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  • Ayn Rand
    • She had a thing for "bodice-ripper" style ravishment sex, which her sex scenes usually involved. The rather violent sex scenes she wrote (especially the rather infamous Howard Roark/Dominique Francon sex scene in The Fountainhead) can plausibly be read as Rape Is Love, although this is debated by many (including anarchist-feminist Wendy McElroy).
    • Rand practiced consensual polyamory during the time she was writing Atlas Shrugged. The heroine of Atlas, Dagny Taggart, has multiple relationships over the course of the novel's plot.
  • Jennifer Diane Reitz's Unicorn Jelly and its spinoffs. The writer/artist is a trans woman, and every series is almost entirely populated with LBGTQIA+ characters.
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    • As a partial justification for the alphabet soup, consider that the lead character in To Save Her is a gender-bending blob stretched over a humanoid metallic robot skeleton. In other words, he/she/it is not only transgender but transspecies. And incidentally a kind of mutant.
  • Rick Remender is a big fan of campy sci-fi and horror comics, and tries to find ways to include them in his works. This is largely why Secret Avengers underwent a massive Genre Shift from Spy Fiction to Cosmic Horror when he took over.
  • Perri Rhoades does this with her Spectral Shadows series. Lots of the plots and characters are used by the author to voice their opinions or do Take Thats to various things. Her series also includes innumerable amounts of references to anything that they've ever been interested in, though most of these are Progressive Rock references, Rhaodes' favored music genre.
  • There's a reason why Everyone Is Bi in Anne Rice's books. Or at least, before she went straight-edge and wrote Christ the Lord.
    • The works she wrote as A.N. Roquelaure (and Anne Rampling) show a marked taste for BDSM.
  • John Ringo. Particularly, his self-admitted 'wanker piece' series. It's long, but you don't have to read very far to get the picture. As they say:OH JOHN RINGO NO.
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    • His Council Wars series plays it more realistically with its very-similar protagonist, Herzer, but the appeal is still there.
    • He does admit everything the reviewer says about the Paladin of Shadows is right.
    • In the Legacy of the Aldenata, an artillery piece is named after Bun-Bun from 'Sluggy Freelance. The crew not only gets away with it, but a random guy they meet just happens to be a big fan. This is after five years of war with a genocidal alien race that has control of most of the planet, yet apparently the Sluggy Freelance servers are still up, or at least a mirror or archive thereof.
    • In all his series you will eventually encounter his musical tastes; Crüxshadows, Evanescence and "March of Cambreadth" put in the most consistent appearances.
  • Guy Ritchie definitely likes his male characters to do a Shirtless Scene at least once in a movie, preferably during a fight. Their body types are always the same: slender bordering on thin, but with well defined muscles. Plot relevance is optional.
  • Brad Roberts of the band Crash Test Dummies seems to have been obsessed with adult baby fetishes around the time of Give Yourself A Hand, mentioning them in three songs. Whether he actually had one himself or was simply playing a character (as he often does) is unknown.:
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    • I Want To Par-tay!:
    I'm walking funny and it's not by chance
    I got some shit stuck in my pants
    • Just Shoot Me, Baby:
    Send me to my room, hold me down
    And spank me, use the wooden spoon
    But be next to me
    Just don't feed me with no tube
    Or change my dirty diaper
    If I'm back at Mommy's boob
    Call in the frickin' snipers
    And just shoot me, baby
    • Party's Over:
    I'm suffering out there, baby
    I'm itching and crying, I want a thumb to suck
    I think you got one for me, baby
  • Phoebe Roberts of Mrs Hawking is fascinated by ballet, dead babies, and classically handsome men.
  • James Robinson is positively obsessed with the Golden Age of comic books, and details his love of the era in the text pieces included in Justice League: Cry for Justice. He also absolutely loves Legacy heroes, and this can be seen in his runs on JSA, Starman, his Elseworlds story The Golden Age, Earth 2, and All-New Invaders.
    • He also really loves obscure pop culture references and collectors. This is especially apparent in Starman, where it's not uncommon to see mook henchmen arguing over which Stephen Sondheim play is the best.
    • He absolutely loves starting off his stories by killing off established but lesser known characters, either to spur his heroes to action or demonstrate how powerful the villain of the story is. Examples include:
      • Starman opens with David Knight (the then-current Starman) being shot and killed by a sniper.
      • JSA begins with Wesley Dodds committing suicide, as well Kid Eternity and Jared Stevens being murdered by the Big Bad of the story, Mordru.
      • Justice League: Cry for Justice opens with a multitude of characters, ranging from Freedom Beast to Winky, Blinky, and Noddy, being killed by the villains working for Prometheus.
      • All-New Invaders begins with Fang from the Shi'ar Imperial Guard shown dead after an encounter with the Kree soldiers working for Tanalth the Pursuer.
  • Justina Robson's books Mappa Mundi and Living Next Door to the God of Love both have tall, dark male romantic interests who are or appear to be mixed-race and have beautiful long-ish hair. And when the second one crossdresses/transforms into a woman, it's very lovingly described indeed. Knock off the dark and you've also got Zal from Quantum Gravity.
  • Gene Roddenberry really likes women with long hair, quite often piled up in a Beehive Hairdo. For instance:
    • Of the three female regulars, the Ms. Fanservice, Janice Rand, is the one with long hair.
    • A lieutenant, drunk on an inhibition-lowering virus, gets on the ship's intercom and asks that all female officers wear their hair long about their shoulders
    • When Khannote  is seducing Lieutenant Marla McGivers, he asks that she wear her hair down.
    • When Saavik wears her hair down for the first time in The Wrath of Khan, both Kirk and Bones notice and compliment her on it. By the way, her hair is miles long.
    • Everybody who worked with him was familiar with the "Roddenberry woman" type; long hair, big bust, vacuous expression.
  • Although they are used in the context of insults, James Rolfe, AKA, The Angry Video Game Nerd, has a lot of references to asses and scatological acts in his videos, one of which appears in the theme song for the show. Most of those acts also have a lot of detail put into describing them.
  • There are always Yaoi Guys in Zee Rose's works or every guy is bi. They're either married, dating, or even just teasing each other—but expect them to get a lot of scenes. Don't believe me? Observe The Princess 99 and then look at her other online published works, especially Gaeadians. Though this might be justifiable since she started out drawing yaoi-oriented doujinshi.
  • Greg Rucka loves strong, lesbian women, or just strong women in general. It could consequently be argued that Rucka not only likes strong women, he likes strong women who themselves like strong women.
    • His first comic, the creator-owned Whiteout, revolved around Action Girls at the South Pole with deliberate Homoerotic Subtext between Carrie and Lily. Queen and Country took the same concept and scattered the locations around the world, with only slightly less Les Yay to go around (The primary character of Q&C was originally considered to be Lily from Whiteout, but Rucka eventually decided to make them two independent people). When he wrote Batman Sasha Bordeaux, Bruce Wayne's tough bodyguard girl, became the main character of the book. He (along with Ed Brubaker) evolved Renee Montoya into a lesbian character (or, as they claim, were the first to reveal that she was a lesbian all along) in the critically acclaimed Gotham Central, and he later created the new, lesbian Batwoman. The only thing that keeps people from claiming his work is nothing but titillation for the readers is the fact that it is all so good, and he has the numerous awards (both in and out of the comic industry) to prove it.
    • And when he stopped writing the Superman book to write said Gotham Central, he made sure to bring Metropolis Special Crimes Unit's lesbian Captain Maggie Sawyer with him. That was a convenient and timely transfer she put in for...
    • He also wrote Batman/Huntress: Cry for Blood, which also featured an Action Girl antiheroine protagonist. When he started writing Renee Montoya as the Question, he repeatedly brought in Huntress as a guest-star, making it clear that Question clearly had a thing for Huntress, who did not even know that Question was gay until the second issue of Convergence: Question, which was the last hurrah for both versions of the two characters.
    • Notably, Rucka recieved a lot of media attention in 2017 when his run on Wonder Woman became the first official series to depict the character as into girls, a decision which Rucka noted was based on the Fridge Logic of Diana knowing all about love, sex and marriage before meeting Steve Trevor despite living on an island populated entirely by women.
  • Salman Rushdie appears to have a thing for girls with scars. Considering he was married to Padma Lakshmi (who has a noticeable scar from a childhood auto accident) of Top Chef fame, that's unsurprising.
  • Ryukishi07 seems to have a thing for legs. Quite a few outfits his female characters wear show them off, such as the Angel Mort waitress outfit in Higurashi and the outfits worn by the Stakes of Purgatory, the Chiesters, the Eiserne Jungfrau in Umineko, and Usagi and Ichou in TRianThology ~Sanmenkyou no Kuni no Alice~, all of which incorporate Showgirl Skirts.

  • S. Sakurai)
    • Gorgeous Princess Creamy Beamy combines the author's love of BBWs (Big Beautiful Women), usually eating until they're sick, combined with parody of Magical Girls.
    • Author S. Sakurai's other webcomic, the Dead to Begin With dark comedy Muertitos, also features more than its fair share of fan service involving fat chicks or women stuffing themselves.
    • This is at least an open and deliberate part of the series, frequently lampshaded and foregrounded.
  • A lot of Richard Sala's comics feature young women who frequently (if not always) go barefoot. Peculia is one example.
  • Tim Sale wanted to draw Catwoman's then-recently introduced black costume with the goggles for Catwoman: When in Rome—despite it taking place concurrently with Dark Victory, which means it's set during the early years of Batman's career (and hence Catwoman's as well). So they compromised, as in the story, Selina's luggage gets lost for the first issue, and Catwoman makes a black costume that uses for the first two issues until she gets her luggage back.
  • Hiroaki Samura seems to have a thing for feet with long, almost finger-like, flexible toes.
    • Aside from the hands and feet fetish, he also seems to enjoy heavy and downright nasty BDSM, its most extreme form happening in Hyakurin's torture and rape scene (the latter happens offscreen, but is referenced in rather vulgar dialogue). Said "preference" reaches even more disturbing heights in his one-shot Bradherley's Coach and in his series of illustrations called Hidotenashi no Koi (The Love of the Brute).
  • Craig Schaefer's Daniel Faust series is positively laden with BDSM imagery, and a notable number of the protagonists are sexually dominant women.
  • Tim Schafer really likes Cool cars, as seen in Full Throttle, Grim Fandango, and Brütal Legend.
  • Dan Schneider apparently likes the sound of people shouting at each other in unison, which has appeared in his shows as early as Drake & Josh.
    • Also has a blatant foot fetish. Every show he's ever made will include at least one, if not multiple, scenes with a lot of feet shots.
    • Karma Houdinis (usually by a young woman) and Comedic Sociopathy.
  • All the Peanuts characters hated coconut because Charles Schulz hated it.
  • Joel Schumacher and naked statues.
  • Nicola Scott really likes drawing nice butts on people, which she isn't shy to admitting, having herself dubbed New 52 Jay Garrick's butt the "Shiny Butt". One of her most famous drawings is one of Nightwing, who is the God of the Nice Ass. Scott admits to having drawn the butt first. Not many mind the eyecandy though, since at least both genders get it.
  • Nearly every RP that Serris posts in, especially Darwin's Soldiers and the Insane Cafe Series, will feature lots of gunplay, violence and action.
  • Animation blogger and playwright Unshaved Mouse (Neil Sharpson)s a massive geek about cartoons and comic books, and regularly lampshades his own tendency to cram in Franchise/Batman jokes everywhere he gets the chance.
    • He's also a fan of Columbo, and though the good lieutenant has only appeared in two reviews, he's one of the blog's most fondly-remembered in-jokes.
    • Parodied with Cleo the goldfish from Pinocchio; Mouse's supposed attraction to cartoon fish is a running joke on the blog.
  • Hentai artist Don Shigeru likes drawing women with large... guns.
  • Makoto Shinkai seems to love the sight of young women without shoes on. (Then again, a couple times it's used constructively to implicitly convey two characters being emotionally and physically comfortable with one another.) And his 2013 project, The Garden Of Words, is about a shoemaker and the Love Interest he's making shoes for; she has several feet shots in the trailer. If that doesn't prove this thesis, nothing will.
  • Dan Shive and his Web Comic El Goonish Shive.
    • Transformation and transgender, though often for humorous purposes, and with much more Lampshade Hanging.
    • Ellen went through her entire introductory arc while wearing a suit and tie, due to Dan's self admitted fetish for women in men's clothing. (Although Ellen had other justified reasons as to why she'd wear men's clothing.)
  • Just try to find an Andy Sidaris film that doesn't include babes with big guns - both types.
  • Tom Siddell, creator of Gunnerkrigg Court, is a fan of Yuri manga, and themes of it crop up from time to time in his comic. Zimmy and Gamma depend on each other to get by each day, as well as main character Kat going through sexuality confusion after being mistaken for it. Zimmy and Gamma were originally part of another comic Tom was going to do before he started Gunnerkrigg Court, and he has stated he would still like to do it someday after Gunnerkrigg ends.
    • Siddell also seems to like spiders, between Jack's spider motif, the Whitelegs spirits that possess him, and his own self-depictions invariably featuring spiders. Confirmed in his Tumblr here.
  • Dan Simmons invariably has some of his character end up having sex in extremely strange places. Including space.
    • And then, there is the relationship between Fedmahn Kassad and Moneta/Rachel: you would think that a love story between a Palestinian and a Jewish girl would be cute, but Simon managed to make this horrifying: they are both turned on by bloodshed, only have sex during violent battles (sometimes but rarely just before a battle starts), and a lengthy scene describes them losing it to their lust just after a slaughter they caused when you see the girl transforming into a Shrike: a monstrous bio weapon...the author might have been trying to make a point with this one, but the direct result is nightmares.
  • Give Walt Simonson the opportunity to insert a dinosaur in a story and he will take it. His distinctive signature (with the big 'O') is actually supposed to be shaped like an Apatosaurus (or Brontosaurus).
    • Simonson has demonstrated an interest in Norse Mythology even before his run on Thor. In Batman #312 (June '79), "A Caper a Day Keeps the Batman At Bay", the Calendar Man, running a series of crimes based on the days of the week, dressed as a modified version of Odin for his Wednesday crime, riding an eight-wheeled stunt vehicle (after Odin's eight-legged horse Sleipnir), and wearing an eyepatch that concealed a heat beam (after the myth that Odin allowed crows to peck out his eye while he was strapped to Yggdrasil in exchange for knowledge of Ragnarok). When it comes to Norse mythology, Simonson has truly Shown His Work.
  • Slave.In.Utero, the anonymous author of Tower of God, has a strange liking for water. This reaches from the Functional Magic, that works over Phlebotinum that has gaseous to aqueous properties and replaces air, over the "magicians" that are commonly known as Wave Controllers, over animals that are designed in fashion of aquatic beings (most notably eels and sea slugs) to the metaphorsnote , nicknamesnote  and sobriquetsnote  the characters use. Shinsoo and Shinheu, referring to the phlebotinum and the fauna of the tower as a whole, both contain the character for water.
  • Kevin Smith seems to have a thing for Catholic school girls. First was Trish "The Dish" in Mallrats, then the fact that Chasing Amy was originally penned to be set in high school, then his Author Avatar Randal espousing the advantages of having sex with "barely legal pussy" (They even like it when you go ass to mouth!) and flirting with a pair of schoolgirls in Clerks II.
    • All the oral sex references (cunnilingus, specifically) are Author Appeal as well. His podcast and live Q&A's discuss this at length.
  • The heroines in Wilbur Smith novels never shave their armpits and the text is always at pains to draw attention to their underarm hair. Though in his defense, hairy armpits are historically correct for his Courtenay and Ballantyne series. Western women didn't shave until the early 20th century, and not just because short razors that could safely shave the hollow of the armpit hadn't been invented yet: missing body hair was a sign that the woman had recently been treated with mercury for a venereal disease. His Egyptian series is more complicated, given that some women, mainly great ladies and members of the Pharaoh's harem, always had their body hair removed by tweezing, while poorer women never removed body hair, both because it never occurred to them to do so and because even if it had, they didn't have the time to remove hair or the money for a pair of tweezers. Whether the attention paid to the hair is sexual in nature is another question entirely, one that only Wilbur could answer.
  • Zack Snyder seems to have a fondness for slowmo fights and more uncomfortably, rape. Sucker Punch, Watchmen, 300 and his upcoming project Army of the Dead have all featured men (or in Army of the Dead’s case zombies) raping women. And while most of these have been adaptations of preexisting comic books, one might start to wonder...
  • Zilpha Keatley Snyder is very fond of the Big Fancy House. Her books are guaranteed to have Maybe Magic, Maybe Mundane situations, often a Wise Beyond Their Years toddler (who might possibly be a Child Mage) and often an Esoteric Happy Ending with An Aesop about sharing, generosity and reaching out to other people. Two of her strongest books have Not Evil, Just Misunderstood characters. Her recurring small, dark, beautiful and otherworldly characters are based on a close childhood friend — Ponyboy in Season of Ponies, Ivy Carson in The Changeling and Teera Eld in the Green-Sky Trilogy. Her favorite word is "amazing". And nearly all her stories take place in Northern California.
  • Starting with Sally Kimball in the Encyclopedia Brown series, Donald J. Sobol seems fascinated by women who can beat up men in some of his other works (e.g. Angie's First Case).
  • Gunsmith Cats would seem to be born in large part out of creator Kenichi Sonoda's preoccupation with barely legal girls and highly detailed firearms and automotives; he actually admitted in one interview that every female character in the manga traces back to one or another of his private obsessions (short girls, dark-skinned girls, girls with glasses, etc. etc. etc.).
    • Lampshaded by the characters themselves - In one of the early stories, Rally sighs in satisfaction after a session on the target range, and Minnie May *ahem*observes how shooting stimulates her. Later, Minnie May indulges in her fetish for explosives and lets out a similar sigh of satisfaction. Rally takes this opportunity to give her a taste of her own medicine and comments, "ooh, they're like little rocks!"
    • Likewise from the same creator, Cannon God Exaxxion.
  • Kent J. Starrett is known for bizarre monsters, Black Comedy Cannibalism, Teenage Wasteland settings and high Color Contrast and Creepy Cute creatures in his artwork.
  • R. L. Stine, author of the Goosebumps series, has a number of characters including a few protagonists who wear Oakland/Los Angeles Raiders hats. Often they specify that they don't actually like the Raiders or even football in general, they just like the team colors (black and silver).
  • Alternate history and science fiction writer S.M. Stirling seems to a liking towards blonde lesbian or bisexual female characters - see Swindapa from his Island in the Sea of Time series and everyone in the Domination of Draka. There's a reason his fanbase calls him S&M Stirling.
  • Trey Parker and Matt Stone of South Park fame seem to have a fascination with retarded people, who feature prominently in most of their works, often quite sympathetically. They also seem to find the concept of characters with exaggerated accents who slur words together (i.e., "they tookerjaarbs!") quite hilarious, probably as a result of doing so many voices themselves.
    • Also, ball-sucking. Quite a bit of ball-sucking gets mentioned, mainly in South Park but also in, for example, Team America's lyrics. Even the single from South Park's soundtrack album centres around Chocolate Salty Balls that listeners are advised to suck.
    • Broadway-style musical numbers have been a longtime obsession as well, dating back to Cannibal The Musical. South Park has long featured far more elaborate musical numbers than might be expected, given the adult-focus, and the South Park film raised some eyebrows for being a musical. The Book of Mormon was thus basically inevitable. (Mormons, incidentally, seem to be another particular fascination of the two.)
  • Suda51 really loves Luchadors.
    • He's also big on motels and hotels: see the Flower, Sun and Rain Hotel, the Union Hotel in Killer7, or Motel No More Heroes.
    • For some inexplicable reason, he seems really fascinated with decapitation. Suda's games frequently feature characters who are disembodied heads (like Susie from Killer7 and Johnson from Shadows of the Damned), or characters who get decapitated and somehow manage to survive it (like Skelter Helter and Nick). Lord knows why.
  • About two thirds of Suzuki Nakaba's characters are from Arthurian Mythology, albeit tweaked a little to fit a Lighter and Softer shonen setting. The Seven Deadly Sins is basically: "Knights of the Round Table: The Prequel", following the (named but undetailed) parents of knights such as Tristan and Lancelot.
    • Another notable trait of Nakaba's work is the proportion of romantic relationships that involve...uh...size differences.
  • Stephen Sommers seems to have a weakness for people getting swallowed by quicksand or quicksand equivalents - witness Harley in Rudyard Kipling's The Jungle Book, the pilot in The Mummy (1999), the men who get stomped under the surface by a pygmy in The Mummy Returns, and the shifting sand that takes out two of the Mooks in The Scorpion King ("Stay on the rocks!").
  • Kaia Sønderby loves parrots, so the protagonist of her Xandri Corelel series owns two parrots, and in the first book meets a race of aliens called Psittacans that closely resemble giant parrots.
  • Robin Staps loves oceanography and is a scuba diver. It figures that he would form a band called The Ocean and make an entire concept album about diving into it.
  • Noelle Stevenson is a big fan of Foe Romance Subtext as her favorite kind of romance. Many of her works include these between a main character and a main antagonist. In Nimona, this is the case between Goldenloin and Blackheart which turn out to be exes, and is repeated in the strong romantic undertones of the fights between Catra and Adora in She-Ra and the Princesses of Power.
  • If Babylon 5 is an indicator, J. Michael Straczynski gives fathers a greater role than mothers. Several characters stated that they grew up in Missing Mom situations. Other main characters tell stories relating to their fathers that had a profound affect on them. When three characters who had a parent appeared on screen at various times, it was their father in all cases, even when it was stated their mother was still alive. Only one character's backstory had their mother as a significant part and she still ended up a Missing Mom due to suicide.
  • The varied art galleries of bisexual artist Suechan tend to be heavy on furries (especially catgirls), a blend of homoerotic and heteroerotic art, comic book characters, '80s cartoons and the PCs from assorted Tabletop Games. Also, for the purest example of this trope, there's a separate, hidden section of her webpage dedicated to hypnofetishism here.
  • Ken Sugimori, the lead art designer of Pokémon, seems to have a thing for Hartman Hips, as can be seen in the designs of Whitney, Clair, Ariana, May, Olivia, and pretty much every female character in Generation V.
    • Even male characters aren't exempt from this—Will, Marlon, and all three of the Striaton triplets are drawn with noticeably curvier hips than other male characters.
  • In Tokyo Ghoul, creator Ishida Sui seems to have a fondness for quite a few things:
    • Literary references up the wazoo, in particular the works of Franz Kafka.
    • Badass Bookworms. A good percentage of the strongest characters are extremely fond of reading, and don't look like they could reduce you into a fine paste.
    • Body modification. Not only is there tattooed-covered and pierced Uta, but Juuzou is fond of Body Stitching and discusses it cheerfully with others. It's rumored that Ishida Sui is a former tattoo artist.
    • Mysterious, deadly characters turning out to be women. In fact, he seems very fond of complex and terrifying women.
  • Wrestling booker Kevin Sullivan: Sdrawkcab Namesnote , Hollywood Satanism, Bathroom Brawls, Wrestling Monsters, Garbage Wrestling, King Curtis Iaukea, Facial Markings
  • It's probably a stretch to say Kurt Sutter is obsessed with asses, but there definitely seems to be an atypical amount of butt shots on Sons of Anarchy. There are more than a couple of shots (sometimes per episode) where the camera pans down (one would think) specifically for the purpose of getting a butt in frame, and he does seem to enjoy putting women in thongs. It's also equal opportunity, there's no shortage of man ass, as well. Sutter's wife, Katey Sagal (who plays Gemma) is no slouch in the "T" area but it's the sight of her "A" that gives Half-Sack the Prospect a "MILF chubbie."
  • John Swartzwelder, a writer on The Simpsons, is a massive Preston Sturges fan and because of that has an accompanying love for hobos, who he has used as a source of humor in a number of episodes he has written.
  • Hungarian director Istvan Szabo has made several movies focusing on artists collaborating with oppressive governments, notably Mephisto and Taking Sides. Which became Harsher in Hindsight when revealed that Szabo worked as an informant for Hungary's Communist government after the 1956 revolution.

  • Satoshi Tajiri, the creator of Pokémon, loved collecting insects as a child, much like how the player's character collects many different Pokemon. In addition, Tajiri has Asperger Syndrome, a common characteristic of which is a fondness for collecting objects, from coins to model trains and, yes, insects and virtual monsters.
  • Kazuki Takahashi, the creator of Yu-Gi-Oh!, likes drawing weird hairstyles and unique monsters.
  • Rumiko Takahashi loves to have couples that do nothing but bicker and argue yet are obviously in love with each other. She also likes to have fun with perverted old men...as well as a particular sign gag.
    • Like the dude below, she also loves her characters to be barefoot, open to any gender.
  • Tetsuya Takahashi, head of Monolith Soft. Just seems to love a good Jigsaw Puzzle Plot with a passion. Wanna a proof? He's the creator of Xenogears, the Xenosaga trilogy and Xenoblade Chronicles. Arguably the three most convoluted plots in the entire J-RPG genre.
    • His obvious appeal for Humongous Mecha. Is there a single game written by him that DOESN'T feature them, one way or another?
    • All games in the Xeno series have at least one Robot Girl. Xenogears has Emeralda, Xenosaga has KOS-MOS and T-elos (as well as MOMO), and Xenoblade Chronicles has Fiora.
  • Natsuki Takaya seems to draw only Bishounen, Bishoujo or characters who look better than average, unless they are old. And most of them are barefoot in houses. It's hard to find a male character wearing socks, except Momiji.
  • Naoko Takeuchi has a big thing for white-haired Bishonens, made prevalent in that every single story arc of Sailor Moon has one. And much like husband Yoshihiro Togashi, she also has an interest in LGBT characters, as well as characters who like to crossdress.
    • She is also a huge fan of modern fashion, especially shoes. Not only does every single character, even minor civilians, sport a unique and detailed outfit, but the shoes are often the most striking feature. This is most notable with the Sailor Senshi themselves, whose Combat Stilettos are the most distinctive parts of their uniform.
    • Other hobbies of hers that have greatly influenced her work include jewelry (almost every villain in Sailor Moon is named after a gemstone), Cool Cars (Haruka/Sailor Uranus has one), and, most importantly, astronomy (she joined a club for it in school, thus starting her fascination with space).
  • Quentin Tarantino:
    • He really likes women's feet, and openly admits to having a foot fetish (to the point of writing a scene where he could drink bourbon from Salma Hayek's foot in From Dusk Till Dawn).
    • He wears his various artistic influences on his sleeve and is very open about being inspired/lifting sequences from other films he enjoys.
    • He loves culture from the 1970s, including music, television, films and even obscure aspects of pop culture, such as the now-defunct Frute Brute cereal.
    • His works have a large number of interracial relationships, usually a white man and a black woman.
    • Most of his films (when period-appropriate) include a reference to classic comic book heroes.
  • Author Donna Tartt seems to like having her ostensibly straight male protagonists experiment with gay sex. Also, complicated, dysfunctional family dynamics, particularly among the wealthy, and heavy drug and alcohol use.
  • Frank Tashlin was a leg man. Kinda paradoxical given the statuesque busts of his female stars (Jane Russell, Jayne Mansfield).
  • Team Ninja and the physics behind a lady's upper half (almost always DD). Case in point: DOA Extreme Beach Volleyball.
    • They worked on Metroid: Other M, starring Samus. It came out about how you would guess.
  • Paul Taylor of Wapsi Square has a thing for big and/or strong, sexually aggressive women. All male/female relationships shown have the female as the more powerful or aggressive partner. This sounds like the author talking...
  • Every one of Craig Thompson's major works so far has featured a main couple snuggling in bed frequently. Sound innocuous? It's not. You can tell from the presentation that the guy is obsessed with this. Goodbye Chunky Rice features a turtle and a rat sharing a bed more than once, Blankets was inspired by the feeling of sharing a bed with someone for the first time and follows through, and the unreleased Haibibi is apparently going to show a lot of this as well.
    • Also, a subversion of this occurs with traumatizing childhood sexual experiences being featured or mentioned often. (Which apparently stems from the artist and his little brother being raped by a baby sitter.)
  • Bruce Timm really, really likes the idea of Bruce Wayne and Barbara Gordon in a relationship. It was heavily implied in Batman: The Animated Series, and he added it into his adaption of "The Killing Joke''. Fan reception has been... less than positive, but he maintains that it's always been an attraction has always been a part of their relationship (he's referencing the campy Adam West show in that regard).
  • Yoshihiro Togashi, author of Yu Yu Hakusho and Hunter × Hunter, has stated in the first volume of the YYH manga that he has an interest in gay and bisexual men, Transvestites and Transgender women. He even has an unpublished series, Trouble Quartet, about a team of crossdressing homosexual soccer players. Shueisha refused to publish it.
  • J. R. R. Tolkien was very fond of trees/forests, fictional languages, Norse mythology, and lengthy songs and poems transcribed in their entirety, to name a few.
    • Not to mention that most of the storylines are either retellings of his favorite legends, or blatant wish-fulfillment. The Children of Húrin, is a retelling of a story from the Kalevala. He took the names of the dwarves in The Hobbit from the Eddas (and also the name Gandalf). These were easily his two favorite collections of mythology. The B-plot in The Lord of the Rings involves Arwen and Aragorn convincing Elrond to let them get married. This was inspired by Tolkien's actual life. When he was a teenager Tolkien's mother died leaving him in the care of a priest who had served as her guardian in the last years of her life. This priest did not approve of young Tolkien's girlfriend, probably because her family was not Catholic. Although he tried many times to persuade his guardian that she was a good choice, he couldn't. He had to wait until he was 21 to marry her, which meant deploying to the Somme single. Of course, that might be why he survived (he described himself as at best, a mediocre soldier: the Somme had one of the highest death tolls out of any battle in WWI). He did marry his teenage sweetheart: but it always annoyed him that he'd never gotten his guardian's permission (because Tolkien was very much a [1]). Arwen and Aragorn do manage to convince Elrond that their marriage would be a good idea through being heroic: but this is of course also because Elrond isn't a bigot. Not that any of this makes the stories worse.
  • There was just something strange going on with Lily Borjarno's hot cocoa-drinking scene late in ∀ Gundam, specifically how one of the militia soldiers reacts to her "cute pink tongue".
    • Speaking of Gundam, when reading Yoshiyuki Tomino's Mobile Suit Gundam novels, you get the feeling he has a thing for chubby girls. It's very restrained, but there are a few telltale signs. The first time we see Mirai Yashima in the second book it's pointed out she gained some weight since her last appearance. Then there's the novel exclusive character Margaret Blair, who's lovingly described as being very cute and plump. She even becomes Char's girlfriend and he absolutely adores her and decides he wants to start a family with her after the war. This seems somewhat out of character for Char, as every other woman he's been involved with was rather petite.
      • This can also be seen in reverse with Lady of War Kycillia Zabi. She is meant to be somewhat unattractive, which is accomplished by emphasizing how unnaturally thin she is, with a sharp, angular face, prominent cheekbones and relatively flat chest (in an era where the typical Japanese standard of beauty favoured busty, caucasian-looking women rather than the current moe craze).
    • Tomino really likes the 'moon-over-earth-over-sun' from 2001: A Space Odyssey, including a visual homage to it in most of his Gundam series' openings.
    • Tomino seems to have a thing for Ambiguously Brown or black people starting with Turn A gundam as in most of his productions after that, there's usually one or two cases popping up.
  • Akira Toriyama:
    • He likes spiky, crazy Anime Hair and unique vehicles.
    • He also seems to like blondes, shown in the Super Saiyan hair colour in Dragon Ball Z, and characters like Lunch and Android 18.
    • Inverted with Frieza who is an amalgamation of everything Toriyama found frightening as a child.
    • He appears to have a fondness for dinosaurs. Not only do they pop up frequently in Dragon Ball proper, they show up in his series-related art (like book covers and chapter title pages).
    • Similar to the above, a lot of title page artwork as well as in-story vehicles often have a WWII flavour, as Toriyama likes to build models in his spare time.
  • Yui Toshiki, creator of Boku no Futatsu no Tsubasa, has some considerable knowledge of gaffs and padding in crossdressing. This shows up again with another work, called My Doll House where the main character is a part time crossdresser. Let's just say it's very obvious this was written by the same author, as some of the other kinks are there too.
  • Touhou, a game featuring Loads and Loads of Characters, has an almost entirely female cast. Word of God says there are just as many men as women in Gensokyo, it's just that apparently, no man ever feels like doing anything in a game where girls fight for no reason besides boredom, or has no superpowers to compete with the girl's Superpower Lottery superpowers, or is a turtle or cloud. Since all romance must, by default, be lesbian (with the rare exception of Rinnosuke, who almost always is paired with Marisa), naturally, the fan catchphrase is "Everyone is gay in Gensokyo".
    • The series creator, ZUN, isn't a very good artist, and his male characters are all either non-humanoid or don't appear in the games themselves; on his part, Gensokyo's unbalanced population might be less rooted in Author Appeal than the limits of his abilities. More directly, though, he's notorious to the point of Memetic Mutation for his love of alcohol, which might explain why every Touhou character seems willing to drink at the drop of a hat, even though the human ones sure don't look of age. There's even one who has never been seen sober.
    • There's also the hats and copious amounts of frills.
    • Pop-culture and science jokes are also incredibly abundant.
  • Karen Traviss and warriors. She is very very fond of badass characters who are either in the military or in paramilitary organizations, especially when not only are they elite, but they also get some degree of autonomy to go wreck things on their own. She goes on Author Tracts about the nobility of warriors and the military. She also has a burning hatred for noncombatants who nevertheless have an impact on war, such as scientists, senior officers, and such.
    • And the rest of the EU burns while the Queen Fandalorian fiddles...
    • Her treatment of the characters in Halo: Glasslands. Look at the page and you'll get the point.
  • Peter Tremayne's Sister Fidelma mysteries go into loving detail about the laws, religion and society of 7th-century Ireland — understandable as Tremayne is historian Peter Beresford Ellis, who has written much nonfiction about Fidelma's world and is basically using his fiction to explain his research to the general public. He is particularly interested in the progressive elements of Irish society, like its enlightened view of women's rights.
  • Harry Turtledove's Darkness Series features the country of Zuwayza, whose inhabitants are all black nudists. He also points out quite a few times how in Algarve circumcision is mandatory.
    • The latter part may have been an inversion based on the fact that the Algarvians play the role of Nazis.
    • Also, nudism does not normally appear in Harry Turtledove novels; the Zuwayzi are more or less the only example. Now, there are other things, like groin attacks, that he features far more often...
    • Turtledove also has a tendency to describe his sex scenes in loving, lavish, lurid detail. Sometimes. Sometimes not. Also, Every Inch A King? The main character and his buddy, Max (currently going under the name "Captain Yildrim=Captain Thunderbolt") share a harem. The sex isn't too lurid, but the harem is described as ridiculously happy with the situation.
      • When describing his characters en flagrante, Turtledove seems particularly fond of "doggie-style" sex — it makes for "slow, lazy love" as he tells us in several different series.
    • His Fox series has Gerin and Van sharing a woman (not at the same time, they roll dice for the privilege). Eventually the wanton wishbone becomes exclusive to Van (not faithfully, she just doesn't sleep with the Fox anymore) and Gerin the Fox gets a more conventionally exclusive love interest.
  • Director Tom Tykwer of Run Lola Run fame has an admitted Charlie Brown-esque preference for redheads, as demonstrated by the eponymous Lola and the characters of The Plum Girl and Laura in his film adaptation of Perfume: The Story of a Murderer, though the latter two were mentioned to have red hair in the novel as well.

  • Albert Uderzo, artist of Asterix, created the character of Obelix entirely because Uderzo loves drawing huge, burly warriors best. When Goscinny wouldn't let him draw Asterix as one, insisting on having him be a tiny, slight Guile Hero, Uderzo insisted that he needed a friend who was a big burly warrior, and Goscinny reluctantly agreed. Probably because of this reluctance, Obelix does nothing in the first album except allow Asterix to explain things to him, but his role was expanded upon in the next volume and he became arguably the most fleshed-out character in the comic.
    • Uderzo also enjoys drawing beautiful Statuesque Stunner women. Often when he draws characters who look like this, he lapses into a more photorealistic style for his own amusement.
  • Makoto Uno loves extremely curvaceous women. All of the series that's he's done the original character design for such as Dragonaut, Witchblade, Gravion feature women with huge breasts and extremely wide hips. No surprise that he's frequently collaborated with Hiraku Kaneko. At one point he had plans for series centering around women with curvaceous builds called Mama paradise but it never came to fruition.

  • The Wachowskis
    • LGBT themes and subtext, some more overt than others. Notably, the character of Switch in The Matrix was originally going to change sex when inside the matrix. Both siblings now live as transgender women.
    • Lana Wachowski]] has a good reason why every good character in The Matrix films loves to wear leather.
  • Yashiro Wada is the creator of Harvest Moon/Story of Seasons, Hometown Story, and Little Dragons Cafe. From the looks of his games, he enjoys peaceful Slice of Life works set in small towns with heavy themes of helping people and befriending people. He's also fond of cooking, farming, fishing, and animal husbandry.
  • Canadian cartoonist/fantasy artist Style Wager has admitted to be fond of short (but full-bodied) girls, which explains the large number of goblins, halflings, gnomes, dwarfs and anthropomorphic rodents that can be found in his works. Judging from his art, he might also have a weak spot for girls with glasses.
  • Honmyou Wakou did a pervy (but not quiiiite pornographic) work called Nozoki Ana ("A Peephole"), which was about a guy being roped into alternating days of voyeurism and exhibitionism by his classmate, a young woman. There was more to it, and it was all well in line with the current trend to take Hentai plot devices and clean them up for romantic comedies...until he started publishing Nozomi To Kimio ("Nozomi and Kimio", although Nozomi's name is a pun on peeping), which is about...a guy being roped into alternating days of voyeurism and exhibitionism by his classmate, a young woman. Well then.
  • Doug Walker freely admits to being a "masochist manwhore", and submission turns up quite a bit in his four main characters; Ask That Guy (despite being a rapist murderer) gleefully admits to loving going down on anyone and anything, Critic is an Amazon Chaser who wanted the women prisoners in Chicago to snuff him, Donnie is the epitome of Really Gets Around who starts off thinking a gun to his head is a gift given as a make-up-gift by his friends, and poor downtrodden bum Chester gets exploited sexually.
    • In his short-lived show Demo Reel, Badass Adorable ditz Rebecca Stone seems to coincidentally have a gun in her hands for every episode.
    • Doug also has a fascination with Batman. He discussed the films and animated series in overly detail, named Batman his second favorite fictional character of all time and in many sketches you see him dressing up like Batman.
    • He was always good giving fanservice to the LGBT Fanbase, but To Boldly Flee and Demo Reel crammed so much Homoerotic Subtext in that Critic's jerkass amnesiac personality called Doug gay slurs for both of them.
    • Man is very proud of his crotch (in a rare non threatening way, fans even got to take pictures in a Anime Milwaukee 2011 panel), and you'll get to see plenty of it, whether it's him spreading his legs for anyone or groin attacks. Sometimes this is a good thing, other times not so much.
  • David Foster Wallace seems to have a thing for large women. Not overweight, just tall and substantial. From Infinite Jest there's Avril and the USS Millicent Kent, and there's also the artist's wife from the short story "The Suffering Channel."
  • Adam Warren's love of tying up girls with plentiful backsides is nowhere clearer than his comic Empowered.
    • Possibly an Inversion, as Emp and the other characters began as commissioned porn. Warren decided to write them into actual characters and so effectively, the plot is the Author Appeal.
    • His earlier works showed a fondness for transhumanism, cyberpunk, and exotic biotechnology.
  • Hiroshi Watanabe, the author of Hell Girl, seems to have a fondness for dogs. Many of the people who get sent to hell over the course of the series are dog-kicking sons of bitches.
  • Sarah Waters seems very fond of delicately-built blonde women: a lot of the love interests in her earlier works fit that description. Furthermore, redheads only ever seem to show up as background characters and usually have a pretty miserable time of it.
  • Bill Watterson of Calvin and Hobbes:
    • He seems to have a thing for women with shortish brown hair. He has admitted that he designed Susie Derkins' design on the type of woman that he found attractive (or rather, what they must have been like as kids), and Calvin's Mom isn't much different. It's not a coincidence that they're the love interests of the characters Watterson himself most identifies with (Calvin and Hobbes for Susie, Calvin's Dad for Calvin's Mom.)
    • His environmentalist messages, dislike of the consumer culture, and support artistic integrity (admittedly while he was having to keep his syndicate from licensing the strip for merchandise) got quite heavy-handed at times.
  • It's quite a bit more subtle than the polygamy thing or the eternal youth thing in his books (plus the giant penis-shaped starships), but David Weber's thing for petite frequently-pregnant women is worthy of comment. While most of the pregnancies occur offscreen, Katherine Mayhew and Allison Harrington in Honor Harrington have eight to eleven pregnancies and eight live births between the two of them. There's never any discussion of the difficulties this would have on a woman of small size, just comments about how beautiful/elegant they are and how impressive it is that they're into natural pregnancy (given that his wife appears to be significantly smaller than him, and they have three children, this may be a personal fondness)...
    • He also seems to have an odd need for Hold Your Hippogriffs expressions, replacing perfectly serviceable cliches with their IN SPACE equivalents for no good reason. This is exclusive to Weber's work on the series; on the novels written or co-written by others, no "hippogriffs" are usually in sight.
    • So far almost every star nationnote  in the Honorverse firmly supports and uses the death penalty where it comes up, while more specifically, the method of execution is hanging. No character or government, not even from the quarters you'd expect, is shown to question or oppose it.
    • His support of laissez-faire capitalism vs. socialism is also quite obvious.
    • In both the Honorverse and Safehold series, baseball has spread to the stars and pages of prose are dedicated to the sport.
  • Margaret Weis tends to make sure her books emphasize the need for the characters to embrace the God (or gods) of the setting. At least one of her series even had the most evil characters be explicitly atheist.
  • TL Welker's Heartcore is rife with fanservice and author appeal, in particular, women who are quite shapely, just to name the biggest one.
  • Florence Welch of Florence + the Machine loves the idea of drowning, which appears in many of her songs, like "Swimming", "What the Water Gave Me", "Never Let Me Go", and so on.
  • Joss Whedon, listed by theme:
    • The man seems (virtually by his own admission) incapable of writing anything that doesn't feature at least one short-statured, petitely-built, very young woman/teenage girl with some angsty emotional issues or even sanity problems who can kick the living crap out of people three times her size for one reason or another. If they're not the main character, they'll at least be a prominent supporting role.
      • Kitty Pryde of X-Men was a Buffy-esque young student teachernote  seemingly just to fit this appeal. He also introduced Armor, a young Japanese-American girl who acted as a foil/partner to Wolverine, just like Kitty used to.
      • In interviews about his (later abandoned) Wonder Woman film project that the title character would "obviously have to be quite young", in bizarre dissonance with every depiction of the famous Wonder WOMAN character ever seen.
      • For Toy Story he proposed the very Whedonesque idea of featuring Barbie as an Action Girl who would have been, in his own words, "T2's Sarah Connor in a pink convertible." Mattel, the company which owns Barbie, thought the film would bomb and wouldn't give them the rights. (Mattel changed their minds about that by the time Toy Story 2 rolled around.) Toy Story 3 featured Barbie in a fairly competent role.
      • The Avengers has Black Widow in a starring role, who was actually introduced in Iron Man 2, Waif-Fu and all. She gets some significant character development now that she's a main character. And if that weren't enough, we have Cobie Smulders as Black Widow's SHIELD colleague Maria Hill.
    • His shows would suggest a fetish for women tying up men in bed. Used by both Buffy in Buffy the Vampire Slayer and many of Echo's imprints in Dollhouse.
    • In addition, he seems to have a thing about incredibly skinny young women who've been driven mad by horrible suffering but are still kind-of hot.
      • Drusilla was tortured to madness by Angelus.
      • Fred was traumatized and broken after being held as a slave to demons in a hell dimension.
      • River was sent to a government-sponsored academy that cut into her brain and ravaged her mind to try to turn her into a weapon.
      • He even singled-out a dead X-Men character who fit the pattern to reappear in a hallucination, even though she'd appeared on about one page in a previous writer's comic and been immediately killed. (Negasonic Teenage Warhead.)
    • He also gets criticized sometimes for his portrayal of lesbians and bisexual women being an author fantasy. He always sticks to the straight male fantasy of the Lipstick Lesbian. Surely there are abnormally attractive butch lesbians out there, but he always stops just short of it. Willow, who assumes a sort of male gender pose in season six (with respect to traditional lesbian gender roles in fiction, especially if you count Tara as a Woman in the Refrigerator), still has an essentially feminine presentation. She even lampshades this in "Once More, With Feeling". This could be more about everyone on his shows usually being abnormally attractive anyway.
    • Whedon's also been accused of having a foot fetish.
      • In Firefly River was seen barefoot quite often, complete with lingering close-up shots of them.note 
      • In Firefly there is an episode where a barefoot Kaylee even playfully pushes one against Simon's cheek. The same thing happens in Heart of Gold between a prostitute and Jayne.
      • Once Fred joins the cast of Angel she always seems to be wearing thong sandals that leave practically her whole foot exposed. And in "Conviction", the first episode of Season Five, which Whedon himself directed, there's a scene in which the opening group shot is blatantly centered on and composed around Fred's bare feet put up on a stool or table.
      • In Shiny Happy People when the newly-born (but adult) Jasmine walks around in the nude, with the shot lingering quite a while on Gina Torres's admittedly well-formed feet.
      • Dollhouse also did this quite a lot, what with the dolls wandering around barefoot all the time.
      • There's even a couple of lingering shots of feet in The Cabin in the Woods, although the feet are in shoes at the time.
      • The Avengers has a lingering close-up shot of Black Widow's feet in flimsy stockings at the end of her introductory fight scene, and very soon afterwards there's a scene between Tony Stark and Pepper Potts in which Pepper is barefoot throughout. That may be justified; unlike every other scene in the Marvel universe featuring her up until that point, she's actually relaxed and out of business wear. Also, she's an inch taller than Robert Downey Jr., even out of heels. When she's seen again at the end of the film, in the same room, she wears ballet flats.
      • In his film version of Much Ado About Nothing the Sexposition scene between Don John and Conrade features a lot of focus on her bare feet, with John deliberately caressing them at one point.
    • He also seems to have a love of mind-control plots, especially human programming. It's hard to tell if it's more of a theme or a kink, but Dollhouse sometimes felt like a TV show designed to explore the ramifications of the fetish.
    • He seems to have an anti-appeal for tattoos and piercings. Almost every time a character in a Whedon work has a tattoo, piercing or other body modification, that character will be a villain, a reformed villain, or extremely self-destructive and unstable. The only exceptions are Cordelia (Charisma Carpenter's real lower-back tattoo, which they managed to cover up throughout Buffy, but gave up on in Angel) and Kennedy.
    • Joss also loves Angst. By the bucketload. To the point where it's virtually Word of God that he loves torturing his characters, actors and fans.
    • He seems particularly fond of writing characters with abusive, neglectful, or otherwise lousy parents, usually fathers:
      • Buffy's father is a deadbeat who left her mother to raise her.
      • Xander's father is alcoholic and physically abusive.
      • Tara's father is a Straw Misogynist who went so far as to lie to her about women in their family being part demon in order to make them obedient.
      • Willow's mother is absent, and more interested in her flights of fancy than her daughter.
      • Wesley's father is overbearing and unappreciative of Wesley, causing Wesley to have some deep insecurities.
      • Angel's father, while not as extreme, behaved similarly.
      • In the Angel episode "Guise Will be Guise" a wealthy man is keeping his daughter celibate to be a Virgin Sacrifice to a demon.
      • In another Angel episode, "Untouched", a girl with telekinetic powers (see above) is found to have been sexually abused by her father.
      • Lorne's parents lament that they "ate the wrong child."
      • Robin's father is absent and his mother is shown to be so devoted to her duty as the Slayer she does not think about Robin, and gets herself killed in a fight, leaving him as an orphan, although she's portrayed far more sympathetically than the other examples.
      • Connor was raised and manipulated by Holtz to be a hate-filled tool for revenge. He has some problems, to say the least.
      • And then there's Simon and River's parents from Firefly, who seemed more concerned about their status than about their daughter, and wouldn't believe Simon about what River was going through in the Academy.
  • Mason "Tailsteak" Williams seems to love blowing up any concept of "normal" sexuality or sexual behavior:
    • Max, one of the main characters of Leftover Soup, is happily pansexual and involved in a five-way relationship. All her friends, even the devout and virginal Christian, have accepted this.
    • The future of the scifi comic Forward has erased the concept of the gender binary. Thanks to social change and the increasingly trivial availability of cosmetic surgery, everyone is "they" and their gender expression is whatever they please. (The protagonist, Lee, doesn't even appear to know that gender-specific pronouns were ever a thing, although Lee is not exactly well-educated.) It's also implied (though not yet confirmed as of Comic 56) that there's no such thing as "indecent exposure" anymore.
    • And don't get Tailsteak started, in or out of his comics, on people who disrespect sex workers or (safely managed) sex work.
  • Tennessee Williams, mid-1900s gay playwright and author of A Streetcar Named Desire had a thing for writing passionate, gorgeous Bishōnen leading men in their mid to late twenties, and, if possible, naked from the waist up (he included a bedroom in a suspiciously high number of his plays where it was very convenient for them to be half-naked). He would write a half-page paragraph describing everything from how they moved to what they were dressed in, while giving the women about one sentence description (i.e. the bare minimum, usually with more description on the clothes than the person in them). When you have lines like, "His body shows no sign of decline, yet it's the kind of a body that white silk pyjamas are, or ought, to be made for", it's a little hard to avoid. Still, he wrote amazing plays and integrated his own Author Appeal into them so well that it not only became justifiable but essential to the play (and hence achieving the goal of all fiction writers since the beginning of time).
    • He also likes writing romantic female characters who are ill-suited to living in the real world. The Glass Menagerie, which is largely autobiographical, suggests that his came from Williams' feeling of guilt over running out on his family (particularly his painfully-shy sister), whom he was supporting.
  • Judd Winick is a vocal critic of the general lack of diversity in superhero narratives, and often tries to offset this in his works. His Outsiders run introduced Thunder, an African-American lesbian, and Grace Choi, a Chinese-American bisexual woman. In his run on the Exiles, he introduced a new version of Sunfire who was a Japanese lesbian in a relationship with a lesbian Alternate Universe version of Spider-Woman. And more recently, he helped launch the Batwing book during the New 52 (though Batwing had been created by Grant Morrison). He also created the TV show The Life and Times of Juniper Lee, which starred a Chinese-American protagonist.
    • He also tries to inject current social issues into his works quite a bit. One famous Green Arrow storyline had Mia Dearden realizing she had contracted HIV, while another storyline dealt with the prospect of gay marriage legalization. His Outsiders run also had a story dealing with human trafficking and child abuse. And of course Batwing, being set in the Democratic Republic of Congo, dealt with Child Soldiers, Parental Abandonment, the HIV virus, and a multitude of other topics.
    • He's also very fond of strong, non-stereotypical depictions of Asian women, with the aforementioned Sunfire and Grace being the most prominent examples. This is likely due to his marriage to Pam Ling, who he met on The Real World.
  • Marv Wolfman has also done this. The most glaring example being Spider-Woman's capture by a vigilante named The Hangman, who ties and gags her and leaves her in his dungeon because he believes that "all women are frail", and he must therefore protect her from the evil world. This is particularly bizarre considering her capture was a cliffhanger ending for the Hangman's first appearance, but following her escape from his dungeon at the beginning of the next issue, he's not heard from again for several years, and when he actually returns, he was an ALLY, thus making the entire sequence utterly pointless in terms of relevance for the plot other than self-serving purposes.
    • On The New Teen Titans, he had Starfire, Wonder Girl, and Raven all undergo some form of this.
  • Ed Wood. While there's a blatant example of deliberate polemic in Glen or Glenda (whose cross-dressing main character he played under a pseudonym), the author's personal love of transvestitism pops its head up in virtually every single movie. (Nice example: Tor Johnson fondling an angora sweater in Bride of the Monster.)

  • Sayo Yamamoto:
  • Suzuhito Yasuda, character designer of Durarara!!, Kamisama Kazoku, Devil Survivor, and official manga artist for Yozakura Quartet, likes giving major characters cat ears.
  • Quite (in?)famously Akira Yasuda, who worked as a Capcom employee for several years and was the original designer of Chun-li, was a big fan of thunder thighs - hence Chun-li's famously thick pillars of muscle. When questioned by a female co-worker on why her thighs were so big, he replied "you just don't understand the appeal" and then started explaining the appeal to her, which apparently creeped her out.
  • Ai Yazawa never gets tired of designing new clothes for her characters. Justified since before becoming a mangaka she attended fashion school.
  • Jane Yolen usually avoids this, but her submission to the anthology A Starfarer's Dozen spends several pages describing exactly how it feels to slowly turn into an animal, using incredibly sensual language for a work not marketed to adults.
    • She also demonstrates in her Pit Dragon Chronicles a fondness for both draconic birthing and draconic unbirthing. One instance of birthing is portrayed as Fan Disservice, but only because the birth went wrong-when the problem is treated and the birth proceeds, the restoration of the natural course is again described in near-sexual terms.
  • Miki Yoshikawa makes it very obvious in her first series Flunk Punk Rumble that she likes delinquents (as long as they have a good heart deep down) and people wearing glasses. It's even in the series' Japanese name! It continues on in her next series, Yamada-kun and the Seven Witches, which also has its fair share of delinquents/outcasts and glasses-wearers (and if a character doesn't wear glasses, expect him/her to be drawn with glasses on a chapter cover page sooner or later).
    • Also inverted in the sense that she has stated to like cruel and sad stories, and she even mentions Berserk as the series that got her back into reading and drawing manga. But Flunk Punk Rumble is a wacky school comedy, a concept that couldn't be any more different than Berserk. While Yamada-kun is a tad more serious and actually involves magic, it is still a school comedy at heart and thus still miles away from Berserk.
  • Mine Yoshizaki, creator of Sgt. Frog is a macrophile, somebody attracted to giants. The main evidence for this is that he actually did write/draw an adult work about a giant naked woman, and in the anime, the presence of the size-changing "Flash Spoon" in later episodes, plus the general size-related issues with the series.
    • Like the manga chapter where Keroro shrinks himself, his platoon mates, and Fuyuki so they can all go swimming in an old kiddie pool. Natsumi and Koyuki show up, having decided not to brave the crowds at the local water park, and decide to play in the pool...while Fuyuki and the frogs are still shrunk and still in it. For extra Fanservice, Giroro even gets sat upon by a giant, bikini-clad Natsumi.
    • If you follow his other works, as well as the occasional stuff he throws into the manga via the mad scientist frog, you can tell he's also got a thing for mind control, transformation, age progression, People Puppets, as well as completely inappropriate clothing styles (a nurse in a bikini top and maebari, for example). Lets just say that Sgt. Frog is the Totally Spies! of the eastern world.
  • Derek the Bard of Warning! Readers Advisory! likes to insert a lot of references to the Cthulhu Mythos, tabletop games (particularly Warhammer 40k), and Blue Oyster Cult into his show.
  • The Lyr altworld (landing page SFW but other pages on the site are unpredictable) is supposed to be an exploration of intelligent life on a large Earthlike planet with a thicker atmosphere and an eccentric orbit. However, it rapidly degenerates into an excuse to show the reader furry porn. Repeatedly. With occasional attempts at justification based on the social structures of bonobos (who do in fact engage in copious social sex), and the, uh, "fact" that species with wings can't fight, i.e. because a broken wing would be more disastrous to a flying species than a broken leg would be to a ground-bound species. There's even an explanation for Animesque eyes shoehorned in—large lashes and clear eyelids to protect the eyes of said flying species.
  • Carlos Ruiz Zafón, author of the widely popular The Shadow of the Wind, often has his characters espouse the majesty of storytelling, and his most virtuous characters are either writers, readers, or (especially) booksellers.

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