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1[[quoteright:300:https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/killer_instinct.jpg]]²[[caption-width-right:300:C-C-C-C-COMBO BREAKER!]]²->''"Available for your home in 1995, only on [[UsefulNotes/Nintendo64 Nintendo Ultra 64]]..."''²-->-- '''The attract mode for the first ''Killer Instinct''.''' [[VaporWare They never fulfilled that promise]]. [[note]]Well, not completely true. The first game did see a [[PolishedPort very good port]] on the UsefulNotes/{{SNES}} and UsefulNotes/GameBoy, and ''[=KI Gold=]'' eventually did make it to the Nintendo (Not-So-Ultra-Anymore) 64 in 1996. But that was a port of the ''second'' game.[[/note]]²²The year was 1994. Creator/{{Nintendo}} were feeling the gaming equivalent of the AnimationAgeGhetto. They got a lot of grief for censoring the [[BloodlessCarnage blood]] and [[FinishingMove Fatalities]] in their otherwise-excellent port of ''Franchise/MortalKombat''. It was Main/TheNineties, so what else was there to do but launch a new IP which would make ''Mortal Kombat'' look tame (even hiring Creator/MidwayGames to co-develop it with Creator/{{Rare}})? Nintendo even broke their own long-established rules like allowing a player to control the undead, or [[NeverSayDie putting the word "Killer"]] in the game.²²''Killer Instinct'' is a series of {{fighting game}}s developed by Creator/{{Rare}} originally for Nintendo systems, then developed by Creator/DoubleHelixGames and later Creator/IronGalaxyStudios for Microsoft's UsefulNotes/XboxOne and PC. The series comprises the following games:²²* ''Killer Instinct''²* ''Killer Instinct 2''²** ''Killer Instinct Gold''²* ''VideoGame/KillerInstinct2013''²²Set in a dystopic future Earth, the plot revolves around the eponymous Killer Instinct tournament held by the [[EvilInc hugely-evil]] [=UltraTech=] corporation for reasons [[ExcusePlot that are unclear]], though the comic implies it's for the huge [[OnlyInItForTheMoney revenue]] from [[HumansAreBastards bloodthirsty spectators]]. Among the competitors are people who have been wronged by [=UltraTech=], most notably the CorporateSamurai and [[MsFanservice fanservice character]] Orchid, and a few of the company's whacked-out test subjects such as the MascotMook Fulgore. ²²''KI''-style {{combos}} are great for beginners who are inexperienced at {{fighting game}}s. ("'''[[ComboBreaker C-C-C-C-COMBO BREAKER]]'''" and "'''[[LargeHamAnnouncer ULLLLLTRAAAAAA COMBO]]'''" seem to be running gags associated with the series.) You don't have to expertly string moves together to keep your opponent in a [[CycleOfHurting stunlock]] state to rack up big damage. Instead, combos in ''Killer Instinct'' are very formulaic and easy, following a strict formula of opening with a special move (called Openers by the community), linking together autoboubles and more special moves, before finally ending in a finisher that shaves off a ton of health. However, the combo system has an out for players who are observant enough to know how their opponent is trying to combo them. A "Combo Breaker" occurs if the opponent is keen enough to know what works in a [[TacticalRockPaperScissors Rock/Paper/Scissors]] situation by pressing the two light, medium or heavy buttons corresponding to what type of autodouble is being performed. This forces players to be keenly aware of what buttons their opponent is pressing even mid combo, and keeps things interesting and engaging the entire match.²²The first proved popular due to its eye-popping graphics (courtesy of Silicon Graphics, who did the pre-rendered sprites for ''VideoGame/DonkeyKongCountry1''), catchy soundtrack, and signature combo-intensive gameplay. A sequel called ''Killer Instinct 2'' was later released, but wasn't nearly as popular for several reasons: getting rid of the pre-rendered backgrounds in favor of [[PolygonCeiling real time polygonal backgrounds]], the revamping of several characters, a confusing time-travel plot, and the rise of 3D {{Fighting Game}}s. An updated version, titled ''Killer Instinct Gold'', was released for the Nintendo 64 a couple months after launch. The series still had a fanbase, however, and some still hoped for a revival done by developer Creator/{{Rare}}. However, in light of [[http://shoryuken.com/2012/08/22/former-rare-employee-explains-why-we-never-saw-a-killer-instinct-3/ certain news]], it sadly seemed unlikely...²².. that is, until [=E3=] 2013 when Microsoft announced a new KI game was in the works for the UsefulNotes/XboxOne. The third game, a reboot of the series titled simply ''[[VideoGame/KillerInstinct2013 Killer Instinct]]'' again, released in 2013. It brought back many of the old characters and gameplay mechanics, but with a modern spin that helped revitalize a nearly 20-year-old franchise.²²Useless trivia: the first game, though marketed as using Ultra 64 hardware, was actually a custom Indigo[[superscript:2]] motherboard with a 100 [=MHz=] MIPS R4600 chip, Ultra graphics, and a hard drive for storing all the assets.²²----²!!The game is the TropeNamer for:²* ComboBreaker: Combos have various 'stages' to them, some of which are immune to being broken, some of which are not.[[note]]A full combo in ''Killer Instinct 2'' goes Opener --> Auto-Double --> Manual Auto-Double --> Manual Auto-Double --> Linker Auto-Double --> Manual Auto-Double --> Manual Auto-Double --> Finisher[[/note]] In the first game and the 2013 game, the breaker must be done based on the strength of the attack used in the attacker's combo. In ''Killer Instinct 2,'' the breaker must be done with Punch if the attacker is using Kick, and vice-versa. Unique to the 2013 game, the breaker ''itself'' can be broken, which allows the combo to continue and temporarily disables combo breakers.²--> '''[[MemeticMutation C-C-C-C-COMBO BREAKER!!!]]''' '''[[UpToEleven C-C-C-COUNTER BREAKER!!!]]'''²-----²!!The series provides examples of[[note]]The 2013 game's tropes can be found in its own page.[[/note]]:²[[foldercontrol]]²[[folder:The franchise in general]]²* TwoAndAHalfD: While the stages rotated freely, characters could only move in 2D under their own power. There was no sidestep command, and they only entered the Z-axis when being hit with certain attacks.²* AllThereInTheManual: The games themselves give nothing more than character backgrounds, although important character information can be pieced together from various profiles to form a vague idea about what's going on. Anything else came from the manuals to the console ports or WordOfGod attached to official artwork and the like. The biggest plot point ignored by the game is that Eyedol is ''not'' an Ultratech bio-weapon in testing like many of the standard characters, but a warring god from ancient times sealed in Limbo by sorcerers (the other one being Gargos, boss of the second game). Eyedol's lava-bridge stage has the portal machine that freed him as its backdrop.²* AnnouncerChatter: ²** "'''UL-TRAAAAAA COM-BOOOOOOOOO!!!'''"²** '''C-C-C-COMBO BREAKER!!!!!!'''²* AwesomeMcCoolname: Even though these were probably a byproduct of the DarkAgeOfSupernames (mid-Nineties, people), pretty much every character. Thunder, Cinder, Riptor, Fulgore, Tusk, you name it.²* BlessedWithSuck: Jago gets superpowers that make him one of the strongest on the entire planet and devotes his whole life to finding inner peace, only to find out he can't find it because those superpowers were bestowed upon him by a demon that wants to take over the world.²* BlueMeansCold: Glacius is an alien with ice-based powers and his skin is blue and white.²* BoobsOfSteel: Maya and Orchid.²* CallBack: Sabrewulf's name traces back to [[VideoGame/SabreWulf Rare's 1984 ZX Spectrum game, Sabre Wulf, back when they were still called Ultimate Play The Game.]]²* CallingYourAttacks: [[KamehameHadoken ENDOKUKEN!]]²* ChargedAttack: Charged by performing a {{combo breaker}}.²* CherryTapping: The "Humiliation" moves, which makes your opponent dance to a disco-ish beat.²* {{Combos}}: This series is basically the TropeCodifier, as it was the second[[note]]after ''Super VideoGame/StreetFighterII''[[/note]] FightingGame to count combo hits and the third to use chain combos[[note]]after ''VideoGame/{{Darkstalkers}}'' and ''VideoGame/XMenChildrenOfTheAtom''; later games like ''VideoGame/StreetFighterAlpha'' and ''VideoGame/MortalKombat3'' would adopt the system[[/note]]. Almost any hit can be strung into a combo, and can be interrupted with a C-C-C-{{COMBO BREAKER}}! In ''Killer Instinct 2,'' it's possible to reach 60+ hits ''without'' glitching or cheating, although this is limited to the end-of-match Ultra combos, and to players who had a full comprehension of the combo engine. Also, combos basically ARE the gameplay; you won't get far without using a few of them.²* TheComputerIsACheatingBastard: The computer pretty much performs {{combo breaker}}s at will. In the second game, it almost always counters your combo opener with [[TacticalRockPaperScissors the move that trumps it]]. One saving grace; the computer will never have magical immunity to the TacticalRockPaperScissors; if you respond to the computer opponent's opener with the appropriate counter, it ''will'' work, every time. The games are also quite infamous for the computer controlled characters hit harder then human ones. Get into a mirror match with the computer and trade blows, you will lose.²* CursedWithAwesome: Sabrewulf laments the fact he is a giant, badass, super strong, super fast, sapient werewolf and never stops looking for a cure [[spoiler: until he finally accepts the fact it has made him nothing but better, save for the fact he's a big ugly wolf now.]]²* DeathCryEcho²* DemBones: Spinal, complete with sword and shield.²* DesperationAttack: If your opponent doesn't use a finishing move of some kind, it's possible to recover from no damage once, which also grants you a ChargedAttack chance.²* DigitizedSprites: At least with the [[UsefulNotes/SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem SNES]] port of the first game and UsefulNotes/{{Nintendo 64}} port of the second.²* EasyModeMockery: In the easier difficulties in some versions, after you fought Fulgore you get... a credits screen and a message from the developers. The outright mockery is if you beat the first game in difficulty 2:²-->''Congratulations, you have defeated Ultratech's low end, garbage, obsolete, floor model, weak, on the verge of extinction, barely mobile, ''only can do a 5 hit combo'', pathetic, [[OverlyLongGag yesterday's news]] boss. I hope you're happy with yourself!''²* EconomyCast: Compared to many modern fighters. Between being a series starting nearly two decades ago and having a long SequelGap, the cast of the series never gets very big. Both KI and [=KI2=] have ten playable characters and one boss character, adding up to a grand total of 15 characters across both games.²* EvilLaugh: '''SPINAL.'''²* FireIceLightning: Cinder, Glacius, and Chief Thunder, respectively. They don't do extra damage to each other, though.²* {{Gorn}}: The game exceeded ''[[VideoGame/MortalKombatI Mortal Kombat]]'' in the gallons of blood characters lost during the match, though the actual finishing moves were relatively tame (opponents still ''died'', but in a less gruesome manner, probably to maintain the game's "T" rating).²* HighAltitudeBattle: The ever-elusive Sky Stage present in the first two games. It's a flat platform somehow floating several stories above ground in-between clouds rushing at high speed. Any hit may be deadly as in, even if you're whooping your opponent's ass, if he manages to use a knockdown move while you're at the corner, you'll fall off the stage and lose (it's a pretty long fall, by the way). ''[=KI2=]'' made it even worse: the platform is even smaller, and you can die simply by ''walking off''.²%% (ZCE) * HitboxDissonance²* {{Homage}}:²** B. Orchid homages Cheshire from Creator/DCComics. Orchid may have received a homage of her own in Joystick from Marvel Comics.²** The entire series and the characters are one huge homage to various cult classics: for example, Jago is a homage to various ninja flicks that were popular in the 80's and 90's, while Eyedol's desing references the cyclops from [[Film/The7thVoyageOfSinbad The 7th Voyage of Sinbad]].²* HomeStage: Every character is associated with and fought on a stage of their own. Though a few characters share them in the 2013 game.²* LargeHam: The announcer, bar none.²* LukeIAmYourFather: [[spoiler:Jago is Orchid's long-lost brother.]]²* MechanicalMuscles: TJ Combo, with the help of Ultratech, illegally implanted cybernetics in his arms, in order to win in boxing battles, said prosthetics being very muscular. Later he was discovered and kicked off. While in ''[=KI1=]'' it's covered with artificial skin, in ''[=KI2=]'' it's visible with [[https://vignette.wikia.nocookie.net/killerinstinct/images/4/46/TJ_Combo_KI_02.png/revision/latest?cb=20131103161904&format=original his hands peeled off showing his cybernetics]], and in the 2013 game, his arms appear scarred all over, implying that the prosthetics had been implanted under his skin and later removed.²* MegaCorp: '''ULTRATECH'''. They dabble in all sorts of freaky science from MechaMooks to reviving the dead to cross-breeding humans and reptile genetics. They also capture aliens and force them to fight, turn convicted felons into sentient lava beings, and graft mechanical arms to werewolves.²* TheOmniscientCouncilOfVagueness: Ultratech.²* PerfectPlayAI: Very prevalent in the first game, not so much in the second. Makes a violent comeback in the third when playing under [[HarderThanHard ''Kyle'' Difficulty]].[[note]]If you reach Shadow Jago, he will fight at "Kyle" level regardless of what difficulty you used to reach him.[[/note]]²* PrisonDimension: Both Eyedol and Gargos were trapped in one until Ultratech busted them out.²* SceneryPorn: Noted for its at-the-time excellent pre-rendered graphics, which made it stand out against the hand-drawn or digitized-sprite fighting games in the genre's glut of imitators.²* SongsInTheKeyOfPanic: When one of the fighters enters Danger state (i.e. is on the verge of losing), the music becomes tense and, sometimes, slightly faster paced, until the end of the fight.²* TacticalRockPaperScissors: The proper combo breaker to use depends on the strength of the combo's initial attack.²** Complaints about the ridiculousness of this (it takes master-level knowledge of every character to recognize what button to do the breaker with) led to a simpler system in the second game, where punch breaks kick and vice-versa. Unlike in the first game, maneuvers in combos will always match the button being used as a blink-and-you-miss-it visual cue for the victim; a punch input results in the character performing a punch, even if it's not the punch that button does outside of combos.²** Also in the second game, every character can open a combo with most basic attacks, standing or jumping in. However, every character also has three special moves that are specifically meant to open combos, often more damaging and easier to work with than the basic punches and kicks. The weakness of the special-move openers is that they function on a literal rock-paper-scissors mechanic, and no matter which two characters are facing off, one character's specific opener will ''always'' trump someone else's specific opener.²* ThreeRoundDeathmatch: A variant: Each character gets two life meters (except for ARIA who has three, one for each form) When the first runs out, the character stands back up, the two face off, and the battle continues.²* TitleScream: Well, more like pronounced normally in a sinisterly low voice.²* {{Troperiffic}}: The entire game's roster, who are inspired by all sorts of media, primarily American film. Jago is a McNinja, Orchid is the kick-ass ActionGirl, TJ Combo is inspired by [[Film/{{Rocky}} Apollo Creed]] and [[Creator/MrT Clubber]] [[Film/RockyIII Lang]], Spinal is directly inspired by the skeletons in Film/JasonAndTheArgonauts, Sabrewulf is the classic Werewolf movie monster, Maya is a JunglePrincess, etc. The third game continues this in earnest, with Hisako being a Japanese StringyHairedGhostGirl, Aganos being a RockMonster, ARIA riffing off classic anime conventions, and Kan-Ra being representative of an EvilSorcerer and the classic Mummy movie monster.²[[/folder]]²²[[folder:Killer Instinct]]²* AIBreaker: You can easily beat Fulgore by dashing in, stopping just out of reach, and jumping back until he tries to uppercut you, then countering over and over.²* ArcadePerfectPort: As for the presentation: The all-black cartridge was pretty badass. (''{{VideoGame/DOOM}}'' was pretty amazing as well; one of only two blood-red carts, the other being ''ComicBook/MaximumCarnage''.) It was basically ''Mortal Kombat'' but with ''VideoGame/DonkeyKongCountry'' TwoAndAHalfD graphics: they rendered some 3D graphics that the SNES isn't capable of producing on its own, then screenshotted them to make sprites that the SNES can draw. So, was the SNES version a good port? The models were grainer, and the cool fireball glowing effects were gone. The "3D" levels like Orchid's rooftop were flattened and the {{Ring Out}}s were changed... It was a little ''too'' ambitious for the SNES and it shows, especially 20 years later. But in the summer of '94, it was a good conversion. ''KI'' was going to be the flagship "Ultra 64" game; the tease for the imminent UsefulNotes/Nintendo64. Nintendo were advertising CGI cutscenes for ''Killer Instinct'' that wouldn't come to fruition until the console's release two years later. ({{Creator/Sony}} pulled a similar trick with UsefulNotes/PlayStation, by the way: kids were standing in crowds three-deep to watch the intro to ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII'' playing on a loop at Gamestop, years before the game was released.) ''KI'' on SNES was Nintendo's apology for the long-overdue [=N64=].²* {{Cap}}: You can do up to 80 hits in a single combo, except for Ultra Combos, which could ''easily'' break into the triple digits.²* DownerEnding: Riptor and Fulgore endings. In the former, the humanity is wiped out (even [[HoistByHisOwnPetard Ultratech]]) and the earth is ruled by Dinosaurs again. In the latter, [[TheBadGuyWins Ultratech successfully starts to mass product a new Fulgore generation]]. (No wonder Fulgore was the penultimate opponent of single-player).²* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: No one touches the original SNES/Arcade games anymore, which have a really wacky combo system: More than half the special moves hit multiple times, so you have to chain them together with regular attacks.²* {{Feelies}}: The game was released with a soundtrack album, ''Killer Cuts''.²* GameBreakingBug: Both Cinder and Eyedol had, as the result of bugs, infinite hit combos. Cinder's however, could be done at any time during a match, completely shutting out the opponent and guaranteeing Cinder the win once the timer ran down.²* HoistByHisOwnPetard: Ultratech in Riptor's ending. Riptor reproduction goes out of control, killing all humans.²* HomeStage: Specific for the first game:²** Black Orchid has Chicago Rooftop.²** Chief Thunder has the Canyon.²** Cinder has Desert Rooftop.²** Fulgore has Industrial Warehouse.²** Glacius has Mountain Temple/Mountain Shrine.²** Jago has Tiger Shrine.²** Riptor has the Altar.²** Sabrewulf has Interior Castle.²** Spinal has Spinal's Rooftop.²** T.J. Combo has the Boxing Gym.²** Eyedol has Eyedol's Lair/Warehouse Basement²* IdiosyncraticComboLevels: Triple, Super, Hyper, Brutal, Master, Awesome, Blaster, Monster, King, Killer. Above that, there's two types: [[FinishingMove Ultimate Combos]] and '''[[NoHoldsBarredBeatdown ULTRAAAAAAAAA COOOOOOMBOOOOOOOOOS!]]'''²* ImMelting: In the Arcade version, if you finish off Glacius with Riptor's Acid Spit or Chief Thunder's Lighting Bolt No Mercy moves, Glacius will melt into oblivion.²* KabukiSounds: On the special limited edition ''Killer Cuts'' CD that came with the SNES port, Jago's theme "Do It Now!" features the "Yoo~ooh!" voice.²* NakedPeopleAreFunny: One of Orchid's finishing moves has her flashing her opponent, causing a comedic overreaction.²* PreRenderedGraphics: The original arcade version featured pre-rendered backgrounds, sprites, and ending cutscenes.²* TheSmurfettePrinciple: Retroactively defied in the original game. Originally Orchid seemed like the only female character on the cast but later on it was revealed that Riptor was probably female in the original game.²* StageFatality: Cinder, Orchid and Spinal's stages are buildings where the loser can be knocked off the edge. The Sky Stage can be fallen off of from either side regardless of health. Eyedol has a unique stage fatality (and a different death cinematic) if he's knocked off the lava bridge instead of punched out on his feet. A popular UrbanLegendOfZelda maintained that Thunder's stage contained a a stage fatality; it didn't.²* TakeThat: Eyedol's ending is clearly inspired by Blanka's ending in ''VideoGame/StreetFighterII''.²[[/folder]]²²[[folder:Killer Instinct 2/Gold]]²* AutobotsRockOut: Gargos's stage theme is really heavy on the electric guitars.²* {{Cap}}: You can do up to 80 hits in a single combo, except for Ultra Combos, which could ''easily'' break into the triple digits.²* ChargedAttack: In addition to the breakers, this game also had a more traditional super meter, but the easiest way to charge it was performing combo breakers.²* CircleOfStandingStones: Tusk's stage takes place in the middle of [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stonehenge Stonehenge]] itself, the stones appearing as part of the background.²* ContinuitySnarl: The character profiles for the second game explain that Eyedol's death sent the surviving characters 2000 years into the past, but several parts of the game's design contradict this while others reinforce it. Several characters, especially the three new ones who could only be ''from'' the past, have stages seemingly set in fantasy worlds or at least fanciful concepts of a past time. On the flipside, T.J. Combo's and Orchid's stages are set in a modern-day city (albeit a ruined one), Fulgore's stage is a robot factory, and Sabrewulf has involuntarily gained cybernetic arms courtesy of Ultratech (not to mention that, when you knock someone off the Sky Stage in the arcade version, there appears to be a modern city layout down there). Various {{handwave}}s have been proposed, some more reasonable than others, [[WildMassGuessing but none of them come from the actual game.]]²* DoesNotLikeShoes: Maya is a barefoot savage.²* DownerEnding: Since the game introduced the concept of MultipleEndings, depending on which specific character you finish off in specific ways, you may get this for your character. For example, if you have Orchid kill [[spoiler:Jago]] (same if you kill Orchid with [[spoiler:Jago]]) in 2.²* {{Feelies}}: ''KI Gold'' had its own soundtrack CD called ''Gold Cuts''.²* GuideDangIt: In order to win, the final hit on Gargos must launch him into the air. If it doesn't, his health bar will hit zero but he won't go down until he's knocked off his feet, and the player will still lose if the timer runs down.²* HomeStage: Characters have new stages this time, though their names aren't too fancy:²** Black Orchid has the Helipad.²** Fulgore has the Museum.²** Glacius has the Spaceship.²** Jago has the Bridge.²** Sabrewulf has Sabrewulf's Castle.²** Spinal has the Ship (and Spinal's Ship).²** T.J. Combo has the Street.²** Kim Wu has the Dojo.²** Maya has the Jungle.²** Tusk has Stonehenge.²** Gargos has the Dungeon.²* IdiosyncraticComboLevels: Triple, Super, Hyper, Brutal, Master, Awesome, Blaster, Monster, King, Killer. Above that, there's two types: [[FinishingMove Ultimate Combos]] and '''[[NoHoldsBarredBeatdown ULTRAAAAAAAAA COOOOOOMBOOOOOOOOOS!]]'''²* MultipleEndings: Depending on who you did or didn't let live (and in Glacius' case, if his ship is still intact), it can cause different ending scenes to play out at the end of the game. ''KI Gold'' removes this and has only one ending per character, most of them based on the arcade (due to this, TheReveal [[spoiler:that Jago and Orchid are siblings]] is never mentioned).²* SpritePolygonMix: More noticeable in Killer Instinct Gold, and EVEN MORE noticeable when you knock your opponent off Jago's stage - the sprite will stay there as if it suddenly decided to lie down on the bridge!²* StageFatality:²** Orchid and Kim Wu's stages are buildings where the loser can be knocked off the edge. The loser in Spinal's stage can be knocked off his ship into the sea on the left side. Sabrewulf's stage has a well the loser can be knocked into if one of the fighters is first knocked through the nearby wall during the bout. Tusk's stage has a flaming pit in the center, and Jago's stage is a bridge that the loser can be knocked off of at any part''except'' either end. Gargos' stage can also have the loser knocked off in any spot, including Gargos himself [[spoiler:(you can only defeat him this way; normally depleting his life bar won't cut it)]]. The Sky Stage makes a return.²** ''Gold'' has all of the above and adds a finisher to T.J. Combo's stage, where the loser can be knocked into train tracks on the background just before the train runs by.²* TacticalRockPaperScissors:²** Complaints about the ridiculousness of this (it takes master-level knowledge of every character to recognize what button to do the breaker with) led to a simpler system in the second game, where punch breaks kick and vice-versa. Unlike in the first game, maneuvers in combos will always match the button being used as a blink-and-you-miss-it visual cue for the victim; a punch input results in the character performing a punch, even if it's not the punch that button does outside of combos.²** Also in the second game, every character can open a combo with most basic attacks, standing or jumping in. However, every character also has three special moves that are specifically meant to open combos, often more damaging and easier to work with than the basic punches and kicks. The weakness of the special-move openers is that they function on a literal rock-paper-scissors mechanic, and no matter which two characters are facing off, one character's specific opener will ''always'' trump someone else's specific opener.²[[/folder]]²----²->''Supreme victory!''²----

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