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Important College letters come in two sizes of envelopes

This work is a proposed Trope, Tropers can vote and offer feedback in the comments section below.
Proposed By:
Gambrinus on Jun 13th 2011 at 10:04:52 PM
Last Edited By:
pokedude10 on Mar 15th 2019 at 4:37:31 AM
Name Space: Main
Page Type: Trope

Current Sponsor: Pokedude10

I am not sure this is prevalent enough In fiction to be tropeable, Please comment.


Needs More Examples, Needs a Longer Description. I am open to ideas.

In high school, college is one of the greater worries of seniors. For many, higher education is the last step in becoming a mature adult. So applications are sent out. and then the waiting begins.

When the time comes, the college will send a written notice to the applicant. And then there will be only two outcomes:  He is either accepted, or rejected. An acceptance letter will be filled to the brim with information for the future student, while an rejection will only state the fact.

Examples

Anime and Manga

Live Action TV

  • Subverted in Veronica Mars when she gets a letter from Stanford. Before Veronica opens it, she says "This is pretty thin for an acceptance letter" before actually reading it and finding out she received conditional acceptance.

Feedback: 14 replies

Jun 14th 2011 at 2:39:16 AM

Isn't this People Sit On Chairs? Because acceptance letters really tend to include more than just a single sheet of paper stating the fact.

Jun 14th 2011 at 11:08:03 AM

I think it's tropable, even if I can't remember examples.

Nowadays and going forward it may become subverted, as the acceptance letter could be a one-pager saying "go to our website to get all the forms you need."

Jun 14th 2011 at 11:17:30 AM

College acceptance letters seem too narrow to be tropable; maybe you could make it Thick Envelopes Are Important or something?

Jun 14th 2011 at 11:22:01 AM

^ That seems a bit more Workable.

Jun 14th 2011 at 11:46:21 AM

In Azumanga Daioh, when Osaka the CloudCuckoolander got a thin envelope, she kept wondering whether or not she was accepted, while her friends around her had a silent Oh Crap reaction.

Jun 14th 2011 at 12:37:47 PM

I think it's a great trope and 100% tropeable, but unfortunately Up For Grabs tropes never seem to go anywhere.

Oct 7th 2011 at 3:24:43 PM

It's been a few months since this was active, and since it is up for grabs. I think I'll take a shot at sponsoring it.

First thing, I don't know how prevalent this is, so I'm going to leave it as is to see how many straight examples it can get. If I don't think there is enough, then I'll rework it into something more/less specific.

Oct 8th 2011 at 12:40:54 AM

This is just something that happens in real life. It happens less often in fiction. Characters receive tiny envelopes and suspect a rejection or are in suspense until they open it and discover they have been accepted. This is different from real life, where acceptance letters come in unambiguous giant packets.

Oct 8th 2011 at 4:37:39 PM

The inverse can happen in publishing. If they like your article/book/what-have-you you get a thin envelope with a check, but if they don't like it they send it back to you.

Oct 8th 2011 at 7:38:55 PM

Subverted in Veronica Mars when she gets a letter from Stanford. Before Veronica opens it, she says "This is pretty thin for an acceptance letter" before actually reading it and finding out she received conditional acceptance.

Oct 8th 2011 at 10:36:34 PM

Now that I think about it, my own acceptance letter was also tiny. The brunt of the heavy lifting was just getting me set up with my University's website. After that all the details were handled digitally.

Maybe thick acceptance letters are becoming a thing of the past?

Oct 9th 2011 at 8:26:47 AM

^That's what I'm worried about. This looks like it's already outdated .

I'll give this a few more days, then I'll evaluate it again.

Oct 10th 2011 at 6:08:45 AM

I for one don't mind if this is historical due to the march of technology; we have other tropes that are specific to certain time periods.

I think the key to this is that the answer is apparent before the missive is opened and read because of the size of the package. Perhaps there are two types, collegiate and publishing?

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