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  • Mitsuru Adachi really really really likes baseball, if the fact that nearly every series he's worked on in his illustrious career revolves around it is any indication.
  • Douglas Adams:
    • During his writing of the first version of the first story of The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy he was obsessed with cheesy American cop shows and how little sense they make, as well as how the heroes tend to be Designated Hero types. Even though Hitch-Hiker's is a science fiction pastiche, this obsession was responsible for things like the two Cowboy Cop characters (Shooty and Bangbang) who attack the main characters while insisting no-one has to die needlessly and the Tear Jerker death scene of the whale, which was supposed to be a reaction to the callous body count of such shows. There's other things like this as well.
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    • He has pretty big Creator Provincialism for the Home Counties, especially Cambridge and its university culture.
    • His love of maths and early computer programming inspired the logic-play that defines his sense of humour.
    • He was fascinated with bad pop-philosophy books - they are a running gag in Hitch-Hiker's and even sneak into his tenure on Doctor Who, where the Doctor is shown to share his love of laughing at them.
    • Baths are a recurring theme in his work, as he loved having them, particularly for procrastination purposes.
  • Brendan Adkins' ommatidia is a website full of stories that are all 101 words. The relevant portion is where a large amount of those stories involve self-possessed young women with unusual names and esoteric interests, usually involving Speculative Fiction elements.
  • Ken Akamatsu
    • Cosplay. Just check out Love Hina or Mahou Sensei Negima!. In fact one of the more important students in Negima, Chisame, is a Cosplay Otaku Girl. The whole thing hits its peak during the school festival arc in which everyone is wearing cosplay, and there is a cosplay contest. His wife is also a famous cosplayer. That's why Elegant Gothic Lolita Evangeline dressed up all the characters left behind in school for summer.
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    • Plus, he has gone on record as saying that he prefers more mature, curvier women...then you notice that Love Hina and Negima both have women just like that acting as enablers and/or helpers for others' relationships. Hmmm...
    • Word of God is that out of all the girls in Negi's class, the one that he'd most want a Pactio withnote  is Kakizaki.
    • He also seems to have a (non-sexual) interest in invincible/immortal characters. Love Hina had a running gag about Keitaro being impossible to kill, Mahou Sensei Negima! featured several immortal/ageless characters including the protagonist at the end, and UQ Holder! is all about immortality, to the point that a good chunk of the primary cast, including the primary protagonist, are all immortal.
  • Alex Ahad, original creator, lead artist, and character designer of Skullgirls, draws a lot of curvy women. A significant portion of characters in the game are also missing eyesnote .
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  • Sherman Alexie seems to have a thing for GLBT themes, heterosexual shotacon, and political Take That!.
  • Woody Allen has made several movies where either the main character or a side character, who is usually a stand-in for Allen himself, gets together with a ridiculously hot girl that is much younger than him who is into him for some reason, which is not Played for Laughs. Such films include Manhattan, Whatever Works, Midnight in Paris, Magic in the Moonlight, Hannah and Her Sisters, and Irrational Man. Given the age discrepancy between himself and his wife Soon-Yi Previn it's hard not to think Allen that really likes this concept.
  • Robert Altman's films shows women humiliated by nudity in M*A*S*H, Nashville, and Prêt-à-Porter. They also show women publicly nude in Brewster McCloud, The Long Goodbye, A Wedding, and Short Cuts.
  • Kozue Amano seems to have a thing for cute girl butts; the angle at which she depicts bent-over and crouching girls makes one wonder at times. This was relatively subtle in works such as ARIA , but becomes quite a bit more blatant in her latest work, Amanchu!, in which she loves to hoist her female main characters into tight diving suits.
  • Brett Anderson of Suede appears to have a thing for extremely skinny women, especially if you go by "She" ("she is bad, she is bored, she is bony") and "She's in Fashion" ("and she's as similar as you can get/to the shape of a cigarette").
  • Wes Anderson's films are obviously esoteric to the point where it might be shorter to list all the weird, narrowly particular things he's not obsessed with. Emotionally cold or distant women tend to be his go-to for love interests. There's also a pronounced fascination with people dealing with the aftermath of some sort of injury: bandages, bruises, slings, etc.
  • The mangaka of Zodiac PI, Natsumi Ando, states in a comment that she loves pretty and long legs on her girls, which is why she likes putting them into mini-skirts a lot.
  • Andre the Black Nerd likes feet, and in every single interview with a woman, he attempts to get a chance to have them show them or let him rub them.
  • V. C. Andrews doesn't have a single series published under that name which doesn't include at least one incestuous relationship.
  • Hideaki Anno. Neon Genesis Evangelion. Hands.
    • This might extend to the rest of the good people of Gainax as well. Every enemy except for the Giant Spider in FLCL is hand-based (giant hand, giant with extendable hands, giant hand throwing a baseball, giant hand with extra hands on the fingers, ludicrously giant hand) as is Tengen Toppa Gurren Lagann where the enemies in the last few episodes are giant Hand and Foot spaceships.
  • Many of Piers Anthony's books include...
    • Averting Nobody Poops. Some books some have more than ten separate references to "bathroom activities."
    • Teenage girls who are involved in nudity and sexual situations, often with adult men; for example, Firefly, and the Mode series. It should be emphasized that in Firefly, it's a five-year-old girl demanding sex from an adult male. (Her family was extremely screwed up.) The Adept books also includes lots of examples of teenage and preteen children being put in the middle of sexual situations, to include 12 year old characters having Sex as Rite-of-Passage. The fact Anthony unapologetically calls himself a "dirty old man" shows he is fully aware of this trope, and that anyone who reads his works are full-warned ahead of time what they will encounter therein.
    • Every Piers Anthony story has to have a woman facing being raped. Often rape is excused as something "normal" or otherwise permitted in society under "special" circumstances.
    • He puts a bit (rather a lot, actually) of a lampshade on people complaining about sexuality in his books in Xanth's "Adult Conspiracy" — the great act of self-censorship that adults participate in to keep kids from finding out about sex — magically enforced in Xanth, to boot. Going back to "nudity and sexual situations", the most cited example of this is tragically — but appropriately — named "The Color of Her Panties" — wherein a mermaid turns herself into a human for a while, but doesn't realize she should be putting on clothing, and no one really cares too much — until she's given a free pair of panties (magic panties, we should point out, which were designed to knock out would-be assailants), which causes every male in view to pass out from over-stimulation. The Aesop? It's not the nudity that's inherently sexual, but rather the intent or the covering up that adds appeal. Or something. Another Xanth story features a demoness displaying her panties on purpose, but then takes them off to escalate when that doesn't get the desired response.
      • His Apprentice Adept series explicitly has the main character be born on Proton, a planet populated by naked Serfs (indentured servants) "owned" by clothed Citizens. When the main character, Stile, has sex behind closed doors he dresses his partner to increase her allure, knowing there would be an extreme scandal if they were seen in public with the sheer nightgown, possibly to the point of being thrown off-planet. When he discovers the portal to the magic realm of Phaze, complete with functional clothing and a nudity taboo, Stile is understandably weirded out. Even in Phaze, there's a scene where his third major love interest, Lady Blue, rides a unicorn naked. (The unicorn, who can shapeshift to human, is his second major love interest.)
    • Somewhat orthogonal to all this, the man also seems a bit fixated on selling Honor Before Reason as an actual virtue. Even if it means throwing in an obvious Deus ex Machina or three so the protagonists can somehow get out of the mess their honorable behavior landed them in in the first place...
  • Detective Conan. Between Ran, Kazuha, Eri, Satou, and Shizuka, one gets the distinct feeling that in Gosho Aoyama's eyes, being able to beat the starch out of an assailant does nothing but add to a woman's attractiveness. Although there is the question of whether this is about BDSM strands, or just not being dependent on the man for every last little thing.
  • In Fullmetal Alchemist creator Hiromu Arakawa's own words: "Men should be buff! Women should be vavoom!" This is most obvious with Hohenheim and Scar who are much more muscular than their anime character designs.
    • Her female character designs: By usual anime standards, they are not particularly skinny. None of the female characters seem to have particularly flat chests, either. Hiromu Arakawa herself has stated that she dislikes overly skinny females, as they look starved and wouldn't have the energy to fight.
    • Arakawa's words have been passed down the Armstrong Line for Generations!
    • Arakawa grew up on a dairy farm, and wrote two characters as butchers in FMA. She's now doing Silver Spoon, which is set at an agricultural school.
  • Gregg Araki's films all have themes of male bisexuality. Araki is himself bisexual.
  • Hirohiko Araki
  • Give Terry Austin (comic book artist and inker, best known for collaborating with John Byrne) an opportunity to draw Popeye and he will take it. You can spot the sailor in numerous crowd scenes in 80s Uncanny X-Men issues.
  • Obsidian Entertainment's Chris Avellone enjoys...
    • Subverting Romance Sidequests in video games he works on; he has admitted that they irritate him. In Neverwinter Nights 2, for instance, both of the original campaign's potential romances are revealed in Mask of the Betrayer to have been killed during the collapse of The Very Definitely Final Dungeon (though side comments in Storm of Zehir put a question mark on Casavir). This was referenced in the stretch goals for Pillars of Eternity's Kickstarter. At one level it was promised Chris Avellone would write the romance subplots; at the next level up, it was promised he wouldn't.
    • Characters that had difficulty communicating. Christine Royce and Sis for the non-verbal communication factor. Ecco, one of Fall-From-Grace's students, from Planescape: Torment is also mute. Non-traditional communication in general is a great mainstay of his, particularly when he's allowed to run away with a primarily text-based game.
  • Konno Azure, creator of Koe de Oshigoto!, really, really likes embarrassed blushing girls.

  • Johnny B, the creator of the Jack French games, has a foot fetish. Word of God says that this is the reason why Lucy is barefoot throughout her interview in the second game.
  • Paolo Bacigalupi (The Windup Girl) enjoys piedophilia (the "i" is very important), pr AFSR, a fetish for dolls, living dolls, and other artificial people. On the milder end, the title character of The Windup Girl is considered extremely desirable because she walks in a jerky fashion like a wind-up toy. On the much less mild end, the title character of The Fluted Girl has holes in her back and a hollow spine and can be played as an instrument. Her owner (there is no other way to put it) has her perform with her twin sister to entertain guests, and both in-universe and in-narration it's portrayed in a blatantly sexual manner.
  • Iain M. Banks's The Culture is a space-faring, almost nomadic civilization that have no sexual taboos. When asked to provide their "national anthem," their ambassador delivered a song called "Lick Me Out."
    • That was more of a political thing which is also relatively big with Mr. Banks: The Culture is a society which considers usual symbology as politically undesirable and thus the ambassador had too little of an understanding of the very concept of "national anthem". Said ambassador just gave out the first tune that popped in his/her mind and the damage was done. This was just the melody and as damage control they didn't give out the lyrics afterwards...
    • All their genetic modifications, the fashion for changing gender at a whim, etc. It's not just the Culture either. The psychopathic sadistic villain from The Algebraist, who has had his genitals genetically altered so he can ejaculate poison or truth serum, immediately springs to mind. Oh, and cannibalism pops up quite a bit in several novels too. (Yes, that IS a fetish. It is not recommended to search for it.)
    • Sexually sadistic alien species are a recurring theme. The elites of the Azadian apices in The Player of Games carry out (and televise) elaborate and perverse tortures, while the Affront males in Excession castrate their slaves...and genetically modified their own species's females to make sex more painful.
    • Incest is as common as non-incestuous relationships in Iain (M.) Banks' books. The Steep Approach to Garbadale is about a man's life-long infatuation with his first cousin; Walking on Glass has a subplot about a brother and sister; Use of Weapons has a love triangle involving closely related characters; the teenage male protagonist of The Crow Road has sex with Janice, his dead uncle's lover, who he thinks of as "aunty Janice"; the teenage female protagonist of Whit is made to strip naked by her grandfather, who then attempts to rape her; A Song of Stone has several sex scenes featuring the narrator and his half-sister. (Or was it his step-sister? Some kind of sister, anyway.)
  • Clive Barker is really into people getting eaten (aka vore). He also seems to assume the reader's into it too.
    • He also has a strong interest in magically induced sex changes; they frequently appear in his early short stories and in the novel Imajica.
    • Barker admitted, on his commentary track for the film Midnight Meat Train, that the Hellraiser series arose out of his interest in BDSM.
  • John Barnes does his absolute best to avert this, repeatedly describing the love interests in his stories as being fat, bucktoothed, or otherwise unattractive. Considering how lovingly he describes their negative physical qualities, though, one wonders if he just has a different concept of beauty.
  • Michael Bay seems to really like explosions, especially unnecessarily large ones.
    • Which is to say nothing of his deep and abiding love for the United States Military.
  • Ira Steven Behr, one of the head writers of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, really likes Frank Sinatra and the Rat Pack. Finally, in the seventh season of Deep Space Nine, he introduced a holographic lounge singer who could help solve the crew's problems while crooning "The Way You Look Tonight". At least the characters seemed to like him.
  • Brian Michael Bendis
    • He was a huge fan of Luke Cage and Iron Fist while growing up, and brought both characters into greater prominence by making them core members of the popular Avengers franchise. Ditto for Spider-Woman, Kitty Pryde, and his own creation, Jessica Jones, who frequently appear in his stories.
    • Also, as noted in a Tales from the Longbox article, Bendis started to make Peter Parker use Jewish terms, even though the guy is in no way Jewish. Phrases like 'oy' work, but 'shmendrick'? The majority of non-Jewish people don't even know what the hell that means. It's also been noted that Peter sort of became a self-insert for Bendis (which also explains the Jewish stuff), and, of course, Kitty Pryde becomes Peter's girlfriend. So yeah, Bendis is basically pairing his favourite character with himself.
    • Bendis really, really, REALLY loves Seinfeldian Conversations. It's most noticeable in New Avengers, but a truly astonishing number of his stories feature moments where the heroes just sit around talking for pages on end, usually while eating something. It has reached Memetic Mutation among comic readers, with people even parodying the "Bendis speak" dialogue.
  • Comic book artist Ed Benes really likes drawing ladies' butts. He will use any opportunity to draw with Male Gaze and Boobs-and-Butt Pose. Thanks to him Red Lantern member Bleez is best remembered as two blue ass cheeks attached to a Winged Humanoid.
  • Gregory Benford has a thing for M/F/F threesomes and Japanese women.
  • Don Bluth is fond of casting talking mice as protagonists, most notably The Secret of NIMH and An American Tail. He also seems to dislike cats. He does, though, show some cats in a positive light, even if they're typically villainous. It could just be that if you focus on mouse protagonists, then naturally, cats would be the main antagonists.
  • Frederic Boilet depicts pretty Asian girls who enjoy casual sex, especially with Western men, in nearly all of his stories.
  • Tinto Brass loves the sight of women urinating, and massive amounts of ungroomed body hair, regardless of what kind of film he's directing.
  • Richard Brautigan liked women's bodies. He especially liked breasts and put them in at every possible opportunity. His novel The Abortion takes this on and lets us see it from the woman's point of view. His other favorite themes include cemeteries, telephones, San Francisco, Japanese culture (he lived in Shinjuku for several years) and of course, and most beloved, trout fishing.
  • Nicholas Briggs adores Daleks more than any other monster. Every big story arc he plans tends to derail into Dalek territory eventually. He even does the Big Finish podcasts with his ring modulator nearby so he can become a Dalek on demand. The good news is that his love of Daleks does not blind him to what makes them work, hence why he became a Promoted Fanboy Dalek voice actor in the new series.
  • Stuart J. Brown uses key moments in his stories to express his fondness of classic rock music, by making his leading character, Annyseed, "geek out" and splurge random knowledge or opinions on certain albums or songs.
  • Ed Brubaker really really really loves taking characters from The Golden Age of Comic Books and recycling them for Darker and Edgier espionage and paramilitary stories. See (among others) Bucky Barnes, John Steele, and Amazing-Man/Prince of Orphans. Flashbacks to World War II are very common in his Marvel work.
  • Steven Brust has stated that the key to writing good fiction is simply to write about what you think is cool. In Brust's books, swashbuckling adventure, fine cuisine and Hungarian cultural references abound.
  • Pop quiz: Quick, name one, single Jimmy Buffett song which doesn't mention liquor at any point.
  • Lois McMaster Bujold writes a lot of older man/younger woman romances.
  • Tim Burton is in love with German Expressionism, The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari in particular. Most of his characters, animated or otherwise, Look Like Cesare, much of the architecture in Burton's films (The Nightmare Before Christmas's Halloweentown in particular) look like Holstenwall, he redesigned The Penguin to look like Caligari and created a Christopher Walken character named Max Schreck...
  • William S. Burroughs was really fond of Erotic Asphyxiation, which can be seen over his entire body of work, including Naked Lunch. The 'orgasm death gimmick' as it became known, was greatly expanded upon in The Soft Machine, The Ticket That Exploded and Nova Express, was strangely absent in The Wild Boys, but returned with a vengeance in Cities of The Red Night, where it was a major plot point. It's completely absent in The Black Rider, too.
    • The above books also bring to light Burroughs's fondness for teenage boys, particularly blonds and redheads.
  • Jim Butcher is often accused of liking objectifying women via narrative Male Gaze, based on the The Dresden Files. However, that's actually the protagonist's issues bleeding through into his narration, and is not present in other works in the same universe from any other character's POV, or his other works. However, he does tend to have petite blonde Action Girls as prominent characters in all three series, and has mentioned that his wife owns lots of guns, much like Murphy.
    • Butcher is also a fan of Marvel Comics, and drops references to them in his Dresden Files stories; in "Ghost Story" Harry Dresden (temporarily a ghost at the time) compares his newfound intangibility and teleportation abilities to Kitty Pryde and Nightcrawler, respectively. In several novels Harry refers to his tendency to poke fun at his adversaries during a fight as following "The Tao of Peter Parker" Butcher even got to write a Spider-Man novel, "The Darkest Hours".
      • The names "Margaret", and to a lesser extent "Gwendolyn", have a tendency to pop up with some frequency in Butcher's works; The Dresden Files has Dresden's protége Margaret "Molly" Carpenter, his mother Margaret Gwendolyn LeFay and his daughter who is also named Margaret. The Cinder Spires has Gwendolyn Margaret Lancaster.
      • Butcher definitely likes his Action Girls, but they are always either petite or amazonian in build. Find a female character in any Jim Butcher book who is between five and six feet tall. We'll wait.
  • For the longest time, fans of author/game designer Jack Butler simply assumed that he had something against women, as everything he wrote included at least one brazenly abusive and violent woman who was usually stupid and prejudiced in some way as well. When he finally admitted to have been the victim of nearly two decades of domestic abuse at the hands of his wife, things became much, much clearer.
  • John Byrne, too, loves having a big, busty, musclebabe teamed up with an average, somewhat shortish male secretary. He even did it to Wonder Woman!
  • At first glance, Daestgatling, the author of Once Upon A Time Abridged and some of the strangest, most meta fics in existence, likes some degree of Big-Lipped Alligator Moment and plots that make you ask What Do You Mean, It Wasn't Made on Drugs? and also Heroic Comedic Sociopath with a few moments crossing the line twice for added strangeness. However, as her works go on, she sometimes stops playing the insensitive Cloud Cuckoo Lander, and starts using her sharp snark for mocking everything inconsistent or insensitive in a plot (mostly any Double Standard, which runs on both), and destroy the heartwarming of moments from the original which have unfortunate undertones, while revealing what is Harsher in Hindsight in a moment of insensitive humor or Heartwarming in Hindsight in what other people take for granted.

  • Sophie Campbell of Wet Moon and Shadoweyes. She loves plump women and very full lips. Even the lead of Water Baby, who is thin, has the "bee-stung" look about her. Pops up again in her comic book adaptation of Jem, where the Holograms and Misfits each already had a blue-haired band member, but decided to make them, Stormer and Aja, into BBW. She also added a Transgender Canon Foreigner, Blaze, after Campbell herself came out as a trans woman. She also very clearly loves piercings.
  • Orson Scott Card book which doesn't feature a nude prepubescent or pubescent boy. Go on, try.
    • Made somewhat more amusing when viewed in the light of how notorious Card has been for his anti-gay views over the years.
  • Jacqueline Carey
    • Most of her books have a bisexual protagonist, and her Kushiel's Legacy novels are about a society where Everyone Is Bi.
    • Paradoxically, even though her Kushiel's Legacy books feature a lot of BDSM, this doesn't seem to be a clear-cut case of Author Appeal. The author has said that the BDSM aspect was done as a subversion of the Damsel in Distress cliché and that she was completely unfamiliar with it prior to researching the books.
  • A great many of the books written by Jack Chalker involve one or more people transforming, often into large-breasted women, though there's also a lot of Body Horror too.
  • The best-known works by Howard Chaykin both involve male, promiscuous Jewish protagonists. It borders on being an Author Avatar, as there isn't much physically separating the main characters of American Flagg and American Century.
  • It has been stated here that "Parts of images that are most often lovingly detailed and realistically crafted in Chick Tracts: Toilets and gay men's muscles. I'm not sure what conclusion to draw from this."
  • Is it humanly possible to name any work by comics artist Frank Cho that doesn't include jungles, dinosaurs, primates, extraordinarily well-endowed women with big butts, or some combination of the above?
  • Chris Claremont's run on X-Men repeatedly showed strong women beating up men, with female characters who were more timid being reworked into dominant bruisers. Psylocke was the prime example of this. Mind control plots are also common in his work, seemingly for the same reason.
    • When a pornstar revealed that Claremont had allegedly hired one of his colleagues to dress up as Storm (a strong female character he wrote) and do things to him involving copious amount of lubricant, many people were grossed out, but only a few were surprised.
    • In addition to strong women beating up men, he also introduced the Hellfire Club. The leader of the group, Sebastian Shaw, has the power to get stronger the more you hit him. The two lead women, Selene and Emma Frost, both wear dominatrix outfits and have hypnotic powers.
      • The outfits in question (and the portrayal of the Hellfire Club, as well as 'Emma' as a name for the HC's queen) are derived from The Avengers episode "A Touch of Brimstone", earlier shown in the U.S.
    • In addition to having female characters going from ingenue to dominant bruiser, Chris Claremont is also fond of having female characters go through some bizarre body modifications. Whether it's Psylocke being transformed from a Caucasian woman to an Asian one, to Storm being reduced in age to a young girl, to Polaris going through a change in her powers that turn her into towering amazonian powerhouse, to Sue Storm from the Fantastic Four being transformed into an alien being, to Kitty Pryde on the Exiles having her body transformed into versions from alternate dimensions (including Cat Girl), to Caitlin Fairchild being turned into a shape-changing goo monster, to Jean Grey getting her arms replaced with a bunch of tentacles, to the completely separate occasion Callisto got her arms replaced with a bunch of tentacles, females undergoing some unwarranted physical change are a pretty common occurrence in his works.
      • Have he and Jack Chalker ever been seen together?
    • Claremont also has a tendency for shy females to dress far more provocatively and show off their body a lot more. Sometimes this is just something like Kitty Pryde having to wear tighter clothes because she has nothing else to wear. Other times this features Rogue dressing very provocatively while undercover, under the rationale that "people won't be paying attention to her face."
    • He also seems to have a bit of a fetish with bondage and S&M themes, even outside the Hellfire Club characters. When Claremont is writing, don't be surprised to see leather and leashes pop up.
    • There's also his proclivity for filling his books with extremely close female friendships and other Les Yay elements to the point where it's only half-jokingly stated that every woman is a lesbian, or at least bisexual, when written by Claremont.
    • He loves creating flying characters, characters who are skilled aviators, or both. Carol Danvers, Betty Braddock, and Madeline Pryor are only the most famous examples.
  • Going by her Immortals After Dark series, Kresley Cole seems to write no male protagonists but those who are at least six and a half feet tall, musclebound, well hung in the extreme, and overbearing, domineering alpha male types. She's a little more flexible with female protagonists, but they seem to top out at five and half feet, usually well-endowed up top, and tend to have curly '80s hair.
  • Eoin Colfer seems to be quite the environmentalist, as evidenced by the heavy Green Aesops that can be found in the Artemis Fowl series. The narrative would often go into the horrific outcomes of pollution and how Humans Are the Real Monsters for all their environmentally destructive ways. Also for killing animals for consumption and espousing the virtues of the green and vegetarian lifestyle of the fairies. He also goes on at length about amazing green innovations made by a master criminal and his son.
  • Amanda Conner seems to really like drawing busty women in little or no clothing. This is not really unusual among comic-book artists, but it might be unusual among female comic-book artists. Seriously, though, in her run on Power Girl, she seemed to look for any excuse to draw both Kara and Attlee nude or nearly so, and one could name plenty of other examples from her work. Make of that what you will.
    • She seems to really have a thing for Power Girl specifically. Once the New-52 remake of PG was gotten rid of, Conner and Jimmy Palmiotti (the latter of which was co-writer of the aforementioned Power Girl series) essentially brought back pre-Nu 52 PG in the Harley Quinn series they've been writing. And then they brought back Peej AND Atlee together in Harley's Rebirth series.
  • Victor Cook, who is of Korean and Caucasian heritage, is co-developer of The Spectacular Spider-Manand the later Stretch Armstrong and the Flex Fighters . Since the former gave a Race Lift to many characters to reflect a culturally diverse modern New York, he did the same thing for the latter to make Charter City feel alive .
  • Cornova, author of the Poké Wars series, seems to have a thing for gore and intricate battle sequences.
  • Larry Correia has often noted that he LOVES firearms and B-movie monsters, so of course his novels are full of both.
  • Michael Crichton may have a... fixation with people using the bathroom, especially women. It generally doesn't derail the plot or get heavily detailed, and often it comes up to add verisimilitude to crazy situations, but it tends to come up at least once a book... often two or three. This may simply be a Lampshade Hanging on the rarity of bathroom visits in most fiction, compared to reality, and an attempt to redress the balance. Or maybe he is a kinky bastard. Or both! Ironically, the most famous example of someone in a Crichton work using the bathroom — Gennaro's ill-fated toilet trip in Jurassic Park — isn't even in the Crichton novel on which it's based.
    When you gotta go, you gotta go.
  • Amid all the Signature Style (i.e. Body Horror and Fan Disservice), it may be hard to spot, but David Cronenberg loves cars and car accidents. Shivers, his debut, has a car crash in a parking lot. Rabid's plot is kicked off by a motorcycle accident. Fast Company is about racecar drivers. The Brood has the protagonist worrying that his drunken father-in-law will drive off a bridge. Revok's escape scene in Scanners involves psychically incapacitating drivers, causing them to crash. Crash is about people who have a sexual fetish for car accidents. So there you go. It's also fun to notice how many of his movie's protagonists are thin, lightly-build guys, matching his own appearance.
  • Robert Crumb and buttocks. Anyone who's read his comments knows it's true, at least he's refreshingly honest about it.
  • Clive Cussler seems to really like blue and green eyed characters. He really, really loves anything to do with the sea and classic cars.
  • The manga group CLAMP has an amazingly diverse array of manga for everyone, but there's several... odd little quirks that pop up in most of them:
    • The biggest one is the Eye Scream. It happens in every single one of CLAMP's manga, save one (mostly because it has a younger target audience than most of their works do)
    • Love in the CLAMP-verse transcends everything. Especially gender. Especially.
    • Speaking of gender, genderless characters are suspiciously common in CLAMP's work.
    • The character and background artist, Mokona, seems to enjoy drawing half-naked women, whether it be for sex appeal or Fan Disservice. A well-known example of the latter is in RG Veda, their first manga, where one female character is stabbed brutally in the chest, with only a small piece of fabric covering her chest...
    • Costume Porn. Everywhere.
    • Angelic/demonic wings.
  • Cool-Kyou Shinsha:
    • They really likes women with big breasts, both in his mainstream works and his porn (where women with said large breasts are usually molesting young boys).
    • They also like having Odd Couples in their stories. For example, Ojojojo, I Can't Understand and Kobayashi's Dragon Maid all revolve around weird couples. Ojojojo has an Upper-Class Twit and a spaced out weirdo falling in love, I Can't Understand focuses around an Otaku and his Everyman wife, and Kobayashi is focused on a master-servant relationship between a software engineer and her superpowered dragon-in-human-form lesbian maid.

  • Paula Danziger had hippie culture. Her hippie-parent characters were wise, benevolent, talented and genuinely cared about their children's opinions, even though they knew exactly where to draw the line in terms of behaviour. They were often single parents or lived with their partner rather than being married. By contrast, if the main character's parents were married, worked for The Man, played golf, went shopping for clothes every weekend or loved city life, they were likely to be neurotic/perfectionist/Extreme Doormat mothers, or abusive, cruel, neglectful fathers, usually on the brink of divorce. A good example of the contrast is Phoebe's newly divorced parents in The Divorce Express; her father is a virtuous and environmentally conscious artist, while her mother is a materialistic, nagging, superficial manipulator. Both The Divorce Express and its sequel, It's an Aardvark Eat Turtle World make it very clear that the reader is meant to sympathise with her father. In the same vein, Hippie Teachers were the only decent teachers in the entire school, with the rest being Sadist Teachers and jobsworths who couldn't care less about the students in their care.
  • Author Madeira Darling has a thing for pretty dominant men in dresses, long pretty hair, and BDSM... considering she writes BDSM erotica this may be justified.
  • Russell T. Davies' fondness for nontraditional romantic relationships has bled into Doctor Who, most noticeably in the in-your-face pansexuality of Captain Jack. And that's not even counting all the stuff that goes on in Whoniverse series Torchwood. He also seems extremely fond of interracial pairings, especially when there is a black man involved. The Doctor Who episode "Gridlock" includes a marriage between a woman and an anthropomorphic cat. They even had kittens. The same episode also features two old ladies who were married.
  • Gay horror film director David DeCoteau was originally notorious for the amount of gratuitous female nudity in his works, but has become well-known in recent years for including equally gratuitous male homoerotica in almost all of his films. And by that, we mean male models in their underwear getting frisky no matter what the film is actually about.
  • Star Wars author Troy Denning has written many books for the expanded universe - and all of them have involved torture, bondage, and/or dismemberment. Often repeatedly. He describes injuries with the loving detail of a romance novelist explaining body parts.
  • Michael DeForge, character designer for Adventure Time! and indie comic book artist seems to have a slight preference depicting for non-heterosexual sexuality. Having one of his major comics Ant Colony have a gay couple as one of the main focuses. He also seems to like drawing leather and other shiny materials in his comics.
    • Body Horror, bright colors, and intricate designs are also fairly common.
  • Edgar Degas drew or painted many, many, MANY images of women bathing, usually from the same angle (Toplessness from the Back, turned so that one breast is visible). The poses sometimes vary, the backgrounds vary, sometimes there's a maid, but there's always a Toplessness from the Back pose and there's usually long luxurious hair being combed, flipped, or otherwise emphasized as well.
  • Several of Philip K. Dick's novels set in the future have a bare breasted woman in them, often an important character. Nobody comments on it, so it can be assumed to be normal in those societies. There's no compelling plot reason for it, but to his credit he avoids it in societies where it would be inappropriate (e.g., the present day, the alternate world where the Axis won, or controlling and repressive societies).
    • The female, dark-haired, small, neurotic, violent alter ego of the author. He has been recorded as suggesting that this represents some dreams he had of his twin sister who died at 5 weeks old.
    • Buxom, dark-haired ladies in tight sweaters are a Dick staple. They even wear tight sweaters in The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch, in which the Earth has become so hot it's dangerous to go outside.
  • Samwise Didier describes his style of art and favourite things to create on his profile at the Sons of the Storm, a website collecting some Blizzard Entertainment artists' works, as "Over-proportioned, primary colored, bulky armored dudes and monsters."
  • Paul Dini, a writer of the DCAU, has a penchant for using Zatanna, a dark-haired Stage Magician with a tendency to wear top hats and fishnets. When Dini's writing her, she tends to take a lot of bubble baths. Also, in Real Life he's married to a dark-haired stage magician with a tendency to wear top hats and fishnets, and first hooked up with his (heretofore non-comics fan) wife because she was given a copy of a Zatanna comic he'd written and she contacted him about her resemblance to the character. He even wrote the character's solo series for a time.
  • Surprisingly enough, Fyodor Dostoevsky seemed to have a thing for the Tsundere archetype: it shows up in a number of his books, and at least one of his lovers was a particularly virulent type A. This being Dostoevsky, they often fit the Sour Outside, Sad Inside archetype and are used as a means to explore the conflict between overbearing pride and existential despair.
  • In Diane Duane's Star Trek novels, such as Spock's World McCoy's sheer awesome is down to the good doctor being the author's all-time favorite.

  • English Western author J.T. Edson seemed to have a fetish for Cat Fights judging from how often he managed to shoehorn them into his novels. The most egregious example involved a character who had a collection of paintings of catfights that had taken place in the author's previous novels, including ones that no one but the participants had been there to witness.
  • Roland Emmerich loves demolishing cities/famous landmarks. He also seems to really enjoy destroying the White House, having done so three times in his career, though he has started to spare it; it gets shot up, but not destroyed, in White House Down, and only incurs minor damage in Independence Day: Resurgence but Emmerich has revealed in an interview with Empire magazine that it is destroyed in an extended edition of the film.
  • Garth Ennis loves to include two things in his comic books: anal sex, and grievous head wounds. It is a rare issue of Preacher that did not include anal sex or someone being shot in the head, or both.

  • Falcoon, producer of The King of Fighters: Maximum Impact, has admitted that he likes designing female characters with large chests, so it's small wonder that the Maximum Impact games feature a lot of Gainaxing and Jiggle Physics. This is especially noticeable with the characters Falcoon designed himself, like Lien Neville (whose chest receives a lot of the focus in cutscenes). Interestingly, he's gay.
  • Joseph Fanning, the author of High School Changed Me appeals to a quite certain amount of things. Out of this, a lot of other things were born, like RPG (which lives through it's 3rd revision already) or a forum roleplay. A sequel (?) to the comic was also born after quite an argument with the artist.
  • Philip José Farmer was the original Fanfic writer. The dude loves writing about sex with historical figures.
    • Not just sex, and not just historical figures. Tarzan, Phileas Fogg...he likes building on pre-existing concepts or using pre-existing characters.
    • He also tends to have characters which surprisingly have the same initials as he does.
  • Almost everything Lauren Faust has worked on contains at least one reference to chocolate milk and The Big Lebowski.
  • One has to wonder about Phil Foglio. As well-done as Girl Genius is, Agatha does spend a lot of time in nothing but lacy bra and bloomers... which is outright tame compared to the pornography he's done. And all the female characters in Girl Genius have big chests and big hips.
    • Remember that Girl Genius is a collaboration between him and his wife. A recent filler sequence took several pages to present a fashion show of several characters in the form of paper dolls, and in the commentary, Kaja expressed delight at having an excuse to show the characters in the sort of corsetry she only occasionally works into the main story. So it's not just Phil.
      • Kaja Foglio has been quite open about being an enthusiast of such lacy Victorian underthings, both in the context of them as art, and using them personally. So yes, more than one type of Author Appeal going on there.
      • Girl Genius is one of the world's few truly equal-opportunity fanservice providers. The princes end up (deliciously) naked about as often as Agatha winds up in corsets and teddies.
    • The trapeze from What's New? with Phil and Dixie.
      • It's worth noting that the Foglios are also responsible for XXXenophile, a delightful adult comic for the open minded. See "Bleached Underpants". Phil has on occasion introduced himself as "Phil Foglio, Gentleman Pornographer".
    • On a more child-friendly level, the Foglios are both avid tea aficionados, and tea works its way into a comic about mad science more than it probably should.
  • Almost every movie featuring Jon Favreau will include his amateur MMA skills.
    • And let's not forget how they wrote him out of Friends....
  • George Formby seems to insert A LOT of references to his home town Wigan into his music despite it being relatively unknown outside the United Kingdom.
  • Leo Frankowski and the Conrad Stargard series. Frankly, the series has enough appeals to fit into every single category on this page.
    • It was bad enough the final books of the Conrad Stargard series are self-published. The books didn't sell and the publisher got sick of his Self-Insert Author Avatar.
  • Frank Frazetta liked big butts on women. He also liked nudity or near-nudity and extreme sexual dimorphism.
  • Stephen Fry's novels usually include and address male homosexuality to at least some extent. Even just acting, in Sherlock Holmes he manages to add an irrelevant scene of Mycroft talking about how gay he is.
  • Kou Fujisaki's works invariably involve workaholic salarymen, giant muscular semes, curvy women, and big lips.
  • Ryu Fujisaki's works reveal that he has something for clowns. Just check Soul Hunter. Almost every character will appear wearing gigantic shoes, big rounded (propably spherical) buttons, fluffy gloves, parachute pants, harlequin-like hats, stars and/or stripes patterns, some of them even with big rounded noses, etc. Just look for the self-portrait cartoon he uses at the end of every volume of the series.
  • Kosuke Fujishima of Ah! My Goddess has a thing for exquisitely detailed machinery.
  • All of Bryan Fuller's shows are about death.
  • If you're watching a Lucio Fulci movie about zombies...it's going to include bloody gory deaths of some kind. (He used to direct Spaghetti Westerns) It was also rather amusing when he made fun of his own sick mind in a later movie!

  • Mark Gatiss also likes addressing his own homosexuality, both in his work on The League of Gentlemen (in which he rather savagely rips into the concept of the Fag Hag) and in his detective novels, which star a dashing bisexual chap named Lucifer Box.
  • Shoji Gatoh (creator of Full Metal Panic!) seems to have a...thing for overt homoerotic overtones. Arguably more so than lesbian overtones. He even made one novel sidestory dedicated to getting Tsubaki to confess (albeit accidentally) to Sousuke, in what appears to be an effort to clarify to the readers that Sousuke (along with Tsubaki) would be the submissive one in a gay relationship. And then there's his fascination and love for the villain Gauron, whom he kept bringing back to life (while many, many fans were screaming why he liked Gauron so much to bring him back). And every time Gauron makes an appearance, Gatoh makes it more and more obvious that the idea of Gauron with Sousuke appeals to him. Including a gratuitous part in the novels where Gauron graphically describes how he fantasized killing and raping Sousuke. And then there's that episode in Lucky Star that Gatoh had a hand in, where Kagami picks up a graphic Yaoi doujinshi of Gauron and a Bound and Gagged Sousuke. It's safe to say that countless viewers cried for Brain Bleach, and the only possible reason why Gatoh even thought of it was because he...liked it.
  • The comics of Melinda Gebbie (longtime girlfriend, now wife of Alan Moore) usually have some sort of girl-on-girl action. An interesting example would be an issue of Supreme wherein two versions of the same story were shown. Chris Sprouse drew a traditional superhero fight, her version looked more like a catfight.
    • All her work on AARGH!, an LGBTQ benefit oneshot comics anthology published by Alan Moore.
    • For that matter, lesbians also tend to pop up quite frequently in Alan Moore's works as well.
  • Mel Gibson:
    • His movies often show his love of dogs.
    • He is a noted fan of The Three Stooges, and his films make occasional references to the troupe and their slapstick routines.
    • A number of his roles endure Cold-Blooded Torture at the hands of the villains. Fans and media have speculated that these scenes appeal to Gibson's devout Catholicism.
  • Compared to the common fanboy-friendly bias towards depicting lesbian and bi women as representatives of sexuality diversity in genre comics, Kieron Gillen's works are much more likely to depict gay and bisexual men as equal in number to the women, and depict their romantic and sexual interactions with equal erotic attention. Gillen himself is bisexual.
  • Tony Goldmark, aka Some Jerk with a Camera is a huge "Weird Al" Yankovic fan, and has put at least one Weird Al reference in all of his episodes, including the times when he put Weird Al HIMSELF in his videos.
  • Terry Goodkind's Sword of Truth series has a very significant theme of sexual violence. Most of the villains are monstrously perverted in some way, most of the female characters must content with rape or attempted rape at some point in the series, and even the male hero is tortured by a league of dominatrix-like characters who play a large role throughout the books, both as villains and heroes. Many readers interpret the theme as originating from a kink of Goodkind's.
  • Lean On Me creator Jade Gordon admits to having a thing for Transgender women and crossdressers, and her comic centers around a romance between her Author Avatar and a beautiful trans girl.
  • Ed Greenwood, main author of the Forgotten Realms is known for his...rather disturbing fixation on characters having sex.
  • Comics creator Mike Grell is all about equal opportunity Fanservice. Any character design he comes up with is almost certain to bare as much skin as possible.
  • Works by the late Mark Gruenwald, particularly his Captain America run, also often featured subtle to not-so-subtle instances on a frequent basis. This could range from standard rope/chain/mechanical devices bondage scenes to a scene where a semi-nude Red Skull had the villainess Viper strap him to a "torture wheel" that would inflict pain on him, which the Viper had full control over. He even pointed out that he was interested in seeing how far the Viper would actually go!

  • Rob Halford from Judas Priest has a thing for S&M leather clothes, as seen in his concert shows and songs (one could say he's 'hell bent, hell bent for leather). He made black leather clothes very popular in the Heavy Metal community. That look came from the Underground Gay Scene; he kept his homosexuality a secret for decades. However the fans may have figured it out a long time ago.
  • Byron Hall seems to have Author Appeal for violent bigotry and rape. And words like "cunt-pipe" and "fuckstick". His infamous Tabletop RPG FATAL tries to justify the massive amount of these things by claiming historical accuracy and realism... badly. This "realistic" RPG includes several varieties of "armor that turns you into a walking racial caricature, for no apparent reason", and has a Subsystem Damage table that somehow lets you damage a man's uterus without accounting for any of the skin, muscle, or other organs that would be in the way even if you pretend that Hall was trying to be trans-inclusive (hint: he was not). The misogynistic approach to (gratuitously detailed) sexuality pushes it past offensively stupid into stupidly offensive. This fairly famous review goes into as much detail as you will ever need — and, tellingly, Hall responded to its accusation that FATAL was "the date rape RPG" by asking "where is dating included?"
  • Laurell K. Hamilton spends considerable text describing clothing worn by Anita Blake. And any man with long hair, and large...
  • In any James Bond movie directed by Guy Hamilton, James will be rougher with the women than usual.
  • As is pointed out elsewhere, almost anything by Hanako Games has Les Yay in it somewhere.
  • Oliver Harper:
    • Huge fan of '80s movies. It's why films from that decade make up the majority of his reviews.
    • Superman, especially the first two Christopher Reeve films.
    • Really likes the LaserDisc video format, and will often mention the LD version if the film he's reviewing was released on the format. This is helped by the fact he amassed a huge collection of them in the early 2000s thanks to car-boot sales and thrift stores.
  • Butch Hartman is an avid comic book fan, something which is made obvious by the sheer number of references and specific parodies in any The Fairly OddParents! episode with a superhero theme. He even tried to make Trixie Tang a closet comic book fan in one episode, but to many fans' frustration, this was never followed up.
  • Yoshiki Hayashi has quite a few, but Ho Yay and BDSM have been around since almost the beginning. Leather as well, though it's usually his other band members wearing it. He tends to like remixing parts of his earlier works, not out of laziness but of liking the work enough to want to do more with it, yet never being satisfied. Models and the Dominatrix also make frequent appearances.
  • Nathaniel Hawthorne liked writing about orphans, distant parents, and the plight of women. Also, his works have a lot of incest. A lot of incest.
  • Hugh Hefner liked blondes. Most of the women he'd dated in recent memory have been blond, and there are also a disproportionately high number of blond Playboy playmates.
  • Robert A. Heinlein made a hobby of this in his various works, enough so that each particular item deserves its own entry.
    • Heroes Want Redheads: His third wife, Virginia, was a redhead. This hair color is a standout feature of almost all the female love interests in his works and a number of the males. Moreover, twin redheads are similarly common.
    • Kindhearted Cat Lover: Heinlein was a cat lover and cats show up throughout most of his novels. Anyone who is mean to cats is certain to be a villain.
    • Polyamory: From Stranger in a Strange Land and on, expect any book to feature its protagonists in a polyamorous group marriage.
    • Sexy Man, Instant Harem: Related to the above, his Gruff Old Man protagonists invariably attract a sizable harem of sexy women.
    • Incest Is Relative: Parental Incest, Brother–Sister Incest, Twincest, lots and lots of incest.
    • Nudism and Skinny Dipping: Heinlein was a practicing nudist and many of his protagonists are as well.
    • Wife Husbandry and Precocious Crush: Several novels involve underage or newly of-age girls throwing themselves at the protagonist, who is frequently a parental figure. In many cases they reveal that they've been waiting years for the opportunity to be noticed, invoking She Is All Grown Up.
    • Free-Love Future: This derives from and is inspired by all of the above. It sometimes extends into Eternal Sexual Freedom by projecting this value system onto past protagonists — for example, Lazarus Long's family on Earth.
    • Kinky Spanking: A large number of works feature spanking as a fetish. Flogging as a punishment shows up from time to time (e.g. in Starship Troopers) but is not fetishized.
    • Author Tract: Heinlein's politics became more and more Libertarian and Hawkish as he got older and it's clear to see in his work.
  • It is impossible to read the work of Gilbert Hernandez and not get the impression that he has a massive thing for women with gigantic breasts and hips and tiny waists.
  • Jaime Hernandez has been accused of fetishising lesbians, based on the number of self-identified lesbian characters in his Love and Rockets work and the frequency with which they turn out to occasionally shag men as well. When the accusations started getting nasty, he suddenly revealed that two long-established male buddy characters sometimes blew each other, making it more of an equal-opportunity Everyone Is Bi. Unless, it was an attempt at an Author's Saving Throw, since it had never been hinted at until he came under fire.
  • Frank Herbert's later books in the Dune series fall prey to this trope. At first the story is about political intrigue and cultural clashing... and then by the fifth book or so it all collapses into what are BDSM dominatrixes taking over the galaxy through their powers of orgasm.
  • Hoo-boy, those guys who wrote the comics at Heroic Publishing sure love incest! Flare, Eternity Smith, Icicle, Champions...
  • If it's a Jonathan Hickman comic, it WILL have charts in it. Fantastic Four, The Avengers and The Nightly News all have them, and S.H.I.E.L.D. takes it to the next level. As the Twitter account Comic Facts put it "If you were to plot a graph showing the details of every Jonathan Hickman comic, you'd have the first page of a new Jonathan Hickman comic."
  • Hidekaz Himaruya loves his military uniforms. And (generally busty) girls with Hair Decorations. And boys in dresses (not only Poland and the younger Italies, but also Noto from the Noto-sama mini-games).
  • Kiseki Himura, best known for his work on Sword Art Online Progressive, absolutely loves drawing short-haired girls with big breasts, with the fanservice generated from the body itself rather than their actions. It doesn't get any clearer than his side project Getsuyoubi no Tawawa, a weekly illustration series all about buxom ladies going about their daily lives.
  • It is claimed that Hellsing mangaka Kouta Hirano based the design of Rip van Winkle (no, not that one) on a mix of his fetishes.
    • If you cross-reference with the other female characters then you can definitely see a pattern emerging: Glasses or sunglasses (Rip, Yumiko, Integra, Heinkel), gloves (almost EVERY character, male and female), androgyny (Rip, Integra, Heinkel and Zorin all wear mens clothes; Seras would look like a boy if not for her exceptionally large breasts, and do we even need to discuss Schrödinger?) stupidly large weaponry (Alucard's Casull, Rip's musket, Seras' "Harkonnen," Zorin's Scythe...). Hmn...
    • He also loves military uniforms, coats, soldiers, warfare, suits, and ridiculously long hair, on people of both genders (Alucard, Yumie, Rip, Luke Valentine, Integra, and even Pip Bernadotte's got an impressive ponytail), and people who are either very tall, very thin, or both. He also seems to like characters with unconventional weaponry (Rip's magic musket, Tubalcain Alhambra's playing cards, Zorin's scythe, Walter's wires, Anderson's bayonets...)
    • Considering that Kouta has made no secret of adapting characters from previous hentai work there's no good reason to be surprised when characters are so rife with fanservice.
  • P. C. Hodgell, author of Chronicles of the Kencyrath, really likes cats. It's most prominent in the first book: Both the Res aB'tyrr and Skyrrman have cats, Boo and Fang respectively; Jame gets her Non-Human Sidekick, her cat Jorin; we learn about the the Arrin-ken—the most awesome Kencyr—who look like are giant cats. Things are toned down a bit in the latter books, but you can still tell these are the work of a cat-lover.
  • William Hope Hodgson had definite opinions on bodybuilding, gender roles, and the domination and disciplining of beautiful women by strong men, and in The Night Land he indulges fully in them.
  • Robert Holmes wrote the Doctor Who serial The Two Doctors as a tirade against meat-eating which has the Doctor and his companion both go vegetarian at the end.
  • "Mr. Basic", the deranged perpetually naked madman behind HowToBasic, obviously enjoys smashing eggs so muh no matter how little reason there is for him to do so that it's a common joke in the fandom that "Eggs killed his parents."
  • Humon has often mentioned her fondness for sharp dressed men, fem!dom and larger men. She's gone out of her way when drawing fanservice-y art to portray characters of all sizes and shapes, on the basis that not all attractive people are Bishōnen and women with impossible hourglass figures. In a non-sexual way, she also prominently features multicultural mythology in all of her work, especially Scandinavian legends and creatures.
  • Andrew Hussie likes RPGs, glasses (especially Cool Shades), and superheroes. Homestuck has a lot of that. Especially glasses - half of the main cast wears some kind of eyewear. He also loves Hip-Hop music; he's done explicitly hip-hop based comics like And It Don't Stop (about giant robot rap battles). In Homestuck, three of the main characters are rappers; Dave Strider is a DJ and music producer who uses turntables to access his time powers (and has some minor Author Avatar elements), and Gamzee Makara is a Fantasy Counterpart Juggalo. Additionally, the narration occasionally dips into using contorted rapper slang and rap-inspired grammatical constructions, usually for humourous effect.
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