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** Discussed and zigzagged in ''Film/Interstellar'' with the robot TARS. He essentially acts as an autopilot, calculator and bodyguard for the space mission, with several characters (and himself) pointing out that he is simply a piece of equipment with multiple functions. However, the astronauts all come to form an attachment to him, and debate whether it's moral to ask him to sacrifice himself at one point in the mission. Interestingly, TARS and his companion robots have sentient traits (humor, trust, honesty), but they must be calibrated by the humans they serve.

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** * Discussed and zigzagged in ''Film/Interstellar'' with the robot TARS. He essentially acts as an autopilot, calculator and bodyguard for the space mission, with several characters (and himself) pointing out that he is simply a piece of equipment with multiple functions. However, the astronauts all come to form an attachment to him, and debate whether it's moral to ask him to sacrifice himself at one point in the mission. Interestingly, TARS and his companion robots have sentient traits (humor, trust, honesty), but they must be calibrated by the humans they serve.

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** Discussed and zigzagged in ''Film/Interstellar'' with the robot TARS. He essentially acts as an autopilot, calculator and bodyguard for the space mission, with several characters (and himself) pointing out that he is simply a piece of equipment with multiple functions. However, the astronauts all come to form an attachment to him, and debate whether it's moral to ask him to sacrifice himself at one point in the mission. Interestingly, TARS and his companion robots have sentient traits (humor, trust, honesty), but they must be calibrated by the humans they serve.


* Averted in the sequel, ''Film/AvengersInfinityWar''. [[spoiler: A significant chunk of the plot hinges on Captain America and the other Avengers refusing to kill the Vision to destroy the Mind Stone embedded in his forehead, even though doing so would prevent Comicbook/{{Thanos}} from completing the Infinity Gauntlet and potentially save the entire universe. Because of this, the Avengers instead opt to go to Wakanda in hopes that Princess Shuri will be able to develop a technique to safely remove the Mind Stone from Vision's skull without harming him. While Comicbook/ScarletWitch does eventually destroy Vision in the final act, it's only after every other option has been exhausted, as well as after Vision himself [[HeroicSacrifice pleads with her to end his life before Thanos can complete the Gauntlet]].]]

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* Averted in the sequel, ''Film/AvengersInfinityWar''. [[spoiler: A significant chunk of the plot hinges on Captain America and the other Avengers refusing to kill the Vision to destroy the Mind Stone embedded in his forehead, even though 1) doing so would prevent Comicbook/{{Thanos}} from completing the Infinity Gauntlet and potentially save the entire universe and 2) Vision himself pleads it's the right thing to do and is willing to die to protect half the universe. Because of this, the The Avengers instead opt to go to Wakanda in hopes that Princess Shuri will be able to develop a technique to safely remove the Mind Stone from Vision's skull without harming him. While Comicbook/ScarletWitch does eventually destroy Vision in the final act, it's only after every other option has been exhausted, as well as after Vision himself [[HeroicSacrifice pleads with her to end his life before Thanos can complete the Gauntlet]].]]

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* ''Film/TheDarkKnight'' adds another caveat to Batman's [[ThouShallNotKill one rule]]. Apparently animals are exempt seeing as he knocks all of The Joker's [[AngryGuardDog AngryGuardDogs]] into an unfinished elevator shaft but at no point is this treated as Batman breaking his one rule.


* Subverted in ''Film/{{Zygote}}''. Mining corporations are said to commonly use [[ArtificialHuman synthetics]] to do more dangerous mining operations, such as the risky job of diving deep into the hearts of asteroids to mine their cores. These 'Canaries' are conditioned to regard themselves as MoreExpendableThanYou more expendable than their human overseers. [[spoiler:Barklay thinks that she is one due to her status as Canary-class, but Quinn reveals to her that creating synths is expensive, thus companies like Cerberus tend to instead buy human orphans like Barklay at young ages, convincing them that they are manufactured instead.]]

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* Subverted in ''Film/{{Zygote}}''. Mining corporations are said to commonly use [[ArtificialHuman synthetics]] to do more dangerous mining operations, such as the risky job of diving deep into the hearts of asteroids to mine their cores. These 'Canaries' are conditioned to regard themselves as MoreExpendableThanYou [[MoreExpendableThanYou more expendable expendable]] than their human overseers. [[spoiler:Barklay thinks that she is one due to her status as Canary-class, but Quinn reveals to her that creating synths is expensive, thus companies like Cerberus tend to instead buy human orphans like Barklay at young ages, convincing them that they are manufactured instead.]]

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* Subverted in ''Film/{{Zygote}}''. Mining corporations are said to commonly use [[ArtificialHuman synthetics]] to do more dangerous mining operations, such as the risky job of diving deep into the hearts of asteroids to mine their cores. These 'Canaries' are conditioned to regard themselves as MoreExpendableThanYou more expendable than their human overseers. [[spoiler:Barklay thinks that she is one due to her status as Canary-class, but Quinn reveals to her that creating synths is expensive, thus companies like Cerberus tend to instead buy human orphans like Barklay at young ages, convincing them that they are manufactured instead.]]


* Used in ''Film/SmallSoldiers'', where the creator of the monstrous-appearing Gorgonites want them to be a line peaceful, educational toys. The CEO decides instead to make them enemies for the heroic, human Commando Elite toys. The movie gives the toys actual intelligence through military computer chips, and the Gorgonites are indeed peaceful, thoughtful beings, while the Commando Elite are violent, bloodthirsty monsters who kill the Gorgonites (and anyone in their way) just because.

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* Used in ''Film/SmallSoldiers'', where the creator of the monstrous-appearing Gorgonites want them to be a line of peaceful, educational toys. The CEO decides instead to make them enemies for the heroic, human Commando Elite toys. The movie gives the toys actual intelligence through military computer chips, and the Gorgonites are indeed peaceful, thoughtful beings, while the Commando Elite are violent, bloodthirsty monsters who kill the Gorgonites (and anyone in their way) just because.


* Averted in the sequel, ''Film/AvengersInfinityWar''. [[spoiler: A significant chunk of the plot hinges on Captain America and the other Avengers refusing to kill the Vision to destroy the Mind Stone in his forehead, even though doing so would prevent Comicbook/{{Thanos}} from completing the Infinity Gauntlet and potentially save the entire universe. Because of this, the Avengers instead opt to go to Wakanda in hopes that Princess Shuri will be able to develop a technique to safely remove the Mind Stone from Vision's skull without harming him. While Comicbook/ScarletWitch does eventually destroy Vision in the final act, it's only after every other option has been exhausted, as well as after Vision himself [[HeroicSacrifice pleads with her to end his life before Thanos can complete the Gauntlet]].]]

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* Averted in the sequel, ''Film/AvengersInfinityWar''. [[spoiler: A significant chunk of the plot hinges on Captain America and the other Avengers refusing to kill the Vision to destroy the Mind Stone embedded in his forehead, even though doing so would prevent Comicbook/{{Thanos}} from completing the Infinity Gauntlet and potentially save the entire universe. Because of this, the Avengers instead opt to go to Wakanda in hopes that Princess Shuri will be able to develop a technique to safely remove the Mind Stone from Vision's skull without harming him. While Comicbook/ScarletWitch does eventually destroy Vision in the final act, it's only after every other option has been exhausted, as well as after Vision himself [[HeroicSacrifice pleads with her to end his life before Thanos can complete the Gauntlet]].]]

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* Averted in the sequel, ''Film/AvengersInfinityWar''. [[spoiler: A significant chunk of the plot hinges on Captain America and the other Avengers refusing to kill the Vision to destroy the Mind Stone in his forehead, even though doing so would prevent Comicbook/{{Thanos}} from completing the Infinity Gauntlet and potentially save the entire universe. Because of this, the Avengers instead opt to go to Wakanda in hopes that Princess Shuri will be able to develop a technique to safely remove the Mind Stone from Vision's skull without harming him. While Comicbook/ScarletWitch does eventually destroy Vision in the final act, it's only after every other option has been exhausted, as well as after Vision himself [[HeroicSacrifice pleads with her to end his life before Thanos can complete the Gauntlet]].]]
-->'''Captain America:''' We don't trade lives.


* PlayedForLaughs in ''Film/AvengersAgeOfUltron''. Midway through the movie, Comicbook/TheVision]] [[spoiler: casually picks up Thor's hammer, which freaks him out because only the worthy are supposed to be able to wield it. At the end, Tony and Steve are trying to convince him it doesn't count because it's a synthetic mind in a synthetic body.

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* ''Film/AvengersAgeOfUltron'':
**
PlayedForLaughs in ''Film/AvengersAgeOfUltron''. Midway midway through the movie, Comicbook/TheVision]] [[spoiler: movie when Comicbook/TheVision casually picks up Thor's hammer, which freaks him out because only the worthy are supposed to be able to wield it. At the end, Tony and Steve are trying to convince him it doesn't count because it's a synthetic mind in a synthetic body.


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** Played straight with the titular Ultron. None of the avengers have any qualms about destroying (killing) him except for Vision, who doesn't want to do it but won't hesitate as it's a NecessaryEvil:
--> '''Vision:''' I don't want to kill Ultron. He's unique... and he's in pain. But that pain will roll over the Earth. So he must be destroyed: every form he's built, every trace of his presence on the net.

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* Discussed in ''Film/VanHelsing''. Anna is more than willing to kill Frankenstein's monster, regardless of whether he is good or evil, because he's just a monster and he can be used by Dracula to unleash an army of vampire offspring. Van Helsing, however, utterly refuses to allow the creature to be killed because, monster or not, [[TheGrotesque it is not evil]].


-->'''Detective Del Spooner''': ''Human beings'' have dreams. Even ''dogs'' have dreams. But not you. You are JustAMachine. An ''imitation'' of life. [[CreativeSterility Can a robot write a symphony? Can a robot turn a canvas into a beautiful masterpiece?]]\\

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-->'''Detective Del Spooner''': ''Human beings'' have dreams. Even ''dogs'' have dreams. But not you. You are JustAMachine. An ''imitation'' of life. [[CreativeSterility Can a robot write a symphony? symphony]]? [[ArmorPiercingQuestion Can a robot turn a canvas into a beautiful masterpiece?]]\\


-->'''Detective Del Spooner''': ''Human beings'' have dreams. Even ''dogs'' have dreams. But not you. You are JustAMachine. An '''imitation'' of life. [[CreativeSterility Can a robot write a symphony? Can a robot turn a canvas into a beautiful masterpiece?]]\\

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-->'''Detective Del Spooner''': ''Human beings'' have dreams. Even ''dogs'' have dreams. But not you. You are JustAMachine. An '''imitation'' ''imitation'' of life. [[CreativeSterility Can a robot write a symphony? Can a robot turn a canvas into a beautiful masterpiece?]]\\

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-->'''Detective Del Spooner''': ''Human beings'' have dreams. Even ''dogs'' have dreams. But not you. You are JustAMachine. An '''imitation'' of life. [[CreativeSterility Can a robot write a symphony? Can a robot turn a canvas into a beautiful masterpiece?]]\\
'''Sonny''': ...[[ArmorPiercingResponse Can you]]?


** The bigwigs at Pixar admit that Johnny 5 served as inspiration for the character of Wall-E; and how many years Wall-E spent alone on an abandoned Earth to develop a personality (with NO brain wipes!).



** [[spoiler:It can be justified as the lifespan of a single clone, once activated, is roughly three years. The clones tend to fall apart and start vomiting up their own insides by the end of it. You could argue that incinerating them painlessly while they fall asleep thinking they are going home is the most humane way of dealing with the situation.]]



** Likewise ''Film/BladeRunner'', though this earlier film was much more subtle in its approach.
** For a kid-friendly ([[WhatDoYouMeanItsNotForKids but not really]]) take, see the book and film ''Literature/TheMouseAndHisChild'', which gets downright philosophical about it.

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** Likewise ''Film/BladeRunner'', though * ''Film/BladeRunner'' makes this earlier film was much more subtle in its approach.
**
central premise, with replicants being artificial humans that are used as slave labor off-world and hunted down if they come to Earth.
*
For a kid-friendly ([[WhatDoYouMeanItsNotForKids but not really]]) take, see the book and film ''Literature/TheMouseAndHisChild'', which gets downright philosophical about it.



** In defense, the first time he had already been contained; killing a prisoner is always kind of iffy. It's also in part "we shouldn't kill someone in cold-blooded vengeance". Once he mutated into the big monster thingie, he was a real threat to everyone, and carrying a WeaponOfMassDestruction in his gut.



* Franchise/{{Godzilla}} himself invokes this trope quite often. On the one hand, there are those who wish to destroy him simply because he's a giant monster (also, there is that tiny problem of him smashing major cities.). On the other, there are those who wish to keep him alive so they can study him. And that's not even including all the times he's saved Japan from even ''worse'' monsters.
** This is especially evident (and inverted) in ''Film/GodzillaTokyoSOS'' in which Kiryu (AKA "Mechagodzilla 3") [[spoiler:sacrifices himself by sending both himself and Godzilla deep into a nearby ocean trench in order to save Japan after realizing that human beings deserve to live]]. [[TearJerker Especially poignant]] considering Kiryu [[spoiler:[[Film/{{Gojira}} Is the original 1954 Godzilla]]]]. Likewise, the human characters no longer see Kiryu as a monster, or even a simple weapon, but as a hero that, in his own way, became "human".

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* Franchise/{{Godzilla}} himself invokes this trope quite often. On the one hand, there are those who wish to destroy him simply because he's a giant monster (also, there is that tiny problem of him smashing major cities.). On the other, there are those who wish to keep him alive so they can study him. And that's not even including all the times he's saved Japan from even ''worse'' monsters.
**
monsters. This is especially evident (and inverted) in ''Film/GodzillaTokyoSOS'' in which Kiryu (AKA "Mechagodzilla 3") [[spoiler:sacrifices himself by sending both himself and Godzilla deep into a nearby ocean trench in order to save Japan after realizing that human beings deserve to live]]. [[TearJerker Especially poignant]] considering Kiryu [[spoiler:[[Film/{{Gojira}} Is the original 1954 Godzilla]]]]. Likewise, the human characters no longer see Kiryu as a monster, or even a simple weapon, but as a hero that, in his own way, became "human".



* PlayedForLaughs in ''Film/AvengersAgeOfUltron''. Midway through the movie, [[spoiler: Comicbook/TheVision]] casually picks up Thor's hammer, which freaks him out because only the worthy are supposed to be able to wield it. At the end, Tony and Steve are trying to convince him it doesn't count because it's a synthetic mind in a synthetic body.

to:

* PlayedForLaughs in ''Film/AvengersAgeOfUltron''. Midway through the movie, [[spoiler: Comicbook/TheVision]] [[spoiler: casually picks up Thor's hammer, which freaks him out because only the worthy are supposed to be able to wield it. At the end, Tony and Steve are trying to convince him it doesn't count because it's a synthetic mind in a synthetic body.

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