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*** For a third point, there are disputes over which civs are being included from a stance of historical importance, with the inclusion of nations like Canada and Nubia before civs like the Maya and Ethiopia. Of course, [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement this provokes debate due to “importance” often being relative]]. This ties in with some civs being seen as too narrow. For example, many players considered it a strange choice to separate Greece and Macedonia into two different civilizations, as Macedonia was a Hellenistic power and, in fact, Alexander the Great has been the Greek leader in almost every Civ game prior. Other controversies include using Scotland instead of Celts and Maori instead of Polynesians. Many feel these more specific civs reduce representation in the game. For example, the Irish were represented under the “Celts” in previous games, but are now totally excluded. Other players argue that these broader civs would be akin to clumping Russians, Poles, and Ukrainians together and calling them “Slavs”.

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*** For a third point, there are disputes over which civs are being included from a stance of historical importance, with the inclusion of nations like Canada and Nubia before civs like the Maya and Ethiopia. Of course, [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement [[Administrivia/RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment this provokes debate due to “importance” often being relative]]. This ties in with some civs being seen as too narrow. For example, many players considered it a strange choice to separate Greece and Macedonia into two different civilizations, as Macedonia was a Hellenistic power and, in fact, Alexander the Great has been the Greek leader in almost every Civ game prior. Other controversies include using Scotland instead of Celts and Maori instead of Polynesians. Many feel these more specific civs reduce representation in the game. For example, the Irish were represented under the “Celts” in previous games, but are now totally excluded. Other players argue that these broader civs would be akin to clumping Russians, Poles, and Ukrainians together and calling them “Slavs”.

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** Diplomacy in IV. Whereas in V you would mainly take reputation hits from ''actions'' (and breaking promises), IV ''loved'' to throw out reputation penalties from ''inactions'', as in you not agreeing to do something another Civilization wanted. Expect to see a ton of demands for gold, technologies, to cancel trading agreements with other civilizations, or worst of all, for refusing to join in a war against another Civilization, despite you possibly being friends with that third Civilization. The equivalent would be like Iran getting upset with England for not joining a war against the U.S. To add insult to injury, the diplomacy screen doesn't allow you to analyze any information before making a decisions, such as the extent of the trading agreements that you have, where the enemy civilization is in relation to your own, and/or where everyone's units are located. Part of this is due to a coding error that prevented AI opponents from making unreasonable demands from each other to avoid unnecessary reputation loss, but didn't account for such demands with the player. Civilization V removed a lot of these "Give us X or we'll hate you" diplomacy options, but does have some oddities of its own. For example, civilizations can get upset that you voted against their proposal in the UN, despite the fact that the proposal was clearly targeting you, such as banning a resource that you're the only one who possesses it.


** Many of the historical quotes shown in game (for all installments) are either misquoted, wrongly attributed, unverified, or taken out of context.

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** Many of the historical quotes shown in game (for all installments) are either misquoted, wrongly attributed, unverified, or taken out of context. This was so prevailing, it turned into a meme within the community. Up to the point there was a running joke in ''VideoGame/CavemanToCosmos'' mod to make silly quotes directly spoofing those from ''IV'' - and many still remain in current build of the mod.

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** Many of the historical quotes shown in game (for all installments) are either misquoted, wrongly attributed, unverified, or taken out of context.


* BaseBreakingCharacter: Gandhi's become this to a degree; he's one of the most famous characters in the series and one of the most memetic, to the point that many players say it's not a ''Civ'' game without Nuclear Gandhi. At the same time, though, veterans of the series dislike him for his relatively passive strategies of peacemaking and religion focus without much variance between games, and ask for a different leader from India's very long history (especially since Gandhi, though important, technically never ruled India). ''VI'' has alleviated this a bit by adding the concept of alternate leaders, and sure enough, Chandragupta was added as an alternate in ''Rise and Fall.''

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* BaseBreakingCharacter: Gandhi's become this to a degree; he's one of the most famous characters in the series and one of the most memetic, to the point that many players say it's not a ''Civ'' game without Nuclear Gandhi. At the same time, though, veterans of the series dislike him for his relatively passive strategies of peacemaking and religion focus without much variance between games, and ask for a different leader from India's very long history (especially since Gandhi, though important, technically never ruled India). ''IV'' and ''VI'' has alleviated this a bit by adding including the concept of alternate leaders, and sure enough, Chandragupta was added as an alternate in ''Rise and Fall.''



** The playable civilizations and their leaders introduced in ''VI'' have been controversial for two main reasons:

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** The playable civilizations and their leaders introduced in ''VI'' have been controversial for two three main reasons:



*** On a more individual level, the inclusion of the Cree in ''Rise and Fall'' has received divided reactions among actual Cree people. Some, such as the singers who performed the civilization's theme song, one of whom is a direct descendant of Poundmaker, were overjoyed to see themselves in the game; others, including notable chief Milton Tootoosis, felt including them was inappropriate in a game based around imperialism, something they were victims rather than perpetrators of in real life.

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*** For a third point, there are disputes over which civs are being included from a stance of historical importance, with the inclusion of nations like Canada and Nubia before civs like the Maya and Ethiopia. Of course, [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement this provokes debate due to “importance” often being relative]]. This ties in with some civs being seen as too narrow. For example, many players considered it a strange choice to separate Greece and Macedonia into two different civilizations, as Macedonia was a Hellenistic power and, in fact, Alexander the Great has been the Greek leader in almost every Civ game prior. Other controversies include using Scotland instead of Celts and Maori instead of Polynesians. Many feel these more specific civs reduce representation in the game. For example, the Irish were represented under the “Celts” in previous games, but are now totally excluded. Other players argue that these broader civs would be akin to clumping Russians, Poles, and Ukrainians together and calling them “Slavs”.
*** On a more individual level, the inclusion of the Cree in ''Rise and Fall'' has received divided reactions among actual Cree people. Some, such as the singers who performed the civilization's theme song, one of whom is a direct descendant of Poundmaker, were overjoyed to see themselves in the game; others, including notable chief Milton Tootoosis, felt including them was inappropriate in a game based around imperialism, something they were victims rather than perpetrators of in real life. Complicating this further is that many civs in the game have been victims of imperialism at some point in history (with some, such as the Inca, having been both victims and perpetrators at various points), so the Cree are hardly unique in this case.


%% *** Catherine de' Medici. Aside from being ethnically Italian (rather than French), many people are upset by the selection as most of her ruling of France was done behind the scenes; Catherine never directly controlled the French throne. In addition, Catherine received the spot over many popular choices or previous leaders such as Napoleon (who was ''also'' Italian, though this is overlooked), Louis XIV, or Charles de Gaulle. Supporters of the decision are happy to see a fresh face ruling the Civ, particularly one with such an interesting involvement in history (she was essentially a real life [[Series/GameOfThrones Cersei]] [[GodSaveUsFromTheQueen Lannister]], albeit a [[MagnificentBastard far more competent one]]). In addition, her role as TheSpymaster and the presence of her Flying Squadron (in real life, ladies-in-waiting who had sex with nobles in exchange for secret information to send to Catherine to aid her in her machinations), are seen by many as a compelling and unique bonus that has yet to be seen in Civ VI.

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%% *** Catherine de' Medici. Aside from being ethnically Italian (rather than French), many people are upset by the selection as most of her ruling of France was done behind the scenes; Catherine never directly controlled the French throne. In addition, Catherine received the spot over many popular choices or previous leaders such as Napoleon (who was ''also'' Italian, though this is overlooked), Louis XIV, or Charles de Gaulle. Supporters of the decision are happy to see a fresh face ruling the Civ, particularly one with such an interesting involvement in history (she was essentially a real life [[Series/GameOfThrones Cersei]] [[GodSaveUsFromTheQueen Lannister]], albeit a [[MagnificentBastard far more competent one]]).one). In addition, her role as TheSpymaster and the presence of her Flying Squadron (in real life, ladies-in-waiting who had sex with nobles in exchange for secret information to send to Catherine to aid her in her machinations), are seen by many as a compelling and unique bonus that has yet to be seen in Civ VI.



** Queen Elizabeth of England is often regarded as a miserable enemy, just for her personality. Her CatchPhrase, [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=utk-v_eIcUk "Would you be interested in a trade agreement with England?"]], has become a MemeticMutation for ''just'' how annoying it is (in addition to the fact that Elizabeth's AI is notorious for making exceptionally absurd trade agreements). She herself suffers from ChronicBackstabbingDisorder and is extremely hostile and difficult to befriend, and will often denounce the player for no discernible reason. And to top it all off, unlike other leaders of similar, aggressive, dominant personalities (such as [[MsFanservice Catherine]] [[MagnificentBastard the Great]] or [[ProudWarriorRaceGuy Shaka]]), she is [[TooDumbToLive woefully incompetent]] and will almost always end up utterly decimated by the other AI in any game she's in. This is especially bad, since her civ is [[GameBreaker exceptionally powerful]] in the hands of a competent player.

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** Queen Elizabeth of England is often regarded as a miserable enemy, just for her personality. Her CatchPhrase, [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=utk-v_eIcUk "Would you be interested in a trade agreement with England?"]], has become a MemeticMutation for ''just'' how annoying it is (in addition to the fact that Elizabeth's AI is notorious for making exceptionally absurd trade agreements). She herself suffers from ChronicBackstabbingDisorder and is extremely hostile and difficult to befriend, and will often denounce the player for no discernible reason. And to top it all off, unlike other leaders of similar, aggressive, dominant personalities (such as [[MsFanservice Catherine]] [[MagnificentBastard the Great]] Great or [[ProudWarriorRaceGuy Shaka]]), she is [[TooDumbToLive woefully incompetent]] and will almost always end up utterly decimated by the other AI in any game she's in. This is especially bad, since her civ is [[GameBreaker exceptionally powerful]] in the hands of a competent player.

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*** The trope is played straight in ''VI'' with ''Rise and Fall'' or ''The Gathering Storm'' enabled: capturing cities far away from your borders results in a ''massive'' drop in Loyalty, which may cause said cities to revolt against you. If the enemy capital is not ''very'' close to your own cities (which is unlikely), it will be a pain to keep it.

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** [[FountainOfMemes Almost anything]] from Door Monster's ''Civilization''-themed [[https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL0u5ZHidq4X4IWR5U2VTv6KVTf7Z9Q0Q3 videos.]] Some of the more popular ones include:
*** Boat Mormons/Denouncing Venice/[=YOLOism=][[labelnote:Explanation]]These three religions appear to be the most popular religions in the world of their session[[/labelnote]]
*** "Ban crabs!" "They are a menace!"[[labelnote:Explanation]]Suleiman and the World Council vote to ban crabs for no discernable reason.[[/labelnote]]
*** "We demand whales!"[[labelnote:Explanation]]In themidst of "We love the King" Day, one citizen demands whales despite not knowing what they are.[[/labelnote]]
*** Cheeseland[[labelnote:Explanation]]Sweden, renamed.[[/labelnote]]
*** Seahenge[[labelnote:Explanation]]A civilization constructed Stonehenge in the ocean, with one worker calling it "sea"-henge due to it being at sea.[[/labelnote]]
*** "I'm just standing here."[[labelnote:Explanation]]An enemy unit standing right at the edge of the Ottoman border justifies his behavior (despite him moving all around) by simply standing still[[/labelnote]]


*** This is somewhat [[InvertedTrope inverted]] in Civilization V. Although the reputation hits for warfare are about the same as previous games, warfare is made far, far easier than any Civilization game to date by the removal of the AI's ability to use "Stacks of Doom" to mess with you, plus now the requirements for a Domination victory only require you to take the opponent's capital city, not demolish them entirely. Unless the capital city is far from the border, it's relatively trivial to declare war and Annex their capital within a few turns. It's even easier if the capital city is on the coast, as borders won't typically extend further than the distance a ship can travel in a turn.

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*** This is somewhat [[InvertedTrope inverted]] in Civilization V. Although the reputation hits for warfare are about the same as previous games, warfare is made far, far easier than any Civilization game to date by the removal of the AI's ability to use "Stacks of Doom" to mess with you, plus now the requirements for a Domination victory only require you to take the opponent's capital city, not demolish them entirely. Unless the capital city is far from the border, it's relatively trivial to declare war and Annex their capital within a few turns. It's even easier if the capital city is on the coast, as borders won't typically extend further than the distance a ship can travel in a turn. As a result, war is often the easiest and earliest way of achieving victory.

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*** This is somewhat [[InvertedTrope inverted]] in Civilization V. Although the reputation hits for warfare are about the same as previous games, warfare is made far, far easier than any Civilization game to date by the removal of the AI's ability to use "Stacks of Doom" to mess with you, plus now the requirements for a Domination victory only require you to take the opponent's capital city, not demolish them entirely. Unless the capital city is far from the border, it's relatively trivial to declare war and Annex their capital within a few turns. It's even easier if the capital city is on the coast, as borders won't typically extend further than the distance a ship can travel in a turn.

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** Due to a peculiar interaction with the civilization's abilities, the best [[HumongousMecha Giant Death Robots]] in ''Civilization VI'' belong to [[{{Afrofuturism}} the Zulus]]. A GDR cannot normally be made into a Corps or Army, limiting their ability to grow more powerful, but the Zulu's ability automatically promotes ''any'' unit that conquers a city into a Corps (or an Army if already a Corps), letting his [=GDRs=] become even more devastating.


** The Civilopedia entry for Writing in ''V'' claims that logographic writing systems have a separate character for each and every word, and require tens of thousands of characters to work.[[note]]("There's a symbol for sheep, and another symbol for a thousand sheep, and yet another symbol for the sound a sheep makes when falling off of a pyramid.")[[/note]] In reality, they don't need nearly as many characters as characters can be combined for compound words. For example, you only need to know around 4,000 characters to understand virtually all modern Standard Chinese writing, and the most common ''500'' make up three-quarters of written text.[[note]](technically, there are over 100,000 characters, but the vast majority of these are obsolete or minor variations)[[/note]]

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** The Civilopedia entry for Writing in ''V'' claims that logographic writing systems have a separate character for each and every word, and require tens of thousands of characters to work.[[note]]("There's a symbol for sheep, and another symbol for a thousand sheep, and yet another symbol for the sound a sheep makes when falling off of a pyramid.")[[/note]] In reality, they don't need nearly as many characters as characters can be combined for compound words. For example, you only need to know around 4,000 characters to understand virtually all modern Standard Chinese writing, and the most common ''500'' make up three-quarters of written text.text - furthermore, the characters themselves are composed of repeating components called radicals, and individual characters can be used as radicals as well, reducing the number of required characters to learn to about 250.[[note]](technically, there are over 100,000 characters, but the vast majority of these are obsolete or minor variations)[[/note]]


*** There are two caveats that bring the difficulty down to "really difficult" and not "you'd have an easier time trying to do this in RealLife", which is that while fairly luck-based, a Domination Victory is NOT actually required for the achievement: the criteria to complete it reads "As Alexander, defeat every known player by 350BC". [[ExactWords 'Every known player' refers only to the players whom you have met at any point in the game.]] So if you were playing on a Continents map and found yourself sharing it with a single other civ, then provided you're lucky enough to not meet anyone else before you can conquer them, it counts. Failing that, you could play one of the five tutorial maps, which does sacrifice the criteria upon completion. You still have to keep restarting until you're randomly assigned Greece, though.

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*** There are two caveats that bring the difficulty down to "really difficult" and not "you'd have an easier time trying to do this in RealLife", which is that while fairly luck-based, a Domination Victory is NOT actually required for the achievement: the criteria to complete it reads "As Alexander, defeat every known player by 350BC". [[ExactWords 'Every known player' refers only to the players whom you have met at any point in the game.]] So if you were playing on a Continents map and found yourself sharing it with a single other civ, then provided you're lucky enough to not meet anyone else before you can conquer them, it counts. Failing that, you could play one of the five tutorial maps, which does sacrifice satisfies the criteria upon completion. You still have to keep restarting until you're randomly assigned Greece, though.


** "Conquest of the World" in ''V'', which requires you to win via a Domination Victory as Greece by 350 BC. Even if you play on a Duel size map (which is ''highly'' recommended for this achievement), there is still a lot of luck involved in what resources your city spawns near, what enemy you get and their playstyle, and how fast you can build up your military so you can both destroy your enemy and meet the deadline, all while ensuring your own civilization's economy doesn't collapse.
*** Unless, of course, you play one of the five tutorial maps, which technically count as a Domination Victory upon completion. You still have to keep restarting until you're randomly assigned Greece, though.
*** While fairly luck-based, a Domination Victory is NOT actually required for the achievement: the criteria to complete it reads "As Alexander, defeat every known player by 350BC". [[ExactWords 'Every known player' refers only to the players whom you have met at any point in the game.]] So if you were playing on a Continents map and found yourself sharing it with a single other civ, then provided you're lucky enough to not meet anyone else before you can conquer them, it counts.

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** "Conquest of the World" in ''V'', which requires you to win via a Domination Victory to defeat everyone you know as Greece by 350 BC. Even if you play on a Duel size map (which is ''highly'' recommended for this achievement), there is still a lot of luck involved in what resources your city spawns near, what enemy you get and their playstyle, and how fast you can build up your military so you can both destroy your enemy and meet the deadline, all while ensuring your own civilization's economy doesn't collapse.
*** Unless, of course, you play one of There are two caveats that bring the five tutorial maps, difficulty down to "really difficult" and not "you'd have an easier time trying to do this in RealLife", which technically count as a Domination Victory upon completion. You still have to keep restarting until you're randomly assigned Greece, though.
*** While
is that while fairly luck-based, a Domination Victory is NOT actually required for the achievement: the criteria to complete it reads "As Alexander, defeat every known player by 350BC". [[ExactWords 'Every known player' refers only to the players whom you have met at any point in the game.]] So if you were playing on a Continents map and found yourself sharing it with a single other civ, then provided you're lucky enough to not meet anyone else before you can conquer them, it counts. Failing that, you could play one of the five tutorial maps, which does sacrifice the criteria upon completion. You still have to keep restarting until you're randomly assigned Greece, though.


** The removal of unit stacking in ''V'' has had a mixed reception, but one headache resulting is that it ''kills'' unit pathfinding. If you tell Unit A and Unit B to both make for the same hex tile, and Unit A gets there first, Unit B will ask for new orders. Imagine if you did that to your entire 15-unit army. The micromanaging is a nightmare, especially when combined with an interface bug that makes Fortified units unselectable once auto-move orders have been executed.

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** The removal of unit stacking in ''V'' has had a mixed reception, but one a...let's say 'mixed reception'. One headache resulting is that it ''kills'' unit pathfinding. If you tell Unit A and Unit B to both make for the same hex tile, and Unit A gets there first, Unit B will ask for new orders. Imagine if you did that to your entire 15-unit army. The micromanaging is a nightmare, especially when combined with an interface bug that makes Fortified units unselectable once auto-move orders have been executed.executed.
*** Unit stacking is problematic for military units, but it completely kills management of your civilians, most importantly workers. From ''I'' to ''IV'', it was possible to stack your workers so they could finish tile improvements faster, meaning that laying rails or expanding in later stages of game could be done very fast, if not instantly with sufficient numbers of workers. By ''V'', you can only use one worker per tile, meaning that no matter how advanced you are and how big your empire is, tile improvements take (sometimes literally) ages. It's even more glaring when you consider that some backward Iron Age civ is building its improvements almost at the same rate as the NextSundayAD empire spanning two continents. There are ways to alleviate this, such as building the Pyramids (Workers build improvements +25% faster, and spawns 2 new Workers for free) and unlocking the Citizenship policy in the Liberty tree (Also +25% faster improvement speed, and 1 free Worker at your capital), but still - it's fair to say one should not be forced to have to [[ComplacentGamingSyndrome rush for the same thing every game]].



** Unit stacking is problematic for military units, but it completely kills management of your civilians, most importantly workers. From ''I'' to ''IV'', it was possible to stack your workers so they could finish tile improvements faster, meaning that laying rails or expanding in later stages of game could be done very fast, if not instantly with sufficient numbers of workers. By ''V'', you can only use one worker per tile, meaning that no matter how advanced you are and how big your empire is, tile improvements take (sometimes literally) ages. It's even more glaring when you consider that some backward Iron Age civ is building its improvements almost at the same rate as the NextSundayAD empire spanning two continents.
*** This can be alleviated considerably by building the Pyramids wonder (Workers build improvements +25% faster, and spawns 2 new Workers for free) and unlocking the Citizenship policy in the Liberty tree (Also +25% faster improvement speed, and 1 free Worker at your capital).
** Trade routes being plundered in ''Brave New World''. The unit for a trade route moves by itself. If a barbarian or enemy unit reaches the trade unit with any moves remaining, they can plunder it. If a trade unit runs into a barbarian or enemy unit, it can be plundered automatically. Upon being plundered, you lose the trade unit, which takes 10 turns or more to build in the early game. On paper, this makes sense; can't have a caravan or cargo ship moving around undefended. The scrappy part is that it's not enough to have a unit nearby that can see your trade unit; it must be right on the same space to keep it protected. Just escorting a normal civilian unit with a military unit is more work than it needs to be (both units have to be manually moved turn-by-turn to make sure they don't split up), but with an automated trade unit, the problem becomes worse. Oh, and if barbarians take your trade route, it turns into a barbarian military unit!
** ''VI'' finally fixes this by allowing units to "escort" non combatant units, which makes them move in a stack.

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** Unit stacking is problematic for military units, but it completely kills management of your civilians, most importantly workers. From ''I'' to ''IV'', it was possible to stack your workers so they could finish tile improvements faster, meaning that laying rails or expanding in later stages of game could be done very fast, if not instantly with sufficient numbers of workers. By ''V'', you can only use one worker per tile, meaning that no matter how advanced you are and how big your empire is, tile improvements take (sometimes literally) ages. It's even more glaring when you consider that some backward Iron Age civ is building its improvements almost at the same rate as the NextSundayAD empire spanning two continents.
*** This can be alleviated considerably by building the Pyramids wonder (Workers build improvements +25% faster, and spawns 2 new Workers for free) and unlocking the Citizenship policy in the Liberty tree (Also +25% faster improvement speed, and 1 free Worker at your capital).
** Trade routes being plundered in ''Brave New World''. The unit for a trade route moves by itself. If a barbarian or enemy unit reaches the trade unit with any moves remaining, they can plunder it. If a trade unit runs into a barbarian or enemy unit, it can be plundered automatically. Upon being plundered, you lose the trade unit, which takes 10 turns or more to build in the early game. On paper, this makes sense; can't have a caravan or cargo ship moving around undefended. The scrappy part is that it's not enough to have a unit nearby that can see your trade unit; it must be right on the same space to keep it protected. Just escorting a normal civilian unit with a military unit is more work than it needs to be (both units have to be manually moved turn-by-turn to make sure they don't split up), but with an automated trade unit, the problem becomes worse. Oh, and if barbarians take your trade route, it turns into a barbarian military unit!
**
unit! Thankfully, ''VI'' finally fixes this (and as a bonus, the hassle of keeping your settlers and workers safe by the same merit) by allowing units to "escort" non combatant units, which makes them move in a stack.

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