwapis's career lost in space until 2005, and it dealt serious damage to the careers of all the actors in the movie who are not named Glenn Shadix and Faye Dunaway (that list includes Jason Alexander, Rupert Everett and Paul Reubens, the last of whom was still recovering from the nudie theater fiasco).
  • Duplex (2003) — Budget, $40 million. Box office, $19,322,135. One of two films in the 2002/2003 schedule that killed Danny Devito's directing career after 1996's Matilda wounded it; Death to Smoochy is the other movie.
  • Duplicity (2009) — Budget, $60 million. Box office, $40,572,825 (domestic), $78,146,652 (worldwide). This was Julia Roberts's first starring role since Mona Lisa Smile and it was one of a series of busts that would cost Universal chairman Marc Smuger his job. The critics generally liked it, though, and Roberts got a Golden Globe nomination.
  • Dutch (1991) — Budget, $17 million. Box office, $4,603,929. The second and last theatrical film directed by Peter Faiman, who went back to TV after producing FernGully: The Last Rainforest.
  • Dylan Dog: Dead of Night (2011) — Budget, $20 million. Box office, $4,634,062. Producer Scott Mitchell Rosenberg, who is a Marvel alumni and the founder of Malibu Comics and Platinum Studios, has not had his name or Platinum's name attached to any film since thanks to this and Cowboys And Aliens. The other producer, Gilbert Adler, also does not have his name attached to another cinematic release past this point, and director Kevin Munroe and co-writer Thomas Dean Donnelly had the lights go out for their cinematic careers for 5 years. It also didn't help former Superman Brandon Routh's career either, and gave rise to the argument that he has fallen into the "Superman Curse."

Top

Example of:

/

Feedback