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* AssPull: Turns out Noonien Soong had a son who's never once been mentioned in the franchise before. It's so out of nowhere that a lot of fans were fully expecting he'd be revealed as another android.

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* AssPull: Turns out Noonien Noonian Soong had a son who's never once been mentioned in the franchise before. It's so out of nowhere that a lot of fans were fully expecting he'd be revealed as another android.



** Given that Spock had a biological brother that went unmentioned for 3 seasons of ''TOS'' and 4 feature films, and an adopted human sister that ''he grew up with'' that didnt get mentioned until ''Discovery'', it's safe to say that Star Trek is quite fond of this trope.

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** Given that Spock had a biological brother that went unmentioned for 3 seasons of ''TOS'' and 4 feature films, and an adopted human sister that ''he grew up with'' that didnt get mentioned until ''Discovery'', it's safe to say that Star Trek the Franchise/TrekVerse is quite fond of this trope.



** This is the first Star Trek series to address the physical differences in the appearance of the Romulans. Here, it is stated that Romulans with ridges on their foreheads are "Northerners", and Romulans with pronounced ridges, mild ridges and none at all appear. In addition, there are several of these northern Romulans with hair similar to their style depicted on ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration''.
** The first season finale includes a conversation between [[spoiler:Picard and Data (well, a copy of him) that allows them to say a proper goodbye to one another, which they were not able to do in ''Film/StarTrekNemesis''.]]

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** This is the first Star Trek ''Star Trek'' series to address the physical differences in the appearance of the Romulans. Here, it is stated that Romulans with ridges on their foreheads are "Northerners", and Romulans with pronounced ridges, mild ridges and none at all appear. In addition, there are several of these northern Romulans with hair similar to their style depicted on ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration''.
** The first season Season 1 finale includes a conversation between [[spoiler:Picard and Data (well, a copy of him) Data's mind that allows them to say a proper goodbye to one another, which they were not able to do in ''Film/StarTrekNemesis''.]]



* LikeYouWouldReallyDoIt: Picard has the weight of a brain disease that will soon kill him throughout Season 1, which is rather hard to take seriously given that the series was greenlit for a second season before it even started airing. A lot of fans actually suspect the show started out as a one-off miniseries that would end with his death, and then the last ten minutes were hastily rewritten when they got another season (not that there is any evidence to suggest this was the case).

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* LikeYouWouldReallyDoIt: Picard has the weight of a brain disease that will soon kill him throughout Season 1, which is rather hard to take seriously given that the series was greenlit for a second season before it even started airing. A lot of fans actually suspect the show started out as a one-off miniseries that would end with his death, and then the last ten minutes were hastily rewritten when they got another season (not season. (That speculation is wrong because WordOfGod has stated in [[https://ca.startrek.com/videos/producing-star-trek-picard-final-fates this featurette]] that there is any evidence to suggest this it was the case).planned all along for Picard to die and then revive him.)



* PortmanteauCoupleName: "Hughnor" for Hugh/Elnor; the name was coined on Tumblr, but the pairing itself was created by [[https://ca.ign.com/articles/picard-hugh-nepenthe-episode-7-jonathan-del-arco-elnor Jonathan Del Arco,]] so the shippers have the blessing of WordOfSaintPaul.



* SpecialEffectsFailure: Close examination of the Starfleet armada in episode 10 reveals that ''every'' Federation ship was of the exact same design, rather than the variety of ships with different roles we saw in the fleet shots on ''[=DS9=]''. There are no heavy cruiser or dreadnought scale vessels at the heart of the formation, with light cruiser or destroyer screening vessels as one might imagine a post-Dominion War Starfleet flotilla being comprised of. It's as if the effects crew just hit "Copy" and "Paste" until they had enough ships on the screen.
** The writing also massively wastes the potential of two gigantic fleets that were as large as anything shown in Deep Space Nine. The two fleets just hang in space watching each other. There's no manoeuvring or jockeying for position, and the resolution happens without any actual combat between the two fleets despite the supposed motivation of the Romulans being the destruction of sentient artificial life at all costs.

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* SpecialEffectsFailure: Close examination of the Starfleet armada in episode 10 "Et in Arcadia Ego, Part 2" reveals that ''every'' Federation ship was of the exact same design, rather than the variety of ships with different roles we saw in the fleet shots on ''[=DS9=]''. There are no heavy cruiser or dreadnought scale vessels at the heart of the formation, with light cruiser or destroyer screening vessels as one might imagine a post-Dominion War Starfleet flotilla being comprised of. It's as if the effects crew just hit "Copy" and "Paste" until they had enough ships on the screen.
** The writing also massively wastes the potential of two gigantic fleets that were as large as anything shown in Deep Space Nine.''[=DS9=]''. The two fleets just hang in space watching each other. There's no manoeuvring or jockeying for position, and the resolution happens without any actual combat between the two fleets despite the supposed motivation of the Romulans being the destruction of sentient artificial life at all costs.



** [[spoiler:The Borg, collectively. While a lot of fans were glad just to have some confirmation that they hadn't been completely wiped out in the finale of ''Voyager'', both previews and the early episodes of season 1 kept hinting that the Borg would play a large role in the plot due to the existence of the Borg Reclamation Project and the Artifact, they are largely sidelined in favor of the synth plotline. The Artifact even crashes ignominiously on the synths' planet (Coppelius) and is just left there along with all the surviving ex-Borg aboard.]]
* TheyWastedAPerfectlyGoodPlot: TheReveal in episode 10 that Data's consciousness ''did'' survive, and that Maddox and Soong had him running in a virtual environment. Had Data's consciousness been revealed earlier and been a larger part of the plot, Picard deactivating him and allowing him to die for good would have carried far more impact than it did.

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** [[spoiler:The Borg, collectively. While a lot of fans were glad just to have some confirmation that they hadn't been completely wiped out in the finale of ''Voyager'', both previews and the early episodes of season Season 1 kept hinting that the Borg would play a large role in the plot due to the existence of the Borg Reclamation Project and the Artifact, they are largely sidelined in favor of the synth plotline. The Artifact even crashes ignominiously on the synths' planet (Coppelius) and is just left there along with all the surviving ex-Borg aboard.]]
* TheyWastedAPerfectlyGoodPlot: TheReveal in episode 10 "Et in Arcadia Ego, Part 2" that Data's [[spoiler:Data's consciousness ''did'' survive, and that Maddox and Soong had him running in a virtual environment. Had Data's consciousness consciousness]] been revealed earlier and been a larger part of the plot, Picard deactivating him and allowing him to die for good would have carried far more impact than it did.


* UnintentionallyUnsympathetic: Soji falls squarely here in the season 1 finale with her deliberate attempt to [[spoiler:instigate a ''galaxy-wide xenocide'']]. While it's true that the Romulans are out to kill her, and that synths are indeed subject to discrimination, the sheer disproportionate scale of the act is difficult to comprehend, let alone justify as self-defense. Not helping is that she's EasilyForgiven in the end, and doesn't appear to face any kind of justice for what she did.

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* UnintentionallyUnsympathetic: Soji falls squarely here in the season 1 finale with her deliberate attempt Soji, an ostensible protagonist, deliberately attempts to [[spoiler:instigate a ''galaxy-wide xenocide'']].xenocide'']] in the finale. While it's true that the Romulans are out to kill her, and that synths are indeed subject to discrimination, the sheer disproportionate scale of the act is difficult to comprehend, let alone justify as self-defense. Not helping is that she's EasilyForgiven in the end, and doesn't appear to face any kind of justice for what she did.

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* UnintentionallyUnsympathetic: Soji falls squarely here in the season 1 finale with her deliberate attempt to [[spoiler:instigate a ''galaxy-wide xenocide'']]. While it's true that the Romulans are out to kill her, and that synths are indeed subject to discrimination, the sheer disproportionate scale of the act is difficult to comprehend, let alone justify as self-defense. Not helping is that she's EasilyForgiven in the end, and doesn't appear to face any kind of justice for what she did.


%%* {{Narm}}: "Initiate planetary sterilization protocol number five."

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%%* * {{Narm}}: "Initiate planetary sterilization protocol number five."" Said with a weird mix of monotone and gravitas, while obviously implying that Romulans have at least five protocols for sterilizing planets, and that which protocol to use against a barren world with one small settlement would be in question.


* {{Narm}}: "Initiate planetary sterilization protocol number five."

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* %%* {{Narm}}: "Initiate planetary sterilization protocol number five."


* CommonKnowledge: The show's detractors often complain that the Federation is "racist" now, and that they refused to help the Romulans due to bigotry. In the show proper, however, Starfleet ''did'' try to help the Romulans evacuate for several years before the attack on Mars destroyed much of the armada they'd been relying on. Furthermore, it's made explicitly clear that the decision to cancel the rescue was a case of {{Realpolitik}} rather than racial bigotry -- many member worlds were uncomfortable expending so much resources to help the Romulan Star Empire, the Federation's oldest enemy, and following the attack on Mars, Starfleet simply couldn't afford to rebuild the rescue fleet from scratch. The ships that were already deployed were ordered to stand down and cease helping, using the situation on Mars as a reason to abandon the project as a whole.
** In addition, writer Creator/MichaelChabon has confirmed that much of the Federation's isolationist streak is a lingering effect of the damage the still fairly recent Dominion War did. However, ExecutiveMeddling has so far prevented the show from exploring this in any greater detail due to fears of ContinuityLockOut.


* SpecialEffectsFailure: Close examination of the Starfleet armada in episode 10 reveals that ''every'' Federation ship was of the exact same design, rather than the variety of ships with different roles we saw in the fleet shots on ''[=DS9=]''. There are no heavy cruiser or dreadnought scale vessels at the heart of the formation, with light cruiser or destroyer screening vessels. It's as if the effects crew just hit "CONTROL-C" and "CONTROL-V" until they had enough ships on the screen.

to:

* SpecialEffectsFailure: Close examination of the Starfleet armada in episode 10 reveals that ''every'' Federation ship was of the exact same design, rather than the variety of ships with different roles we saw in the fleet shots on ''[=DS9=]''. There are no heavy cruiser or dreadnought scale vessels at the heart of the formation, with light cruiser or destroyer screening vessels. vessels as one might imagine a post-Dominion War Starfleet flotilla being comprised of. It's as if the effects crew just hit "CONTROL-C" "Copy" and "CONTROL-V" "Paste" until they had enough ships on the screen.screen.
** The writing also massively wastes the potential of two gigantic fleets that were as large as anything shown in Deep Space Nine. The two fleets just hang in space watching each other. There's no manoeuvring or jockeying for position, and the resolution happens without any actual combat between the two fleets despite the supposed motivation of the Romulans being the destruction of sentient artificial life at all costs.

Added DiffLines:

* CommonKnowledge: The show's detractors often complain that the Federation is "racist" now, and that they refused to help the Romulans due to bigotry. In the show proper, however, Starfleet ''did'' try to help the Romulans evacuate for several years before the attack on Mars destroyed much of the armada they'd been relying on. Furthermore, it's made explicitly clear that the decision to cancel the rescue was a case of {{Realpolitik}} rather than racial bigotry -- many member worlds were uncomfortable expending so much resources to help the Romulan Star Empire, the Federation's oldest enemy, and following the attack on Mars, Starfleet simply couldn't afford to rebuild the rescue fleet from scratch. The ships that were already deployed were ordered to stand down and cease helping, using the situation on Mars as a reason to abandon the project as a whole.
** In addition, writer Creator/MichaelChabon has confirmed that much of the Federation's isolationist streak is a lingering effect of the damage the still fairly recent Dominion War did. However, ExecutiveMeddling has so far prevented the show from exploring this in any greater detail due to fears of ContinuityLockOut.


* CommonKnowledge: The show's detractors often complain that the Federation is "racist" now, and that they refused to help the Romulans due to bigotry. In the show proper, however, Starfleet ''did'' try to help the Romulans evacuate for several years before the attack on Mars destroyed much of the armada they'd been relying on. Furthermore, it's made explicitly clear that the decision to cancel the rescue was a case of {{Realpolitik}} rather than racial bigotry -- many member worlds were uncomfortable expending so much resources to help the Romulan Star Empire, the Federation's oldest enemy, and following the attack on Mars, Starfleet simply couldn't afford to rebuild the rescue fleet from scratch. The ships that were already deployed were ordered to stand down and cease helping, using the situation on Mars as a reason to abandon the project as a whole.
** In addition, writer Creator/MichaelChabon has confirmed that much of the Federation's isolationist streak is a lingering effect of the damage the still fairly recent Dominion War did. However, ExecutiveMeddling has so far prevented the show from exploring this in any greater detail due to fears of ContinuityLockOut.


* Narm: "Initiate planetary sterilization protocol number five."

to:

* Narm: {{Narm}}: "Initiate planetary sterilization protocol number five."


* Narm: "Initiate planetary sterilization protocol number five."



** Narm: "Initiate planetary sterilization protocol number five."

Added DiffLines:

** Narm: "Initiate planetary sterilization protocol number five."


** [[spoiler: And let's add Data, who was actually alive again in a simulation... only to request Picard deactivate it, as he believes life without death is meaningless, and it is a GildedCage]].
** [[spoiler:The Borg, collectively. While both previews and the early episodes of season 1 kept hinting that the Borg would play a large role in the plot due to the existence of the Borg Reclamation Project and the Artifact, they are largely sidelined in favor of the synth plotline. The Artifact even crashes ignominiously on the synths' planet (Coppelius) and is just left there along with all the surviving ex-Borg aboard.]]

to:

** [[spoiler: And let's add Data, who was actually alive again in a simulation... only to request Picard deactivate it, as he believes life without death is meaningless, and it is a GildedCage]].
GildedCage. Though this at least had the excuse of Creator/BrentSpiner only being willing to play Data for long enough to give him a more satisfying exit than the one he had in ''Film/StarTrekNemesis'', and the production team being further limited by the costs of making Spiner look like he did circa 2002]].
** [[spoiler:The Borg, collectively. While a lot of fans were glad just to have some confirmation that they hadn't been completely wiped out in the finale of ''Voyager'', both previews and the early episodes of season 1 kept hinting that the Borg would play a large role in the plot due to the existence of the Borg Reclamation Project and the Artifact, they are largely sidelined in favor of the synth plotline. The Artifact even crashes ignominiously on the synths' planet (Coppelius) and is just left there along with all the surviving ex-Borg aboard.]]


* TheyCopiedItNowItSucks: Some reviews accuse the overarching plot regarding an "inevitable" war between organics and synthetics as simply ripping off ''VideoGame/MassEffect''.

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* TheyCopiedItNowItSucks: TheyCopiedItSoItSucks: Some reviews accuse the overarching plot regarding an "inevitable" war between organics and synthetics as simply ripping off ''VideoGame/MassEffect''.


** FridgeLogic: A great number of the varied classes were destroyed on mars however, it stands to reason that they went with a standardized model to get fleet size up to scratch before working on more specialized vessels. In STO it's quite common to see a base "Hull" customized and outfitted for different roles, such as the Odyssey line of ships. Quite notably the ships on screen are nearly identical to the Avenger-class Battlecruiser, well known for it's power and versatility and top-of-the-line stats in-game as well as still being a compact and zippy design, contrasted with the Galaxy-class Battleship aka the Enterprise D, which the federation even admitted was more of a Show Pony than anything else.
*** It can be presumed that the reason so many older ships or different classes were present in TNG and DS9 was because of the long period of peace after the end of the Klingon War. Then the Dominion War occurred and cost Starfleet a lot of vessels so they may have standardized more during the rebuild of the fleet. It still however looks lazy to have every ship in the armada looking totally alike when they could have mixed some Defiant-class and other modern ships in there.

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