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* BrokenBase: Fans disagree as to whether his post-60s work was a welcome focus on songwriting and artistic growth or a misguided rejection of his guitar-god image that caused him to become boring and conventional. This even extends to ''guitar choice'', with a number of fans rejecting any music Clapton released after he switched out his Gibsons for Fender Stratocasters.


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** In fact, Cream's "Tales of Brave Ulysses," which wound up on the B-side of "Strange Brew" in the spring of 1967, was the first record to utilize a wah pedal, beating Hendrix' "Burning of the Midnight Lamp" by several months.


-->''I get off on '57 Chevys''
-->''I get off on screamin' guitar''

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-->''I get off on '57 Chevys''
-->''I
Chevys''\\
''I
get off on screamin' guitar''



* CrowningMomentOfHeartwarming: "Wonderful Tonight" and "Let it Grow"


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* SugarWiki/HeartwarmingMoments: "Wonderful Tonight" and "Let it Grow"


* CreatorBreakdown: After the death of his son, Conor, in 1991. He came back with "Tears in Heaven".
** And "Layla", his way of shouting out the pain from his unrequited love to Pattie Boyd, then-wife of his buddy Music/GeorgeHarrison.
*** What's more, he's admitted that pretty much everything he wrote for Music/DerekAndTheDominos is about Patti in some way.



* DrugsAreBad: "Cocaine".



* TearJerker: "Tears in Heaven". Oh, goodness, [[GriefSong "Tears in Heaven"]]. The story behind his four-year-old son Conor's death is just heartbreaking. If this doesn't make the listener's eyes mist over, chances are good they don't have a soul.
** "Bell Bottom Blues, you made me cry..." is an apt description of the effect the titular song can have.
*** "Wonderful Tonight" from ''24 Nights'', his Royal Albert Hall performance and two-disc set. It's slower-paced and a lot gloomier--if the original one is the main couples' dance at ''your'' wedding, then this one is you watching the new couple have their first dance, while feeling that you must examine your own life a bit harder if you're ever to have that shining moment.
*** [[LyricalDissonance "My Father's Eyes"]] deals with Clapton's experiences growing up without knowing his father. In the first verse, he expresses a sense of lacking direction ("Just a toe-rag on the run/How did I get here?/What have I done?"). In the second, he describes the [[HopeSpot joy of raising his son]], but also doubts his worth as a parent ("Where do I find the words to say?/How do I teach him? What do we play?"). In the final verse, disaster has struck and his son is dead, and he [[BookEnds realizes that he had his father's eyes]]. ("As my soul slides down to die/How could I lose him?/What did I try?/Bit by bit, I've realized/That he was here with me/I looked into my father's eyes")


* SeinfeldIsUnfunny: Clapton is best known now for his unplugged solo material and his lighter pop hits, but back in the 60s he was an even more influential guitarist than Music/JimiHendrix. This was even the guy who influenced Hendrix.
** The image of a guitar hero playing a Gibson Les Paul through a Marshall amp arguably began with Eric.

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* SeinfeldIsUnfunny: Clapton is best known now in recent decades for his unplugged solo material material, his blues revival efforts, and his lighter pop hits, but back in the 60s TheSixties he was an a certified rock god who essentially defined the role of lead guitarist. His work with Cream and John Mayall may not sound as innovative today, especially since it was almost immediately followed by the even more influential guitarist than Music/JimiHendrix. This revolutionary work of Music/JimiHendrix (who was even the guy who influenced Hendrix.
** The image
a great admirer of a guitar hero playing a Gibson Les Paul through a Marshall amp arguably began with Eric.Clapton), but rock audiences had never heard anything like it in 1966.

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* GenreTurningPoint: Clapton's one album and subsequent live performances with John Mayall's Blues Breakers, particularly their cover of Freddie King's "Hide Away". There had been great rock guitarists before (e.g., Music/ChuckBerry and Music/LinkWray), but Clapton took the role to new levels, effectively creating the role of guitar hero.
** From a technical aspect, Clapton's use of a Les Paul overdriven through Marshall amplifiers innovated what has become the signature rock guitar sound, often accomplished by distortion pedals today.
** [[WhatCouldHaveBeen Mayall's original plan]] was to release a live album that would have emphasized Clapton's solos even more. Poor recording quality resulted in the studio version instead.


* DoNotDoThisCoolThing: "Cocaine".

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* DoNotDoThisCoolThing: DrugsAreBad: "Cocaine".


* TearJerker: "Tears in Heaven". Oh, goodness, [[GriefSong "Tears in Heaven"]]. The story behind his four-year-old son Conor's death is just heartbreaking.

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* TearJerker: "Tears in Heaven". Oh, goodness, [[GriefSong "Tears in Heaven"]]. The story behind his four-year-old son Conor's death is just heartbreaking. If this doesn't make the listener's eyes mist over, chances are good they don't have a soul.


----



** While the riff in "Layla" is definitely epic, that was [[MisattributedSong Duane Allman, not Eric Clapton]] on the guitar. This leads people to mistakenly believe that ALL the great guitar playing on the album was Duane Allman, even on the three tracks on which he did not appear.



* SuspiciouslySimilarSong: Goes both ways with "Let It Grow". Reviewers in 1974 noted the resemblance of the melody to [[Music/LedZeppelin "Stairway To Heaven"]]. Fast forward eight years, and [[{{Music/Toto}} "Africa"]] has melodic similarities to "Let It Grow".

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* SuspiciouslySimilarSong: Goes both ways with "Let It Grow". Reviewers in 1974 noted the resemblance of the melody to [[Music/LedZeppelin "Stairway To to Heaven"]]. Fast forward eight years, and [[{{Music/Toto}} [[Music/{{Toto}} "Africa"]] has melodic similarities to "Let It Grow".






*** [[LyricalDissonance "My Father's Eyes"]] deals with Clapton's experiences growing up without knowing his father. In the first verse, he expresses a sense of lacking direction ("Just a toe-rag on the run/How did I get here?/What have I done?"). In the second, he describes the [[HopeSpot joy of raising his son]], but also doubts his worth as a parent ("Where do I find the words to say?/How do I teach him? What do we play?"). In the final verse, disaster has struck and his son is dead, and he [[BookEnds realizes that he had his father's eyes]]. (As my soul slides down to die/How could I lose him?/What did I try?/Bit by bit, I've realized/That he was here with me/I looked into my father's eyes)


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*** [[LyricalDissonance "My Father's Eyes"]] deals with Clapton's experiences growing up without knowing his father. In the first verse, he expresses a sense of lacking direction ("Just a toe-rag on the run/How did I get here?/What have I done?"). In the second, he describes the [[HopeSpot joy of raising his son]], but also doubts his worth as a parent ("Where do I find the words to say?/How do I teach him? What do we play?"). In the final verse, disaster has struck and his son is dead, and he [[BookEnds realizes that he had his father's eyes]]. (As ("As my soul slides down to die/How could I lose him?/What did I try?/Bit by bit, I've realized/That he was here with me/I looked into my father's eyes)

eyes")



* OldShame: In the early 70s, Clapton was a big supporter of Enoch Powell's anti-immigration rhetoric and made a few [[{{Understatement}} slightly controversial statements]] regarding race relations in Britain at a time when racial tension was very high.



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**** [[LyricalDissonance "My Father's Eyes"]] deals with Clapton's experiences growing up without knowing his father. In the first verse, he expresses a sense of lacking direction ("Just a toe-rag on the run/How did I get here?/What have I done?"). In the second, he describes the [[HopeSpot joy of raising his son]], but also doubts his worth as a parent ("Where do I find the words to say?/How do I teach him? What do we play?"). In the final verse, disaster has struck and his son is dead, and he [[BookEnds realizes that he had his father's eyes]]. (As my soul slides down to die/How could I lose him?/What did I try?/Bit by bit, I've realized/That he was here with me/I looked into my father's eyes)


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* DoNotDoThisCoolThing: "Cocaine".


* NeverLiveItDown: Going on stage, dead drunk in 1976, and stumbling into an anti-immigration rant including such choice sayings as "Throw the wogs out! Keep Britain white!". Clapton has tried to defend it in the past as drunken trolling, but mostly him, his fans, and his numerous multi-ethnic collaborators all just pretend it never happened.
* OldShame: In the early 70s, Clapton was a big supporter of Enoch Powell's anti-immigration rhetoric and made a few slightly controversial statements regarding race relations in Britain at a time when racial tension was very high.

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* NeverLiveItDown: Going on stage, dead drunk in 1976, and stumbling into an anti-immigration anti-immigration, anti-black rant including such choice sayings as "Throw the wogs out! Keep Britain white!". Clapton has tried to defend it in the past as drunken trolling, but mostly him, his fans, and his numerous multi-ethnic collaborators all just pretend it never happened.
* OldShame: In the early 70s, Clapton was a big supporter of Enoch Powell's anti-immigration rhetoric and made a few [[{{Understatement}} slightly controversial statements statements]] regarding race relations in Britain at a time when racial tension was very high.


* CrowningMomentOfHeartwarming: "Wonderful Tonight"

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* CrowningMomentOfHeartwarming: "Wonderful Tonight"Tonight" and "Let it Grow"


* MagnumOpus: ''Music/LaylaAndOtherAssortedLoveSongs'' is the usual pick, with occasional votes for ''Music/DisraeliGears'', ''461 Ocean Boulevard'' or a given LiveAlbum.

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