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** The pre-"doubles push" rule in the Money Cards, which meant if the next card was the same, you lost the money you bet. This was changed late in the Perry run to nullify the bet if a push happened. The original "doubles lose" rule returned late in the 2001 revival and has stayed put since.

to:

** The pre-"doubles push" rule in the Money Cards, which meant if the next card was the same, you lost the money you bet. This was changed late in the Perry run to nullify the bet if a push happened. The original "doubles lose" rule returned late in the 2001 revival and has stayed put since. It reared its ugly head in the 2019 revival when one unlucky contestant left the studio with nothing after turning three Aces in a row.


** The pre-"doubles push" rule in the Money Cards which meant if the next card was the same, you lost the money you bet. This was changed late in the Perry run to nullify the bet if a push happened. The original "doubles lose" rule returned on the 2019 revival.
** The 2001 version forced contestants to use their in-game money to bet on the Money Cards and in the 2019 revival they must do the same. In all other previous versions, money earned in the main game was the contestant's to keep.

to:

** The pre-"doubles push" rule in the Money Cards Cards, which meant if the next card was the same, you lost the money you bet. This was changed late in the Perry run to nullify the bet if a push happened. The original "doubles lose" rule returned on late in the 2001 revival and has stayed put since.
** Both the 2001 and
2019 revival.
** The 2001 version forced
versions force contestants to use their in-game money to bet on the Money Cards and in the 2019 revival they must do the same.Cards. In all other previous versions, money earned in the main game was the contestant's to keep.


** The pre-"doubles push" rule in the Money Cards which meant if the next card was the same, you lost the money you bet. This was changed late in the Perry run to nullify the bet if a push happened. This rule will return on the 2019 revival.

to:

** The pre-"doubles push" rule in the Money Cards which meant if the next card was the same, you lost the money you bet. This was changed late in the Perry run to nullify the bet if a push happened. This The original "doubles lose" rule will return returned on the 2019 revival.


** The 2001 version forced contestants to use their in-game money to bet on the Money Cards. In all other previous versions, money earned in the main game was the contestant's to keep, which, by all indication, will return in the 2019 revival.
* SpecialEffectFailure: On at least one occasion, the mechanical freeze bars in the Perry version failed to work, so the hostesses "froze it by hand". The Eubanks/Rafferty version kept this as a permanent fixture.

to:

** The 2001 version forced contestants to use their in-game money to bet on the Money Cards. Cards and in the 2019 revival they must do the same. In all other previous versions, money earned in the main game was the contestant's to keep, which, by all indication, will return in the 2019 revival.
keep.
* SpecialEffectFailure: On at least one occasion, the mechanical freeze bars in the Perry version failed to work, so the hostesses "froze it by hand". The Eubanks/Rafferty version kept this as a permanent fixture.fixture (it was changed to a "sliding bar" Bob or Bill used).


** The 2001 version forced contestants to use their in-game money to bet on the Money Cards. In all other previous versions, money earned in the main game was the contestant's to keep. It is unknown whether the 2019 revival will do the same.

to:

** The 2001 version forced contestants to use their in-game money to bet on the Money Cards. In all other previous versions, money earned in the main game was the contestant's to keep. It is unknown whether keep, which, by all indication, will return in the 2019 revival will do the same.revival.


** The 2001 version forced contestants to use their in-game money to bet on the Money Cards. In all other previous versions, money earned in the main game was the contestant's to keep.

to:

** The 2001 version forced contestants to use their in-game money to bet on the Money Cards. In all other previous versions, money earned in the main game was the contestant's to keep. It is unknown whether the 2019 revival will do the same.


** The pre-"doubles push" rule in the Money Cards which meant if the next card was the same, you lost the money you bet. This was changed late in the Perry run to nullify the bet if a push happened.

to:

** The pre-"doubles push" rule in the Money Cards which meant if the next card was the same, you lost the money you bet. This was changed late in the Perry run to nullify the bet if a push happened. This rule will return on the 2019 revival.


** The pre-"doubles push" rule in the Money Cards which meant if the next card was the same, you lose the money you bet. This was changed late in the Perry run to nullify the bet if a push happened.

to:

** The pre-"doubles push" rule in the Money Cards which meant if the next card was the same, you lose lost the money you bet. This was changed late in the Perry run to nullify the bet if a push happened.


** One question from 1978 asked to 100 people: "Would you vote a qualified candidate for president even if he had been divorced?". Two years later, the U.S. elected its first president to have been divorced: Ronald Reagan.

to:

** One question from 1978 asked to 100 people: men: "Would you vote a qualified candidate for president even if he had been divorced?". Two years later, the U.S. elected its first president to have been divorced: Ronald Reagan.UsefulNotes/RonaldReagan.


* CrowningMusicOfAwesome: Many fans love the NBC version's ThemeTune, which was recycled from Goodson-Todman's earlier game ''[[Series/DoubleDare1976 Double Dare]]'' (no, not [[Series/DoubleDare1986 that one]], although both themes actually did have the same composer, Edd Kalehoff).

to:

* CrowningMusicOfAwesome: SugarWiki/AwesomeMusic: Many fans love the NBC version's ThemeTune, which was recycled from Goodson-Todman's earlier game ''[[Series/DoubleDare1976 Double Dare]]'' (no, not [[Series/DoubleDare1986 that one]], although both themes actually did have the same composer, Edd Kalehoff).



* HeartwarmingMoments[=/=]TearJerker: The CBS finale, with Bob Eubanks getting teary near the end. [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p4f-5V-oUdY See it here.]] (It starts at 1:24)

to:

* HeartwarmingMoments[=/=]TearJerker: SugarWiki/HeartwarmingMoments: The CBS finale, with Bob Eubanks getting teary near the end. [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p4f-5V-oUdY See it here.]] (It starts at 1:24)


** During the Game show hosts turnabout tournament from 1980, Jim Lange, who was playing against Alex Trebek, said that he could name that tune in two notes. Four years later, and he would host the 1984 revival of ''Name That Tune''.

to:

** During the Game show hosts turnabout tournament from 1980, Jim Lange, who was playing against Alex Trebek, said that he could name that tune in two notes. Four years later, and he would host the 1984 revival of ''Name That Tune''.''Series/NameThatTune''.


* HilariousInHindsight: One question from 1978 asked to 100 people: "Would you vote a qualified candidate for president even if he had been divorced?". Two years later, the U.S. elected its first president to have been divorced: Ronald Reagan.

to:

* HilariousInHindsight: HilariousInHindsight:
**
One question from 1978 asked to 100 people: "Would you vote a qualified candidate for president even if he had been divorced?". Two years later, the U.S. elected its first president to have been divorced: Ronald Reagan.
** During the Game show hosts turnabout tournament from 1980, Jim Lange, who was playing against Alex Trebek, said that he could name that tune in two notes. Four years later, and he would host the 1984 revival of ''Name That Tune''.


* ScrappyMechanic: The pre-"doubles push" rule in the Money Cards which meant if the next card was the same, you lose the money you bet. This was changed late in the Perry run to nullify the bet if a push happened.

to:

* ScrappyMechanic: ScrappyMechanic:
**
The pre-"doubles push" rule in the Money Cards which meant if the next card was the same, you lose the money you bet. This was changed late in the Perry run to nullify the bet if a push happened.happened.
** The 2001 version forced contestants to use their in-game money to bet on the Money Cards. In all other previous versions, money earned in the main game was the contestant's to keep.

Added DiffLines:

* ScrappyMechanic: The pre-"doubles push" rule in the Money Cards which meant if the next card was the same, you lose the money you bet. This was changed late in the Perry run to nullify the bet if a push happened.


* ValuesDissonance: Some high-low questions, particularly in the Perry version, may appear to be downright sexist if asked again today. Imagine the looks the poll-taker would receive if he asked female executives, "Has your boss ever patted you on the fanny?" these days.

to:

* ValuesDissonance: Some high-low questions, particularly in the Perry version, may appear to be downright sexist if asked again today.in the present. Imagine the looks the poll-taker would receive if he asked female executives, "Has your boss ever patted you on the fanny?" these days.

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