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* SugarWiki/FunnyMoments:
** The entire chapter "Queen Alice". The Red Queen and White Queen finally appear together, and the result is malapropisms and math puns on a grand scale.

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* SugarWiki/FunnyMoments:
**
SugarWiki/FunnyMoments: The entire chapter "Queen Alice". The Red Queen and White Queen finally appear together, and the result is malapropisms and math puns on a grand scale.



* MissingEpisode: There was a "lost chapter" of ''Through the Looking Glass'' that Carroll omitted because Tenniel didn't seem to like it. [[GrailInTheGarbage Discovered at Sotheby’s in 1974]], it was named "A Wasp in a Wig" and detail Alice meeting a GrumpyOldMan with a wasp-like face. [[http://www.alice-in-wonderland.net/resources/chapters-script/a-wasp-in-a-wig/ You can read it here.]]


** Tweedledee and Tweedledum. If an adaptation includes anything from ''Through the Looking Glass'', odds are that it will be them. Their roles in Disney/AliceInWonderland (the Disney movie) probably helped this.

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** Tweedledee and Tweedledum. If an adaptation includes anything from ''Through the Looking Glass'', odds are that it will be them. Their roles in Disney/AliceInWonderland WesternAnimation/AliceInWonderland (the Disney movie) probably helped this.


* SignatureScene: Any proper reference to ''Alice'' has at least one Mad Tea Party scene in it (regardless of if the party's [[ArtifactTitle actually "mad" or not]]). Oftentimes the Tea Party will make up the majority of the references to the book.

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* SignatureScene: Any proper reference to ''Alice'' has at least one Mad Tea Party scene in it (regardless of if the party's [[ArtifactTitle actually "mad" or not]]). Oftentimes the Tea Party will make up the majority of the references to the book. Amusingly enough, in the original version of the story, ''[[http://www.gasl.org/refbib/Carroll__Alice_under_Ground.pdf Alice's Adventures Underground]]'', this scene wasn't present at all, skipping right from the scene where Alice first eats the mushroom to the Queen's croquet grounds.

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* StockParodyJokes: Alice is either mad or a drug user.


* BigLippedAlligatorMoment: "Literature/{{Jabberwocky}}" somehow manages to be one ''in spite of'' the context. Unlike most examples of this trope, however, it ''is'' mentioned later on when Alice asks Humpty-Dumpty to translate the poem for her.

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* BigLippedAlligatorMoment: BigLippedAlligatorMoment:
**
"Literature/{{Jabberwocky}}" somehow manages to be one ''in spite of'' the context. Unlike most examples of this trope, however, it ''is'' mentioned later on when Alice asks Humpty-Dumpty to translate the poem for her.


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* HardToAdaptWork: ''Alice's Adventures In Wonderland'' and its sequel are considered "unfilmable," which is pretty remarkable considering that they're also AdaptationOverdosed. The reasons given for this is that the books' verbal charms can't quite translate to a visual medium, and their episodic structure can't quite be reconciled with the three-act structure.


* BigLippedAlligatorMoment: "Literature/{{Jabberwocky}}" somehow manages to be one ''in spite of'' the context.

to:

* BigLippedAlligatorMoment: "Literature/{{Jabberwocky}}" somehow manages to be one ''in spite of'' the context. Unlike most examples of this trope, however, it ''is'' mentioned later on when Alice asks Humpty-Dumpty to translate the poem for her.


** The Mad Hatter, probably the ''most'' well known of the characters, other than the Cheshire Cat.

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** The Mad Hatter, probably the ''most'' well known of the characters, other than the Cheshire Cat.Cat and Alice herself.

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* AlternateCharacterInterpretation: Is Alice simply an imaginative child, or is she actually mad? The level of insanity varies from adaptation to adaptation, with ''VideoGame/AmericanMcGeesAlice'' being one of the notable examples of the latter.


* SignatureScene: Any proper reference to ''Alice'' has at least one Mad Tea Party scene in it (regardless of if the party's [[ArtifactTitle actually "mad" or not]]).

to:

* SignatureScene: Any proper reference to ''Alice'' has at least one Mad Tea Party scene in it (regardless of if the party's [[ArtifactTitle actually "mad" or not]]). Oftentimes the Tea Party will make up the majority of the references to the book.


* GeniusBonus[=/=]FridgeBrilliance: In the 1987 animated television film based on "Through the Looking Glass", a hairy creature called the Snark appears as a tag-along to the Jabberwock and the Bandersnatch. While he may at first glance be an original character created for the film, he's actually a reference to the poem ''Literature/TheHuntingOfTheSnark'', which, like ''Alice's Adventures in Wonderland'' and ''Through the Looking Glass'', was also written by Lewis Carrol, but isn't as widely known.

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* GeniusBonus[=/=]FridgeBrilliance: GeniusBonus: In the 1987 animated television film based on "Through the Looking Glass", a hairy creature called the Snark appears as a tag-along to the Jabberwock and the Bandersnatch. While he may at first glance be an original character created for the film, he's actually a reference to the poem ''Literature/TheHuntingOfTheSnark'', which, like ''Alice's Adventures in Wonderland'' and ''Through the Looking Glass'', was also written by Lewis Carrol, but isn't as widely known.


* CommonKnowledge: The Queen of Hearts and the Red Queen are two separate characters. People usually get confused due to several adaptations turning them into one CompositeCharacter. Technically the same applies to Looking Glass Lands and Wonderland proper, yet both places might exist in the same... place.

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* CommonKnowledge: The Queen of Hearts and the Red Queen are two separate characters. The Queen of Hearts is a playing card and an antagonist and the Red Queen is a chess piece and, although rather stern, is a good guy who acts as a mentor to Alice. People usually get confused due to several adaptations turning them into one CompositeCharacter. Technically the same applies to Looking Glass Lands and Wonderland proper, yet both places might exist in the same... place.


** "There goes Bill!" "Poor Bill..."


** That said, he almost certainly would have exposed himself to something with hallucinogenic properties while writing the books. Patent medicines were ubiquitous in his time, and they're infamous for having contained substances like cocaine and heroin that far back - even cough medicine would likely have contained something fishy by today's standards. The better question wouldn't be whether or not it was made on drugs, it would be how much of a creative influence the drugs actually were at all.


* GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff: Japan really seems to love ''Alice in Wonderland'', as it's the subject of various forms of Japanese media. The sheer amount of anime, manga, light novels and video games that take inspiration from it are especially noticeable. Alice's {{Moe}}ness almost certainly helps.
* IAmNotShazam: Contrary to popular belief, Carroll never actually refers to any character as "the Mad Hatter" in the book; he is simply called "the Hatter". Alice's name, which was generally left as OnlyOneName in the books, was never the exact same as her real life namesake, either -- Caroll got this Alice's surname from the real one's middle name, [[WordOfGod and only ever mentioned it once elsewhere.]]

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* GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff: Japan really seems to love ''Alice in Wonderland'', as it's the subject of various forms of Japanese media. The sheer amount of anime, manga, light novels and video games that take inspiration from it are especially noticeable. It's touted as one of the premier examples of fairy tale literature despite not technically being one, as almost anything fairy tale related there will use "Alice" in the name to evoke whimsy as much as the West uses "Grimm". Alice's {{Moe}}ness almost certainly helps.
* IAmNotShazam: Contrary to popular belief, Carroll never actually refers to any character as "the Mad Hatter" in the book; he is simply called "the Hatter". Alice's name, which was generally left as OnlyOneName in the books, was never the exact same as her real life namesake, either -- Caroll Carroll got this Alice's surname from the real one's middle name, [[WordOfGod and only ever mentioned it once elsewhere.]]


* IAmNotShazam: Contrary to popular belief, Carroll never actually refers to any character as "the Mad Hatter" in the book; he is simply called "the Hatter".

to:

* IAmNotShazam: Contrary to popular belief, Carroll never actually refers to any character as "the Mad Hatter" in the book; he is simply called "the Hatter". Alice's name, which was generally left as OnlyOneName in the books, was never the exact same as her real life namesake, either -- Caroll got this Alice's surname from the real one's middle name, [[WordOfGod and only ever mentioned it once elsewhere.]]

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