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Abandoned Mascot

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The mascot of a work, creator, or franchise is replaced with another character.

This trope has been Launched!
Proposed By:
Pichu-kun on Apr 30th 2017 at 2:37:08 PM
Last Edited By:
Snicka on Mar 19th 2018 at 2:34:06 PM
Name Space: Main
Page Type: trope

http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/boskobugs.jpg
For Bosko, that was all, folks.
Series Mascots are usually consistent for decades on end, however eventually many works or companies will replace their mascot. It's not uncommon to even go through multiple mascots throughout their lifespan.

Why mascots get replaced varies. Sometimes the original mascot is too outdated and/or offensive, so they're replaced instead of redesigned. At other times, a new mascot is created for a retool, rebranding, or marketing change. Often times the old mascot is just outshined by a newer Breakout Character who ends up becoming the successor mascot. Replacing mascots is more common with advertisements than in other media, however this still pops up in various mediums.

This can be an example of Early Installment Weirdness if it happens early enough. Compare to Chuck Cunningham Syndrome, Demoted to Extra, and What Happened to the Mouse?.


Examples:

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     Advertising 
  • GEICO has a tendency to hedge betting on their mascots' viability:
    • The GEICO Cavemen are likely the most famous example, having been a mascot to rival the gecko for a few years, getting a brief series for a half-season, and then disappearing without a trace.
    • Maxwell the Pig was last seen on June 11, 2014. He is presumed retired, as his only social media presence is run by fans.
  • Host Cereals:
    • Honeycomb rarely has a mascot, but when it did, it was the bizarre CGI character Crazy Craving. It lives on in peoples' memories, just not on the airwaves.
    • Back in the 1960s was the Honeycomb Kid. His fate was sealed with the demise of the Spaghetti Western.
  • Erin, a pink haired spy, was a mascot to the auto insurance company Esurance. She was used for several years in the 2000s. Erin was retired due to the company not liking all the Rule 34 and other less-than-family-friendly content based around her online.
  • While the long-running mascot for Lucky Charms is Lucky the Leprechaun, back in 1975 there was an alternate mascot called Waldo the Wizard. He was only seen in the New England section of the USA, and lasted less than a year.
  • McDonald's:
    • In the early years, McDonald's had a mascot named "Speedee", a chef-like character with a hamburger for a head. He was named for their fast, "Speedee Service System", and appeared primarily on signage. He was replaced by Ronald McDonald in 1967.
    • The classic McDonaldland characters such as Birdie, Hamburglar, and Grimace were dropped in 2003, shortly after The Wacky Adventures Of Ronald Mc Donald was released. They were replaced with the "I'm lovin' it" campaign due to decreased popularity. Despite McDonaldland being discarded, the characters still appear in the kid's sections of restaurants. A Hotter and Sexier Hamburglar was briefly brought back in 2015 to promote a new burger.
    • In the 2010s McDonald's began to try and do away with Ronald McDonald due to the controversies surrounding the company marketing junk food towards children. He's been replaced by an animated Happy Meal box for now.
  • Hostess snack cakes had an array of long-gone mascots, each of whom assumed the shape of their respective product. Twinkies had the cowboy-like Twinkie the Kid, Fruit Pies had Fruit Pie the Magician, and Hostess Cupcakes had a seafaring Captain Cupcake. Less prominent was the Robin Hood-like Happy Ho Ho, mascot for Hostess Ho Hos. But more complex was Ding-Dong's mascot, since the product was formerly known as King Dons and Big Wheels in different parts of the USA. There were the similar King Don and King Ding Dong (with at least one commercial the same, except the name), but for Big Wheels, you had a (stereotypical-looking) American Indian — Chief Big Wheel.
  • The Frito Bandito was the mascot for Fritos corn chips from 1967-1971. Most sources say that he was abandoned due to the obvious political incorrectness of the character, though others say that most Mexicans liked him (see also Mexicans Love Speedy Gonzales).
  • ask.com used to have Jeeves. He has since been retired.
  • Quaker Cereals: Cap'n Crunch had a bunch of other mascots he shared the box with until the 80s. The cereals then dropped the secondary mascots and just kept the Cap'n. These would include Quisp & Quake, Wilma the Vanilla Whale, and the Crunch Berry Beast.
  • Ralston Purina —> General Mills:
    • Cookie Crisp went through a handful as well:
      • 70s, Cookie Jarvis the wizard was first.
      • 80s. Followed by Cookie Crook and Cookie Cop with Chip the Dog.
      • 90s, Followed by Chip the Dog by himself, howling the name of the cereal.
      • 2000s, Followed by Chip the Wolf who howls the name of the cereal.
      • 2000s, Followed by a new iteration of Chip the Wolf who no longer howls.
      • In some countries, Chip is replaced with a panther mascot. No, really.
  • Throughout the 1970s, Milton the Toaster was the mascot for Kellogg's Pop Tarts toaster pastries.
  • Before Nesquik's Quicky was used worldwide, locals mascotts were sometimes used, like Groquik until 1990.
  • The bubble gum brand Malabar used Mr. Malabar until 2011, when he was replaced by Younger and Hipper cat Mabulle. He tends to hated by nostalgics.
  • In 1973, Duracell's mascot was the Duracell Bunny. In the commercials featuring him, he was one of the many similar battery-operated drum-playing rabbits that ran on different batteries. One by one, the bunnies would wear down, except the one powered by the Duracell Battery. Although he continues to be used in Europe and Australia (and has long since moved on from drum-playing, instead participating in sporting events), Duracell failed to renew the US trademark, and as a result, lost it by 1989. A few years after the Energizer Bunny debuted in the US (with the original Energizer Bunny commercial being a Take That! to the Duracell Bunny commercials), Duracell introduced The Puttermans, an Uncanny Valley Robo Family whose advertising campaign lasted from 1994 to 1997.
  • In 1987, Energizer's mascot was Mark "Jacko" Jackson. His ad campaign lasted from 1987 to 1988 in the US, but was more popular in Australia, and lasted a few years longer there. In 1989, after Duracell failed to renew its US trademark of the Duracell Bunny, Energizer created the Energizer Bunny, whose original commercial was a Take That! to Duracell's commercials for comparing its batteries to zinc-carbon batteries and not similar alkaline batteries like Energizer, and the Bunny has been the American mascot for Energizer batteries ever since. In Europe and Australia, where the Duracell Bunny remains Duracell's mascot, Energizer's mascot is the Energizer Man, an anthropomorphic battery.

     Film — Animation 

    Live Action TV 

     Toys 
  • The mascot to My Little Pony changes each gen. In the original G1 line from the 1980s, Firefly was the unofficial mascot. G2 didn't have one due to being unpopular outside of Europe. Ever since G3, Pinkie Pie has been the mascot that is featured on most merchandise (being pink and bubbly, despite Twilight Sparkle being G4's main character).

     Video Games 
  • Sega:
    • Sega's first mascot was the ship from Fantasy Zone, Opa-Opa, however eventually it was replaced with the protagonist of Alex Kidd. Alex Kidd was an average platformer series however never became that successful, especially outside of Japan. For the Sega Mega Drive, Sega conceived a new mascot to go against Nintendo's Super Mario Bros.. Sonic the Hedgehog quickly replaced Alex Kidd and Sonic has been Sega's mascot ever since. Alex has appeared in a few cameo roles over the years but hasn't received a new game since the Mega Drive era.
    • Opa-Opa was Sega's first official mascot, but their first unofficial mascot was Professor Asobin, a Funny Animal rabbit who showed up in manuals for SG-1000 games to offer advice to the players. He was later replaced with Alex Kidd as well.
  • Microsoft intended for Blinx to be their mascot for their new Xbox franchise of gaming consoles. Blinx was a cute Mascot with Attitude cat meant to attract younger gamers. The game however ended up bombing. Blinx was a Stillborn Franchise with only one sequel. The Xbox's flagship title instead ended up being Halo, with its main character Master Chief becoming the Xbox mascot. Master Chief helped solidify the view of Xbox as a console for older audiences, in contrast to Sony's and especially Nintendo's more family-friendly images.
  • Unlike its competition, the Playstation brand doesn't have a concrete mascot (baring a Japanese-only cat mascot). It instead has a series of popular characters who all work as mascots, some official and some unofficially. Most of these mascots only last a few years before being demoted:
    • Crash Bandicoot was the Playstation's answer to Super Mario Bros. and Sonic the Hedgehog. He was an incredibly popular character in both western countries and Japan (a rare feat for a western character) and was created as a Kid-Appeal Character to get younger gamers to buy a Playstation. Crash's time as a mascot only lasted a few years though. Naughty Dog lost their rights to the franchise right when the Playstation 2 was being released. Crash Bandicoot became a multiplat series afterwards before fading after the release of Mind Over Mutant in 2008. It was revived in the 2010s but is still multiplat.
    • Spyro the Dragon came out a few years after Crash and shared its status as a mascot, albeit to a far lesser degree. Similarly to Crash Bandicoot, it only lasted three main titles under its creators before they moved on due to wanting to make a main character who could use guns. It became mutiplat and eventually faded after the The Legend of Spyro Continuity Reboot, with only cameos in Skylanders (which was conceived as a Spyro MMO before becoming a separate franchise) afterwards.
    • Lara Croft of Tomb Raider fame was largely seen as a Playstation mascot, however the first title was actually multiplat. It was only after a deal to make the next few games exclusive to Playstation that it gained a reputation as a Playstation mascot. This status as a mascot lasted until the main titles began releasing on non-Playstation platforms, along with the decline in the series' popularity.
    • Parappa The Rapper was a brightly coloured, kid-friendly rhythm title. It received a spinoff, a sequel on the PS2, and even an anime but couldn't quite become the main Playstation mascot. Despite the fact he hasn't had a new title in years (bar rereleases), Parappa pops up every once in a while nevertheless, such as appearing in Playstation All Stars Battle Royale.
    • LittleBigPlanet's protagonist, Sackboy, was the mascot of the Playstation 3 but dropped off with the Playstation 4.
    • Knack was a failed attempt at a mascot for the PS4. The game didn't have a positive enough reception to become popular.
  • Pokémon's original mascot is assumed to have been intended to be Clefairy. Pikachu, a more gender-neutral but equally cute character, however ended up surpassing it as the mascot at the last minute. Ash in the Pokémon anime was intended to receive a Clefairy starter but ended up with a Pikachu instead. Red from the Pocket Monsters manga (the longest-running adaptation of the series) owns both a Clefairy and a Pikachu as a reference to how Clefairy was the original mascot.
  • K.K. Slider was the original mascot of Animal Crossing franchise. The fourth title, Animal Crossing: New Leaf, introduced the protagonist's secretary, Isabelle. Isabelle quickly became a Breakout Character and surpassed K.K. Slider as the series' mascot, though he is still prominently featured in merchandising. Both K.K. and Isabelle are Funny Animal dog characters, but Isabelle is cuter and quirkier.
  • Capcom had various mascots during its history:
    • The first one was Captain Commando, (note that the first three letters of each word forms the word "CapCom"), from the game Captain Commando as well as the NES game Section Z. He has gone on to appear in many of Capcom's fighting games, including Marvel vs. Capcom. Mega Man is now considered to be Capcom's mascot, because of the large amount of games in the franchise and the popularity of the franchise. Ryu, from Street Fighter, could also be considered one of Capcom's mascot, but Ryu is more thought of as the face of the Street Fighter franchise.
    • The Yashichi is an item that appears in many of Capcom's games. Usually, it acts as health restoration or a power-up. It is a red circle that has something resembling a pinwheel on it. The Yashichi was first in Capcom's very first game, Vulgus, as an enemy, and has gone on to appear in Mega Man and many other games (albeit with a more helpful role).

     Western Animation 
  • Walt Disney started out with Oswald the Lucky Rabbit as his first flagship animated character. Oswald was on his way to becoming an iconic cartoon character like Felix the Cat, however Disney lost the rights to Oswald after creating only a few shorts for him. Oswald continued to have shorts written by others however they weren't as popular as Disney's and Oswald was discontined by the 1940s. After Disney lost the rights to Oswald and his wife Ortensia he created two Suspiciously Similar Substitutes, Mickey Mouse and Minnie Mouse. They were hits and would soon eclipse Owald and Ortensia. Mickey ended up becoming the most iconic cartoon character within a few decades. Almost a century after Walt Disney lost the rights to Oswald, the Disney company brought him back and revived him with the video game Epic Mickey. He, his wife, and their many children have appeared in cameos since then, and are even face-characters at Disney theme parks.
  • Warner Bros.' Looney Tunes series went through a series of mascots to counter Disney's aforementioned Mickey. The early shorts first introduced Bosko, a similar blackface style Everyman character, though, like Oswald, creators and rights led to the character being traded to a rival animation company, MGM. The later character, Beans the Cat was intended to be the next attempt at a mascot, but his sidekick Porky Pig trounced him in popularity. Porky's mascot status lasted for a while until the staff eventually conceived a smartalec Karmic Trickster by the name of Bugs Bunny, who quickly surpassed Porky in popularity and became the face for Looney Tunes from there on out.

Feedback: 45 replies

Apr 30th 2017 at 3:21:53 PM

Apr 30th 2017 at 3:46:21 PM

Compare Chuck Cunningham Syndrome. Can be a result of Breakout Character.

Advertising

  • GEICO has a tendency to hedge betting on their mascots' viability:
    • The GEICO Cavemen are likely the most famous example, having been a mascot to rival the gecko for a few years, getting a brief series for a half-season, and then disappearing without a trace.
    • Maxwell the Pig was last seen on June 11, 2014. He is presumed retired, as his only social media presence is run by fans.
  • Post Cereals:
    • Honeycomb rarely has a mascot, but when it did, it was the bizarre CGI character Crazy Craving. It lives on in peoples' memories, just not on the airwaves.
    • Back in the 1960s was the Honeycomb Kid. His fate was sealed with the demise of the Spaghetti Western.

There's a whole slew of abandoned, legitimate on-the-box cereal mascots if you dig deep enough. I just got the ball rolling.

Video Games (YMMV on this one...)

  • Pokemon: The franchise was originally slated to have Clefairy as the mascot, but it was changed at the last moment — presumably to appeal to a broader worldwide audience.

Apr 30th 2017 at 6:35:54 PM

In the early '70s, Hardee's fast-food restaurants had animated characters Speedy Mc Greedy (who always tried to steal Hardee's "Huskees" burgers) and Gilbert Giddyup (a sheriff who was out to catch the former).

Apr 30th 2017 at 6:50:12 PM

Note on the cereal mascots: It's true that some cereals have had multiple mascots come and go over the years — Cocoa Krispies alone has had at least 5. But that's not counting all the mascots who represented a single cereal product, only to be abandoned with the product. For example, there were line-extensions to Cap'n Crunch cereal which had their own mascot; Punch Crunch had Harry S. Hippo (http://www.mrbreakfast.com/cereal_detail.asp?id=292), and Vanilly Crunch had Wilma the Whale (http://www.mrbreakfast.com/cereal_detail.asp?id=383). Both products came and went in the '70s. And let's not forget the eponymously-named mascots from the discontinued "Monster Cereals": Frute Brute and Yummy Mummy (though the latter might not have been an official monster cereal).

Should those be included in the trope?

Apr 30th 2017 at 6:59:41 PM

I thought SNK once had a monkey (forgot the name) as their mascot, but then Terry of Fatal Fury games replaces it. It's given a nod in King Of Fighters 99 where the monkey sometimes appear in Terry's win poses.

Another

May 1st 2017 at 4:06:10 AM

^^ IMO, cereal mascots shouldn't be included if they went down with the ship -or- if they were never on the box. Basically:

  • If the Trix rabbit was discontinued but Trix were still sold without him, that'd be worthy of this trope.
  • If Smacky Jacks had Randolph the Gopher as a mascot from 1950-1966, then stopped being produced in 1980, that'd also be worthy of this trope.
  • For examples like Sugar Rice Krinkles whose mascot was Krinkles the clown (this was real), this wouldn't qualify because the cereal ended production with him on the box.
  • Mayor McCheese wouldn't really qualify because he shared a very broad spotlight and was hardly on anything outside the commercials. (not cereal, but he's the most readily available example) A cereal example I suppose might be a villain in some of the 80's and 90's cereal commercials.

Incidentally, this brings to mind... (and trust me, the format below is worth keeping because there are a LOT of General Mills cereals)

  • General Mills:
    • Cinnamon Toast Crunch had three bakers, Wendell whose name was canonical, as well as Bob and Quello whose names' origins are apocryphal but are likely fan-based. In 1991, Bob and Quello were retired from both the box and all advertisements. Wendell himself has been replaced by the Crazy Squares mascot since 2014, and can be presumed retired aside from occasional acknowledgements on General Mills' blogs and social media.

Apr 30th 2017 at 8:31:51 PM

  • Quaker Cereals:
    • Cap'n Crunch had a bunch of other mascots he shared the box with until the 80s. The cereals then dropped the secondary mascots and just kept the Cap'n. These would include Quisp & Quake, Wilma the Vanilla Whale, and the Crunch Berry Beast.
  • Ralston Purina —> General Mills:
    • Cookie Crisp went through a handful as well:
      • 70s, Cookie Jarvis the wizard was first.
      • 80s. Followed by Cookie Crook and Cookie Cop with Chip the Dog.
      • 90s, Followed by Chip the Dog by himself, howling the name of the cereal.
      • 2000s, Followed by Chip the Wolf who howls the name of the cereal.
      • 2000s, Followed by a new iteration of Chip the Wolf who no longer howls.

Apr 30th 2017 at 8:41:46 PM

The Frito Bandito. Mascot for Fritos corn chips from 1967-1971. Most sources say that he was abandoned due to the obvious political incorrectness of the character, though others say that most Mexicans liked him (see also [[Mexicans Love Speedy Gonzales]]).

May 1st 2017 at 2:11:01 AM

  • ask.com used to have Jeeves. He retired.

May 1st 2017 at 7:32:37 PM

Hostess snack cakes had an array of long-gone mascots, each of whom assumed the shape of their respective product. Twinkies had the cowboy-like Twinkie the Kid, Fruit Pies had Fruit Pie the Magician, and Hostess Cup Cakes had a seafaring Captain Cupcake. Less prominent was the Robin Hood-like Happy Ho Ho, mascot for Hostess Ho Hos. But more complex was Ding-Dong's mascot, since the product was formerly known as King Dons and Big Wheels in different parts of the USA. There were the similar King Don and King Ding Dong (with at least one commercial the same, except the name), but for Big Wheels, you had a (stereotypical-looking) American Indian — Chief Big Wheel.

May 2nd 2017 at 6:56:25 AM

On Cookie Crisp. A variation in the Asian market, as the mascot is replaced with a panther.

May 2nd 2017 at 8:21:19 AM

Video Games:

  • Capcom had various mascots during its history. The first one was Captain Commando, (note that the first three letters of each word forms the word "CapCom"), from the game Captain Commando as well as the NES game Section Z. He has gone on to appear in many of Capcom's fighting games, including Marvel Vs Capcom. Mega Man is now considered to be Capcom's mascot, because of the large amount of games in the franchise and the popularity of the franchise. Ryu, from Street Fighter, could also be considered one of Capcom's mascot, but Ryu is more thought of as the face of the Street Fighter franchise.
    • The Yashichi is an item that appears in many of Capcom's games. Usually, it acts as health restoration or a power-up. It is a red circle that has something resembling a pinwheel on it. The Yashichi was first in Capcom's very first game, Vulgus, as an enemy, and has gone on to appear in Mega Man 1 and many other games (albeit with a more helpful role).

May 2nd 2017 at 12:02:27 PM

Geico seems to be an aversion to this as their main mascots all started out as a one off commercials that fans loved (and it says something, as they have a long string of humorous ad campaigns). To wit:

  • The Gecko started life as a one off add about a poor Gecko who was reminding people to call Geico for car insurance 24/7 and to stop calling him (by the desperation in it's voice, he seemed like he had been plagued by wrong numbers at odd hours for weeks).
  • The Cavemen seemed like a full blown campaign and recent commercials have had call backs.
  • Maxwell the Pig was originally a one off character (The little piggy that went Weeeeeee all the way home... in a school carpool). He was later repurpoused for the app campaign.
  • The Hump Day camel, is an interesting varient as he hasn't appeared in a GEICO campaign on his own, but was used in a movie theater's "Cellphone Warning" and an "M&M" comerical. GEICO's only reference was by showing a pair of Camels in a zoo who were irrate because the mematic ad was causing people to treat them like this all the time.

May 2nd 2017 at 7:23:04 PM

While the long-running mascot for Lucky Charms is Lucky the Leprechaun, back in 1975 there was an alternate mascot called Waldo the Wizard. He was only seen in the New England section of the USA, and lasted less than a year. http://www.blog.generalmills.com/2014/03/waldo-lucky-charms/

May 27th 2017 at 7:52:39 PM

In the early years, Mc Donald's had a mascot named "Speedee", a chef-like character with a hamburger for a head. He was named for their fast, "Speedee Service System", and appeared primarily on signage. Replaced by Ronald Mc Donald in 1967.

May 31st 2017 at 7:24:34 PM

There's no reason to split examples from Series Mascot to this trope. It just isn't common enough and there aren't enough unique ways to play with abandoning a mascot that have actually happen.

Jun 18th 2017 at 11:07:43 AM

Throughout the 1970s, Milton the Toaster was the mascot for Kellogg's Pop Tarts toaster pastries. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y-HfXBdzzWo

Jun 20th 2017 at 4:18:37 AM

Oswald doesn't count. He's wasn't abandoned, it's more like taken hostage.

Jun 20th 2017 at 12:01:19 PM

  • Before Nesquik's Quicky was used worldwide, locals mascotts were sometimes used, like [[Groquik http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-c5AqjYVqJM0/UAvPvV-u7bI/AAAAAAAAA28/VYEQ5RfnetM/s1600/groquick.jpeg]] until 1990

  • The bubble gum brand Malabar used [[Mr Malabar http://s-www.ledauphine.com/images/8642525B-168D-4F95-85BD-A53B2BD0E428/LDL_V0_12/monsieur-malabar-part-en-retraite-apres-42-annees-de-service-dr.jpg]] until 2011, when he was replaced by Younger And Hipper cat [[Mabulle https://www.olybop.fr/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/mabulle-malabar.jpg]]. And he tends to hated by nostalgics.

Jun 20th 2017 at 12:02:47 PM

Before Nesquik's Quicky was used worldwide, locals mascotts were sometimes used, like Groquik : http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-c5AqjYVqJM0/UAvPvV-u7bI/AAAAAAAAA28/VYEQ5RfnetM/s1600/groquick.jpeg until 1990.

The bubble gum brand Malabar used Mr Malabar: http://s-www.ledauphine.com/images/8642525B-168D-4F95-85BD-A53B2BD0E428/LDL_V0_12/monsieur-malabar-part-en-retraite-apres-42-annees-de-service-dr.jpg until 2011, when he was replaced by Younger And Hipper cat Mabulle: https://www.olybop.fr/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/mabulle-malabar.jpg . And he tends to hated by nostalgics.

Aug 29th 2017 at 6:57:20 PM

  • Warner Bros' Looney Tunes series went through a series of mascots to counter Disney's aforementioned Mickey. The early shorts first introduced Bosko, a similar blackface style Everyman character, though, like Oswald, creators and rights led to the character being traded to a rival animation company, MGM. The later character, Beans the Cat was intended to be the next attempt at a mascot, but his sidekick Porky Pig trounced him in popularity. Porky's mascot status lasted for a while until the staff eventually conceived a smartalec Karmic Trickster by the name of Bugs Bunny, who quickly surpassed Porky in popularity and became the face for Looney Tunes from there on out.

Aug 29th 2017 at 7:33:32 PM

NBC had a peacock "mascot" from 1956 to 1976. He was then retired, but brought out of retirement in 1979 and has been part of the logo in one form or another ever since.

Aug 30th 2017 at 7:55:32 AM

^ What section does that go under?

Sep 1st 2017 at 6:09:03 PM

Opa-Opa was Sega's first official mascot, but their first unofficial mascot was Professor Asobin, a Funny Animal rabbit who showed up in manuals for SG-1000 games to offer advice to the players.

Sep 6th 2017 at 11:19:15 AM

Advertising

  • In 1973, Duracell's mascot was the Duracell Bunny. In the commercials featuring him, he was one of the many similar battery-operated drum-playing rabbits that ran on different batteries. One by one, the bunnies would wear down, except the one powered by the Duracell Battery. Although he continues to be used in Europe and Australia (and has long since moved on from drum-playing, instead participating in sporting events), Duracell failed to renew the US trademark, and as a result, lost it by 1989. A few years after the Energizer Bunny debuted in the US (with the original Energizer Bunny commercial being a Take That to the Duracell Bunny commercials), Duracell introduced The Puttermans, an Uncanny Valley Robo Family whose advertising campaign lasted from 1994 to 1997.
  • In 1987, Energizer's mascot was Mark "Jacko" Jackson. His ad campaign lasted from 1987 to 1988 in the US, but was more popular in Australia, and lasted a few years longer there. In 1989, after Duracell failed to renew its US trademark of the Duracell Bunny, Energizer created the Energizer Bunny, whose original commercial was a Take That to Duracell's commercials for comparing its batteries to zinc-carbon batteries and not similar alkaline batteries like Energizer, and the Bunny has been the American mascot for Energizer batteries ever since. In Europe and Australia, where the Duracell Bunny remains Duracell's mascot, Energizer's mascot is the Energizer Man, an anthropomorphic battery.

Nov 22nd 2017 at 6:09:15 PM

Nov 22nd 2017 at 10:37:46 AM

What indexes would this go in?

Nov 23rd 2017 at 1:11:17 AM

For a picture, how about one featuring Bosko The Talk Ink Kid in front of the Looney Tunes logo? Something like this.

Nov 24th 2017 at 1:05:05 AM

For a picture, how about one featuring Bosko The Talk Ink Kid in front of the Looney Tunes logo? Something like this.
If we use that image, we need to pair it up with this. The comparison would help lessen the possibility of Just A Face And A Caption.

Nov 24th 2017 at 10:15:11 AM

^^^^ I meant the trope when it launches.

Nov 29th 2017 at 11:51:49 AM

^^^ Can someone post the images to the TLP?

Dec 1st 2017 at 11:59:45 PM

An important question: Have we abandoned Trope Tan?

Dec 4th 2017 at 10:27:35 AM

This draft seems ready to launch. Are there specific concerns holding it in TLP?

Dec 4th 2017 at 9:50:57 PM

^ Which indexes should this be put under. Trivia?

Dec 5th 2017 at 8:37:13 AM

I don't think this is trivia because if you watch the whole series then you will notice that there's a change in the mascot. This change is present in the work and you don't need outside information to figure that out. That said, it may be difficult to do this for older works or for Long Runners, but it is still in the work itself. See also What Happened To The Mouse (and the fact that it's not trivia either).

Other indexes could be Older Than Television (due to the 1933 change for Looney Tunes from Bosko to Bugs?).

Dec 5th 2017 at 10:52:03 AM

^ Yes, Older Than Television. Disney changing Oswald to Mickey happened even earlier, in 1928.

Mar 19th 2018 at 2:34:06 PM

We need the Crazy Squares for Cinnamon Toast Crunch to be abandoned, because they're the cereal mascot equivalents to the Minions from Despicable Me, and Rabbids from Rayman.

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