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  • If you live somewhere cosmopolitan, this is completely unremarkable.
  • Mormons are frequently stereotyped as being prone to giving their kids really strange names. Frequently the names are archaic, or created by combining two or more regular names into something irregular.
    • The two best places to find ridiculous names are Utah and the National Football League, though those two groups have little else in common.
      • Speaking of the NFL, the present champion of this trope (almost regardless of who he is standing next to) is Captain Munnerlyn, who was named after his grandfather (who was not called Captain, but at some point WAS a captain), particularly apparent when standing next to his brother and non-football player 'Tim'.
      • What, no love for Major Wright? D'Brickashaw Ferguson? Jaquizz Rodgers? How about Leodis McKelvin? What about Leger Douzable, Frostee Rucker, Latavius Murray, Ndamukong Suh, Anquan Boldin, Golden Tate, Carson Wentznote , Dak Prescott, Letroy Guion, or <snicker> Ha Ha Clinton-Dix ("Ha Ha" is short for "HaSean")? Or, for an inversion of Tomboyish Name, Danielle Hunter?
      • Even the NFL in the past had some interesting names. Examples include Natrone Means, Cletidus Hunt, Elvis Grbac, Browning Nagle, Babe Laufenberg, Merton Hanks, Ki-Jana Carter, and Akili Smith.
      • Don't forget about Sealver Siliga – NFL defensive tackle, Utah resident, and Mormon. And "Sealver" isn't even his real first name! It's Tupaimoefitpo.
      • Speaking of Sealver Siliga, the bank of unique NFL names is supplemented by the large presence of Pacific Islander (mostly Polynesian) football players. As such, we have players named U'ani Unga, Manu Tuaisosopo,note  Manti Te'o, Vai Sikahema, Ma'ake Kemoeatu, the father-and-son duo of Mosi and Lofa Tatupu, and Haloti Ngata. And the college ranks have plenty of Pacific Islander players likely to add their names to this bank in the future, with one notable current example being Alabama quarterback Tua Tagovailoa (whose full first name is Tuanigamanuolepola).
      • Famously spoofed by Key and Peele
  • NBA players also fall under this trope a lot. Examples include Kentavious Caldwell-Pope, LeBron James, Draymond Green, Marreese Speights, Elfrid Payton, and Kawhi Leonard. Factor in foreign players like Giannis Antetokounmpo, Zaza Pachulia, Kristaps Porziņģis, Jusuf Nurkić, Luka Dončić, and Nenê (whose birth name was even weirder: Maybyner Rodney Hilário), and the NBA can give the NFL a run for its money in terms of unique names.
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    • Anyone who thinks that this is restricted to the modern NBA is mistaken. Some retired players (both international and domestic) with unique names include Peja Stojaković, Vlade Divac, Šarūnas Marčiulionis, Arvydas Sabonis (whose son Domantas is now in the league), Detlef Schrempf, Alton Lister, the late Dražen Petrović, and the immortal God Shamgodd.
      • The Lakers' showtime trio consisted of Magic (Earvin), Kareem.... and James.
    • And that's not even counting players who changed their names, like Metta World Peace note  and World B. Free note 
    • Special mention goes to NBA legend Kobe Bryant, who was named after Kobe Beef!
    • US college basketball has also had its share of unusual names. Just to name two: Grlenntys Chief Kickingstallionsims and Mahershalalhashbaz Gilmore. The former bounced around a few overseas leagues. The latter went into acting and is now known as Mahershala Ali.
  • Modern Filipino families are guilty in naming their children with this. Sometimes, they use Anglo surnames as first names, sometimes add an extra letter, and sometimes even using names of countries as names. There are even cases that some children are named after anime characters. This comes with their Spanish or native Filipino surname. It is also common for modern Filipinos, especially the Protestant ones, to use the English version of Biblical names rather than the Spanish they are accustomed.
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    • In essence: if you see a person named Arwind, Junemar, Jennylyn, Melai, Chito, Jazielle, Jayvee, Laarnie, Rowell, Rochelle, or Rodel, there's a good chance that this person is Filipino. (On that note, anyone named "Rommel" — or "Erwin", for that matter — is almost certainly not named after Erwin Rommel.)
    • Filipinos are also guilty of placing "h" between a vowel and a consonant for their nickname or complete first name — Ronald could become Rhon, Jun could become "Jhun", or Joel may get bored with his ordinary name and become Jhoel. Oftentimes, the "h" is there from birth, e.g. parents naming their kids Jhoanne or Rhandy, for instance.
    • Or combining the names of both parents to name their offspring, e.g. a Robmar could be the son of Roberto and Maria. It's also common for fathers to add "-lyn" to the diminutive form of their name when naming their daughters, e.g. Ernielyn being the daughter of an Ernesto or Ernest, or Robbielyn being the daughter of a Roberto or Robert. (Looks like Renesmee was not the first one!) In fact, it's pervasive enough that "-lyn", along with "-elle" and "-zelle/-zel/-ziel", are very common ending syllables for modern Filipino feminine names, kind of like how a lot of African American girls' names end with "-iqua" or "-isha".
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    • Blending multiple names, in general, is quite common in the Philippines. Try combining the names of Jesus, Joseph, and Mary, in the case of politician Jejomar Binay. Or former Senator Heherson Alvarez, whose first name is a combination of male and female pronouns, and the word "son". Certainly sounds better than "Hisherson", though he goes by the more conventional nickname Sonny among family and friends.
    • All this won't be of any comfort to poor Lord Voldemort Estioco, however.
      • Speaking of Pinoys, most Filipino surnames are Spanish/Iberian family names (Cruz, Santos, Gomez, Acosta, Cuenca, Torres), Chinese surnames (Tan, Ong, Lim, Chua, Uy), or native Filipino surnames (Gatdula, Pangilinan, Bayani). However, some families have surnames that are drastically altered from their foreign (usually Chinese or Indian) origins. Examples include Tangco, Pabelico, Jaring, Colayco, Bagatsing (derived from Bhagat Singh), Cuyengkeng, Cojuangco, Monfort (derived from Montfort), Matiao, etc.
    • The entire Philippines, on average, actually has an "Aerith vs. Bob" dynamic with almost the entirety of Asia, since it's the only major country on the whole continentnote  where Western names and their derivatives have gained extreme prominence—thanks to centuries of pervasive cultural colonialism from both Catholic Spain and Anglophone America. From a Western (and perhaps Filipino?) point of view, most other Asians have the exotic, "Aerith"-style names, whilst Filipinos themselves have "Bob"-style names.
  • Jewish communities will include people with Hebrew names like Shoshana note , Golan, and Elisheva note , and those with more Western names like George, Hillary, and Melissa note . Bridging the gap are Western names with Hebrew or biblical origins, like Sarah, Daniel, or Michael.
    • And then there are Jewish communities in Germany, where most people are Russian and have either Russian or western sounding names, with some Israeli, Biblical, German and Yiddish names thrown into the mix.
      • Jewish immigrants to North America in the 1900-1940 era often gave their sons upper-crust English first names such as Irving, Mortimer, Arthur, Stanley, and Harvey in order to help them assimilate. These names almost instantly dropped out of favour among WASP families, leaving them to be regarded as "Jewish names".
  • Similar to Jewish communities, Armenian names can be sometimes derived from the Bible as well, so you might be just as likely to meet an Armenian named Ara, Vartan or Raffi as you are to meet one named David (or Davit as the case may be), Samuel or Gregory.
  • There is a local government district in Wales officially named, hold your breath, "Newtown and Llanllwchaiarn".
  • In some Latin American countries, it's becoming pretty common to give your children a fancy-sounding North-American name (most of them are pretty common American names, but in these countries, they sound foreign and rare). And, parents usually like to add a more local-sounding name. So you get pretty unique combinations such as Jonathan Nepomuseno, Brian Alejandro, Tyson José, and Leslie María (all actual names).
    • Sometimes they went a bit over the top, like Vladimiro Ilyich Montesinos, Peruvian intelligence chief.
    • Ilich Ramírez Sánchez AKA Carlos_the_Jackal — his two younger siblings were named "Lenin" and "Vladimir". (Their father was a dedicated Marxist.)
    • Latin American countries also contain immigrants who are not Spanish, so various European names like "Ludmilla" pop up, and you get names like "Jose Chen" from the Asian immigrants (unless they were Filipino, in which case a lot of them would already have Spanish surnames to begin with). Archaic names like "Hippolito" also seem to stick around.
    • The use of North American surnames as first names is not uncommon either.
    • And it's even better when their pronunciation gets adapted to Spanish phonetics, which is the case of Colombian football player James Rodríguez. His name is not pronounced like "James", as in James Potter, but more akin to "HA-mess", first syllable like ja in jalapeño, with a hard h sound, and second syllable like mess, but with a shorter s sound.
    • They also name people for English things, sentences and slogans, often spell-adapted to Spanish (mostly in Cuba), being two of such names "Yusmeil" and "Usnavi" (from "U.S. Mail" and "U.S Navy"), "Danyer" (danger), "Maivi" (maybe), "Yusimi" and "Aisiyu" ("you see me" and "I see you").
    • In Brazil, it's made worse by rewriting the names as they think it's spelled in Portuguese (David = Deivid, Diane = Daiane), along with adding fancy-looking letters (Maicon, already a changed up "Michael", can become Maikon or Maykon; Mike = Mayke). And then there's weird stuff that qualifies under As Long as It Sounds Foreign, such as Kissila.
  • Shows up in some areas of Australia where the population of recent (first- or second-generation immigrants) is high — and inverted in an interesting case. Traditional but relatively uncommon or archaic western names like Kenneth, Vincent, Edmund and the like are much more likely to belong to ethnic Asians than Europeans. The name Anthony Wong tips him specifically as an Australian actor; ditto for composer Edmund Choi. A lot of Asian families have been there as long as a lot of European families.
    • This is also true of Asians in New Zealand. There have been Chinese people in NZ since the Victorian age, but there was a lot of immigration in the 90s, particularly in the lead-up to Hong Kong being handed back to China. People called names like Shane Wong are likely to be descended from men who came to pan for gold during the Goldrush, on the other hand Agnes and Modesta Wong would have most likely moved to NZ in the last decade or so.
    • This is not an Australian thing at all, but rather an Asian-immigrant-to-English-speaking-countries thing.
    • On the other hand, this applies to place names in both Australia and New Zealand where towns will have ordinary English sounding names but their suburbs or local districts will often have the local Aboriginal/Maori names or sometimes the situation is vice versa. Some suburb names might even have an influence by other immigrant groups: Adelaide has the suburb of Klemzig, named by the Germans who settled there.
  • Judging by their athletes, European forenames are also common in Kenya: their fastest marathon runners include Duncan Kibet Kirong, James Kipsang Kwambai, Paul Tergat, Martin Lel, Vincent Kipruto; and among the women, Catherine Ndereba, Margaret Okayo, Susan Chepkemei, and Joyce Chepchumba.
    • This is due to the mandatory teaching of English in the school system and also the lack of Western-style family names in the various tribes. The child receives a traditional Kenyan tribal name at birth, and when they enter the school system they often register with an English first name and their father's traditional first name as their last name (although if their father was in the school system, it's more convenient to use the last name he used), so they tend to end up with very odd-sounding combinations.
    • It's quite common in French-speaking Africa (or Haïti), where locals often have names fallen out of fashion in France proper.
  • Very common math textbook exams where the questions which use people as a framing device always give them diverse names by dint of always going for the very exotic or unusual or those which are so very traditional English no one used them anymore. Once in the same question, there was a dilemma involving Alejandro, Raj, and Bill.
  • Former Major League Baseball player Andrés Galarraga has three daughters: Andria, Andrianna, and Katherine. There is, in fact, a theme here: the first two names are obviously derived from his name "Andres". The third? His nickname, "The Big Cat".
  • While many of its citizens don't realize it, the U.S.A. is a prime example of this, being a nation of immigrants. Even disregarding the increasingly-common mixing of Eastern and Western names ("Ben Song" or "James Miyamoto"), European names from completely different roots are combined pretty freely as well. Then there are the growing ranks of "Sheniqua Jones"es - or how about Aisha Tyler?
    • In many areas it's actually more common to have this type of name than a straight-up Western European one. In fact, you'd have a surprising amount of trouble finding anyone anywhere whose names were all of the same origin.
  • During the '90s in Germany, it was very fashionable to give your kids English or French names. Unfortunately, this phenomenon was mostly restricted to low-education low-income families, to the point that it's now considered to seriously hurt your chances to get a job if you're named Kevin or Jaqueline. Add to that the fact, that many of these parents didn't know the correct pronunciation of such names, which made "Shackelleenne" a very wide spread running gag.
    • Üffes Rocher.
    • People in Belgium frequently have English first names. It is probable that Brussels' nature as an international city has led to this, or perhaps it's the fact that Belgium has two main languages, French and Flemish, plus German in a small pocket in the country's far east.
  • Common on Internet forums, where handles range from the person's real name, through "Awesome McCool" Name, to Word Salad Title.
  • This is very common in Ireland. You can get people in the same family named Michael, Ciarán, Kathleen and Aibreann. In Leinster, you're more likely to come across unchanged Biblical or foreign names. In the north and west, Irish variants of Biblical/foreign names and original Irish names are more common.
  • The famous Jesus had a brother/cousin just as famous (in their time) named James.
    • "James" is just a clumsy English translation of Ya'aqov (Jacob). For that matter, Jesus' name (Yeshu or Yeshua, from the same root as Joshua) wouldn't have necessarily been out of place either.
    • It wasn't. In fact, the anecdote about the criminal 'Barabbas' the crowd acclaimed to be freed instead of Jesus is simplified in translation; the man's full name was 'Jesus Bar-Abbas.' For extra points, Bar Abbas is Aramaic for 'Son of the Father.'
  • In both Poland and the Polish community abroad, there are two basic naming conventions: the generic Greek and Hebrew-derived names used by most of the Western world nowadays, and ancient names that derive from Old Polish and Slavic roots.
    • This is true of most European countries, where Christianization resulted in the adoption of many names coming from Hebrew and Aramaic (e. g. the various national variants of John, Mary, Joseph, Ann), Greek (Catherine, Christopher, Alexander), and Latin (Pia, Agnes, Barbara, Martin). Later the popularity of some saints also led to the spread of names from other languages - "Xavier" for instance is believed to be derived from the Basque name Etxeberria (or Etcheberria). Some Polish names for instance also were taken from German, e.g. Karol (Karl, via Latin Carolus), Henryk (Heinrich), Jadwiga (Hedwig).
      • Names with Germanic origins are historically very popular in France (and neighbors), where the nobility was of Frankish or Latin extraction (and names where replicated throughout generations, hence the numeration system). Thierry, Robert, Louis, Charles, Henri, etc. are only the most common examples among potentially thousands of given names.
  • Reading a history book you find a variety of names, some of which are still in use (Norse/Germanic Frederic, Roderic, Helga, Alfred. Greek Alexander, Jason, Philip, Theodore, Bernice. Roman Marcus, Lukas, Julia, Claudius. Hebrew Sarah, Benjamin, David, Daniel.) and many of which aren't (Norse/Germanic Theodahad, Wulfila, Beowulf, Æthelred. Greek Anaxandridas, Ogyges, Pericles, Herodotus. Roman Tarquin, Servius, Caelius, Gnaeus.)
    • This can happen even with 19th-century history. Names given to the generation who fought the American Civil War fall into three categories - the timeless (John, Michael, Thomas); the antique (Obadiah, Ebenezer); and the third category that would've sounded old-timey as late as the 1970s but wouldn't raise an eyebrow today (anything that shortens to "Eli" or "Zack" has long since traded its mule and Morse Code book for an old Honda Civic and a new Android...)
  • Swedish foreign minister Carl Bildt has two children from his first marriage: Nils (son) and Blanceflor (daughter). To clarify: "Nils" has been a very common boy's name in Sweden (as a short form for "Nicholas") for centuries, even though its popularity was low for a large part of the 20th century. "Blanceflor" though is a French girl's name, that is pretty much unheard of in Sweden otherwise.
  • Take the Kardashian and Jenner children (please): Kim, Kourtney, Khloe, Kendall, Kylie...Brody, and Robert. Brody's name difference is because he is Bruce Caitlyn Jenner's child from another marriage (and thus a step- or half-brother to the other children) and Robert was named after his father.
    • The reason for the theme naming among the women is obvious when you note that their mother's name is Kristen.
    • Caitlyn Jenner is a case of this happening with *one* person. Both Bruce and Caitlyn are very common names these days, but the latter peaked in 1998. Caitlyn Jenner was born in 1949.
  • The 2008 US Presidential Election. On the Republican side, there's Sarah Palin and John McCain. On the Democratic side, there's Joe Biden and...Barack Obama. Sarah Palin's children (oldest to youngest): Track, Bristol, Willow, Piper, and Trig. Bristol named her son Tripp. In the end, the office went from George to Barack (and then to Donald). Barack even has a half-brother named George.
  • Even amongst the Anglosphere, we find this - many British people had to do a double take when they heard that two of the 2012 Republican candidates were called "Newt" and "Mitt".note 
  • In Romania people can be found with surnames outlandish from the country's language perspective - while this can be justified if the said people have Slavic, Greek, Turkic or Magyar names inherited from ancestors, it becomes pretty funny when you find in the Bucharest telephone directory a few dozens of people named Grant, Fox, Lohan or Malone, combined with typically Romanian given names, as there never has been a community of English (leave alone Irish) people there.
  • The center of all bizarre, ordinary, and cultural names of all... THE CLASS YEARBOOK. This is especially true in modern times where schools can have children of all backgrounds or origins. Thus, it's entirely possible nowadays to have a classroom with children who come from families with their own naming customs.
    • The phone book is also a good example of this.
  • Country Music group Tompall & the Glaser Brothers: Chuck, Jim, and Tompall Glaser. Actually a subversion, since Tompall's real name was Thomas Paul Glaser.
  • Another geographical example: The 50 states that compose the United States. Some state names are straightforward Spanish or English names. Others are Spanish, English, or French mangling of Native American words. Then some states are names of British kings and queens translated into Latin. Finally, you have Alaska (Russian pronunciation of an Aleut word) and Hawaii (a native Hawaiian word, also spelled Hawai'i).
    • The same goes for Canadian provinces on a smaller scale: New Brunswick, British Columbia, Alberta (English); Quebec (French-Native); Ontario, Manitoba, Nunavut (Native); and Nova Scotia (Latin).
  • Scientists, for all their love of really long and weird terminology, also like simplicity at times, explaining why many of the transporters in mitochondria (power-houses in cells) are given common English male names. This means we have TIM, TOM, SAM and...OXA?
  • The list of passengers on the Mayflower runs the gamut from Mary, John, Eleanor & William to Remember (female), Love (male), Humility (female) & Wrestling (male)
  • Because of the way we refer to their names, Ancient Rome during the transition from the Republic to Empire seemed to come off as this. We have major figures from Caesar, Pompey, Crassus, Cicero, Cato, Octavian/Augustus, Brutus, Cleopatra, and... Mark Antony? Of course, Mark Antony's proper name is "Marcus Antonius," which fits in much better.
  • Dracula. His father's name is "Vlad Dracul". His brother's name is "Radu". His cousin's name is... "Stephen".
  • When Ferruccio Lamborghini founded his car company, he hired three ex-Ferrari engineers: Gian Paolo Dallara, Paolo Stanzani... and Bob Wallace.
  • In the 1970s, an expedition was carried out to search for the lost city of Atlantis. Leading the expedition were Pino Turolla, Dimitri Rebikoff and...David Zink.
  • A former Maryland state senator of Polish descent had the legal given names "American Joe."
  • Touring jugglers The Flaming Idiots introduced themselves like this: "I'm Gyro!" "I'm Pyro!" "I'm Walter."
  • The famous magician duo of Siegfried Fischbacher and Roy Horn.
  • Inconsistencies in journalistic/historical translation conventions on names led to this trope appearing with respect to names of various countries' leaders, especially royalty. For example, the Spanish monarchs who commissioned Christopher Columbus are called in English works as Ferdinand (a German name) and Isabella (an Italian name), not Ferdinand and Elizabeth (the same names in English) nor Fernando and Isabel (the same names in Spanish). Their great-grandson is Philip II, but their more distant descendant who reigns in Spain today is Felipe VI. Likewise, famous Russian tsars include Peter (not Pyotr) and Ivan (not John). Some older historical works can startle readers by referring to Caliph Aaron the Just (Harun al-Rashid) or Sultan Solomon (Suleyman), next to Mohammeds and Khalids.
  • The South African soccer team has one of the most ethnically diverse squads, containing players from all ethnicities of the Rainbow Nation. This results in the following team lineup: Goalkeepers: Itumeleng Khune and Darren Keet; Defenders: Anele Ngcongca, Thabo Matlaba, Tefu Matshamaite and... Clayton Daniels; Midfielders: Siboniso Gaxa, Siphiwe Tshabalala, Thulani Serero and... Dean Furman; Forwards: Tokelo Rantie and Bernard Parker.
    • Many black South Africans have a native African first name and an English middle name, or vice versa. See former president Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela and infamous Serial Killer Maoupa Cedric Maake for an example of each.
  • Marilyn Manson's lineup for the 2003 album The Golden Age of Grotesque. As Marilyn Manson (the man, not the band) had stopped assigning female icon/serial killer hybrid names around this time, the all-male lineup looked like this — Marilyn (Manson), Madonna (Wayne Gacy), Ginger (Fish), Tim (Skold), and John (5, aka John Lowery).
  • Exchange students probably know this trope quite well, too. Either by going far away - "James" in a class with other kids names "Yuki", "Shoutarou" and "Misaki", for example - or by meeting up with other exchange students from a bunch of different countries, so James may talk to Nur-Illada, Aylin and Ville.
  • The 3 stars of FC Barcelona's offense: Luis (Suárez), Lionel (Messi)... and Neymar.
    • The 3 stars of Leicester's Cinderella season: Riyad (Mahrez), N'Golo (Kanté)... and Jamie (Vardy).
    • What about the Man United Treble-winning team? Players named Peter, Roy, Paul, Ryan, Andy, Gary, etc. were teammates with players named Jaap and Ole Gunnar.
    • Arsenal's invincibles say hello: Patrick, Ashley, Roberto, and Dennis shared the field with Thierry, Sol, Jens, and Kolo. And Sol is a nickname; his real first name is Sulzeer.
  • Association Football, in general, is like this due to its international presence. It's not uncommon to see players named Thomas, Wayne, Frank, Paul, David, Antonio, Robert, and Luis play against or alongside players named Kwadwo, Arjen, Bastian, Odion, Shinji, Asmir, Zlatan, or Riyad.
    • Hockey is like this as well. Expect to see a Joe, John, Brad, Matt, Wayne, or Patrick share the ice with an Anže, Jaromír, Joonas, Zdeno, Teemu, or Henrik.
  • During the early Soviet times it was popular to use non-traditional names for children, ranging from generic words such as names of tree species and minerals, through chemical elements, mathematical/technical terminology and such (supposed to symbolize scientific and industrial progress), to all-out constructed words with revolutionary symbolism. That last category included many strange-sounding names. Examples include Vil, Vladlen, Dazdranagon, Revmira, Solpred, Takles, and Persostrat. note 
    • Unsurprisingly, these names became subjects of mockery by those fortunate enough to have an old-style or at least less ridiculous-sounding) name, and lots of people changed their name after turning 18 or at least shortened it to something more ordinary.
    • The use of patronymics provides a contrast with parents' names. Take, for example, Rimidalv Ivanovich Pogrebnoy.
  • The 2016 Olympic and Paralympic mascots count, as they are named Vinicius (which represents the fauna of Brazil, specifically cats, birds, and monkeys) and Tom (which represents the flora of Brazil).
    • However, this doesn't apply in Brazil, where "Vinicius" is a far more popular name than "Tom", which is rarer but still "normal". Also, it's a Shout-Out to musical duo Antonio Carlos "Tom" Jobim and Vinicius de Moraes.
  • In the Netherlands since the early '2000s there has been both a resurgence of old-fashioned Dutch names that had been in decline in the late 20th century, e.g. Hanneke (eq. to Johanna in English) for women and Thijs (eq. to Matthew) for men, as well as a rise of English names (probably because Dutch people are exposed to English both early in education and a lot culturally via TV, which is English-spoken with subtitles instead of dubbing) such as Michael and Kevin.note  Thus in the same family children can be named both old-fashioned Dutch names, and modern English names.
  • In Ireland there's been a resurgence in the popularity of traditional Irish names, which means you can find people named Aoife, Caoimhe and Ciarán alongside people named Emma, Chloe and Jack
  • Because of Ceuta and Melilla, a map of most common surnames per province in Spain will include a spot for Mohamed (with only one 'M' - it's a Spanish surname, after all).
  • The historical Cardinal de Richelieu had many cats over his life, and may have contributed to it being popular as a pet (no word on whether they were white and always kept at hand). At his death, the list included Félimare, Lucifer, Ludovic-le-Cruel, Ludoviska, Mimi-Piaillon, Mounard-Le-Fougueux, Perruque (wig), Rubis-sur-l'ongle (a French expression meaning paying up front), Serpolet (thyme), Pyrame, Thisbe (two characters from Greek Mythology), Racan, Soumise (Submissive) and Gazette.
  • Once upon a time there was an Italian immigrant family in France with six children. Their names were Joseph, Louis, Caroline, Lucien, Pauline...and Napoleon. Somewhat justified in that those were all Gallicized versions of their originally Corsican/Italian names. Napoleon was the only one that had no French equivalent. Still stands out, though.
  • Four of the sons of legendary Tongan rugby union player Fatai Kefu (and his wife Neomai) have also played rugby at a high level: Toutai, Fa'aleo, Mafile'o (Mafi), and Steve. A fifth son, Simione (Simi), is a TV presenter.
  • While many Commonwealth tanks during World War II were given some pretty fearsome and evocative names, such as Crusader, Grizzly, Firefly and Sentinel, they also counted among their number two tanks named Matilda and another named Bob.
  • Thanks to her multiple marriages, by the end of her life Sonia Greene had become Sonia Haft Greene Lovecraft Davis. You might have noticed that the last name from her second marriage is... rather unusual.
  • Ted Cruz's full name is Rafael Edward Cruz. No, not Eduardo. Edward. (It actually almost makes him sound Filipino (see above), but he's not.)
  • The first names of the generals of the American army during World War II were George, Douglas, Mark, George... and Dwight and Omar.
  • Once upon a time in Texas, there was a poor family called the Murphys. Some of the children had common names: Richard, Joseph, Charles, and Elizabeth. Two of the children had names that sound old-fashioned now but were common then: Willie Beatrice and Eugene. But the other children had more unusual names: Ariel, Vernon, Oneta, Verda, and, most famously, Audie.
  • The leaders of the Eeaster Rising were Patrick Pearse, James Connolly, Tom Clark, Thomas MacDonagh...and Eamonn Ceannt, Seàn MacDermott, and Èamon de Valera.
  • Elizabeth the First had two hired pirates who captured Spanish treasure ships for her, served as vice admirals during the sinking of the Spanish Armada, and often sailed together. Their names? Francis Drake and John Hawkins.
  • The three most famous American playwrights of the twentieth century are Eugene O'Neill, Arthur Miller, and...Tennessee Williams? Granted, it was just a nicknamenote , but it’s still strange.
  • Nicholas Barbon had the middle name of (deep breath)... If-Christ-had-not-died-for-thee-thou-hadst-been-damned.
  • Women who have multiple marriages can sometimes end up with odd combinations of last names.
  • Nicolas Sarkozy’s full name is Nicolas Paul Stéphane Sarközy de Nagy-Bocsa. Blame it on his dual French and Hungarian heritage.
  • Even The Pope is no stranger to this. There have been Popes named John, Peter, Zachary, Francis, and Leo, and there have been Popes that were named Hyginus, Formosus, Pontian, Zephyrinus, and Anacletus. Many Popes have often taken on a new name when they ascended to their holy status, likely inspired by a man named Mercurius, who became Pope John II in the year 533.
    • This is arguably also derived from biblical naming conventions; when someone's name changes in the Bible, it signifies a major change of status with God (i.e. Abram to Abraham, Sarai to Sarah, Jacob to Israel, Simon Bar-Jonah to Peter, Saul of Tarsus to Paul, etc.).
  • Movie credits often have an odd mix of names.
  • Celebrities with strange stage names often have normal real names:
    • Evel Knievel's real first name was Robert. Granted, his last name really was Knievel, but still.
    • Meat Loaf's real name is Michael Lee Aday.
  • After becoming an American, Lauri Törni changed his name to the much less exotic "Larry Thorne".
  • Pets. Some people name their pets traditional pet names, like “Fluffy”. Some people give their pets human names, like “Alex”. Some people name their pets weird things, like “Waffle Dots” or “Pitsky”. It all depends on the owner.
  • Penn Jillete's family. There's, of course, Penn himself, and his kids, Zolten Penn, and Moxie Crimefighter, and his wife, Emily.
  • One of Hong Kong's cultural quirks is a huge variety of English names, from Isaac, Emily and Thomas, to Devil, Kinky and Whale. Seriously.
  • Native American names can sound a bit like that. You have traditional names from their original tongue, names that are English phrases stuck together without spaces, names that are a phrase with the spaces, and English names of varied origin and rarity, or a combination of the above. For example, the voice actors of Connor and his mother from Assassin's Creed III were Noah Watts and Kaniehtiio Horn.
    • This also extends to place names in many states, such as Washington State. On one hand, you have normal-sounding city names such as Everett, Bremerton, and Vancouver. On the other hand, you have names like Puyallup note  (which also serves as a shibboleth), Issaquah and Tacoma. In fact, Seattle's name is a loose approximation of how Chief Sealth's name was pronounced in his native language.
      • Arctic place names can also be tongue-twisters. While names like Deadhorse or Yellowknife are easy enough, chances are you're not going to pronounce Utqiaġvik or Tuktoyaktuk correctly on your first try. Notably, many of these places used to have completely different English names before being changed back into their native names; the aforementioned Utqiaġvik used to be called (and is still sometimes referred to as) Barrow.
  • Such was the case with the Dionne family, who became famous for having the first known surviving quintuplets, and who also had eight additional children. The quintuplets all had French names (Yvonne, Annette, Cecile, Emilie, and Marie), as did the parents, but only four of the other eight Dionne children did; the other four were named Ernest, Rose, Daniel, and Victor.
  • The England national team for the 2018 World Cup included players called Harry, Eric, Phil and John, and ones called Raheem, Fabian, Delenote  and Ruben. (To be fair, with the exception of Fabian, the ones with unusual names are all from immigrant families.)

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