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Macho Latino

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Mexican and Latino cultural attitude in which men are hypermasculine.

This work is a proposed Trope, Tropers can vote and offer feedback in the comments section below.
Proposed By:
EdnaWalker on Jan 2nd 2019 at 11:13:18 PM
Last Edited By:
EdnaWalker on Feb 1st 2019 at 3:18:09 AM
Name Space: Main
Page Type: trope

Es macho, es muy macho, es muy mas macho!

A tendency for overtly masculine, aggressively manly men to hail from and be embraced by Latin America and by Latinos and Hispanics in the USA note  and Belize note , this regional variant of the Macho Macho Man has a special place in the hearts of Spanish and Portuguese note  speakers. It should — they invented the word machismo. Strong, fierce men are culturally revered, from great generals to luchadores. Perhaps not unrelated, per The Other Wiki, the Nahuatl word macho means "one who is worthy of imitation", despite being etymologically unrelated. The roots of Latin macho and machismo run deep.

Can be, but is not always a Latin Lover. Distinct from the generally more reserved and sophisticated Dashing Hispanic, though the two can and do overlap. The macho latino is a common stereotype in Telenovelas.

This trope is, of course, Rated M for Manly, and can result in Testosterone Poisoning if not monitored. Part of National Stereotypes, and found in Latin Land, Spexico, and beyond. Despite the name this could just as easily apply to a macho Filipino note , a macho Chicano (A native-born citizen of the USA with a Mexican heritage), a macho Puerto Rican, a macho Amerindian or other ethnicity (Hispanic or not, be they white, black, or Asian, not just mestizo) from Mexico or other Latin American country, or a native of mother Spain or Portugal. May sport one of the Magnificent Moustaches of Mexico, but is just as likely to go clean-shaven or wear a neatly-trimmed goatee.

Subtrope of Macho Macho Man.

Examples:

     Animated Film 
  • A villainous example from Despicable Me 2. Gru describes El Macho, a Latino supervillain, as hypermasculine in every way possible, down to the way he died (though Gru suspects the death was faked, because they never found the body, only a pile of singed chest hair). He is right about that.

     Literature 
  • The Choirboys: in which Officer Roscoe Rules, the most macho cop in the LAPD, gets into a who-blinks-first clash of heads with a Puerto Rican streetfighter, and tears his moustache off - provoking a Curb-Stomp Battle in which two cops end up receiving a beating.
  • Don Quixote has a healthy dose of this in the tale of the old knight who takes it into his head to go on a quest in Spain and backs down from no perceived peril.
  • The Puerto Rican-Jewish J of I Am J is obsessed with masculinity, which is troubling because most still see him as a teenage girl. J mocks himself for doing something as "un-Puerto Rican" and "wimpy" seeming as hanging around a Manhattan Starbucks.

     Live-Action Television 
  • A famous sketch from the February 17, 1979 episode of Saturday Night Live consisted of a game show called "Quien Es Mas Macho?" The sketch, delivered entirely in Spanish, had the contestants picking which of various Hispanic celebrities were more macho.
    "Quien es mas macho? Fernando Lamas, o Ricardo Montalban?"
  • A common stereotype used in Telenovelas where usually the male lead is a macho latino, even in the main image of that page appears two men that fit this trope. Some specific examples of this:
    • Pasion de Gavilanes is about three macho brothers working for a hacienda ruled by three strong women. The story is focused mostly in these brothers, being the three of them the classical stereotype of the macho latino.
    • Machos is about a patriarchy of only men. Although every member of the Mercader family has a different and distinctive male stereotype, the father and one of the sons can be marked under this stereotype as the "machos" of this Chilean telenovela.

    Pro Wrestling 
  • WWE had various wrestlers with this stereotype in its history, not just luchadores. One of the most recent examples was Alberto Del Rio, a Mexican wrestler stated as a macho and millionaire who looks like a Telenovela actor.

     Video Games 
  • Subverted in Red Dead Redemption II: In the campfire scenarios involving Micah Bell, when Javier Escuella (who is from Mexico) kicks Micah Bell, the latter insults him for the way he kicks by saying, "You kick like a girl. He also seems less manly than the other men in Dutch's gang.

    Western Animation 

     Real Life 
  • The culture of knife-fighting in Peru and elsewhere in South America has a healthy dose of this trope.
  • Male lucha libre wrestlers are usually depicted as hyper-macho and manly as part of their over the top personas.
  • Subverted: As much as Mexico is known for its machismo, Mexico's culture is also highly matriarchal in nature.
    • The combination of words "tu" and "madre" (your mother) is cacophonous and taken offensively by spanish-speakers, regardless of age or gender. If you must use it, remember to replace it with "su (senora) madre" at formal situations or the sweeter "tu mama" at informal ones.
    • To insult a person's mother is a Mexican cultural Berserk Button.

Feedback: 45 replies

Jan 2nd 2019 at 11:13:58 PM

Can you think of a good description for the trope?

Jan 2nd 2019 at 11:58:33 PM

Cannot.

That said, you need to add a laconic before you can add a better description. And, maybe start with adding examples first and then go from there?

Jan 3rd 2019 at 12:21:52 AM

Ah, so you do. My bad.

Jan 3rd 2019 at 12:21:52 AM

Ah, so you do. My bad.

Jan 3rd 2019 at 4:52:25 AM

Isn't this (looking in from the outside, from Europe) a more general Latin American thing and even extends back to Spain? Latin Land, Spexico, et c, as a cultural trope and possibly covered in National Stereotypes?

Specific examples; the culture of knife-fighting in Peru and elsewhere in South America.

  • The Choirboys: in which Officer Roscoe Rules, the most macho cop in the LAPD, gets into a who-blinks-first clash of heads with a Puerto Rican streetfighter, and tears his moustache off - provoking a Curb Stomp Battle in which two cops end up receiving a beating.
  • Don Quixote has a healthy dose of this in the tale of the old knight who takes it into his head to go on a quest in Spain and backs down from no perceived peril.

Jan 3rd 2019 at 5:24:26 AM

Unless I'm missing some stereotype associated with Mexico, machismo is a general issue associated with the entirety of Latin America.

Jan 3rd 2019 at 6:24:28 AM

We have Dashing Hispanic, which covers not just Spanish but also the Mesoamerican, but I have the feeling that it only covers the "dashing" kind of characters, who are typically not macho.

Jan 3rd 2019 at 10:58:35 AM

Lucha libre wrestlers are usually depicted as hyper-machismo as part of their over the top personas.

Jan 3rd 2019 at 3:52:49 PM

I was going to suggest Macho Latino, or Latin Machismo.

A draft for the description, definitely not complete, feel free to rewrite as needed.


Es macho, es muy macho, es muy mas macho!

A tendency for overtly masculine, aggressively manly men to hail from and be embraced by Latin America, this regional variant of the Macho Macho Man has a special place in the hearts of Spanish and Portuguese speakers. It should — they invented the word machismo. Strong, fierce men are culturally revered, from great generals to luchadores. Perhaps not unrelated, per The Other Wiki, the Nahuatl word macho means "one who is worthy of imitation", despite being etymologically unrelated. The roots of Latin machismo run deep.

Distinct from the generally more reserved and sophisticated Dashing Hispanic, though the two can and do overlap.

This trope is, of course, Rated M For Manly, and can result in Testosterone Poisoning if not monitored. Part of National Stereotypes, and found in Latin Land, Spexico, and beyond — despite the name this could just as easily apply to a Macho Filipino or native of mother Spain. May sport one of the Magnificent Moustaches Of Mexico, but is just as likely to go clean-shaven or wear a neatly-trimmed goatee.

Jan 4th 2019 at 5:50:52 AM

Jan 5th 2019 at 9:09:12 AM

I like Latino Machismo.

Jan 5th 2019 at 10:56:49 AM

^It may take away from the alliteration, but it better reflects the fact that it is also a general Latino attitude and not just a Mexico specific attitude.

Jan 5th 2019 at 11:15:01 AM

I would call it Macho Latino. Machismo sounds like He Man Woman Hater.

Jan 5th 2019 at 12:24:23 PM

[Suggestions for the description, see below.]

Es macho, es muy macho, es muy mas macho!

A tendency for overtly masculine, aggressively manly men to hail from and be embraced by Latin America (and beyond), this regional variant of the Macho Macho Man has a special place in the hearts of Spanish and Portuguesenote  speakers. It should — they invented the word machismo. Strong, fierce men are culturally revered, from great generals to luchadores. Per The Other Wiki, the Nahuatl word macho even means "one who is worthy of imitation", despite being etymologically unrelated. The roots of Latin machismo run deep indeed.

Can be, but is not always a Latin Lover. Distinct from the generally more reserved and sophisticated Dashing Hispanic, though the two can and do overlap.

This trope is, of course, Rated M For Manly, and can result in Testosterone Poisoning if not monitored. Part of National Stereotypes, and found in Latin Land, Spexico, and the good old U.S. of A — despite the name this could just as easily apply to a macho Chicano (a native-born citizen of the USA with a Mexican heritage),note  macho Amerindian (Hispanic or not — see Mayincatec for the broad strokes), macho Filipino, macho assimilated person of another ethnicity living any Spanish-speaking country, or a native of mother Spain and the whole Iberian Peninsula. May sport one of the Magnificent Moustaches Of Mexico, but is just as likely to go clean-shaven or wear a neatly-trimmed goatee.


Suggesting a few edits, changed a few things around and moved the note about Spanish-speaking parts of the US down with the other information about specific countries/regions.

I'm partial to Macho Latino as well but I don't really see how Latin Machismo is any closer to He Man Woman Hater. Related, but not in danger of being confused, I think.

Lucha libre definitely needs its own example section under real life at some point, so I'd suggest moving the orphaned line there (see below) and eventually adding more detail. Bullfighting too.

Real Life

  • Male lucha libre wrestlers are usually depicted as hyper-macho as part of their over-the-top personas.

Jan 5th 2019 at 11:40:28 AM

^ I admit that I probably see it that way because I speak Spanish. "Machismo" is the word used for the attitues agaisnt women, and the word is more often translated as "sexism". While "Macho" is used for simple, over-the-top manly gestures. I would like to hear comments on other spanish speakers, because when I first saw the title, I thought it would be like "Mexicans are more sexist on average."

Jan 5th 2019 at 12:20:09 PM

Ahh. Fair enough, then. Didn't realize that.

Jan 5th 2019 at 2:59:04 PM

Good point.

Latino Macho or Macho Latino then.

Jan 5th 2019 at 6:19:13 PM

Can't get the link to work, sorry. But just so you know, you can also embed links in text the same way as wikilinks, like this:

[[https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/100sweatridley.jpg here]]

Which should show up like this: here

Jan 5th 2019 at 10:39:52 PM

Live-Action Television

  • A famous sketch from the February 17, 1979 episode of Saturday Night Live consisted of a game show called "Quien Es Mas Macho?" The sketch, delivered entirely in Spanish, had the contestants picking which of various Hispanic celebrities were more macho.
    "Quien es mas macho? Fernando Lamas, o Ricardo Montalban?"

Jan 6th 2019 at 10:54:31 AM

Edna Walker, the picture actually downloaded on my end, and... I really don't know why you've sent us this picture. What is this meant to portray?

(For all else, here's an imgur link: https://imgur.com/TyybGZh )

Jan 6th 2019 at 11:53:55 AM

That picture was shown only to debunk the prevailing assumption that, because Mexico is an hispanohablante country, that "all Mexicanos are Latino."

So despite it saying Latino, the person need not necessarily be Latino, they just need to be from an hispanohablante (Spanish) country, a lusophone (Portuguese) country, Filipino, or Hispanic and/or Latino Americans (be they from Puerto Rico, Florida, Texas, California, New York, Hawaii, e.t.c.) or Belizans.

Not adding to YKTTW.

Jan 6th 2019 at 12:21:00 PM

...Er, was anyone saying that?

What are you not adding, sorry? The picture?

Jan 6th 2019 at 12:54:37 PM

Yeah, I'm a little confused too. I don't think anyone is saying or implying here that all examples must be Latino rather than be someone from one of the countries you've listed or of Hispanic/Latino descent.

Why wouldn't you add that bit to the TLP, if you think mentioning it is important?

Jan 6th 2019 at 1:09:42 PM

  • Despicable Me 2 features a Mexican supervillain known as "El Macho", he dressed as a luchador and faked his own death via jumping into a volcano riding a shark loaded with dynamite.

Jan 6th 2019 at 3:17:03 PM

Do we really count Filipinos here?

Jan 6th 2019 at 4:18:16 PM

I think we can, but it's going to depend on the example, case by case. A macho Filipino definitely could qualify for this trope — they might not, necessarily, but they could. It's flexible, it's not meant to be a hard border.

v That puts it better.

Jan 6th 2019 at 4:05:34 PM

I think it would have to depend on context, and if the macho nature of this theoretical Filipino character is based on them being, for lack of a better term, "Latino", or if they just happen to be a Filipino character that's macho.

Same goes for every other example here of course; if there isn't a link between the character's culture and their macho nature, it's just a coincidence.

Jan 7th 2019 at 8:03:18 AM

I count macho examples from the USA (not just Puerto Rico), Belize, The Philippines to some extent as long as they specifically that tie to this trope because they have close ties to Hispanohablante countries (USA and Philippines to Mexico and Belize to Honduras).

Jan 8th 2019 at 4:56:53 AM

Oooohhh, I was to mention "El Macho" example, but it's added already (at least in comments)

Pro Wrestling:

  • WWE had various wrestlers with this stereotype in its history, not just luchadores. One of the most recent examples was Alberto Del Rio, a Mexican wrestler stated as a macho and millionaire who looks like a Telenovela actor.

Jan 8th 2019 at 8:10:40 AM

Jan 11th 2019 at 6:13:15 AM

Live-Action TV:

  • A common stereotype used in Telenovelas where usually the male lead is a macho latino, even in the main image of that page appears two men that fit this trope. Some specific examples of this:
    • Pasion de Gavilanes is about three macho brothers working for a hacienda ruled by three strong women. The story is focused mostly in these brothers, being the three of them the classical stereotype of the macho latino.
    • Machos is about a patriarchy of only men. Although every member of the Mercader family has a different and distinctive male stereotype, the father and one of the sons can be marked under this stereotype as the "machos" of this Chilean telenovela.

Jan 11th 2019 at 7:44:12 AM

There's a certain fairy in Fairly Oddparents who looks Latino and loves showing off his muscles, but I forgot the name.

Jan 11th 2019 at 9:35:17 AM

^ Juandissimo

Also, I toss my hat (or should I say, sombrero?) because you had me at "Macho", and Filipino.

Jan 15th 2019 at 9:07:43 PM

Spell check/formatting: {{Telenovela}}s and {{Spexico}}, and you probably don't need that second link to Macho Macho Man at the end of the description.

Could any of the people who've bombed this tell us why?

Jan 30th 2019 at 4:11:41 AM

Just 2 things:

  • If you put folder commands, you've to put also the [[ foldercontrol ]] (without the spaces) above all to expand/compress all the other folder sections
  • Machos now has its own page here in TV Tropes. Also has a mexican remake, to be mentioned in its part

Jan 30th 2019 at 9:49:11 AM

Referenced in Romancing The Stone, when the romance novelist main character is heading off to Columbia: "Do you have any idea what it's like in Colombia? Your books do very well in these macho countries."

Jan 31st 2019 at 3:48:30 PM

^^ Heads up: For some reason, I'm seeing a bug on TLP drafts that cosmetically affects the foldercontrol button, but leaves the function alone.

Jan 31st 2019 at 4:52:33 PM

A villainous example from Despicable Me 2. Gru describes El Macho, a Latino supervillain, as hypermasculine in every way possible, down to the way he died (though Gru suspects the death was faked, because they never found the body, only a pile of singed chest hair). He is right about that.

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