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Taking The Fight Outside

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Someone tells people fighting (or about to fight) to leave the area, or the fighters decide to do so themselves. (prepping for launch)

This work is a proposed Trope, Tropers can vote and offer feedback in the comments section below.
Proposed By:
Miss_Desperado on Mar 28th 2018 at 6:53:16 AM
Last Edited By:
Miss_Desperado on Jul 18th 2018 at 1:43:49 PM
Name Space: Main
Page Type: trope

When two or more characters are about to fight or in the middle of fighting, a bystander will interrupt and ask them to take the fight outside. Alternatively, as an overlap with Let's Fight Like Gentlemen, one of the fighters could suggest settling the score outside.

This can overlap with Do Wrong, Right if the interrupter starts with seemingly disapproving of fighting at all, only to switch to shooing the fighters outside.

Compare and contrast Get Out, which declares someone to be no longer welcome but doesn't have to involve physical fighting. Compare and contrast Getting the Boot, which involves physical removal of unwelcome characters regardless of the reason they're unwelcome. When this trope is averted, see Fighting in All the Wrong Places Index.

Will be indexed on Fight Scene.


Examples:

Anime and Manga

  • One Piece: Sanji in later chapters meets his estranged father, Judge (that's his name), and they get into a heated argument about how Sanji doesn't fit into the family. In the end, Judge tells Sanji that they'll settle things outside. Cue fight scene.
  • In Ranma , when Ranma and Pantyhose Taro are in the Cat Cafe and both ready to tear each other apart, Cologne has them take the fight outside by sending them both flying out of the building with a strike of her staff.
  • Various of the Dragon Ball Z movies and OVAs are about the new enemies taking cities and wreaking havok. Then, the Z-Warriors convince them to fight outside the city, thus saving the citizens from an imminent destruction.
  • In Is It Wrong to Try to Pick Up Girls in a Dungeon?, Mord causes trouble for Bell's group, trying to get him to join up with his party so he'd have access to his waitress friends. Lyu tells him to get lost and when he keeps persisting while insulting Bell, Lyu painfully clamps his fingers down. Angered, Mord tries to attack while declaring he wouldn't go easy on her just because she was a woman. However Mama Mia, the tavern head, slams her fist down on the table, breaking it, and tells them if they were going to fight they were to take it outside. Not wanting to incite her wrath, Mord and his party leaves.

Film - Live-Action

  • Superman II. Superman does this twice, once as Clark Kent and once as Superman.
    • After Superman has been de-powered, he travels with Lois Lane in Clark Kent guise. When a man acts rudely toward them in a diner, he asks the man "Excuse me, sir, would you care to step outside?" twice. As they start to go outside to fight, the man hits him from behind and knocks him down. The man then brutally beats him up inside the diner.
    • While the three Kryptonian supervillains are inside the Daily Planet building, Superman appears outside a window and says to General Zod, "General, would you care to step outside?" Zod and his minions leave the building and engage Superman in a battle that ends in a draw and Superman flying away.
  • X-Men Origins: Wolverine: When Wolverine finds his brother in a bar, the bartender nervously says, "Guys, whatever this is, take it outside." The brothers don't listen and a Bar Brawl ensues.
  • Road House: Subverted in the opening. Dalton is attacked by an unruly patron with a knife, so he suggests that they "take it outside". As soon as they set foot out the door, Dalton simply instructs his bouncers to form a human wall to keep them out. More generally, Dalton later advises the bouncers working under him in his new job at the Double Deuce to never start a fight inside the bar to deal with troublemakers unless it's absolutely necessary.

Live-Action TV

  • In The Twilight Zone (1959) episode entitled "The Bewitchin' Pool", Sport and Jeb enter the titular pool at the behest of a boy named Wit, who appeared there suddenly while their parents were arguing. They descend to a place for unloved children and meet "Aunt T" an elderly, loving matriarch. Wit makes a comment that upsets Sport and she resolves to fight him. Aunt T calmly hands them each a pair of boxing gloves and tells them to go outside, fight fair and to avoid hitting below the belt. She then turns to Jeb and asks for help frosting the cake she's made. Sport asks to help too only for Aunt T to reply "But I thought you two were gonna beat each other up." Wit and Sport inform her that they'd rather frost the cake instead.
  • On Cheers, Woody gets into an argument with a snooty attendee at a high society function and they agree to settle it with a fight at Cheers. When they decide that they can't hold the fight in the main room, they move it...to the pool room. (Note: this is where Woody's relationship with Kelly begins.)

Video Games

  • The Scott Pilgrim game has the fight against Todd Ingram taken outside the club that Stage 3 takes place in.
  • Downplayed in Dragon Age: Origins, where the player has the option of fighting one of Loghain's emissaries just outside the entrance to Orzammar. If the player decides to fight said emissary, the dwarven guard will tell them to fight away from the entrance, and the fight will begin a fair distance away from the entrance.

Web Animation

  • Played with in ASDF Movie, which features two rowdy types in a bar with drinks looking like they're about to get into a fight, with one of them, in a very serious tone, suggests 'taking this outside', to which the other replies in just as serious a tone 'Sure!'. One cut later, with both of them outside, and the Bait-and-Switch is apparent:
    Rowdy guy number 1: (still in pre-fight tone of voice) Wow! What a lovely evening!
    Rowdy guy number 2: (Also still in pre-fight voice) This was a really great idea!

Feedback: 48 replies

Mar 30th 2018 at 9:42:10 PM

I could use some help changing the thesis of the description to not be an example. Suggestions are welcome.

Mar 30th 2018 at 11:58:43 PM

"When two characters are about to fight, a third party will ask them to take the fight outside."

"There's no Bait And Switch involved..."

Mar 31st 2018 at 1:02:19 AM

...No offense, but isn't this a little People Sit On Chairs?

Mar 31st 2018 at 1:02:41 AM

What about it's one of the fighters who tells the other to take it outside?

Apr 1st 2018 at 2:15:56 PM

4tell0life4 that could work, too, but expanding the draft to cover that concept as well would necessitate a rename. Any suggestions?

Edit: What if I renamed this to Take The Imminent Fight Outside ?

Apr 1st 2018 at 6:08:19 PM

OK, Taking The Imminent Fight Outside. Boos? Yays? Other suggestions?

Apr 1st 2018 at 11:11:23 PM

  • One Piece: Sanji in later chapters meets his estranged father, Judge (that's his name), and they get into a heated argument about how Sanji doesn't fit into the family. In the end, Judge tells Sanji that they'll settle things outside. Cue fight scene.

Apr 4th 2018 at 3:53:33 AM

Getting a yay from me. ASDF Movie features two rowdy types in a bar with drinks looking like they're about to get into a fight, with one of them, in a very serious tone, suggests 'taking this outside', to which the other replies in just as serious a tone 'Sure!'. One cut later, with both of them outside, and the Bait And Switch is apparent:

Rowdy guy number 1: (still in pre-fight tone of voice) Wow! What a lovely evening!
Rowdy guy number 2: (Also still in pre-fight voice) This was a really great idea!

Apr 4th 2018 at 4:25:47 PM

Perhaps gotta a dd a bit of detail that Sanji and Judge were talking inside their family's home ship (they live in the seas), and "outside" refers to the ship's outdoors.

Apr 4th 2018 at 7:55:32 PM

^ ??? I've never seen One Piece and I'm having trouble visualizing what you described... are there nautical terms for what you're talking about?

Apr 4th 2018 at 10:44:38 PM

^ They were talking in the ship's interior, then Judge suggested to take it outdoors. I'm making it simple because going into details for One Piece would be confusing for those who aren't familiar.

Apr 4th 2018 at 11:18:34 PM

  • In Ranma One Half, when Ranna and Pantyhose Taro are in the Cat Cafe and both ready to tear each other apart, Cologne has them take the fight outside by sending them both flying out of the building with a strike of her staff.

Apr 6th 2018 at 7:28:32 AM

Anime and Manga:

  • Various of the Dragon Ball Z movies and OV As are about the new enemies taking cities and making havok. Then, the Z-Warriors convice them to fight outside the city and so save the citizens of an imminent destruction.

Apr 6th 2018 at 9:58:06 AM

I think "Bringing The Fight Outside" sounds more natural.

Or just "Taking The Fight Outside". That "imminent" just sounds forced.

Apr 7th 2018 at 7:26:51 PM

Hmm, I'm gonna wait for more votes on the name before making changes to it.

Apr 7th 2018 at 9:49:53 PM

Taking The Fight Outside would mean it'd count cases where the fight was already underway. But I think those examples should count, too.

Apr 9th 2018 at 8:40:48 PM

^ You have a point. Changing the name now.

Apr 10th 2018 at 1:40:40 AM

The Laconic needs to be shorter.

Apr 11th 2018 at 10:20:28 AM

^ Agreed, but I'm suffering from writer's block. Suggestions?

Apr 13th 2018 at 1:25:57 AM

^ "Someone tells people fighting (or about to fight) to leave the area, or the fighters decide to do so themselves."

Apr 13th 2018 at 8:42:58 PM

"What's going on here?" "Ah, they're blowing up a city!" "We need to go to place that's completely desolate, and would never be in real life at all, and is huge, and a bajillion miles wide, and it's nowhere to be found on Earth but it's right over there!"
DBZ In A Nutshell, Newgrounds.com

Apr 16th 2018 at 9:10:51 PM

^ I don't like that quote, I'd rather have something shorter.

Apr 16th 2018 at 9:21:54 PM

  • The Scott Pilgrim game has the fight against Todd Ingram taken outside the club that Stage 3 takes place in.

Apr 17th 2018 at 2:28:40 AM

  • Capitalized the title.
  • Examples section
    • Italicized work names as per How To Write An Example - Emphasis For Work Names.
    • Changed "making havok" to "wreaking havok".

Apr 17th 2018 at 2:43:45 AM

Film

  • Superman II. Superman does this twice, once as Clark Kent and once as Superman.
    • After Superman has been de-powered, he travels with Lois Lane in Clark Kent guise. When a man acts rudely toward them in a diner, he asks the man "Excuse me, sir, would you care to step outside?" twice. As they start to go outside to fight, the man hits him from behind and knocks him down. The man then brutally beats him up inside the diner.
    • While the three Kryptonian supervillains are inside the Daily Planet building, Superman appears outside a window and says to General Zod, "General, would you care to step outside?" Zod and his minions leave the building and engage Superman in a battle that ends in a draw and Superman flying away.

Apr 22nd 2018 at 1:11:41 AM

  • Road House: Subverted in the opening. Dalton is attacked by an unruly patron with a knife, so he suggests that they "take it outside". As soon as they set foot out the door, Dalton simply instructs his bouncers to form a human wall to keep them out. More generally, Dalton later advises the bouncers working under him in his new job at the Double Deuce to never start a fight inside the bar to deal with troublemakers unless it's absolutely necessary.

May 7th 2018 at 3:37:10 PM

Gosh, I nearly forgot about this. I'd appreciate constructive criticism on the name and description.

May 7th 2018 at 5:10:19 PM

  • In Robin Hood Friar Tuck, infuriated by the Sheriff of Nottingham stealing from the poor box, forcibly ejects him from the church and forces him into a sword fight. This turned out to be Batman Gambit however, as the Sheriff's cronies were waiting outside to help ambush him.

May 7th 2018 at 9:42:43 PM

^ I don't think that counts, there's no overlap with Lets Fight Like Gentlemen and Friar Tuck wasn't declaring his intent to fight specifically outside the church. That example fits better under Get Out.

Come to think of it, I need to contrast my idea with Get Out.

May 16th 2018 at 3:07:41 PM

Bumping for constructive criticism on the description.

May 19th 2018 at 8:41:33 PM

What should I index this on?

May 25th 2018 at 9:53:52 AM

I still need constructive criticism on the description. Even nitpicks are welcome.

Jun 2nd 2018 at 1:41:41 AM

  • In Is It Wrong To Try To Pick Up Girls In A Dungeon, Mord causes trouble for Bell's group, trying to get him to join up with his party so he'd have access to his waitress friends. Lyu tells him to get lost and when he keeps persisting while insulting Bell, Lyu painfully clamps his fingers down. Angered, Mord tries to attack while declaring he wouldn't go easy on her just because she was a woman. However Mama Mia, the tavern head, slams her fist down on the table, breaking it, and tells them if they were going to fight they were to take it outside. Not wanting to incite her wrath, Mord and his party leaves.

Jun 26th 2018 at 3:46:59 PM

In The Twilight Zone 1959' episode entitled "The Bewitchin' Pool" Sport and Jeb enter the titular pool at the behest of a boy named Wit, who appeared there suddenly while their parents were arguing. They descend to a place for unloved children and meet "Aunt T" an elderly, loving matriarch. Wit makes a comment that upsets Sport and she resolves to fight him. Aunt T calmly hands them each a pair of boxing gloves and tells them to go outside, fight fair and to avoid hitting below the belt. She then turns to Jeb and asks for help frosting the cake she's made. Sport asks to help too only for Aunt T to reply "But I thought you two were gonna beat each other up." Wit and Sport inform her that they'd rather frost the cake instead.

Jul 2nd 2018 at 7:56:40 PM

^ Example added.

I found an example on the You Squared page that fits this trope but it might need the context tweaked before I can add it. I've never watched that show, so I can't do it myself.

  • In Kamen Rider Double, Shotaro is having a friendly conversation with another patron at the barber shop. They keep just missing getting to see each other's faces for some time. When Shotaro realizes he's been chatting with The Dragon, we get the following as the poor owner can only look on in confusion:
    Kirihiko/Nazca Dopant: You!
    Shotaro: YOU!
    Kirihiko: Let's take this outside!

Jul 8th 2018 at 9:33:49 PM

Live Action Television

  • On Cheers, Woody gets into an argument with a snooty attendee at a high society function and they agree to settle it with a fight at Cheers. When they decide that they can't hold the fight in the main room, they move it...to the pool room. (Note: this is where Woody's relationship with Kelly begins.)

Jul 9th 2018 at 2:13:27 PM

This is launching soon, if anybody has any objections, now's the time to voice them.

Jul 9th 2018 at 9:54:02 PM

  • A variation occurs in Dragon Age Origins, where the player has the option of fighting one of Loghain's emissaries just outside the entrance to Orzammar. If the player decides to fight said emissary, the dwarven guard will tell them to fight away from the entrance, and the fight will begin a fair distance away from the entrance.

Jul 11th 2018 at 9:09:36 PM

I know we're supposed to avoid using dialogue to name tropes, but this seems like a case where just calling the trope Take It Outside would actually make it more recognizable and easier to adopt than the more specific name.

Jul 12th 2018 at 10:16:08 AM

^ I disagree, "it" is an ambiguous pronoun that might get this draft mistaken for tropes like Appliance Defenestration. That and you yourself brought up the point that we're supposed to avoid using dialogue to name tropes.

Jul 12th 2018 at 10:29:24 AM

The point of not naming tropes to sound like dialogue is about recognition and visibility/adoption outside of this website. This seems like the opposite of that — taking a common bit of everyday speech and rendering it less immediately recognizable to fit the culture of TV Tropes. That might fit the letter of the rule, but seems against the spirit of it.

Jul 12th 2018 at 3:23:29 PM

Should we make a crowner? (I don't know how.)

Jul 18th 2018 at 1:43:49 PM

I asked the tropers and crowners seem to be broken right now. No word yet on the No New Stock Phrases question.

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