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* ''VideoGame/TheWorldEndsWithYou'' probably has ''way'' more than these few examples, but these are the obvious ones. Alll the characters use modern American teenage slang properly (i.e. "TotallyRadical" is avoided except in one intentional case); Beat goes even farther with a stereotypical "gangsta" speaking style, whereas in Japanese his speech is simply rather rough and impolite.

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* ''VideoGame/TheWorldEndsWithYou'' probably has ''way'' more than these few examples, but these are the obvious ones. Alll All the characters use modern American teenage slang properly (i.e. "TotallyRadical" is avoided except in one intentional case); Beat goes even farther with a stereotypical "gangsta" speaking style, whereas in Japanese his speech is simply rather rough and impolite.


* The Newcomer trailers for the 3DS and Wii U iterations of ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros'' feature punny phrases for each characters introduced ("[[VideoGame/PunchOut Little Mac]] [[BoxingBattler Punches In!]]", "[[VideoGame/KidIcarusUprising Palutena]] [[LightEmUp Alights!]]", and [[VideoGame/FireEmblemAwakening Robin]] [[MagicKnight Brings the Thunder!]]", to name a few[[note]]and even broke that rule once so they could do a proper ShoutOut ("[[VideoGame/StreetFighterII Here Comes a New Challenger! Ryu!]])[[/note]]), as opposed to simply "(insert name here) 参戦 joins the battle!" (only VideoGame/{{Mega Man|Classic}}'s trailer has a splash with this phrase in both English and Japanese).
** This was repeated for ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBrosUltimate'', with Chrom and Dark Samus being the only ones getting a generic "Joins the Battle!" splash.
* ''VideoGame/RecettearAnItemShopsTale'' became a surprise hit and sold over a hundred thousand copies in America (the translators were expecting ten thousand at best) partially due to the high quality of the translation, which was [[ShoutOut/RecettearAnItemShopsTale filled to the brim with shout outs]] while still keeping original game's feel -- [[{{Moe}} cute]] but not [[TastesLikeDiabetes cloying]] -- intact. This is pretty much Carpe Fulgur's MO, according to their FAQ. They aim to work closely with the creators to capture the feeling and humor of the games. It also has a rather high rate of people that played the demo deciding to purchase the game. The normal conversion rate is around 10%. ''Recettear'''s was over ''50%''.

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* The Newcomer trailers for the 3DS and Wii U iterations of ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros'' feature punny phrases for each characters introduced ("[[VideoGame/PunchOut Little Mac]] [[BoxingBattler Punches In!]]", "[[VideoGame/KidIcarusUprising Palutena]] [[LightEmUp Alights!]]", and [[VideoGame/FireEmblemAwakening Robin]] [[MagicKnight Brings the Thunder!]]", to name a few[[note]]and even broke that rule once so they could do a proper ShoutOut ("[[VideoGame/StreetFighterII Here Comes a New Challenger! Ryu!]])[[/note]]), as opposed to simply "(insert name here) 参戦 joins the battle!" (only VideoGame/{{Mega Man|Classic}}'s trailer has a splash with this phrase in both English and Japanese).
**
Japanese). This was repeated for ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBrosUltimate'', with Chrom and Dark Samus being the only ones getting a generic "Joins the Battle!" splash.
* ''VideoGame/RecettearAnItemShopsTale'' ''VideoGame/RecettearAnItemShopsTale'':
** The game
became a surprise hit and sold over a hundred thousand copies in America (the translators were expecting ten thousand at best) partially due to the high quality of the translation, which was [[ShoutOut/RecettearAnItemShopsTale filled to the brim with shout outs]] while still keeping original game's feel -- [[{{Moe}} cute]] but not [[TastesLikeDiabetes cloying]] -- intact. This is pretty much Carpe Fulgur's MO, according to their FAQ. They aim to work closely with the creators to capture the feeling and humor of the games. It also has a rather high rate of people that played the demo deciding to purchase the game. The normal conversion rate is around 10%. ''Recettear'''s was over ''50%''.


** This was repeated for ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBrosUltimate'', with Chrom and Dark Samus being the only ones getting a generic "Joins the Battle!" splash.



** The second game translated by them, ''VideoGame/{{Chantelise}}'', contains the same translation style. One of the most noteworthy things they changed was the name of a character, who in Japanese was "Mirai", a Japenese word for "future." The name wound up being heavily symbolic [[spoiler: since she had concocted a plan to break the ViciousCycle of sacrifices and ultimately finish off the BigBad, but only long after her own death]], and it had originally even been the name of the climactic chapter, it wound up being changed to "Fortuna" and the chapter's name to "Fortuna Favors the Bold." [[http://www.carpefulgur.com/drakblog/?p=41 They did not make this decision lightly.]]

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** The second game translated by them, ''VideoGame/{{Chantelise}}'', contains the same translation style. One of the most noteworthy things they changed was the name of a character, who in Japanese was "Mirai", a Japenese Japanese word for "future." The name wound up being heavily symbolic [[spoiler: since she had concocted a plan to break the ViciousCycle of sacrifices and ultimately finish off the BigBad, but only long after her own death]], and it had originally even been the name of the climactic chapter, it wound up being changed to "Fortuna" and the chapter's name to "Fortuna Favors the Bold." [[http://www.carpefulgur.com/drakblog/?p=41 They did not make this decision lightly.]]



* Dragon's Crown has a fair few references to American memes such as Arrested Development (I've made a huge mistake) and Skyrim (arrow to the knee) in the quotes given off by dead bodies. Also debatable whether this counts as a Woolseyism, but one of the bosses is [[spoiler: a full reference to the killer rabbit from Monty Python and the Holy Grail, referencing one of John Cleese's many costumes, the knights, and even the holy hand grenade.]]

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* Dragon's Crown ''VideoGame/DragonsCrown'' has a fair few references to American memes such as Arrested Development (I've made a huge mistake) and Skyrim (arrow to the knee) in the quotes given off by dead bodies. Also debatable whether this counts bodies, such as references to ''SeriesArrestedDevelopment'' ("I've made a Woolseyism, but one of the bosses is [[spoiler: a full reference huge mistake") and ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim Skyrim]]'' (The infamous "arrow to the killer rabbit from Monty Python and the Holy Grail, referencing one of John Cleese's many costumes, the knights, and even the holy hand grenade.]]knee" line).


* In ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid2SonsOfLiberty'', Rosemary insists that the building that Film/KingKong climbed was the [[TooSoon Twin Towers]], and Raiden suggests she'd mixed it up with ''Film/TheToweringInferno''. The intended joke was that ''Film/KingKong1933'' used the Empire State Building, but ''Film/KingKong1976'' used the Twin Towers, so both of them are right. However, the game was mastered literally ''days'' after September 11, 2001, so in the English version it was changed to the Chrysler Building, mixing it up with the building in the American ''Film/{{Godzilla 1998}}''. This is somewhat more appropriate, first because ''Godzilla'' and ''King Kong'' are both [[{{Kaiju}} giant monster movies]] (rather than a giant monster movie and a disaster movie like in the original), and secondly because Creator/HideoKojima compared Raiden and Snake to King Kong (a romantic monster who came from nature and gets to return there) and Godzilla (a noble monster created by humans), respectively in WordOfGod.

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* In ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid2SonsOfLiberty'', Rosemary insists that the building that Film/KingKong climbed was the [[TooSoon [[FunnyAneurysmMoment Twin Towers]], and Raiden suggests she'd mixed it up with ''Film/TheToweringInferno''. The intended joke was that ''Film/KingKong1933'' used the Empire State Building, but ''Film/KingKong1976'' used the Twin Towers, so both of them are right. However, the game was mastered literally ''days'' after September 11, 2001, so in the English version it was changed to the Chrysler Building, mixing it up with the building in the American ''Film/{{Godzilla 1998}}''. This is somewhat more appropriate, first because ''Godzilla'' and ''King Kong'' are both [[{{Kaiju}} giant monster movies]] (rather than a giant monster movie and a disaster movie like in the original), and secondly because Creator/HideoKojima compared Raiden and Snake to King Kong (a romantic monster who came from nature and gets to return there) and Godzilla (a noble monster created by humans), respectively in WordOfGod.

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** Of note are Grit and Sami, who's names were originally Billy and Domino respectively in Japan, who were changed not only to sound more unique but also as a case of a GeniusBonus. Anyone from the military will recognize "GRIT" as the mnemonic for fire control orders which is used to issue firing orders to a squadron over a radio[[note]]G for Group, as in who will fire, R for range, the distance to the target, I for indication, how the target's location will be described, and T for type of fire, as in how they will fire at the target[[/note]], which is a rather fitting name for a sniper. Anyone familiar with history will recognize Sami as a reference to Sammy L. Davis, an infantry war hero of the UsefulNotes/VietnamWar and recipient of (among other awards) the Medal of Honor, which is well-fitting for a [=CO=] who specializes in infantry tactics.

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*** In German, Charizard is known as "Glurak", which combines "glut" (ember) and "Drache" (dragon), alluding to its design, but the spelling of the latter is corrupted into "drak", a dragon (or dragon-like creature) in Slavic mythology that had a flame at the end of its tail just like Charizard and its pre-evolutions.


*** Articuno and Zapdos' French names are "Artik'''odin'''" and "Elec'''thor'''", as in the Norse gods, and Moltres' is "Sulfu'''ra'''" as in the Egyptian god; the other part of their names referring more obviously to their element. The last of these is also in a non-optional location in its first appearance (Cinnabar Island can be surfed to from Pallet Town to skip Seafoam Islands, the Power Plant is optional entirely, and Victory Road must be completed to beat the game). Later in the series, it STILL had some sort of difference in location (when it wasn't roaming or obtained through a portal, anyway); in ''[=FireRed=]'' and ''[=LeafGreen=]'', it was in the Sevii Islands instead of Kanto, and in ''[=HeartGold=]'' and ''[=SoulSilver=]'', it still isn't in Kanto, being in Johto.
*** In French, Fushigidane/Bulbasaur is known as "Bulbizarre", which is actually a much more faithful translation to the original Japanese (the original name means "Isn't it strange?" which reflects on the fact that [[CartoonCreature no one can tell what kind of animal it's based on]]), and essentially combining both the Japanese and English names while ignoring [[InformedSpecies the English translation's implication that it's a dinosaur despite looking nothing like one]].

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*** Articuno and Zapdos' French names are "Artik'''odin'''" and "Elec'''thor'''", as in the Norse gods, and Moltres' is "Sulfu'''ra'''" as in the Egyptian god; the other part of their names referring more obviously to their element. The last of these is also in a non-optional location in its first appearance (Cinnabar Island can be surfed to from Pallet Town to skip Seafoam Islands, the Power Plant is optional entirely, and Victory Road must be completed to beat the game). Later in the series, it STILL had some sort of difference in location (when it wasn't roaming or obtained through a portal, anyway); in ''[=FireRed=]'' and ''[=LeafGreen=]'', it was in the Sevii Islands instead of Kanto, and in ''[=HeartGold=]'' and ''[=SoulSilver=]'', it still isn't in Kanto, being in Johto.
Johto. A [[https://eo.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uzanto:Amika_Babilfrenzo/Pokemon fan-made Esperanto translation of the original 151 Pokémon names]] (in common usage by speakers of the language) reuses the French names for the trio but instead translates Moltres as "Bru'''loki'''", making the theme more cohesive.
*** In French, Fushigidane/Bulbasaur is known as "Bulbizarre", which is actually a much more faithful translation to the original Japanese (the original name means "Isn't it strange?" which reflects on the fact that [[CartoonCreature no one can tell what kind of animal it's based on]]), and essentially combining both the Japanese and English names while ignoring [[InformedSpecies the English translation's implication that it's a dinosaur despite looking nothing like one]]. The unofficial Esperanto translation adapts the name as "Bulbizaro" and derives the whole line's names from the French translation.


*** In French, Fushigidane/Bulbasaur is known as "Bulbizarre", which is actually a much more faithful translation to the original Japanese (the original name means "Isn't it strange?" which reflects on the fact that [[CartoonCreature no one can tell what kind of animal it's based on]]).

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*** In French, Fushigidane/Bulbasaur is known as "Bulbizarre", which is actually a much more faithful translation to the original Japanese (the original name means "Isn't it strange?" which reflects on the fact that [[CartoonCreature no one can tell what kind of animal it's based on]]).on]]), and essentially combining both the Japanese and English names while ignoring [[InformedSpecies the English translation's implication that it's a dinosaur despite looking nothing like one]].


* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyTactics'', when it was localized, went through this for almost the entire script due to the way the setting was. In Japanese, the writing and script was fairly normal as far as how things were explained, meaning that while characters might of been written in different Kanji styles, the script was straightforward. When the game was being localized, the script was adjusted to be more Shakespearian and dramatic, resulting in some [[{{Narm}} cheesy lines for sure]], but also a script that feels more fitting for the world. When the PSP remake came along, the script was also adjusted again to be more fitting for the times by removing some of the more awkward translations.

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* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyTactics'', when it was localized, went through this for almost the entire script due to the way the setting was. In Japanese, the writing and script was fairly normal as far as how things were explained, meaning that while characters might of have been written in different Kanji styles, the script was straightforward. When the game was being localized, the script was adjusted to be more Shakespearian and dramatic, resulting in some [[{{Narm}} cheesy lines for sure]], but also a script that feels more fitting for the world. When the PSP remake came along, the script was also adjusted again to be more fitting for the times by removing some of the more awkward translations.


* ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaALinkToThePast'':
** Ganondorf and Ganon's full names in the [[AllThereInTheManual Manual]], Ganondorf Dragmire and Mandrag Ganon, were actually added into the English translation: In the original Japanese version, he was identified simply as Ganondorf and Ganon.
** In the game itself, the contents of the Book of Mudora were itself the result of Woolseyism (in the Japanese version, it was treated more like an instruction booklet than a book containing various lore).
* In the English version of ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTwilightPrincess'', Midna's dialogue to Link [[spoiler: right before she breaks the Mirror of Twilight is "Link, I...see you later." Some translations of the Japanese imply that the drifting "I..." wasn't in the original version. Considering that a lot of fans have interpreted the evocative statement to mean she was going to say or confess something very emotional and heartwarming (the most obvious being "I love you" or something similar), it can mildly alter a player's view of Midna and her relationship to Link.]] With or without the change, the scene is one of the most emotionally charged in the game, though. Also, in Japanese, Midna just says "bye" before [[spoiler:breaking the mirror]]. In English, it's turned into a MeaningfulEcho of her CatchPhrase.

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* ''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda'':
**
''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaALinkToThePast'':
** *** Ganondorf and Ganon's full names in the [[AllThereInTheManual Manual]], Ganondorf Dragmire and Mandrag Ganon, were actually added into the English translation: In the original Japanese version, he was identified simply as Ganondorf and Ganon.
** *** In the game itself, the contents of the Book of Mudora were itself the result of Woolseyism (in the Japanese version, it was treated more like an instruction booklet than a book containing various lore).
* ** In the English version of ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTwilightPrincess'', Midna's dialogue to Link [[spoiler: right before she breaks the Mirror of Twilight is "Link, I...see you later." Some translations of the Japanese imply that the drifting "I..." wasn't in the original version. Considering that a lot of fans have interpreted the evocative statement to mean she was going to say or confess something very emotional and heartwarming (the most obvious being "I love you" or something similar), it can mildly alter a player's view of Midna and her relationship to Link.]] With or without the change, the scene is one of the most emotionally charged in the game, though. Also, in Japanese, Midna just says "bye" before [[spoiler:breaking the mirror]]. In English, it's turned into a MeaningfulEcho of her CatchPhrase.


* The Brazilian translation of the Creator/LucasArts heaven\hell sim ''Videogame/{{Afterlife}}'' is just as hilarious as the original, as well as translating well some English figures of speech. For instance, the Heaven reward "Humble Pie" becomes the local idiom "Bread Baked By The Devil", "St. Quentin Scareatino" is "[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carandiru_Penitentiary Carandiruim]]", and the descriptions of Hell-enhancing structures made by an UngratefulBastard reference local things such as Coffin Joe and "a crowded camp in Ubatuba during a rainy holiday".

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* The Brazilian translation of the Creator/LucasArts heaven\hell sim ''Videogame/{{Afterlife}}'' ''Videogame/Afterlife1996'' is just as hilarious as the original, as well as translating well some English figures of speech. For instance, the Heaven reward "Humble Pie" becomes the local idiom "Bread Baked By The Devil", "St. Quentin Scareatino" is "[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carandiru_Penitentiary Carandiruim]]", and the descriptions of Hell-enhancing structures made by an UngratefulBastard reference local things such as Coffin Joe and "a crowded camp in Ubatuba during a rainy holiday".


** ''VideoGame/SakuraWarsSoLongMyLove'' changed two of the characters names for the game's overseas release. Rikarita Aries was renamed to Rosarita Aries (Rosita, for short), which not only is an actual given name in Mexican Spanish, but is also the name of a type of beans, fitting the character's BigEater traits. Sagitta Weinberg, meanwhile, is renamed to Cheiron Archer, "Cheiron" being derived from a centaur from Greek mythology. The Sagittarius constellation resembles a centaur, so the StellarName theme still applies. In addition, the MiniMecha used by the New York Combat Revue are renamed from the unwieldy "Fenics" to the simple, yet still thematically appropriate, [[FunWithAcronyms Super Telekinetic Assault Robots, or "STARs"]].

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** While [[VideoGame/SakuraWars1996 the first game]] never made its way to the west, there is an unofficial FanTranslation, which adds its own little touches that help the dialogue stand out. Among the gems in this translation are the pet names some of the Imperial Combat Revue give to Ogami, such as "Chief" for Kohran, "Boss" for Kanna, and "Mon Frere"[[note]]French for "My Brother", from the Japanese "Onii-chan"[[/note]] for Iris.
** ''VideoGame/SakuraWarsSoLongMyLove'' changed two of the characters names for the game's overseas release. Rikarita Aries was renamed to Rosarita Aries (Rosita, for short), which not only is an actual given name in Mexican Spanish, but is also the name of a type of beans, fitting the character's BigEater traits. Sagitta Weinberg, meanwhile, is renamed to Cheiron Archer, "Cheiron" being derived from a centaur from Greek mythology. The Sagittarius constellation resembles a centaur, centaur holding a bow, so the StellarName theme still applies. In addition, the MiniMecha used by the New York Combat Revue are renamed from the unwieldy "Fenics" to the simple, yet still thematically appropriate, [[FunWithAcronyms Super Telekinetic Assault Robots, or "STARs"]].


** The French names for Muk and Grimer are Tadmorv and Grotadmorv ([[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Pile 'o snot and Big pile o' snot]] respectively). Doesn't stop [[AmericansHateTingle French-Canadian fans]] from [[SnarkBait ragging on those two names in particular]].

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** The French names for Muk and Grimer are Tadmorv and Grotadmorv ([[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Pile 'o snot and Big pile o' snot]] respectively). Doesn't stop [[AmericansHateTingle French-Canadian fans]] from [[SnarkBait ragging on those two names in particular]].

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* ''VideoGame/SakuraWars''
** ''VideoGame/SakuraWarsSoLongMyLove'' changed two of the characters names for the game's overseas release. Rikarita Aries was renamed to Rosarita Aries (Rosita, for short), which not only is an actual given name in Mexican Spanish, but is also the name of a type of beans, fitting the character's BigEater traits. Sagitta Weinberg, meanwhile, is renamed to Cheiron Archer, "Cheiron" being derived from a centaur from Greek mythology. The Sagittarius constellation resembles a centaur, so the StellarName theme still applies. In addition, the MiniMecha used by the New York Combat Revue are renamed from the unwieldy "Fenics" to the simple, yet still thematically appropriate, [[FunWithAcronyms Super Telekinetic Assault Robots, or "STARs"]].
** For most of the series's history in English publications, the term for MiniMecha was simply "spirit armor". ''VideoGame/SakuraWars2019'' spices up the term by rechristening them "Spiricle Strikers".

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