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Saved By The Coffin

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A coffin saves somebody from danger.

This trope has been Launched!
Proposed By:
Quatic on Sep 6th 2012 at 9:49:07 PM
Last Edited By:
Quatic on Feb 4th 2018 at 12:36:31 PM
Name Space: Main
Page Type: Trope

Arrr, Arivor be seizin' yer drarrrft.

Rolling Updates

Needs a Better Name: While neither the current title nor Hiding In A Coffin are really bad, I'm still not overly excited about either.


A coffin is, most commonly, a symbol for death. Its sole purpose is to serve as a container for dead people. That is why it can have a strong effect to subvert that connotation by using a coffin as a means for the hero to save his life: A symbol of death as a life saver.

The most common variation is for the hero to hide in the coffin. Maybe he's being chased by someone across a graveyard, or maybe he's illegally examining a deceased loved one when he hears their murderer approaching. This comes in two flavours: The coffin may be empty, which can have a very eerie feeling and may evoke pictures of being Buried Alive; or it may already be occupied, which can either be very squicky or Played for Laughs, with the hero apologizing for the intrusion.

Hiding oneself in a coffin or sarcophagus is not the only option covered by this trope, though. Most coffins are made of light wood, so they float on water and can thus serve as a makeshift lifeboat, and inventive heroes can find other uses for them as well.

Of course, the heroes are not the only ones who can do this. If the villain of a story uses this, the connotations may be different: After the danger is gone, they may emerge from the coffin, thus giving the impression that they are somehow connected to death.

Especially creepy when the coffin is, for one reason or another, the hero's own.

Should this backfire on the hero, they could very well become Buried Alive. Alternatively (and less Nightmare Fuel-y), it can lead to Waking Up at the Morgue.

May come attached to Faking the Dead if the hero pretends to actually belong in the coffin. Compare Cramming the Coffin, where the person hiding (or, more accurately, being hid) in the coffin is already dead. Compare also the Bodybag Trick, which uses a bodybag instead of a coffin, but can have similar symbolic effect.


Examples:

    open/close all folders 

    Anime & Manga 
  • Part One of Jojos Bizarre Adventure ends with Erina Joestar (née Pendelton) surviving the destruction of her honeymoon ship by floating in Dio Brando's coffin.

    Comics 
  • G.I. Joe (IDW): Kwinn and Lighthorse smuggle Snake-Eyes across the border by hiding him a coffin inside a hearse and say they are returning a family member to be buried in his native land.

    Film 
  • Rosewood. The hero's mother is killed by white racists attacking the black town, and the hero himself is smuggled out in her coffin.
  • Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines. Ahnuld carries the hero and his girl through a hail of bullets and out of harm's way in a steel coffin.
  • In Once Bitten, Mark and his Love Interest hide in a coffin when the Countess and her aide are searching the house for them. It doesn't work for very long, but long enough for the love interest to very quickly relieve Mark of his virginity, rendering him unsuitable for the vampiress's tastes.
  • In A Fistful of Dollars Clint Eastwood's nameless character hides in a coffin and watches the rival gangs running the town go at each other.
  • Possibly Older than You Think — Laurel and Hardy used this in one of their first films, A-Haunting We Will Go, where they are escorting a coffin, not knowing that a criminal gang leader has hidden in it to escape the police.
  • In Funeral in Berlin this is supposed to be the method by which an East German defector is to be smuggled to the west; but the whole thing is a Soviet setup to catch the ones who smuggle out defectors.
  • Captain Jack Sparrow hides with a dead man in a coffin to escape from prison at the beginning of Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest.
  • In Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade the Brotherhood of the Cruciform Sword sets fire to the tomb complex Indy and Dr. Schneider are exploring for clues to the Holy Grail. The pair overturn Sir Richard's coffin as shelter from the flames.
  • Zwartboek:
    • The Jewish refugee Rachel passes through German inspection to her new hiding place by posing as a corpse and being smuggled by a pair of sympathetic undertakers.
    • Subverted at the end when the treacherous Dr. Franken tries to escape with his loot through Allied inspection by hiding in a coffin transported by a corrupt undertaker he paid off. He is intercepted by the surviving two resistance members, and suffocated by bolting the casket shut.
  • In O Brother, Where Art Thou?, towards the end of the movie, the evil sheriff shows up at Mc Gill's cabin ready to hang Mc Gill and his two companion protagonists (never mind that they've been pardoned by the governor), and has three gravediggers with coffins at the ready; but just then the valley floods (as part of a rural electrification program) and everybody is swept away; the protagonists pop up in the water and are able to cling to one of the coffins.

    Literature 
  • In Moby-Dick, Ishmael survives the sinking of the Pequod by clinging to the coffin intended for Queequeg.
  • Discworld:
    • In Pyramids, when Teppic rescues Ptraci from prison, he hides her in an empty sarcophagus, leaving it open a crack. The next morning, the Genre Savvy high priest Dios comes along, spots the slightly ajar coffin, triumphantly has the guards open it, to reveal... wood shavings. Ptraci had gone out earlier to answer nature's call, and once the confused Dios had left (even checking the sarcophagus containing the king's mummy), went back into hiding.
    • In Carpe Jugulum, Agnes Nitt blags her way into a castle being taken over by vampires by hiding in a coffin being ferried in by cart. The vampires' guards assume this is a delivery of bedroom furniture and do not bother to check.
    • Wizards tend to attempt to cheat Death by sealing themselves into tombs surrounded by their best arsenal of wards and amulets. The usual reaction: "A bit cramped in here, isn't it?"
  • Justified in The Witcher: The Last Wish. Geralt hides inside a striga's stone sarcophagus both for protection and because his contract is to cure the striga, King Foltest's daughter Adda. Spending a night near a striga's coffin breaks the curse long enough for one to suppress it with various charms, and the stone lid is just handy protection. (The sequence also appears in the opening cinematic of The Witcher video game.)
  • In the backstory of John Dickson Carr's novel The Hollow Man, this is part of the story that leads to the killer's vengeful motivation. Three brothers escaped from a prison by feigning death and allowing themselves to be Buried Alive, but the one who managed to escape from his coffin first ran away and left the other two to die. One survived and pursued him.
  • In Les Misrables, Jean Valjean escapes from the convent of Petit-Picpus in a coffin.
  • Invoked in Terry Pratchett's Nation. in which a ship's cook prepares for the possibility that his vessel might sink by bringing a coffin on board for himself ... and outfitting it with fresh water, fishing gear, and a small collapsible sail. In the wake of the tsunami, he's found sailing his coffin by a rescue ship.

    Live Action TV 
  • Buffy the Vampire Slayer
    • In "Bad Girls", Buffy hides from the Eliminati in a sarcophagus.
    • In "Goodbye Iowa", when Initiative soldiers kick down the door to his crypt, Spike hides beneath a corpse in a sarcophagus. Note that vampires do not usually inhabit coffins in this universe.
  • The Sarah Jane Adventures. Galactic undertakers try to steal the Doctor's TARDIS by faking evidence of the Doctor's death so that two of his former companions will come to the funeral, where their memories can be harnessed to create a key to the TARDIS. The Doctor shows up and gets the companions to remember all of their adventures, overloading the memory capturing machine which, naturally, starts counting down towards blowing up. The companions survive by hiding in the lead-lined coffin created for the Doctor.
  • In the MacGyver episode "Deathlock", Mac uses this ploy to be carried out of East Germany (with stolen microfilm). Of course in this case the coffin is also a fully functional motorized water vehicle.
  • Dexter eludes the police when they raid the Trinity Killer's house (he was there to kill Trinity) by hiding in a coffin that Trinity had made himself until enough time had passed that Dexter (a member of the police department) could realistically have arrived.
  • AlfredHitchcockPresents "Final Escape" subverts this when a male prisoner (female in the remake) plans an escape using this method. The prisoner is supposed to hide in the next coffin being used, then the prison undertaker is supposed to come and dig the coffin up once the coast is clear. When the prisoner feels that they've been waiting too long, they light a match to see that they're buried with ... the undertaker.
  • Breakout Kings: In "Steaks", two convicts murder an obese inmate and then hide in his coffin in order to escape.

    Video Games 
  • In Skyrim, a Dark Brotherhood aligned Dovahkiin needs to hide inside the Night Mother's coffin when The Penitus Oculatus raze the Falkreath sanctuary.
  • Near the end of Laura Bow 2, Laura evades the killer by hiding in a sarcophagus.
  • Joked with in Castlevania: Symphony of the Night, where you save your game by going to your coffin.
  • At the end of the Tutorial Level in Remember Me, Nilin escapes La Bastille by hiding in one of the coffins meant to transport dead prisoners' bodies out.

    Web Comics 
  • In The Order of the Stick #900, the heroes use the coffin of Girard Draketooth to survive the explosion created by Girard's Gate being destroyed.

    Real Life 
  • Rabbi Yohanan Ben-Zakai hid in a coffin to escape the Roman siege of Jerusalem; the coffin was carried outside the city by his followers for his 'burial'.

Indices: Ironic Index

Feedback: 80 replies

Sep 6th 2012 at 10:29:21 PM

Admittedly not usually "heroic," but...in classic Vampire lore a vampire has to spend daylight hours in the earth he was buried in; Dracula gets around that by bringing boxes and boxes of genuine Transylvanian dirt with him when he moves to London, sleeping the days away in his coffin buried in (and/or filled with) the Transylvanian soil.

Sep 6th 2012 at 10:44:42 PM

Yeah I already created this in YKTTW.

Sep 6th 2012 at 11:04:59 PM

@Kage Nara I saw that but no, this is different. The Doctor Who appearance? No actual dead person. Same in Love At First Bite and A Fistful Of Dollars and the real-life example with the rabbi. No dead people involved. They overlap in examples where there's an actual dead person or the dead person arranged for their coffin to be used for such a purpose, but that's only a handful of examples.

Sep 6th 2012 at 11:30:07 PM

  • In Skyrim, a Dark Brotherhood aligned Dovahkiin needs to hide inside the Night Mother's coffin when The Penitus Oculatus raze the Falkreath sanctuary.

Sep 6th 2012 at 11:50:00 PM

@randomsurfer I don't know that I'd consider Dracula an example of this trope, since he needs the coffin itself to survive on a daily basis, and is not simply using it as a place to hide or survive an attack.

Sep 7th 2012 at 12:17:01 AM

Captain Jack Sparrow hides with a dead man in a coffin to escape from prison at the beginning of Pirates Of The Caribbean: Dead Mans Chest.

Sep 7th 2012 at 1:17:15 AM

You may have noticed two different YKTTW drafts involving a coffin saving a life, this one and Coffin Savior OR Reaper Rescue . Since I can be perceived of having a bias, I would like my fellow Tropers look and see if these two are the same, or are different and require different Tropes. Also if they are the same state, which one is more Tropeworthy.

Here is a link to the other YKKTW Draft.

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/discussion.php?id=gg5g7oh4jf6q61eh49qfs0qb

Sep 7th 2012 at 6:37:48 PM

In Moby Dick, Ishmael survives the sinking of the Pequod by clinging to the coffin intended for Queequeg.

Sep 7th 2012 at 8:39:36 PM

I've enunciated, I think, the distinction between this and the proposed Coffin Savior trope, that being that there's no requirement of an actual death or dead body, but there is requirement of use of a coffin (most frequently to hide in, possibly as an actual shield from an explosion or such). But if the overlap is too much, I've no quarrel with merging them up.

Sep 7th 2012 at 10:21:34 PM

I think they're different. Coffin Savior needs a better title because (as I understand it) it isn't the coffin that is rescuing the hero, it's the person inside the coffin - and often there isn't a coffin in the first place, just a dead person. Whereas here it's a coffin which more than likely dosn't have any dead person in it.

@Quatic re Dracula: Well...he's hiding from an attack of sunlight isn't he?

Jul 17th 2013 at 7:58:57 PM

  • In Order Of The Stick #900, the heroes use the coffin of Girard Draketooth to survive the explosion created by Girard's Gate being destroyed.

Jul 17th 2013 at 8:05:24 PM

I think this is rather old thanks to Real Life: didn't some slaves in the southern US escape the South by having themselves shipped in coffins?

Jul 17th 2013 at 10:51:40 PM

Jul 18th 2013 at 1:03:12 AM

How about calling this simply Hiding In A Coffin?

  • Inverted in Pelagia and the Black Monk (spin-off of the Erast Fandorin series), where the villain puts people in coffins, leading to one (apparent) suicide and one madness.

Jul 18th 2013 at 5:13:22 AM

  • Dexter eludes the police when they raid the Trinity Killer's house (he was there to kill Trinity) by hiding in a coffin that Trinity had made himself until enough time had passed that Dexter (a member of the police department) could realistically have arrived.

Jul 18th 2013 at 11:29:11 AM

Here is a slight variation. In The Count Of Monte Cristo, hero Edmond Dantès is imprisoned in a cell next to a priest, whom he befriends after the priest accidentally tunnels into Dantès' cell while trying to escape. When the priest dies, and his body is put in a bag for disposal, Dantès uses the tunnel to sneak the priest's body into Dantès' cell, and then puts himself in the bag, to be tossed into the sea, and so, to freedom.

Jul 19th 2013 at 11:25:47 AM

^ It should be noted that he didn't expect to be thrown in the sea at all, thinking he'd dig himself out of a shallow grave. His panicked yelling tipped the guards off to the escape, but they thought he'd drowned.

Pyramids: When Teppic rescues Ptraci from the prison, he hides her in an empty sarcophagus, leaving it open a crack. The next morning, the Genre Savvy high priest Dios comes along, spots the slightly ajar coffin, triumphantly has the guards open it, to reveal... wood shavings. Ptraci had gone out earlier to answer nature's call, and once the confused Dios had left (even checking the sarcophagus containing the king's mummy), went back into hiding.

Jul 19th 2013 at 11:40:11 AM

Film:

  • In Indiana Jones And The Last Crusade the Brotherhood of the Cruciform Sword sets fire to the tomb complex Indy and Dr. Schneider are exploring for clues to the Holy Grail. The pair overturn Sir Richard's coffin as shelter from the flames.

Video Games:

  • Justified in the opening cinematic of The Witcher. Geralt hides inside a striga's stone sarcophagus both for protection and because his contract is to cure the striga, King Foltest's daughter Adda. Spending a night near a striga's coffin breaks the curse long enough for one to suppress it with various charms, and the stone lid is just handy protection.

Jul 21st 2013 at 5:08:00 AM

  • Zwartboek:
    • The Jewish refugee Rachel passes through German inspection to her new hiding place by posing as a corpse and smuggled by a pair of sympathetic undertakers.
    • Subverted at the end when the treacherous Dr. Franken tries to escape with his loot through Allied inspection by hiding in a coffin transported by a corrupt undertaker he paid off. He is intercepted by the surviving two resistance members, and suffocated by bolting the casket shut.

Jul 21st 2013 at 8:30:48 AM

This may or may not count, depending on how this trope's definition shapes up:

  • In a variant, a hypothermia casualty on MASH needed to be submerged in warm water to bring his body temperature up. Radar suggested that the medical team use a coffin from the stockroom as an improvised warm-water bath.

Jul 21st 2013 at 9:15:37 PM

This should probably go on the Ironic Index. Since it's s juxtaposition of coffins (a symbol of already being dead) saving someone's life.

Jul 22nd 2013 at 7:25:58 AM

  • Near the end of Laura Bow 2, Laura evades the killer by hiding in a sarcophagus.

Jul 22nd 2013 at 9:29:08 AM

  • In Once Bitten, Mark and his Love Interest hide in a coffin when the Countess and her aide are searching the house for them. It doesn't hide them for very long, but long enough for the Love Interest to very quickly relieve Mark of his virginity, rendering him unsuitable for the vampiress's tastes.

Jul 22nd 2013 at 10:03:05 AM

... also, a joke should be made about Castlevania Symphony Of The Night, where you save your game by going to your coffin.

May 26th 2014 at 10:45:49 AM

Do lead-lined fridges count? because this happened in Indiana Jones.

May 27th 2014 at 2:41:13 PM

'fraid not Shanghai Slave. Whole point is that it's a coffin — a signifier of death — which is being used to save one's life (whether through trickery or sheer bullet-proofedness)

Jan 26th 2015 at 12:44:27 AM

Not gonna grab this... unless nobody answer.

Jan 28th 2015 at 7:35:05 AM

Okay, first: Pulled a hat because with that description this is really not "ready to publish".

Second: Might grab it this weekend if noone has done so by then.

Third: Everything needs a Buffy example.

  • Buffy The Vampire Slayer
    • In "Bad Girls", Buffy hides from the Eliminati in a sarcophagus.
    • In "Goodbye Iowa", when Initiative soldiers kick down the door to his crypt, Spike hides beneath a corpse in a sarcophagus. Note that vampires do not usually inhabit coffins in this universe.

And fourth: Compare Cramming The Coffin, where the person hiding (or, more accurately, being hid) in the coffin is already deceased.

Jan 28th 2015 at 10:02:18 PM

  • Part One of Jojos Bizarre Adventure ends with Erina Joestar (nee Pendelton) surviving the destruction of her honeymoon ship by floating in Dio Brando's coffin.

Jan 28th 2015 at 11:02:13 PM

Look, we got an example of somebody being saved by the coffin without having that somebody be in it.

Jan 28th 2015 at 11:02:34 PM

Look, we got an example of somebody being saved by the coffin without having that somebody be in it.

Jan 31st 2015 at 5:08:37 AM

Me be grabbing this here trope.

Jan 31st 2015 at 5:21:40 AM

^ make sure the laconic and description don't say that the guy doesn't have to be inside the coffin. Nor should it be a hero.

Jan 31st 2015 at 5:50:31 AM

New description is up. Please tell me if I forgot anything.

Dan: You wrote while I was editing for that exact reason.

I'll go over the examples later and see what needs cleaning up. Also, I noticed that folders seem to work in YKTTW now. That's nice.

I am unhappy with the current working title, so any suggestions are welcome. Hiding In A Coffin or similar are out of the question since the scope of this trope is wider than that.

Edit: Examples all cleaned up. Now to start rolling.

Feb 1st 2015 at 2:19:33 PM

Non-ZCE examples rolled to here.

Feb 4th 2015 at 1:37:58 AM

Le bump. Comments? Additions? Name suggestions?

Feb 9th 2015 at 1:49:09 PM

Would anyone care to put a hat, cap, pumpkin or other head covering on this? Alternatively, new name suggestions would be much appreciated.

Feb 9th 2015 at 1:53:37 PM

Um.

Coffins float. They don't "swim". :p

Also, I was about to suggest The Count of Monte Cristo as a possible variant using a bodybag, but found that that is already covered by Bodybag Trick—which I think would be a Sub Trope of this, or at least a Sister Trope. No, it's not a coffin; but it is very much a container typically reserved for corpses, which is pretty closely related.

EDIT: Oh, and I see at least one example on that page that uses a coffin. So that page should probably be mined for examples.

Aaaaaaand see also Waking Up At The Morgue for what this can potentially lead to.

Feb 9th 2015 at 2:01:40 PM

Hm. I am unsure about this. Merriam-Webster gives me "to float on a liquid; not sink". May that as it be, I agree that "float" is the right-er word here and will now change the description.

Though I rather hope that is not the only thing you have to say about this entry...

PS: Reading that sentence again, I am starting to dislike it more and more, because in reality, being made of wood does not imply floating on water, so the sentence reads like an outright false logical statement.

Feb 9th 2015 at 2:03:19 PM

I edited several other things into that post.

That said, I think any valid concern/suggestion should be made, however small.

I don't mean to be rude or condescending, but if you are not a native English speaker, trust me; "swim" does not make sense in that sentence. I mean, it does, but only in a "Oh, that's what they mean" sort of way. "Float" is clearer.

Feb 9th 2015 at 2:52:02 PM

I know, I did not perceive that remark as condescending. I did, after all, ask for suggestions. I'll edit in your other findings tomorrow. Thanks!

Feb 9th 2015 at 3:00:09 PM

Re: ^^^ remember that we're troping fiction, not Real Life; regardless of whether wood actually always floats (it doesn't), AND whether coffins are actually always made of wood (they're not), that's rarely if ever going to come up in fiction. In fiction, if a character in a coffin gets thrown into the sea, the coffin is probably made of wood, and if it's made of wood, it'll almost definitely float.

But then, I don't personally know of any examples of any of that actually coming up in fiction, so maybe cutting the sentence is the way to go, if you wanted to do that.

Feb 9th 2015 at 3:04:32 PM

I know, I'm just a nitpicky person. It does actually come up in the Moby-Dick example.

Feb 9th 2015 at 3:05:56 PM

Oh hey, so it does. Probably worth keeping, then. The sentence, I mean.

Feb 9th 2015 at 3:16:09 PM

Edited in your suggestions and changed the "lifeboat" sentence to specifically mention light wood. That way it stays readable, and I'm happy.

Feb 9th 2015 at 3:20:49 PM

Niiiiice. My name is Solip Schism and I approve of these changes.

Feb 12th 2015 at 12:24:57 PM

Now with new and improved examples from our friends and colleagues over at Bodybag Trick!

Feb 12th 2015 at 1:39:29 PM

Since this trope hasn't launched yet, best not to delete anything from Bodybag Trick just yet, but when this trope launches, duplicates (i.e., coffin examples on the Bodybag Trick page) should be nuked. With an edit reason stating that they've been moved here, of course.

Feb 12th 2015 at 2:29:36 PM

Yeah, that's stop number two on the after-launch crosswicking spree.

Feb 12th 2015 at 3:36:09 PM

Something just occurred to me, if we're still not wild about the title—what about just straight-up Hiding In A Coffin/Hiding In The Coffin? It's a little more versatile than Saved By The Coffin, with the added bonus that it directly describes what the hero is doing, rather than its effect.

That said, I'm pretty happy with this draft, especially with all the poached examples. I'm going to mull over the description and title for another day or two and then I'll hat it if I don't come up with anything else.

Feb 12th 2015 at 6:39:07 PM

BTW, the reason a coffin can float is the same reason a ship can - it has air inside. Not necessarily because it is made of wood.

Feb 13th 2015 at 1:46:48 PM

^^ The reason I do not like Hiding In Article Coffin is that there are many examples that do not involve doing just that. I'm normally rather good at coming up with at least decent names, but for some reason I am stumped on this one.

^ Okay, or even more accurately, it displaces water of a mass greater than its own. Point is, they float, at least in fiction. By the way, does anyone know if coffins actually do that? I imagine that being waterproof is not the first quality people look for in a coffin.

Feb 13th 2015 at 2:00:16 PM

^ What do you mean? Seems like most of the examples are hiding. And the big reason I like it is that "hiding" is an assertive verb that indicates a character deliberately getting into a coffin; "saved" is a little broader, and is passive, as if the hero's actions are irrelevant, because it's the coffin doing the action.

Not that I feel strongly either way, it was just an idea.

Feb 13th 2015 at 2:17:25 PM

^ That is a good point. Honestly, I don't really like either, but one of those two will have to do if nothing better comes along.

Feb 13th 2015 at 2:59:45 PM

Re: My "I'll mull it over" comment, I don't feel strongly about the title and the description looks pretty good, I just have one point that occurred to me:

If you're going to state that a trope has "two flavours", those two flavours should be consistently and clearly shown, either by giving each its own paragraph, both being in the same paragraph (not ideal usually, especially when each description is long), bullets, et cetera. But here, since both "flavours" are concisely described in a single sentence apiece, I suggest:

  • Changing "This comes in two flavours:" to "This trope comes in two flavours:"
  • Moving that sentence into a new paragraph
  • Rolling "On the other hand" back into that paragraph

In other words, lump everything between "This comes in two flavours" and "with the hero apologizing for the intrusion" into a single paragraph.

Otherwise I like it. Once you implement the above suggestion or reply to it, I'll be happy to give this a hat.

Feb 14th 2015 at 12:33:45 PM

^ It's not about the trope coming in two flavours, but the specific subset of hiding coming in two flavours. I agree that the paragraph was split rather unfortunately. I have consolidated the two sentences into a single, more manageable uber-sentence and am now out of duct tape.

Feb 17th 2015 at 11:57:20 AM

^^ Fair cop. I'm satisfied. +1 hat.

Feb 20th 2015 at 12:35:50 PM

Literature;

  • In Carpe Jugulum, Agnes Nitt blags her way into a castle being taken over by vampires, by hiding in a coffin being ferried in by cart. The vampires' guards assume this is a delivery of bedroom furniture and do not bother to check.

Feb 24th 2015 at 3:33:27 PM

Le bump. Head coverings, anyone?

Feb 24th 2015 at 4:26:22 PM

I'm afraid I can only add one. :p

Mar 1st 2015 at 1:41:48 PM

And so I shall bump this once more.

Mar 1st 2015 at 7:58:18 PM

I'll add one, and an example from the Extra Strength Coffin YKTTW

  • In Discworld, wizards tend to attempt to cheat Death by sealing themselves into tombs surrounded by their best arsenal of wards and amulets. The usual result:
A bit cramped in here, isn't it?

Mar 5th 2015 at 8:38:18 AM

Example added. Does anyone happen to have a good page quote or image?

Mar 26th 2016 at 11:51:35 AM

Invoked in Terry Pratchett's Nation. in which a ship's cook prepares for the possibility that his vessel might sink by bringing a coffin on board for himself ... and outfitting it with fresh water, fishing gear, and a small collapsible sail. In the wake of the tsunami, he's found sailing his coffin by a rescue ship.

Mar 31st 2017 at 3:37:49 PM

Coming from Trope Finder.

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