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Quality Improvement

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Some works of poor quality that has become good through fixes, remakes, DLC, reboots, and patches, and as well as the continuation of high quality movies or seasons in a show or series, whether fan-made or officially made.

This work is a proposed Trope, Tropers can vote and offer feedback in the comments section below.
Proposed By:
ChocolateElemental on Jan 6th 2019 at 9:35:05 AM
Last Edited By:
ChocolateElemental on yesterday
Name Space: Main
Page Type: trope

Almost nothing starts off as great as they should, which is considered to be a rocky upstart. As long as people listen to feedback about the flaws in terms of quality, this is when all the magic happens; the quality has been mended. Despite the quality being formerly bad in terms of history telling, people are now pleased that some of the company members alike are capable of proving themselves that they're capable of fixing them.

More often than not sadly, some corporations doesn't exactly do that, allowing fans to fix them instead as they wished too. Something of bad quality being improved to substantial quality is a rare but an amazing decision to commit, which fixes all of the flaws that makes something undesirable and terrible. Sometimes, the flaws would may be beyond repair, meaning they have to resort to remaking or rebooting it, at least depending on how fixable they are.

Another fact that should be noted is that a series or show can have its quality improved by simply continuing making episodes, seasons, and movies that are of high quality, which in turn earns back the audience.

This trope must not be confused with The Remake or Video Game Remake, since these tropes are only similar to Quality Redemption. In direct comparison with each other, they both mainly revolve around something being remade to fit the modern age for obvious reasons.

It should be noted that this doesn't coincide with Growing the Beard, however it is in fact, a supertrope to this. Growing the Beard is basically a trope that explains about a series getting progressively better, while Quality Redemption focuses on a specific thing that has become good through extensive fixing, whether through patches, remakes, and some others.

The subtropes to this however are as follows.


Examples:

Live-Action TV

  • Seinfeld is a live-action TV series that used to start off as this. However, as soon as David and his crew had listened to what the flaws are in the show, they managed to redeem the quality of the show by simply cranking out seasons of great quality, which is all thanks to their highest possible effort put into them.

Video Games

  • Action 52 is one of the most colossal NES failures to ever be made. Having a history of being a sort of scam all because of the whopping $199.99 price, nobody is almost able to get their money back for how all of the games are of atrocious quality. However, way back in April of 2010, there exists a fan recreation project in remaking the Action 52 game, simply known as Action 52 Owns. Even though this is a collaborative effort between different developers, the project is a rather slow process to become a reality, meaning the people will just have to wait until the further news regarding this project has been completed for years to come.
  • Castlevania II: Simon's Quest on the Nintendo Entertainment System (abbreviated as NES), where someone has made a mod where it patches the game to much better quality unlike its past version. The mod is known as Castlevania II: Simon's Quest Redaction.
  • A minor but effective one with the Playstation 2 version of Crash Bandicoot: The Wrath of Cortex. The original release suffered from Loads And Loads Of Loading, which was cut down significantly for the Platinum and Greatest Hits rereleases. The Xbox version dumbed them down even further and offered a few other cosmetic tune ups. While the game is still considered So Okay, It's Average, most fans say that is much easier to sit through when more time is spent playing than waiting for it to load.
  • While not outright panned, Knights of the Old Republic II: The Sith Lords suffered when it was Christmas Rushed for the 2004 holiday season, being launched with bugs and missing content. Obsidian offered to release a patch to restore some of the content, but LucasArts turned it down. Many years later, The Sith Lords Restored Content Mod was released and helped give KOTOR 2 the status it has today.
  • No Man's Sky, at least to most people, are totally disappointed with the game at release, especially the whopping $60.00 which is a huge slap in the face to the consumers. However, as two years passed, No Man's Sky had its quality improvised as of the year 2018. In the process, this caused some people to play it again.
  • Pokémon Diamond and Pearl: One of the biggest complaints aimed at these games is that they're just too slow, as in that even battle animations are slow-loading. Platinum, the third game of the bunch, would come along to speed things up a bit, and by the time of Pokemon Heart Gold And Soul Silver, Game Freak had gotten accustomed to working on the DS and were able to bring the games back up to their typical speed.

Western Animation

  • Uncle Grandpa at least to most people, had started off terrible, but by Season 3, it has become apparent that the show's quality had begun to escalate. This in turn caused some of the viewers to return watching it, though sadly it has been cancelled eventually by Cartoon Network. Nevertheless however, people can still watch it over and over again as they need to, since its still available on DVD, and it can be watched online on the Kim Cartoon website.

Feedback: 45 replies

Jan 6th 2019 at 10:26:01 AM

Uh, why is this one getting a discard too?

Jan 6th 2019 at 12:47:33 PM

  • A minor but effective one with the Playstation 2 version of Crash Bandicoot The Wrath Of Cortex. The original release suffered from Loads And Loads Of Loading, which was cut down significantly for the Platinum and Greatest Hits rereleases. The Xbox version dumbed them down even further and offered a few other cosmetic tune ups. While the game is still considered So Okay Its Average, most fans say that is much easier to sit through when more time is spent playing than waiting for it to load.

Jan 6th 2019 at 12:52:28 PM

IDK why it was bombed, but you shouldn't be so quick to say "no examples" as usually YMMV pages can still have examples as long as the examples are well-written; usually "no example" pages are for omnipresent tropes, flame bait tropes, or fan speak, which this isn't.

In addition, the Castlevania example should be moved to an actual example section rather than be awkwardly discussed in the description.

  • Pokemon Diamond And Pearl: One of the biggest complaints aimed at these games is that they're just too slow, as in that even battle animations are slow-loading. Platinum, the third game of the bunch, would come along to speed things up a bit, and by the time of Pokemon Heart Gold And Soul Silver, Game Freak had gotten accustomed to working on the DS and were able to bring the games back up to their typical speed.

Jan 6th 2019 at 3:10:47 PM

Edited just to regain the lost formatting on my example.

Chocolate, are you just copy+pasting? If you click the gray circle next to each comment you can go to markup mode, which gives you all the formatting each example was written with.

Jan 6th 2019 at 3:11:23 PM

  • While not outright panned,Knights Of The Old Republic II The Sith Lords suffered when it was Christmas Rushed for the 2004 holiday season, being launched with bugs and missing content. Obsidian offered to release a patch to restore some of the content, but Lucas Arts turned it down. Many years later, The Sith Lords Restored Content Mod was released and helped give KOTOR 2 the status it has today.

Jan 6th 2019 at 3:14:08 PM

4tell, this trope mustn't be confused with any of those, since this mainly focuses on things of terrible quality. I'm just saying.

Jan 6th 2019 at 3:15:30 PM

^ "Terrible" quality in this case is subjective— there's a reason things like So Bad Its Horrible are Darthwiki pages and not normal YMMV pages. With that out of the way, what about those tropes excludes the idea of the previous work being bad quality?

Jan 6th 2019 at 3:28:08 PM

It's just the fact that I don't want this trope to be confused with the said tropes mentioned above, but for the benefit of the doubt, I'll answer your question. To basically put it, Quality Redemption is only similar to them, not the exact same. If that's not the answer you are looking for, well, you could try to give more clarity of what you're saying. Quality Redemption is an event trope that happens whenever the developers manage to fix up the quality of something, for example video games and consumer products, among anything else along those lines.

Jan 6th 2019 at 4:01:22 PM

Nobody wants their new idea to be confused for other ideas, but it happens— what I'm asking for is the difference that makes Quality Redemption separate from the others and why the definition you gave "an event trope that happens whenever the developers manage to fix up the quality of something, for example video games and consumer products, among anything else along those lines" either doesn't apply to the other tropes or if it does apply to those other tropes, what makes them different.

In other words, what makes Quality Redemption different from the other tropes listed? Or, what makes those tropes different from this one?

Besides, 4tell0life4 wasn't saying this is those other tropes- they said that this could be the Supertrope, so every example of those tropes is by definition also this trope but more specific, where this is broader so would only include examples not covered by a subtrope.

Jan 6th 2019 at 4:50:40 PM

Uh, hi. This is awkward. I'm the one who bombed it earlier. Saw the trope, thought it felt like it was too close to Growing The Beard (as well as the Polished Port and Updated Rerelease tropes 4tell mentioned above), had a post half-written out, got called away for the day without warning and only just got back to it. Sorry.

With the benefit of looking at it with a fresh pair of eyes, I could maybe see it working as its own trope (or like 4tell and War Jay mentioned, a supertrope), but it's going to need some spit and polish to make it stand out from the others first.

Jan 6th 2019 at 8:08:33 PM

^ Growing The Beard is, in turn, the supertrope to this. (it can cover cases where the bad parts wasn't fixed, it's just that the new stuff they come up with is gradually better.)

And as I'm checking the examples, the Crash one is Polished Port, so we don't need to list that one here. That's what being "supertrope to some subtropes" entails.

See also Game Mod, which may be used for this trope.

Jan 6th 2019 at 8:26:17 PM

And Chocolate, I should be clear that being a supertrope is by no means a bad thing. All it means is that the trope is broad enough to cover a range other tropes have covered more specifically. It's absolutely okay when this happens as long as the super-and-sub tropes are both fleshed out enough and distinct enough that having two separate tropes is worth it.

Say, if "Car" was a trope then "race car" would be the subtrope; however, "race car" existing doesn't invalidate "car", it just means the page for "car" can't include examples of "race car".

Jan 7th 2019 at 6:45:29 AM

I see, but why wasn't the statement of it not being a bad thing being mentioned in it anyways?

Jan 7th 2019 at 8:44:27 AM

Wait, scratch all this. Just go to The Remake (and Video Game Remake).

Jan 7th 2019 at 10:22:28 AM

^^ What do you mean? If you're asking why 4tell didn't mention it, I guess they just didn't think it'd be considered a problem to begin with?

You also still didn't explain what makes this trope different from those others... and now different from The Remake.

Jan 9th 2019 at 2:38:54 PM

I think the difference between this trope and the others as The Remake is this should be more fan-oriented, since the patches and mods are more seen by fans than official companies, IMO. Maybe focusing there, this could have more hats. BTW, here's my two cents:

  • This was seen a lot in MUGEN during the Turn Of The Millennium, in which when a character was released and the author doesn't make proper updates to improve it (or straightly every update make it worse), other authors make patches that improve the character for real. These patches are usually downgrades (Win -> DOS, 1.0 -> Win), but most of them fix gameplay, commands and/or moves. This tendence goes now as a Dead Horse Trope, since creators go directly to The Remake and make their own versions of bad characters from scratch instead trying to fix them.

Jan 9th 2019 at 6:24:36 PM

^ Maybe...

It's up to you Chocolate, there seems to be two routes you can take here: This can be turned into a supertrope, or you can narrow things down and go with Basara-kun's idea. I mean I'm sure you could probably Take A Third Option too but my point is you gotta give this some aim and hammer out the relationship it has to other similar ideas.

Jan 10th 2019 at 9:27:42 AM

What happens if it's a supertrope exactly Jay? I mean, I will make it a supertrope but is there anything I must do to make it a supertrope?

Jan 10th 2019 at 10:49:11 AM

^^ Well you'd have to list all the tropes it's "super" too and then make sure the examples you take don't fall into territory covered by one of those other tropes; back to the car analogy, if you had the supertrope car and the subtrope racecar, all racecar examples would have to go on racecar, even though they'd all fit car, because examples go on the page that most specifically fits.

Jan 11th 2019 at 6:45:44 AM

Also, you've to specify this is only for video games. I was thinking in an example about toys/figures that are badly made or bootlegs that fans take them and repaint/remodel them into pieces of art even better than the official ones. But then, I only see VG examples here when the title and description are wider than that.

Maybe changing the name and fixing the description to be more VG-focused could save this, but as it is now, I put a bomb instead a hat, sorry

Jan 11th 2019 at 7:10:46 AM

The initial release of Ultima 8: Pagan required lots of precise jumping to be done with the overly sensitive controls. This led to a lot of annoying deaths. A later patch made the jumping targeting automated, which rendered the whole thing rather pointless as Spoony notes.

Jan 11th 2019 at 7:43:05 AM

i feel like this is fine as is if you just make it a YMMV trope.

as in it's too subjective what counts are 'poor initial quality' and 'better after updates.' Like would a game that's already good out of the gate, but keeps getting update patches count?

And since its all fan reception anyway there's no clear way to measure unless its like an unambiguous PR fiasco like Battlefront. Or it's used as a plot device in a show that was there's a narrative thrust behind it but almost all these are Real Life examples, like Eight Point Eight.

Jan 11th 2019 at 8:28:00 AM

This is better as a supertrope, which will cover whatever else its subtropes don't.

"Update patches", for one, is something we don't yet have a page for.

Jan 13th 2019 at 8:25:24 AM

Yeah, but what happenns if it's a supertrope, and how does the TV Tropes expect me on how to create one exactly? I mean, I know this is a stupid question, but how do I make this a supertrope?

Jan 13th 2019 at 10:01:46 AM

^ All you do is explain that this is a supertrope in the description, and add a bulleted list of subtropes that 4tell0life4 has given you.

That said, I think that "poorly received video game improved by patches/DL Cs/mods" is a meaningful and useful concept for an Audience Reaction that we don't have. This would be a sister trope to Surpsingly Improved sequel, and might be caused by a Polished Port, Uptdated Rerelease, or Video Game Remake. I would support this as a direction for this draft to go. If so, it definitely needs a more specific name, as Quality Redemption is very broad and includes other audience reactions in concept.

I don't really support this being a supertrope, as 4tell0life4 has included a mix of objective tropes and Audience Reactions there.

Jan 13th 2019 at 9:40:05 AM

The Castlevania example should properly link to the Nintendo Entertainment System, and there's no need to state that it's commonly known as the "NES".

Jan 14th 2019 at 3:21:59 PM

^^ "a mix of objective tropes and Audience Reactions there."

Doesn't stop some other indices/supertropes to be a list of both.

Jan 14th 2019 at 9:02:15 PM

^^^I go for this idea, totally. If OP doesn't want it, I can make a trope of my own with this concept and following it (with adding other media like Toys and Fan Works in general, not just Video Games).

Also, I agree about changing the name for something more VG-related, the actual title is still ambiguous as in the beginning

Jan 15th 2019 at 5:05:53 AM

Sorry, but the Quality Redemption trope is created for the purpose of including anything that has been improved quality wise. There just needs to be some more examples alongside the video game examples.

Jan 15th 2019 at 11:53:27 AM

... how. You're framing this as a trope about post-release patches and updates improving something. Other than computer software, there's not a lot where that can apply.

Also, the name's really bad. Like, I can think of at least three potential meanings for a trope of Quality Redemption and none of them are this. I think. I'm still unclear because the grammar in the description is pretty wonky.

Throwing in a bomb for the time being. I'm down with (what I think is) the idea behind this, but it isn't ready for launch by a long shot.

Jan 15th 2019 at 11:59:58 AM

So how would a non-video game example work for this trope, Chocolate? The only example I can really think of is, say, someone re-doing a poorly written fanfic and making it good (and I don't have any examples of that in real life to use). Poorly written books can't exactly be taken back and re-done; movies and TV shows are already finished production by the time they air and nobody can go back and fix any mistakes afterward...

Jan 15th 2019 at 5:44:25 PM

Anyway, some tropes are Video Game focused but still allow for non Video Game examples on the page, so you could probably do that.

Jan 17th 2019 at 4:31:26 AM

While I do understand that point of view, if you look at the laconic description, you'll see the reboot and remake word been added into it. This means that while most shows, movies, etc are beyond fixing, rebooting or remaking them is definitely an option, as long as the creators take a long break before doing so.

But, you can explain to me why exactly books couldn't be remade, especially whenever it comes to TV shows and movies.

Jan 17th 2019 at 6:37:36 AM

Should probably mention Better On DVD in the description somewhere.

Jan 18th 2019 at 11:01:20 AM

Looks okay to me.

For books I guess it's because...once they're published and sold, the work is done. I suppose someone could remake a book but with the exception of children adaptations and the like I've never really seen it happen. That doesn't mean it hasn't, I guess, but the idea is that once a book is written usually that's just... it.

Jan 18th 2019 at 11:14:22 AM

I don't agree with the listing of The Remake, as remakes may be better, worse, similar, or Base-breaking in terms of their quality. I'm having a hard time understanding what the paragraph about The Remake and Video Game Remake is even trying to say.

Surprisingly Improved Sequel should be added to the list.

Confused by how Growing The Beard is treated here. How can it not coincide with this, but also be a subtrope? Growing The Beard happens over time, and if there are changes in writers, directors, actors, or the overall direction of the story associated with the Beard, I would say that counts as "a specific thing that has become good through extensive fixing".

Jan 18th 2019 at 5:27:09 PM

^ I thought I said Growing The Beard is the supertrope to this.

The Remake's usual intention is to improve the work, in various ways. Whether it comed out as actually good or not doesn't matter.

Jan 19th 2019 at 1:14:17 AM

  • Mass Effect 3's original ending left much to be desired with nine nigh identical cut-scenes depending on Effective Military Strength(EMS) score and which of the three ways you chose to use the Crucible. The Catalyst gave an unfulfilling answer for why the Reapers harvest all life(Organics eventually create AIs which eventually starts a Robot War and wipes out the Organics. The Reapers "preserve" life in the form of Reapers to stop this from happening) and there was no way to say,"We proved you wrong by making peace between the Quarians and the Geth." There was a complete lack of a Denouement to tell the fates of the crew, major planets, races, and the galaxy in general. Not to mention the Inferred Holocaust of having all the mass relays destroyed and the majority of the galaxy's leaders and military stuck in the Sol system, of which a significant portion is unable to eat anything from Earth. Lastly, the EMS score required to see the best endings was unattainable without playing multiplayer mode. The fan outcry was not pretty. Bioware shifted their post release schedule to focus on making and releasing the Extended Cut DLC which fixed most of these issues. The endings were clearly different depending on the final choice. There was a new option to refuse to use the Crucible dooming the current cycle, but saving the next. The fates of major characters and races were detailed in the epilogue. The relays were only damaged by the crucible and shown being repaired, except for the worst ending, low EMS destroy, where the relays are destroyed. The EMS score requirements for the endings were lowered so that multiplayer wasn't necessary to see the best endings. It also added extra scenes, and altered existing ones, during the final mission. Lastly, it changed the ending message after the credits from "Look out for future DLC" to "Thanks for playing the trilogy helping us shape these games."

Jan 19th 2019 at 2:04:24 AM

@War Jay: remaking a book means writing a new version of it. "Quality Improvement" as a trope would also count a better sequel to that book, though.

yesterday

I know what "remaking a book" means. I've just never seen it happen.

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