Follow TV Tropes

Brick Flick

Go To

Using a brick/cinderblock with the intent to harm or destroy

This trope has been Nuked
Proposed By:
HackUrToatser on Nov 5th 2018 at 12:06:50 PM
Last Edited By:
Dravencour on Nov 12th 2018 at 8:22:04 AM
Name Space: Main
Page Type: trope

Ah Bricks! The real life legos of the world, used to make sturdy buildings ever since 7500 BC, but there are a minority of people who thinks there are other uses of the good old sun-dried clay block. Yep, throwing it, whether it's at people or through a snappy neighbor's car window, it's more easier to find, stronger and tougher than a small rock or if you did enough efficient excercise you could throw a cinderblock at the desired target, it would win 100% of your fights and totally decimate whoever's property it landed on.

With the hard flat edge of the brick it could be also used as a bludgeon weapon, that's why the Improvised Weapon made of newspaper, The Millwall Brick note  get it's name.

Not to be confused with Brick Joke, Brick Break, Bowel-Breaking Bricks or Flying Brick, as this page is about the literal meaning of a flying brick, See also Improbable Weapon User.


Examples:

Comic Books

  • Batman: Tim Drake's first introduction to his future girlfriend Stephanie Brown comes with a brick to the face when she attacks the shadowy figure following her before she realizes he's a fellow hero.
Film
  • Home Alone 2: Kevin tries drop a brick on Harry, he dodges and brains Marv, twice. Marv later tries to turn the tables.
    Marv: "SUCK BRICK, KID!"
Live-Action TV
  • The Sopranos: During a heated argument about paying an expensive bill between Paulie and Christopher outside a restaurant, a waiter comes out to ask about a low tip. After the two mob guys insult him the waiter calls them assholes, Christopher proceeds to throw a brick at his head, the waiter falls and gets a seizure so Paulie puts him down with a gun fearing he might tell cops about the events. It's a Kick the Dog and Played for Drama as it's another example of the Dimeo Family killing innocent people unrelated to the Mob, and it doesn't help that the waiter said he had a family to feed.
Toys
  • The G.I. Joe action figure Road Pig features a sledge hammer accessory with a cinder block at the end.
Video Games
  • Bully: It's a throwable weapon found around the school Auto Shop, or poor areas like New Coventry, amazngly it always breaks on contact no matter if you throw it at old people, hobos, high schoolers, little kids, and they all get up with part of their health missing as if nothing happened, it's unknown if it's because the bricks are brittle or everyone has a Hard Head.
  • In Dead Rising 2 and Dead Rising 3, it's used as a melee, and thrown weapon but in 3 it loses the melee part, and in the 2 it gets thrown like a football by Chuck.
  • In the computer game Hooligans: Storm Over Europe, the player's units could gather bricks from construction sites to throw at other hooligans, cars, buildings, or police. There was also the "turret" command, where your units will gather defensively around the brick pile and throw bricks at any police or rival hooligans that come near the pile.
  • The Last of Us: A brick is a common throwing item in the game to make noise and lure enemies or stun foes when thrown on them.
  • The brick is a Joke Weapon in the TimeSplitters series. It's thrown in an arc, making it hard to hit with, and risks ricocheting off something and killing you. It's also the only unlockable weapon in the first two games.
Web Video
  • SuperMarioLogan: In "Home Alone 2" Jr drops a brick on the Brooklyn Guy's wife as a shout out to it's namesake.

Feedback: 28 replies

Nov 5th 2018 at 12:20:11 PM

ey how tf do i edit my trope, edit button broke or something

Nov 5th 2018 at 12:27:59 PM

Yeah, there seems to be a glitch happening...

Nov 5th 2018 at 1:05:44 PM

When you can edit your proposal, the grammar could use some work.

Nov 5th 2018 at 3:32:58 PM

In addition to being a little confusing term, it violates No New Stock Phrases; Brick Toss or Brick Throw might work just as well.

Also, don't ever confuse with Brick Joke. Ever.

Nov 5th 2018 at 4:10:13 PM

The Last Of Us: A common throwing item in the game to make noise and lure enemies or stun foes when thrown on them.

Nov 5th 2018 at 5:47:47 PM

Maybe something alliterative like Brick Bunt or Brick Bludgeon if this can be expanded?

Nov 6th 2018 at 6:56:56 AM

I feel like this should just be Throw Anything, the ranged equivalent of Improbable Weapon User.

Nov 6th 2018 at 1:38:30 PM

^ "ranged equivalent of Improbable Weapon User" would be Abnormal Ammo

Nov 6th 2018 at 6:16:13 PM

Is there a trope for someone killing or hurting another character with a rock? Someone who just wants to do some damage and attacks someone with stone? Because that could easily include using items like bricks, or cement, or what have you.

Nov 7th 2018 at 12:13:34 AM

^ If they actually manipulate said rock, it's Dishing Out Dirt

Nov 7th 2018 at 10:15:12 AM

^ it's a glitch

^^ True, I was thinking more like "Character picks up a rock and uses it as a makeshift weapon".

Nov 7th 2018 at 12:01:34 PM

If this is just about bricks and the like as weapons, but not necessarily as thrown weapons:

  • Batman: Tim Drake's first introduction to his future girlfriend Stephanie Brown comes with a brick to the face when she attacks the shadowy figure following her before she realizes he's a fellow hero.

Nov 8th 2018 at 5:27:51 PM

Toys

  • The GI Joe action figure Road Pig features a sledge hammer accessory with a cinder block at the end.

Nov 8th 2018 at 5:29:18 PM

Can it be just regular rock/stones?

Nov 8th 2018 at 6:52:11 PM

In the computer game Hooligans: Storm Over Europe, the player's units could gather bricks from construction sites to throw at other hooligans, cars, buildings, or police. There was also the "turret" command, where your units will gather defensively around the brick pile and throw bricks at any police or rival hooligans that come near the pile.

Nov 8th 2018 at 7:02:14 PM

ey if you want regular rocks/stones, go to Dishing Out Dirt

Nov 8th 2018 at 7:16:09 PM

^ Dishing Out Dirt is for earth-related superpowers, not just using a rock as a weapon. You wouldn't call someone An Ice Person for killing someone with an icicle, would you?

Nov 9th 2018 at 2:10:30 PM

I think the "Quick" in the title isn't really necessary. "Brick Flick" is clever and clear enough.

  • The brick is a Joke Weapon in the Time Splitters series. It's thrown in an arc, making it hard to hit with, and risks ricocheting off something and killing you. It's also the only unlockable weapon in the first two games.

Nov 9th 2018 at 11:59:20 PM

It's not a subtrope of Dishing Out Dirt. It's a superpower, this draft is not.

Nov 11th 2018 at 3:54:34 AM

And no, this has nothing to do with movies whose demographic are bricks, literal or figurative but one can dream.

Nov 11th 2018 at 6:55:23 AM

Krazy Kat: Ignatz never misses a chance to toss a brick at poor Krazy; Krazy, rather than be hurt by it, considers it a token of appreciation from their "L'il ainjil."

Nov 11th 2018 at 11:24:38 AM

I really don't see any reason not to include normal rocks in this trope. Beyond the misunderstanding of what Dishing Out Dirt is, the idea of someone using a rock as a weapon and someone using a brick as a weapon aren't all that different. Both implies the character is either physically strong enough to use a rock as a weapon and that they want to do damage without a real weapon perhaps because they're desperate or because they want to hurt their opponent as much as possible. Bricks, Concrete, Rocks... in the end they all convey the same idea. In the end, a brick is no more meaningful than a normal rock.

In the specific example I'm thinking of, one character, enraged after being stalked and attacked, uses a block of concrete to break their attacker's leg. This same character later kills an innocent man by smashing their head in with a large rock. You're saying that these scenes would be somehow different in meaning if this character used a brick instead.

Nov 11th 2018 at 12:03:35 PM

Yeah rocks and bricks are similar, but I consider them distinct enough to be tropes on their own, Sister Trope even. Just like how Cloth Fu is similar and sister trope to Clothing Combat.

Nov 11th 2018 at 12:07:29 PM

In what way? Cloth Fu and Clothing Combat aren't the same trope because the fighting style and meaning are different despite their similarities. How is using a rock different from using a brick?

Nov 11th 2018 at 2:07:34 PM

^ Because he thought "using a rock" as Dishing Out Dirt. Which is wrong.

Nov 12th 2018 at 8:22:04 AM

The Onion had an infographic titled "Top Murder Weapons By Income"; the weapon of choice in the >$6,000 range was "Brick", while "Gold Brick" was for those making $210,000-590,000. https://www.theonion.com/top-murder-weapons-by-income-1819587155

Top